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Tony Soprano : [over the phone]  It's a bad connection, so I'm gonna talk fast! The guy you're looking for is an ex-commando! He killed sixteen Chechen rebels single-handed! Paulie 'Walnuts' Gual

Sopranos movie prequel in the works according to David Chase

Could have used more Furio before they wrote him out. His first scene in America collecting at the brothel was insane. up in the club cracks me up every time.

He says, "You got some balls, my friend," to the Russian, so it might be from a different scene.

I remember him saying "You gotta learn to shut the f### up" when the Russian is digging. When did he say what you typed? And yeah, I'm 100% sure he says "You got a lotta balls, my friend!" in the scene I'm seeking. They play it coming back from every break at the top of the hour.Google is no help. Edited by Raider Nation
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The russian died out in the woods and was never found. This is pretty obvious to anyone who watched the whole series.

Speak for yourself.

I watched the entire series. (A thousand times). I have friends who watched the entire series. We'd all like to know what happened to the Russian. If it was so obvious, it would not be the #1 question Chase got asked about up until the "Is Tony dead or alive?" question.

That's what is so good and is so bad with The Sopranos. I forget the specifics of the quote, but someone in the entertainment business said if you have a woodchipper on stage, you better have an explanation for it and use it; because by it being there, the audience expects it to be used. That's what The Sopranos did; constantly giving showing us a wood chipper. If a Russian is important enough to be shown to be shot, or a rapist important enough to be found or a terrorist threat against a port is important enough to be mentioned or a mobster underling is deemed important enough to fall in love with the Boss's wife, us modern viewers expect some sort of resolution. Chase obviously breaks away from that....and while it's pretty cool...it goes against all of our understanding about modern entertainment viewing; to the point where we don't enjoy it as much.
For me, any show or film that doesn't explain everything gets big points. I don't get any satisfaction out of the easily explainable or the tidy ending.
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  • 4 weeks later...

After seeing the comeuppance mob thread, the question occurred to me: What was the best comeuppance in The Sopranos?

For short-term characters, Mustang Sally easily takes the cake.

For long-term characters, I'd go with either Richie or Christopher, as much as the latter's death sucked.

Edited by Ghost Rider
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After seeing the comeuppance mob thread, the question occurred to me: What was the best comeuppance in The Sopranos? For short-term characters, Mustang Sally easily takes the cake. For long-term characters, I'd go with either Richie or Christopher, as much as the latter's death sucked.

Febby Petrullio (the mob rat up in Maine).Or Jimmy Bones.... for being an Elvis impersonator.
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After seeing the comeuppance mob thread, the question occurred to me: What was the best comeuppance in The Sopranos? For short-term characters, Mustang Sally easily takes the cake. For long-term characters, I'd go with either Richie or Christopher, as much as the latter's death sucked.

Ralphie by a mile.No one else is close.He killed that poor sad girl Tracy so brutally, and felt no remorse. When Tony decks him, all he can say is "I'm a made guy".The prank with Paulie's Mom.Pie-Oh-My.He was a total doosh, and Tony bashing his head against the floor was great comeuppance.
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After seeing the comeuppance mob thread, the question occurred to me: What was the best comeuppance in The Sopranos? For short-term characters, Mustang Sally easily takes the cake. For long-term characters, I'd go with either Richie or Christopher, as much as the latter's death sucked.

Ralphie by a mile.No one else is close.He killed that poor sad girl Tracy so brutally, and felt no remorse. When Tony decks him, all he can say is "I'm a made guy".The prank with Paulie's Mom.Pie-Oh-My.He was a total doosh, and Tony bashing his head against the floor was great comeuppance.
Not to defend him, but Ralph had some major demons.Failed husband. Failed father. Drug addict. Bipolar. Closeted homosexual.But yeah, that was a gratifying kill as a viewer.
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After seeing the comeuppance mob thread, the question occurred to me: What was the best comeuppance in The Sopranos? For short-term characters, Mustang Sally easily takes the cake. For long-term characters, I'd go with either Richie or Christopher, as much as the latter's death sucked.

Gonna go out on a limb and say Tony.
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After seeing the comeuppance mob thread, the question occurred to me: What was the best comeuppance in The Sopranos? For short-term characters, Mustang Sally easily takes the cake. For long-term characters, I'd go with either Richie or Christopher, as much as the latter's death sucked.

Ralphie by a mile.No one else is close.He killed that poor sad girl Tracy so brutally, and felt no remorse. When Tony decks him, all he can say is "I'm a made guy".The prank with Paulie's Mom.Pie-Oh-My.He was a total doosh, and Tony bashing his head against the floor was great comeuppance.
Ralphie is a good pick, but let me just say that the prank call to Paulie's mother was one of the funniest scenes of the entire series, and I still say that Ralph didn't kill the horse (it was left ambiguous, so you could argue either way and not be wrong). I always thought that was the irony: after all of the stuff Ralph did that he deserved to be whacked for, Tony killed him for something he didn't do.Besides, for me, when going back and watching the series, Richie is still an unlikable #####, while Ralphie, for all of his faults, was very entertaining and hilarious, so I simply enjoyed Richie's comeuppance a bit more. Edited by Ghost Rider
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The russian died out in the woods and was never found. This is pretty obvious to anyone who watched the whole series.

Speak for yourself.

I watched the entire series. (A thousand times). I have friends who watched the entire series. We'd all like to know what happened to the Russian. If it was so obvious, it would not be the #1 question Chase got asked about up until the "Is Tony dead or alive?" question.

That's what is so good and is so bad with The Sopranos. I forget the specifics of the quote, but someone in the entertainment business said if you have a woodchipper on stage, you better have an explanation for it and use it; because by it being there, the audience expects it to be used. That's what The Sopranos did; constantly giving showing us a wood chipper. If a Russian is important enough to be shown to be shot, or a rapist important enough to be found or a terrorist threat against a port is important enough to be mentioned or a mobster underling is deemed important enough to fall in love with the Boss's wife, us modern viewers expect some sort of resolution. Chase obviously breaks away from that....and while it's pretty cool...it goes against all of our understanding about modern entertainment viewing; to the point where we don't enjoy it as much.
For me, any show or film that doesn't explain everything gets big points. I don't get any satisfaction out of the easily explainable or the tidy ending.

I usually do to....and I'm fine with pretty much all of what Chase has done, except for the Russian situation. I thought he was really setting this thing up to push a Russian v. Italian thing. I thought that that was a realistic situation to move towards, what with the natural train of progression of organized crime in the country and (more importantly) it presented a situation that if done right by making the Russians the "bad" guy, Tony could have been seen by the viewer as a "less bad" guy. Once the show got away from his family and focused more towards the business, Tony became a very unlikeable character. His whole crew was. All his griping about (in a episode I forget the name of) the historical trials and tribulations of the Italian immigrant experience and why the Mafia was brought to the United States ring hollow....as he has everything. He games the system to the point where's he semi-legit with the community, he doesn't worry for cash nor has to really fear anything from the other criminal element. I don't really remember a show in which the main character (and virtually all of the supporting characters), was presented as such a degenerate, particularly when compared to the other characters of the show. I watch the Sopranos and don't feel a thing for Tony's "problems", but instead feel for the lawn guy, Roc the Cop, the guy beaten by Mustang Sally, the waiter in A.C. and any number of schlubs exactly like me who are unfortunate to cross paths with this sociopath. Continuing the Russian storyline would have make Tony a little more sympathetic.

Of course, Chase probably wasn't interested in doing that....and I can live with that as the show was/is flat out great. There aren't too many shows out there that have people dissecting them so long after they went off the air.

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After seeing the comeuppance mob thread, the question occurred to me: What was the best comeuppance in The Sopranos? For short-term characters, Mustang Sally easily takes the cake. For long-term characters, I'd go with either Richie or Christopher, as much as the latter's death sucked.

Ralphie by a mile.No one else is close.He killed that poor sad girl Tracy so brutally, and felt no remorse. When Tony decks him, all he can say is "I'm a made guy".The prank with Paulie's Mom.Pie-Oh-My.He was a total doosh, and Tony bashing his head against the floor was great comeuppance.
Ralphie is a good pick, but let me just say that the prank call to Paulie's mother was one of the funniest scenes of the entire series, and I still say that Ralph didn't kill the horse (it was left ambiguous, so you could argue either way and not be wrong). I always thought that was the irony: after all of the stuff Ralph did that he deserved to be whacked for, Tony killed him for something he didn't do.Besides, for me, when going back and watching the series, Richie is still an unlikable #####, while Ralphie, for all of his faults, was very entertaining and hilarious, so I simply enjoyed Richie's comeuppance a bit more.
For some reason, I'm a bit more sympathetic towards Richie. I can respect a guy getting angry over being passed over for a man who he thinks is inferior. I always thought his one season stint was a mistake and that Chase kept trying to fill that void with Richie style antagonists.
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For some reason, I'm a bit more sympathetic towards Richie. I can respect a guy getting angry over being passed over for a man who he thinks is inferior. I always thought his one season stint was a mistake and that Chase kept trying to fill that void with Richie style antagonists.

Richie wasn't passed over; he was in prison when Tony rose through the ranks and eventually became Boss. Richie simply didn't like taking orders from someone who was beneath him prior to his stint in prison (similar to what also happen later with Feech). And let's not forget that Richie is the guy who ran Beansie over with his car. Hell, even Tony never did anything that horrible to a citizen (albeit a connected one).But I agree that a second season with Richie would have been money. You wonder how it would have played out if he and Janice had actually gotten married and the Tony/Richie feud just continued to build. Edited by Ghost Rider
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I still say that Ralph didn't kill the horse (it was left ambiguous, so you could argue either way and not be wrong). I always thought that was the irony: after all of the stuff Ralph did that he deserved to be whacked for, Tony killed him for something he didn't do.

:confused: He absolutely, positively, 100% ordered the stable fire.I have no idea how anyone could listen to that entire conversation in the kitchen and come to any other conclusion.
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I still say that Ralph didn't kill the horse (it was left ambiguous, so you could argue either way and not be wrong). I always thought that was the irony: after all of the stuff Ralph did that he deserved to be whacked for, Tony killed him for something he didn't do.

:confused: He absolutely, positively, 100% ordered the stable fire.I have no idea how anyone could listen to that entire conversation in the kitchen and come to any other conclusion.
Ralph didn't give a crap about the horse - and why should he have?.. his son was laid up at the hospital at the time with serious injuries - but that doesn't mean he ordered the fire. Joe Pantoliano even said that he asked David Chase if Ralph actually started the fire, and Chase wouldn't say, so Pantoliano, by his own admission, played the scene like Ralph had not started the fire.The way he says, "NO I DID NOT! BUT SO WHAT!," said it all to me. It was like, "I didn't kill the horse, but who freaking cares?" Edited by Ghost Rider
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I don't need to watch the scene again. I've seen it a dozen times. I stand by what I said. And Joey Pants saying he played the scene a certain way is very telling. Like I said, if you think he did it, that is fine, but again, you can argue it either way, and neither of us are wrong. It was left ambiguous on purpose. That David Chase is a cruel man sometimes. :lol:

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Joe Pantoliano even said that he asked David Chase if Ralph actually started the fire, and Chase wouldn't say, so Pantoliano, by his own admission, played the scene like Ralph had not started the fire.

Not doubting you, but.... link?
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I'd have to do some digging, but I remember reading it years ago. It might not have been online, but I know I read it. You'll probably just have to take my word for it.

Okay.I read that Chase said Ralph definitely had the horse killed.You'll have to take my word for it.
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If we're talking Sopranos ambiguity.Season Four "For All Debts Public and Private": Did that cop really kill Christaphuh's father, or was Tony trying to test him?The cop denies everything to the very last moment--he even tells Chris that he is being manipulated.

I think he did kill Chrissy's father. There was familiarity in Barry Haydu's expressions and reactions when Chris was quizzing him.
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If we're talking Sopranos ambiguity.Season Four "For All Debts Public and Private": Did that cop really kill Christaphuh's father, or was Tony trying to test him?The cop denies everything to the very last moment--he even tells Chris that he is being manipulated.

I agree that there is definitely some question in this one. But I do think that he did it.
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So Chase wouldn't even tell Joey Pants if his character killed the horse or not. How's he supposed to act? Ralph(Joe P.) knows whether or not he killed Pie Oh My, but thanks to Chase he can't act a certain way.

If Joe P. says I know what Ralph did and I swore that I wouldn't tell what happened I think that's fine, but Chase telling "Ralph" he didn't know what happened with the horse is garbage. Deep down "Ralph" knew what happened and should have acted accordingly. You cant just keep saying it could have went either way. That was an insanely powerful scene and Ralph knew whether or not he killed the horse which would have made him act one way or another.

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If we're talking Sopranos ambiguity.Season Four "For All Debts Public and Private": Did that cop really kill Christaphuh's father, or was Tony trying to test him?The cop denies everything to the very last moment--he even tells Chris that he is being manipulated.

I don't think it was that ambiguous. When Chris told the detective who his father was, you could tell by his expression that he knew he was cooked. And when he finally realized he couldn't talk Chris out of it, he said he was sorry as he made his futile attempt to escape.
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I'd have to do some digging, but I remember reading it years ago. It might not have been online, but I know I read it. You'll probably just have to take my word for it.

Okay.I read that Chase said Ralph definitely had the horse killed.You'll have to take my word for it.
Really? You gonna play this game now? Given how much we both know the show, do you really think I would make something up and then say the actor said this when he really didn't? Really? Also, I thought it was very questionable BEFOFE I knew of Joey Pants saying that, for what it's worth.

If we're talking Sopranos ambiguity.Season Four "For All Debts Public and Private": Did that cop really kill Christaphuh's father, or was Tony trying to test him?The cop denies everything to the very last moment--he even tells Chris that he is being manipulated.

I don't think it was that ambiguous. When Chris told the detective who his father was, you could tell by his expression that he knew he was cooked. And when he finally realized he couldn't talk Chris out of it, he said he was sorry as he made his futile attempt to escape.
Exactly. It is hilarious that someone could think that that was more ambiguous than the horse's death. I guess the guy yelled, "I'm sorry," to Christopher for no reason right before he pulled the trigger, right?
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  • 3 weeks later...

This isn't the interview I remember reading a while back, but for what it's worth...

From Joey Pants himself:

"The Sopranos" is a TV show you really need to earn the privilege of knowing. Most people don't. I get people who watch the show and they say, "Oh, it's the best show on television. I loved it when Tony strangled the guy when he was taking his daughter to college." Or they go, "Hey, what the #### happened with you? Why'd you beat up that girl? What's a matter with you?" What they don't get is what the author was trying to say there. The show was about innocence. That at the same time Ralphie was sodomizing that girl while she was performing oral sex on a police officer, the counterpart is that Tony in the end is responsible for that element of behavior happening in the first place at his club, the Bada Bing! And at the same time, Tony's daughter is losing her sexual innocence to a young black boy in a dorm at Columbia. Nobody ever made the connection.

Another connection that people miss is how Ralphie is enamored with being a gladiator. He talks about Russell Crowe, he's swinging the chain, and he's identifying with the arc and the struggle of that man who has lost everything. He is a gladiator and he dies the death of a gladiator. It's a fight to the death between him and Tony over a horse that he had nothing to do with. Over a horse that Tony extorted away from him. Over a horse that was killed in a fire that Ralph virtually had nothing to do with. It was an accident. And when Tony leaves the Bada Bing! after washing Ralph's blood off of his hands, he walks by and sees a photograph of Tracy [the dancer Ralph viciously murdered last season].

http://www.weeklystandard.com/Content/Public/Articles/000/000/001/928bzzvc.asp?page=2

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I never re-watch Adriana's last scene.

In the whole series, this is the only scene that I have only seen twice.

She was a dumb, shallow, materialistic girl--but she wasn't mean, she wasn't spiteful.

The drive with Silvio...she didn't realize until the very end.

It's just too sad to view, again.

.

Edited by Encyclopedia Brown
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She wasn't spiteful? You might want to re-watch Rat Pack (Season 5 - Episode 2).

Generally speaking, Adriana was still on the high end of "goodness" when compared to the other characters on the show, but she still was not a good person.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Watching through the entire series (via Netflix) for the first time. Currently in season 6, episode 3.

Just wanted to say the dream sequence with Tony contemplating entering the "Finnerty" house while he is in cardiac arrest at the hospital is one of the best scenes of the entire series so far. A very moving and well put together moment.

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Just wanted to say the dream sequence with Tony contemplating entering the "Finnerty" house while he is in cardiac arrest at the hospital is one of the best scenes of the entire series so far. A very moving and well put together moment.

It sure was. Especially with Meadow saying "Daddy, don't leave us" and all that.But of course, scenes like that lose their effectiveness over multiple viewings since you know the outcome.
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Watching through the entire series (via Netflix) for the first time. Currently in season 6, episode 3.Just wanted to say the dream sequence with Tony contemplating entering the "Finnerty" house while he is in cardiac arrest at the hospital is one of the best scenes of the entire series so far. A very moving and well put together moment.

At the time it aired, the whole Kevin Finnerty dream sequence was probably the most aggravating stretch of the entire series.
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Watching through the entire series (via Netflix) for the first time. Currently in season 6, episode 3.Just wanted to say the dream sequence with Tony contemplating entering the "Finnerty" house while he is in cardiac arrest at the hospital is one of the best scenes of the entire series so far. A very moving and well put together moment.

At the time it aired, the whole Kevin Finnerty dream sequence was probably the most aggravating stretch of the entire series.
I'm rewatching the series too and I'm at that point. Except for when he's about to enter the Inn at the Oaks, the whole Kevin Finnerty thing sucked, IMO.
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I didn't like the whole Kevin Finnerty dream sequence the first time through either, but in retrospect, it was pretty great. It is just different and moves slowly. I actually get chills every time I see the end of Join the Club; very powerful ending, yet not one that beats you over the head. I love stuff that makes you think. :thumbup: :thumbup:

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  • 4 weeks later...

He is diabolical.

The awful way he ignites the scene: "I wonder where Harpo is eating his Sunday dinner".

To the aftermath when he struts outside, with that smirk.

Janice was making genuine strides to improve herself, but Tony couldn't take it. He had to bring her down.

When he went to visit her the day before (with the little rat dog next door barking incessantly to drive home the point that little things don't bother her anymore), he said to her "I'm happy for you, Janice -- really. And it seemed like he genuinely meant it. But I guess there was only so much serenity he could take.
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I don't know if it's because I really don't give a #### about the Johhny Sac's wedding and health or Carmella's spec house or A.J.'s identity crisis or Tony getting shot or Vito's dealing with his homosexuality but I've been watching the sixth season again....man it really does pale. Frank Vincent is a horrible antagonist.

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I don't know if it's because I really don't give a #### about the Johhny Sac's wedding and health or Carmella's spec house or A.J.'s identity crisis or Tony getting shot or Vito's dealing with his homosexuality but I've been watching the sixth season again....man it really does pale. Frank Vincent is a horrible antagonist.

:goodposting:I recently was re-watching the series from start to finish and I completely lost interest in the first half of season 6. Haven't picked it up to watch the rest, which wasn't bad.When the well of ideas in an awesome TV series starts to run dry, it's sad to watch. :(
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I don't know if it's because I really don't give a #### about the Johhny Sac's wedding and health or Carmella's spec house or A.J.'s identity crisis or Tony getting shot or Vito's dealing with his homosexuality but I've been watching the sixth season again....man it really does pale. Frank Vincent is a horrible antagonist.

:goodposting:

I recently was re-watching the series from start to finish and I completely lost interest in the first half of season 6. Haven't picked it up to watch the rest, which wasn't bad.

When the well of ideas in an awesome TV series starts to run dry, it's sad to watch. :(

That's the entire issue in a nutshell. This show was never supposed to last six seasons. Chase wasn't even sure if it would get picked up after the pilot.
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