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U.S. Religious Landscapes Survey by The Pew Forum


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A new survey came out the other day by The Pew Forum called "U.S. Religious Landscapes Survey". The media seems to be focusing on the fluidity of our religious affiliations. This article by The Wall Street Journal is typical: link.

The entire report and statistics are here: link. It's worth a look for anyone interested in religious demographics.

As an atheist, I'm always interested in statistics on other atheists. Below are some statistics about self-described atheists.

Atheists make up 1.6% of the population.

70% are male (compared to 48% of the population)

86% are white (compared to 71%)

73% are between the ages of 18-50 (compared to 59% of adults)

39% married (54%)

37% never married (19%)

75% have no kids currently in the household (65%)

20% have a post-graduate level of education (11%)

28% have household incomes greater than $100,000 (18%)

(Note: all statistics are relative to the population sampled. This, of course, can differ from the actual U.S. population although I assume they won't be far off in most cases.)

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A new survey came out the other day by The Pew Forum called "U.S. Religious Landscapes Survey". The media seems to be focusing on the fluidity of our religious affiliations. This article by The Wall Street Journal is typical: link.

The entire report and statistics are here: link. It's worth a look for anyone interested in religious demographics.

As an atheist, I'm always interested in statistics on other atheists. Below are some statistics about self-described atheists.

Atheists make up 1.6% of the population.

70% are male (compared to 48% of the population)

86% are white (compared to 71%)

73% are between the ages of 18-50 (compared to 59% of adults)

39% married (54%)

37% never married (19%)

75% have no kids currently in the household (65%)

20% have a post-graduate level of education (11%)

28% have household incomes greater than $100,000 (18%)

(Note: all statistics are relative to the population sampled. This, of course, can differ from the actual U.S. population although I assume they won't be far off in most cases.)

You forgot to add that 75% of them post in the FFA.
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A new survey came out the other day by The Pew Forum called "U.S. Religious Landscapes Survey". The media seems to be focusing on the fluidity of our religious affiliations. This article by The Wall Street Journal is typical: link.

The entire report and statistics are here: link. It's worth a look for anyone interested in religious demographics.

As an atheist, I'm always interested in statistics on other atheists. Below are some statistics about self-described atheists.

Atheists make up 1.6% of the population.

70% are male (compared to 48% of the population)

86% are white (compared to 71%)

73% are between the ages of 18-50 (compared to 59% of adults)

39% married (54%)

37% never married (19%)

75% have no kids currently in the household (65%)

20% have a post-graduate level of education (11%)

28% have household incomes greater than $100,000 (18%)

(Note: all statistics are relative to the population sampled. This, of course, can differ from the actual U.S. population although I assume they won't be far off in most cases.)

You forgot to add that 75% of them post in the FFA.
:goodposting:

I thought of the same joke but decided to stay serious in the opening post.

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A survey of young people ages 18-25 by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press includes news about the growth of humanist beliefs among the so-called "Generation Next." Among the findings: * One-in-five members of "Generation Next" say they have no religious affiliation or are atheist or agnostic, nearly double the proportion of young people who said that in the late 1980s. * Nexters are among the least likely to attend church regularly: 32 percent attend at least once a week compared with 40 percent of those over age 25. * Nearly two-thirds of Nexters (63 percent) believe humans and other living things evolved over time. By contrast, Americans over the age of 40 favor Creationist accounts over evolutionary theory. * Nexters are the most tolerant of any generation on social issues such as immigration, race and homosexuality. * Nexters are among the most likely to say the will of the American people, not the Bible, should be a more important influence on U.S. laws. * And just 4 percent of Gen Nexters say people in their generation view becoming more spiritual as their most important goal in life.

As the Pew Forum notes, in its 1986 survey on religion and belief, 11 percent of 18-25 year olds gave their religious preference as "no religion/atheist/agnostic" and 8 percent of American over 25 said the same. Moving forward two decades, 20 percent of 18-25 year olds had no religion as did 11 percent of those over 25.

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A survey of young people ages 18-25 by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press includes news about the growth of humanist beliefs among the so-called "Generation Next." Among the findings: * One-in-five members of "Generation Next" say they have no religious affiliation or are atheist or agnostic, nearly double the proportion of young people who said that in the late 1980s. * Nexters are among the least likely to attend church regularly: 32 percent attend at least once a week compared with 40 percent of those over age 25. * Nearly two-thirds of Nexters (63 percent) believe humans and other living things evolved over time. By contrast, Americans over the age of 40 favor Creationist accounts over evolutionary theory. * Nexters are the most tolerant of any generation on social issues such as immigration, race and homosexuality. * Nexters are among the most likely to say the will of the American people, not the Bible, should be a more important influence on U.S. laws. * And just 4 percent of Gen Nexters say people in their generation view becoming more spiritual as their most important goal in life.

As the Pew Forum notes, in its 1986 survey on religion and belief, 11 percent of 18-25 year olds gave their religious preference as "no religion/atheist/agnostic" and 8 percent of American over 25 said the same. Moving forward two decades, 20 percent of 18-25 year olds had no religion as did 11 percent of those over 25.

That's interesting. What do you think it means?
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A new survey came out the other day by The Pew Forum called "U.S. Religious Landscapes Survey". The media seems to be focusing on the fluidity of our religious affiliations. This article by The Wall Street Journal is typical: link.

The entire report and statistics are here: link. It's worth a look for anyone interested in religious demographics.

As an atheist, I'm always interested in statistics on other atheists. Below are some statistics about self-described atheists.

Atheists make up 1.6% of the population.

70% are male (compared to 48% of the population)

86% are white (compared to 71%)

73% are between the ages of 18-50 (compared to 59% of adults)

39% married (54%)

37% never married (19%)

75% have no kids currently in the household (65%)

20% have a post-graduate level of education (11%)

28% have household incomes greater than $100,000 (18%)

(Note: all statistics are relative to the population sampled. This, of course, can differ from the actual U.S. population although I assume they won't be far off in most cases.)

You forgot to add that 75% of them post in the FFA.
:lol: nice
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A survey of young people ages 18-25 by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press includes news about the growth of humanist beliefs among the so-called "Generation Next." Among the findings: * One-in-five members of "Generation Next" say they have no religious affiliation or are atheist or agnostic, nearly double the proportion of young people who said that in the late 1980s. * Nexters are among the least likely to attend church regularly: 32 percent attend at least once a week compared with 40 percent of those over age 25. * Nearly two-thirds of Nexters (63 percent) believe humans and other living things evolved over time. By contrast, Americans over the age of 40 favor Creationist accounts over evolutionary theory. * Nexters are the most tolerant of any generation on social issues such as immigration, race and homosexuality. * Nexters are among the most likely to say the will of the American people, not the Bible, should be a more important influence on U.S. laws. * And just 4 percent of Gen Nexters say people in their generation view becoming more spiritual as their most important goal in life.

As the Pew Forum notes, in its 1986 survey on religion and belief, 11 percent of 18-25 year olds gave their religious preference as "no religion/atheist/agnostic" and 8 percent of American over 25 said the same. Moving forward two decades, 20 percent of 18-25 year olds had no religion as did 11 percent of those over 25.

That's interesting. What do you think it means?
This is the future of the country: secular and liberal.
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A 2006 Harris Interactive Poll

BELIEF IN GOD OR SUPREME BEING

Q3005_1 "Thinking now about religion, would you say that you are a…?"

Base: All adults in six countries

Great Britain |  France | Italy | Spain | Germany | United States																					  %		  |	  %	|   %  |	%   |	  %	   |	   %------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Believer in any form of God or any type of supreme being							  35		 |	  27   |  62  |	48   |	  41	  |	   73------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Agnostic (one who is skeptical about the existence of God but not an atheist)		 35		 |	 32	|  20  |   30	|	  25	  |	   14------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Atheist (one who denies the existence of God)										 17		 |	 32	|   7  |	11   |	  20	  |	   4------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Would prefer not to say															   6		  |	 6	 |   8  |	8	|	  10	 |	   6------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Not sure																			  7		  |	 4	 |   3  |	3	|	  4	  |	   3
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A survey of young people ages 18-25 by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press includes news about the growth of humanist beliefs among the so-called "Generation Next." Among the findings: * One-in-five members of "Generation Next" say they have no religious affiliation or are atheist or agnostic, nearly double the proportion of young people who said that in the late 1980s. * Nexters are among the least likely to attend church regularly: 32 percent attend at least once a week compared with 40 percent of those over age 25. * Nearly two-thirds of Nexters (63 percent) believe humans and other living things evolved over time. By contrast, Americans over the age of 40 favor Creationist accounts over evolutionary theory. * Nexters are the most tolerant of any generation on social issues such as immigration, race and homosexuality. * Nexters are among the most likely to say the will of the American people, not the Bible, should be a more important influence on U.S. laws. * And just 4 percent of Gen Nexters say people in their generation view becoming more spiritual as their most important goal in life.

As the Pew Forum notes, in its 1986 survey on religion and belief, 11 percent of 18-25 year olds gave their religious preference as "no religion/atheist/agnostic" and 8 percent of American over 25 said the same. Moving forward two decades, 20 percent of 18-25 year olds had no religion as did 11 percent of those over 25.

That's interesting. What do you think it means?
This is the future of the country: secular and liberal.
But hasn't the younger generation historically always been more secular and liberal than the older population? As people get older (and wiser :goodposting: ) they tend to get more conservative
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A survey of young people ages 18-25 by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press includes news about the growth of humanist beliefs among the so-called "Generation Next." Among the findings: * One-in-five members of "Generation Next" say they have no religious affiliation or are atheist or agnostic, nearly double the proportion of young people who said that in the late 1980s. * Nexters are among the least likely to attend church regularly: 32 percent attend at least once a week compared with 40 percent of those over age 25. * Nearly two-thirds of Nexters (63 percent) believe humans and other living things evolved over time. By contrast, Americans over the age of 40 favor Creationist accounts over evolutionary theory. * Nexters are the most tolerant of any generation on social issues such as immigration, race and homosexuality. * Nexters are among the most likely to say the will of the American people, not the Bible, should be a more important influence on U.S. laws. * And just 4 percent of Gen Nexters say people in their generation view becoming more spiritual as their most important goal in life.

As the Pew Forum notes, in its 1986 survey on religion and belief, 11 percent of 18-25 year olds gave their religious preference as "no religion/atheist/agnostic" and 8 percent of American over 25 said the same. Moving forward two decades, 20 percent of 18-25 year olds had no religion as did 11 percent of those over 25.

That's interesting. What do you think it means?
That the US is following the trend of Western European countries, where there is a strong trend away from religiosity. These numbers mirror the trends of W. European countries of 20 years ago.Interestingly enough, I see a trend back to stronger beliefs in religion as a whole in Western Europe within the next 20 years as their demographic rapidly changes towards a more Muslim population.
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But hasn't the younger generation historically always been more secular and liberal than the older population? As people get older (and wiser :( ) they tend to get more conservative

Not to the extent that we see now.

As the Pew Forum notes, in its 1986 survey on religion and belief, 11 percent of 18-25 year olds gave their religious preference as "no religion/atheist/agnostic" and 8 percent of American over 25 said the same. Moving forward two decades, 20 percent of 18-25 year olds had no religion as did 11 percent of those over 25.

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