Jump to content
Fantasy Football - Footballguys Forums

Mad Men on AMC


Recommended Posts

I see Don and Peggy staying platonic. She's basically taken Anna's place, and Don and Anna were platonic. It's certainly possible that with them working together and being so close that something happens at some point. But I didn't see this Don-Peggy blossoming romance angle in this episode that NY Mag is pushing. NY Mag is no Sepinwall and doesn't deserve to be quoted.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I see Don and Peggy staying platonic. She's basically taken Anna's place, and Don and Anna were platonic. It's certainly possible that with them working together and being so close that something happens at some point. But I didn't see this Don-Peggy blossoming romance angle in this episode that NY Mag is pushing. NY Mag is no Sepinwall and doesn't deserve to be quoted.

I'll quote articles I find interesting.

You skip over the ones you don't find interesting, and you don't need to announce it should that occur.

Pretty simple concept.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I see Don and Peggy staying platonic. She's basically taken Anna's place, and Don and Anna were platonic. It's certainly possible that with them working together and being so close that something happens at some point. But I didn't see this Don-Peggy blossoming romance angle in this episode that NY Mag is pushing. NY Mag is no Sepinwall and doesn't deserve to be quoted.

I'll quote articles I find interesting.

You skip over the ones you don't find interesting, and you don't need to announce it should that occur.

Pretty simple concept.

I just don't want you leading the board back to the sort of wrong interpretations that were being thrown around before people began reading Sepinwall.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I see Don and Peggy staying platonic. She's basically taken Anna's place, and Don and Anna were platonic. It's certainly possible that with them working together and being so close that something happens at some point. But I didn't see this Don-Peggy blossoming romance angle in this episode that NY Mag is pushing. NY Mag is no Sepinwall and doesn't deserve to be quoted.

I'll quote articles I find interesting.

You skip over the ones you don't find interesting, and you don't need to announce it should that occur.

Pretty simple concept.

I just don't want you leading the board back to the sort of wrong interpretations that were being thrown around before people began reading Sepinwall.
But interpretations are just that. Sometimes there is no right answer. Getting dissenting opinions is interesting, no?
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I literally cannot believe how good that scene was between Draper and Peggy. You could feel the chill go down her body when he told her she should be thanking him and Jesus every morning. "you never say thank you""that's what the money is for"

Reminded me of when he gave his secretary her bonus in cash. Money instead of praise.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I literally cannot believe how good that scene was between Draper and Peggy. You could feel the chill go down her body when he told her she should be thanking him and Jesus every morning.

"you never say thank you"

"that's what the money is for"

:thumbup:

I almost came out of my seat when Don delivered that line. I've been telling my wife this for years. Not to sound like Gordon G but everytime my wife comes home and complains about some minor slight at her job I say "Are you still getting a paycheck? Are they asking you do to something illegal? Are they asking you to do something that isn't safe? No? Then let it go." Of course I'm a little more diplomatic about it.

Sadly I know too many people...men and women that don't understand that your boss owes you nothing but a paycheck.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

After the weird California episodes at the end of last season, I was worried that this show had peaked. I was dead wrong. Mad Men is just hitting its stride. Last night was one of the best hours of television I've ever seen, and I'm not even sure it's the best episode of the season. It's amazing what they're doing with this show. I am glad they are making this show more about Peggy, because I cannot take my eyes off her, and it's certainly not because they're making her up to be hot. She is just doing so much with that role. She's so much more intriguing than January Jones. And Roger continues to deliver some of the richest per-second-of-screentime content in the show. Just can't say enough good about it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Serious question...Who is Anna?

Anna is the widow of the real Don Draper.The Don Draper that we know and love was born Dick Whitman. His father, Archie Whitman, was a drunk who knocked up a young hooker. When she died the midwife took Dick to Archie's house and Dick was raised by his biological father and his wife.From wiki:Korean WarWhen Whitman was nineteen years old (his brother Adam mentions being 'only eight' when Dick left), he enlisted in the U.S. Army - he mentioned that he "ran away" to do so - and was sent to serve in the Korean War. Whitman was put under the command of Lt. Donald Draper, an engineer[2] who was in charge of building a field hospital with only Whitman to assist him.The two men are fired upon by the enemy, but they are unharmed, and after dusting themselves off soon begin to light cigarettes. When Lt. Draper tells Whitman that he has pissed himself, Whitman accidentally drops his lighter and ignites a pool of gasoline, which sets off a stockpile of explosives. Lt. Draper is killed in the explosion, his face burned beyond recognition. Upon seeing this, Whitman removes Lt. Draper's dog tags and switches them for his own.Whitman, now believed to be Draper, awakens in the hospital, and is awarded the Purple Heart. He is then sent home with Lt. Draper's coffin (now believed to be Whitman's) to offer the Army's regrets to Whitman's survivors. He avoids meeting the Whitmans at the train station, but is spotted by Adam. Whitman makes his escape and begins his life as Don Draper.Life as "Don Draper"Draper was working as a used car salesman when he was tracked down by Anna Draper, the real Draper's widow. The two remained friends until Draper met and married Betty Hofstadt. After securing a legal divorce, he continued to support Anna, a piano teacher, financially. Their relationship evolved from confrontational at first to more supportive, with Don ultimately fleeing to her place for a few weeks in the later part of the second season to help clear his head. Anna, who is of great importance to Don, ultimately serves as a confidant to him, and may be the one who truly understands him.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just watched last night's episode. It seems to me that, among other things, it was to set Peggy up to be Draper's new "Anna".

I got the feeling that, with Anna's death, combined with the beginnings of what looks like an actual healthy relationship with another human being (Peggy), "rock bottom" has already happened for Don and he'll begin turning it around. He's been living with knowing Anna's going to die for a while now and I think her death will help him begin to start moving on.

Edited by pollardsvision
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Serious question...Who is Anna?

Anna is the widow of the real Don Draper.The Don Draper that we know and love was born Dick Whitman. His father, Archie Whitman, was a drunk who knocked up a young hooker. When she died the midwife took Dick to Archie's house and Dick was raised by his biological father and his wife.From wiki:Korean WarWhen Whitman was nineteen years old (his brother Adam mentions being 'only eight' when Dick left), he enlisted in the U.S. Army - he mentioned that he "ran away" to do so - and was sent to serve in the Korean War. Whitman was put under the command of Lt. Donald Draper, an engineer[2] who was in charge of building a field hospital with only Whitman to assist him.The two men are fired upon by the enemy, but they are unharmed, and after dusting themselves off soon begin to light cigarettes. When Lt. Draper tells Whitman that he has pissed himself, Whitman accidentally drops his lighter and ignites a pool of gasoline, which sets off a stockpile of explosives. Lt. Draper is killed in the explosion, his face burned beyond recognition. Upon seeing this, Whitman removes Lt. Draper's dog tags and switches them for his own.Whitman, now believed to be Draper, awakens in the hospital, and is awarded the Purple Heart. He is then sent home with Lt. Draper's coffin (now believed to be Whitman's) to offer the Army's regrets to Whitman's survivors. He avoids meeting the Whitmans at the train station, but is spotted by Adam. Whitman makes his escape and begins his life as Don Draper.Life as "Don Draper"Draper was working as a used car salesman when he was tracked down by Anna Draper, the real Draper's widow. The two remained friends until Draper met and married Betty Hofstadt. After securing a legal divorce, he continued to support Anna, a piano teacher, financially. Their relationship evolved from confrontational at first to more supportive, with Don ultimately fleeing to her place for a few weeks in the later part of the second season to help clear his head. Anna, who is of great importance to Don, ultimately serves as a confidant to him, and may be the one who truly understands him.
Cool, thanks. That is quite complicated.My wife and I watched most of season 1, so I know some of this, but admittedly, I have not seen much since. Just got back into watching this season.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Top notch acting in this one. Hamm was on fire. He was so good that the only sour note for me was the phone call to Anna's niece Stephanie where she wasn't close to being the same league acting as Hamm. That really stood out to me since that was such a powerful moment in the episode. Great mix of ad biz and personal life. This show is one of the best of all time.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Top notch acting in this one. Hamm was on fire. He was so good that the only sour note for me was the phone call to Anna's niece Stephanie where she wasn't close to being the same league acting as Hamm. That really stood out to me since that was such a powerful moment in the episode. Great mix of ad biz and personal life. This show is one of the best of all time.

Elisabeth Moss and Jon Hamm are murdering it this season. An entire episode devoted not only to Peggy and Don, but to Peggy and Don interacting with each other in closed quarters, just a brilliant concept and perfectly done. Has Don cried on the show before? When he fessed up to Betty about his past he did, but not sure he wasn't just putting on a show. Very powerful scene after the phone call when he looked up at Peggy and broke down. It looked like Peggy didn't think it was possible.I doubt Don and Peggy will ever enter a relationship, but it looks like the only way Don will get his life put back together is with Peggy's help.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just watched last night's episode. It seems to me that, among other things, it was to set Peggy up to be Draper's new "Anna". I got the feeling that, with Anna's death, combined with the beginnings of what looks like an actual healthy relationship with another human being (Peggy), "rock bottom" has already happened for Don and he'll begin turning it around. He's been living with knowing Anna's going to die for a while now and I think her death will help him begin to start moving on.

My take as well.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

From Wiki:

Ali/Liston II

Because of the unexpected ending of the first bout, the World Boxing Council ordered a rematch, this time with Liston as challenger. The World Boxing Association disagreed, as immediate rematches were against its rules, and stripped Ali of his title. Originally scheduled for Boston, Massachusetts in November 1964, the fight was postponed six months when Ali needed emergency surgery for a strangulated hernia. However, since the promoters did not have a license in Massachusetts, the fight eventually was moved to a small auditorium in Lewiston, Maine, the state's second largest city. Due to the remote location (140 miles north of Boston), only 2,434 fans were present, setting the all-time record for the lowest attendance for a heavyweight championship fight. (It remains the only heavyweight title fight held in the state of Maine.)

The ending of the second fight remains one of the most controversial in boxing history. Midway through the first round, Liston fell to the canvas, in what many have argued was not a legitimate knockdown. Referee Jersey Joe Walcott, a former world heavyweight champion himself, appeared confused after Ali refused to retreat to a neutral corner. Instead, Ali stood over his fallen opponent, gesturing and yelling at him, "Get up and fight, sucker!" The moment was captured by ringside photographer Neil Leifer, and has become one of the iconic images of sport. The photograph of the knockdown of this fight is one of the most heavily promoted photos in the history of the media, and was even chosen as the cover of the Sports Illustrated special issue, "The Century's Greatest Sports Photos".

Ali then posed over him, with his fists in the air celebrating the knockdown.

While Walcott tried to sort out the situation, 20 seconds passed, and by then Liston had gotten to his feet and resumed boxing. Nat Fleischer, publisher of The Ring, took it upon himself to climb into the ring and tell Walcott that as Liston had spent over 10 seconds on the canvas he had been KOed. Walcott stopped the fight — awarding Ali a first-round knockout (see Muhammad Ali). However Fleischer was quite wrong in his interpretation of how the rules applied: since Clay had deliberately not gone to a neutral corner, Wallcot had been correct in not counting Liston out; the actual time Liston had been down was beside the point..[4]

The blow that ended the match became known as "the phantom punch," so named because most people at ringside did not see it. Even Ali was unsure as to whether or not the punch connected, as footage from the event shows Ali asking his entourage "Did I hit him?" after the match. Slow motion replays show Ali connecting with a quick, chopping right to Liston's head (known as the "Anchor Punch" according to Ali) as Liston was moving toward him, and show that Liston was unsteady when he finally got to his feet. (Ali appeared to connect with four additional unanswered punches before Walcott belatedly declared the knockout, ending the contest.) However, whether the blow was a genuine knockout punch remains inconclusive.[5]

There were claims that Liston had bet against himself and "took a dive" because he owed money to the Mafia. Others believe that he feared for his safety from Nation of Islam extremists who supported Ali. The latter theory was supported by Mark Kram's book Ghosts of Manila, which included an interview with Liston conducted years after the fight. Liston claimed to have intentionally lost because of his fear of retaliation from the Black Muslims. No independent substantiation of this claim has come to light.

Ali would reclaim the WBA Heavyweight Championship from Ernie Terrell in 1967. After one successful defense as the universal World Heavyweight Champion, Ali would be stripped of his titles for refusing to enlist when drafted later that year, being a conscientious objector from the Vietnam War.

The fight:
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I see Don and Peggy staying platonic. She's basically taken Anna's place, and Don and Anna were platonic. It's certainly possible that with them working together and being so close that something happens at some point. But I didn't see this Don-Peggy blossoming romance angle in this episode that NY Mag is pushing. NY Mag is no Sepinwall and doesn't deserve to be quoted.

I'll quote articles I find interesting.

You skip over the ones you don't find interesting, and you don't need to announce it should that occur.

Pretty simple concept.

I just don't want you leading the board back to the sort of wrong interpretations that were being thrown around before people began reading Sepinwall.
But interpretations are just that. Sometimes there is no right answer. Getting dissenting opinions is interesting, no?
:bag: You're wrong. Sepinwall is always right.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It seems like Draper needs to have somebody in on his #### Whitman life. He had Anna, she died, and now he starts dropping parts of it to Peggy. It's interesting that she never knew he was in Korea, and he told that line and his father dying as if she already knew it.

I think he's just slowly starting to drop the curtain. Somewhat. Maybe not as far as letting on that his real name is Dick, like he did during the all-Saturday blackout, but just starting to let people get close to him, to the extent that it's feasible.I think I might end up liking this show more than The Wire when all is said and done. It's already passed The Sopranos, IMO.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

:shock: SEPINWALL :excited:

"Somebody very important to me died." -Don

"Who?" -Peggy

"The only person in the world who really knew me." -Don

"...That's not true." -Peggy

How many people in the world really know you? A handful at best if you're lucky: a spouse or a lover or sibling or close friend, in some combination, maybe.

Don Draper is not so fortunate. Through his own choices, and then through the fickle finger of fate, he's come to believe he's a closed book to the world except to the real Don Draper's widow, Anna. With her, he felt free to be himself - to be vulnerable but sweet Dick Whitman and not this sonuva##### role he adopted in Korea and cultivated in the years since - and without her, he feels completely, utterly lost.

But as Peggy points out in the climax of "The Suitcase" - the high point to date of season four, and one of the best episodes so far of this incredible series - Anna isn't the only person who knew Don.

Peggy knows him. She always has.

And maybe, just maybe, she can pull him out of this spiral he's been in since his marriage ended.

Now, an argument could be made that the man Peggy knows so well isn't really him. You might say that Anna knew Dick Whitman, and Peggy knows Don Draper. But it's more complicated than that. Peggy has met Dick. Dick Whitman visited her in the psych ward after her baby was born and taught her the lesson he learned from the hobo. Pete tried to tell her some of the story while Don was AWOL in California, though Peggy shut that down. And at their impromptu birthday dinner at the Greek diner (as opposed to the upscale Greek restaurant Mark invited her to), he casually offers up other pieces of the #### Whitman puzzle, mentioning Korea, Uncle Mac(*), his father's death, his mother, etc.

(*) Uncle Mac's line about always keeping a suitcase packed sounds very hobo-like, doesn't it?

Peggy doesn't have the whole Dick Whitman picture, but she has enough of it, and she knows Don Draper even better than Anna did. She's been his secretary, his protege, his partner and the closest thing he has to a friend. If anyone can help him through this rough patch, it's Peggy Olson - if he'll let her in long enough to do it. And the moment they share at his desk at the end of the episode - with the squeeze of her hand saying more than any words could - suggests maybe he's ready to do just that.

"The Suitcase" isn't just about how well Peggy knows Don, but about how well he knows her, and the difficulty in finding someone who knows you, and also the dangers that come from too much or too little knowledge.

We already knew how little Mark understood Peggy from his belief that she was a virgin when she met him, but he misses the point to an even greater degree when he invites her family and hated roommate to her birthday dinner. Duck unfortunately knows Peggy too well, having been with her during a vulnerable period, and after she talks him out of defecating on Roger's chair, the two important, pathetic drunks in her life come to blows when Duck makes the mistake of using the word "whore" in front of Dick Whitman. (Don's too blitzed to do much about it, though, and falls at the hands of a man who had actual combat experience where he actively killed men, as opposed to Don accidentally causing the real Draper's death.)

And the thing is, Don knows Peggy almost as well as she knows him. That knowledge can come out in both cruel moments, as when he tells Peggy, "You should be thanking me every morning when you wake up, along with Jesus, for giving you another day," and in more tender ones, like when they finally discuss Peggy's baby. (And they do that in the kind of shorthand that only people who know each other this well can; though she could say the word "baby" once to Pete, it seems much easier to just talk around it with someone who was there and understands.)

Peggy is now comfortable enough with Don - and fed up enough with his recent behavior - that she can insult him under her breath, but she can't quit the SOB. Time and again in "The Suitcase," she puts her coat on and prepares to leave, and though she gives a different excuse each time, the fact is that this place, and this man, have a gravitational pull on her. As she admits to Don at the diner, nothing matters to her as much as that office, and the work they do together there. She was with Mark because she thought she should be with someone, but she's already with someone in the way that's most important to her. She's with Don. There's nothing romantic there, and likely never will be(**), but she loves Don in a different but unmistakable way, and she winds up being there for him on a night when he desperately needs someone to love him.

(**) At the end of season two's "The New Girl" - which was, like this episode, directed by Jennifer Getzinger - I said that I could see Peggy eventually growing into the kind of woman who would be attractive to Don, and that this was a rare case of me not minding a show taking a platonic male-female relationship and making it sexual. Two years later, I'm not so sure. I mean, I think I would buy it if the show eventually went there, but their professional and now personal relationship has become so fascinating without bringing that into it that, if anything, a Peggy/Don affair would feel far more routine than what we have now.

My god, how incredible are Jon Hamm and Elisabeth Moss in this one? Outside of the opening and closing scenes, Matthew Weiner's script is essentially a two-character piece - when Duck or Peggy's mom or Mark wander through, it's to illustrate what Peggy has in her relationship with Don that's lacking everywhere else in her life - and both actors get to play nearly every emotion in the book, and to play them all brilliantly. And almost all of it works in parallel. Both break down sobbing (Peggy after Don has suggested how little he thinks of her, Don after Stephanie confirms Anna's death). Both get to look sad for and protective of the other (Don when Peggy talks of being reminded about the baby, Peggy after Don's phone call). Both get to appear terrified of the phone, and completely lost after the news they get from it (that Mark has dumped Peggy, that Anna is dead). Both get to tear into each other (the Glo-Coat argument), and both get to candidly (almost casually) discuss things with each other that they usually keep locked deep inside. And even in the midst of a heavyweight dramatic episode, both get some wonderful light moments, like Don's reaction to Roger's memoirs or Peggy wryly mocking Don about his one-nighter with Allison.

I know I've said on many occasions ("The New Girl," "The Gypsy and the Hobo") that Hamm has never been better, but damn if he doesn't manage to keep topping himself. The complete vulnerability he shows during the call to California and immediately afterward is astonishing. He's holding nothing back there. And Moss is at his level throughout. With "Breaking Bad" and Bryan Cranston ineligible at next year's Emmys, might this be the episode to finally get Hamm and/or Moss a win? I obviously haven't seen what the other usual suspects like Hugh Laurie and Michael C. Hall have cooking in their seasons, but it's hard to imagine seeing two better dramatic performances on television this year than what these two accomplish here.

But of more pressing concern than real-life awards is whether Don might have finally, finally turned a corner here. I'd like to think so, but we've seen Don briefly recover already this season and then slip back, and the rock bottom of last week wasn't enough to scare him straight. We've also, for that matter, seen Don and Peggy reconcile (as they did in last year's finale) after a period of him being an unbearable ###, only for him to resume using her as his punching bag. I'd like to think that this night of walls tumbling down between them makes things different - that he can't go back to treating her that way anymore, and that having her closer to him (and having confronted the loss of Anna), he can put the bottle away and be the crisp, creative Don Draper we see at the episode's end.

I just don't know if it's that simple. At the diner, Don talks about how in coming up with a campaign, you can bang your head against a wall, struggling to tell an awful idea from a great one, but that eventually, the idea comes to you and all is well. But both acknowledge that the rest of life doesn't work that way, much as they want it to. And much as we all want to see Peggy help Don get his act together - to pack up his problems in a Samsonite and fling it off the roof - we still have a half-season to go, and Don may have farther to fall.

But I want to believe. After most of the episodes this season ended with a door being closed, here Peggy asked Don what she wanted him to do with his door, and (as Simon & Garfunkel's "Bleecker Street" began to play) he asked her to leave it open. That's a start.

Some other thoughts:

[*]-The show has in the past showed Don having visions of his past (falling down the steps at the Ossining house and seeing a scene out of his childhood, or imagining the night of his own birth), so Anna's spectral visit to Don's office (with suitcase in hand!) wasn't outside the series' house style. Given Don's liquid state, though, we could also view it as a drunken fantasy as easily as we could a bit of metaphysics.

[*]-Roger's memoirs are the gift that keeps on giving. Here they not only tell us that Roger once slept with Ms. Blankenship back when she was "the queen of perversions" (and looked more like this), but answer the riddle of his reference to Dr. Lyle Evans back in "The Chrysanthemum and the Sword." "Unnecessary orchiectomy"? Ouch. Ouch. Ouch. Though it does explain a LOT about Bert Cooper, does it not? And I would not be surprised at all if Roger wasn't joking about Cooper having Evans killed.

[*]-Trudy's conversation with Peggy in the ladies' room helps spark more of Peggy's baby remorse and general anxiety - "You know," Trudy says, trying to be helpful but completely misreading her audience, "26 is still very young" - and then briefly freaks out Pete. Think he ever gets comfortable seeing those two together unsupervised?

[*]-For those who don't know the backstory, the boxing match was the second title fight between Sonny Liston and Cassius Clay - or, rather, the first between Liston and the man who was now calling himself Muhammad Ali, even if most of white America refused to call him that for several more years. To this day, the phantom punch that won the fight for Ali is still disputed (just Google the phrase "anchor punch" for several thousand pages on the subject). It's interesting to see Don here hostile to both Ali (who always boasted that he was "the greatest") and Joe Namath (who became far more famous than your average QB with one Super Bowl win entirely because of the guarantee he made before he won it). Even after the interview he gave at the end of the season premiere, he still doesn't quite grasp how important self-promotion is going to become in the culture.

[*]-Also, Stan comments that Clay would make a great ad man, while Don objects to celebrity endorsements as lazy; Ali did, in fact, become a pitchman much later in his career, after he was beloved instead of controversial, but also after his mind and speech were slowed down by too many hits to the head. His D-Con commercials were fun, but had Madison Avenue warmed to him in the mid-'60s, he might have been one of the greatest pitchmen of all time.

[*]-Speaking of '70s ads, Peggy's onto something with her idea of the elephant stepping on the Samsonite case. A similar idea, involving a chimp trying to

, was a huge hit in the '70s. (And is, amusingly, now remembered by most people as having been an ad for Samsonite. Branding only lasts so long.)

[*]-In listing potential clients for his never-gonna-happen agency, Duck talks about "that queer from Belle Jolie," an obvious reference to the guy who tried to sleep with Sal back in season one. It's five years later; I wonder if he actually came out of the closet or if Duck can just tell. (Or if Duck is, as usual, just being an ###.)

[*]-What exactly does Stephanie know about our Don, anyway? She calls up his office, and even though it's his private line, I'm sure Blankenship answered with some variation of "Don Draper's line." It seemed in the California episode that Stephanie and her mother knew Don as Anna's friend Dick, yet she didn't bother to ask here why Dick is using her dead uncle's name.

[*]-And one more Blankenship point: looks like we're with her for the long haul, as Don explains to Peggy why he hasn't gotten rid of her: "Joan knew exactly what I needed and made sure I got it." Don knows both that he deserves some kind of punishment for the Allison thing, but also that he doesn't need any more temptation while he's in his current state.

[*]-As with everyone other than Don and Peggy, Joan doesn't get much to do here, but there's that funny little moment where we see that Danny and Stan are still scared of her but Joey isn't.

[*]-Ever since Jane first appeared, and especially after she hooked up with blue-blood Roger, fans have wondered if the name Siegel means she's supposed to be Jewish. Adding fuel to that fire is Harry telling her cousin Danny "You're such a Jew" when Danny complains about having to pay for tickets Harry got for free. But it's entirely possible that Harry is just being, as usual, an ###, and trading on the general stereotype of Jews being cheap - that he'd have said the same thing to Stan Rizzo had he complained first.

[*]-I like the brief moment where Peggy pauses in between the men's and women's rooms, not sure where to take Don to vomit - does it really matter in the middle of the night? - and then her reaction to being in the men's room for the first time. (Note the mocking "For a good time, call Caroline" graffiti, referencing Roger's frumpy secretary.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It seems like Draper needs to have somebody in on his #### Whitman life. He had Anna, she died, and now he starts dropping parts of it to Peggy. It's interesting that she never knew he was in Korea, and he told that line and his father dying as if she already knew it.

I think he's just slowly starting to drop the curtain. Somewhat. Maybe not as far as letting on that his real name is Dick, like he did during the all-Saturday blackout, but just starting to let people get close to him, to the extent that it's feasible.

I think I might end up liking this show more than The Wire when all is said and done. It's already passed The Sopranos, IMO.

;)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I never got a chance to get into the Wire, bit Sopranos was always my benchmark for TV shows. I didn't think it would be touched. Incredibly, Mad Men is on the outside, about to pass.

I ####ing love this show.

DUDE.... you know I'm the biggest Sopranos honk around here. Even I acknowledge that The Wire is the better show, and likely the greatest TV show ever. Do yourself a favor and find the DVD box set of the entire series. Amazon had it for about $90 or so last month. Great deal.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I never got a chance to get into the Wire, bit Sopranos was always my benchmark for TV shows. I didn't think it would be touched. Incredibly, Mad Men is on the outside, about to pass.

I ####ing love this show.

DUDE.... you know I'm the biggest Sopranos honk around here. Even I acknowledge that The Wire is the better show, and likely the greatest TV show ever. Do yourself a favor and find the DVD box set of the entire series. Amazon had it for about $90 or so last month. Great deal.
I know, I know. I actually have the first two seasons. Just have to find time.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
  • Create New...