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Have always liked Scotch but I'm slowly becoming a pseudo-snob. Bought a bottle of Glenmorangie Quinta Ruban Port Cask and that really changed the way I think about and drink Scotch. Currently sipping on the old stand-by my Glenlivet 18 year

List your recommendations and or snobbery here.

Edited by Doctor Detroit
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Have always liked Scotch but I'm slowly becoming a pseudo-snob. Bought a bottle of Glenmorangie Quinta Ruban Port Cask and that really changed the way I think about and drink Scotch. Currently sipping on the old stand-by my Glenlivet 18 yearList your recommendations and or snobbery here.

I think this thread is a re-peat. I could be wrong.
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Islays, islays, islays!!!I just love these lately.I love Laphroiag and Lagavulin. I recently had Ardbeg and loved that also. I can't wait to try more.

I've tried the Lagavulin but neither of the others. Did you have the 16 year or some other blend?
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Islays, islays, islays!!!

I just love these lately.

I love Laphroiag and Lagavulin. I recently had Ardbeg and loved that also. I can't wait to try more.

I've tried the Lagavulin but neither of the others. Did you have the 16 year or some other blend?
Yes sir. 16.

All the islays (at least the ones I've had) are really strong, really peaty. You know you're drinking scotch. Good stuff.

I know it's not scotch, but about a year ago for the first time I had Jameson 18. I've not looked back since then -- love the stuff.

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Islays, islays, islays!!!

I just love these lately.

I love Laphroiag and Lagavulin. I recently had Ardbeg and loved that also. I can't wait to try more.

I've tried the Lagavulin but neither of the others. Did you have the 16 year or some other blend?
Yes sir. 16.

All the islays (at least the ones I've had) are really strong, really peaty. You know you're drinking scotch. Good stuff.

I know it's not scotch, but about a year ago for the first time I had Jameson 18. I've not looked back since then -- love the stuff.

So far I've found I prefer the Highlands because I like the smooth taste and the different textures. I don't like anything that makes me shake my head after I take a sip if you know what I mean. I usually add a splash of water and then enjoy one or two over a few hours just to take the edge off a long day.
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  • 2 weeks later...

Love all of them. Speyside, Highland, Islay, they're all different yet great in their own way. Drinking The Macallan right now but there's a bottle of Laphroaig in my bar at all times. I found a bottle of Macallan 18yr old last year for 115.00. Now you would be lucky to find it for under 170.00. it's ridiculously overpriced but better than 12 or 15 IMO. Just not 4 times better.

The Islay scotches are a totally different animal. It takes awhile to adjust to the smokiness but once you do it's hard to get off of them.

:mellow:

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Islays, islays, islays!!!

I just love these lately.

I love Laphroiag and Lagavulin. I recently had Ardbeg and loved that also. I can't wait to try more.

I've tried the Lagavulin but neither of the others. Did you have the 16 year or some other blend?
Yes sir. 16.

All the islays (at least the ones I've had) are really strong, really peaty. You know you're drinking scotch. Good stuff.

I know it's not scotch, but about a year ago for the first time I had Jameson 18. I've not looked back since then -- love the stuff.

So far I've found I prefer the Highlands because I like the smooth taste and the different textures. I don't like anything that makes me shake my head after I take a sip if you know what I mean. I usually add a splash of water and then enjoy one or two over a few hours just to take the edge off a long day.

X

Mary Kate Danaher: Could you use a little water in your whiskey?

Michaleen Flynn: When I drink whiskey, I drink whiskey; and when I drink water, I drink water.

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Love all of them. Speyside, Highland, Islay, they're all different yet great in their own way. Drinking The Macallan right now but there's a bottle of Laphroaig in my bar at all times. I found a bottle of Macallan 18yr old last year for 115.00. Now you would be lucky to find it for under 170.00. it's ridiculously overpriced but better than 12 or 15 IMO. Just not 4 times better.The Islay scotches are a totally different animal. It takes awhile to adjust to the smokiness but once you do it's hard to get off of them. :mellow:

I saw the MacCallan 18 for 70 Euro today which is about $120. I was told by my Scotch snob friend that that Lagavulin 18 is better and that is slightly cheaper at around $100 even. I'm gonna buy a bottle of Mccallan 12 next week because I've never tried it. Like I said, I'm new to this.
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Islays, islays, islays!!!

I just love these lately.

I love Laphroiag and Lagavulin. I recently had Ardbeg and loved that also. I can't wait to try more.

I've tried the Lagavulin but neither of the others. Did you have the 16 year or some other blend?
Yes sir. 16.

All the islays (at least the ones I've had) are really strong, really peaty. You know you're drinking scotch. Good stuff.

I know it's not scotch, but about a year ago for the first time I had Jameson 18. I've not looked back since then -- love the stuff.

So far I've found I prefer the Highlands because I like the smooth taste and the different textures. I don't like anything that makes me shake my head after I take a sip if you know what I mean. I usually add a splash of water and then enjoy one or two over a few hours just to take the edge off a long day.

X

Mary Kate Danaher: Could you use a little water in your whiskey?

Michaleen Flynn: When I drink whiskey, I drink whiskey; and when I drink water, I drink water.

Scotch snobs might disagree. I think it really depends on the4 blend but I have found a splash of water really opens up certain Scotchs and makes the experience a little better. Water may just be the French tickler of Scotch. :loco:
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Islays, islays, islays!!!

I just love these lately.

I love Laphroiag and Lagavulin. I recently had Ardbeg and loved that also. I can't wait to try more.

I've tried the Lagavulin but neither of the others. Did you have the 16 year or some other blend?
Yes sir. 16.

All the islays (at least the ones I've had) are really strong, really peaty. You know you're drinking scotch. Good stuff.

I know it's not scotch, but about a year ago for the first time I had Jameson 18. I've not looked back since then -- love the stuff.

So far I've found I prefer the Highlands because I like the smooth taste and the different textures. I don't like anything that makes me shake my head after I take a sip if you know what I mean. I usually add a splash of water and then enjoy one or two over a few hours just to take the edge off a long day.

X

Mary Kate Danaher: Could you use a little water in your whiskey?

Michaleen Flynn: When I drink whiskey, I drink whiskey; and when I drink water, I drink water.

Scotch snobs might disagree. I think it really depends on the4 blend but I have found a splash of water really opens up certain Scotchs and makes the experience a little better. Water may just be the French tickler of Scotch. :loco:
It's definitely a way to slow yourself down during an evening of drinking. I may, MAY add ice, but I just can't bring myself to add water to a 1st class single malt.
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Islays, islays, islays!!!I just love these lately.I love Laphroiag and Lagavulin. I recently had Ardbeg and loved that also. I can't wait to try more.

Bowmore, my friend. I love the oakey taste. It's fantastic, and not too strong like I think Laphroig is. Dammit, now I've got a taste in my mouth for it and I don't have a bottle in my liquor cabinet! :loco:
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Islays, islays, islays!!!

I just love these lately.

I love Laphroiag and Lagavulin. I recently had Ardbeg and loved that also. I can't wait to try more.

I've tried the Lagavulin but neither of the others. Did you have the 16 year or some other blend?
Yes sir. 16.

All the islays (at least the ones I've had) are really strong, really peaty. You know you're drinking scotch. Good stuff.

I know it's not scotch, but about a year ago for the first time I had Jameson 18. I've not looked back since then -- love the stuff.

So far I've found I prefer the Highlands because I like the smooth taste and the different textures. I don't like anything that makes me shake my head after I take a sip if you know what I mean. I usually add a splash of water and then enjoy one or two over a few hours just to take the edge off a long day.

X

Mary Kate Danaher: Could you use a little water in your whiskey?

Michaleen Flynn: When I drink whiskey, I drink whiskey; and when I drink water, I drink water.

Scotch snobs might disagree. I think it really depends on the4 blend but I have found a splash of water really opens up certain Scotchs and makes the experience a little better. Water may just be the French tickler of Scotch. :loco:
It's definitely a way to slow yourself down during an evening of drinking. I may, MAY add ice, but I just can't bring myself to add water to a 1st class single malt.
Redman>Hi

you are a really smart guy and I know that you know ice=water. :thanks::hifive:

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Islays, islays, islays!!!

I just love these lately.

I love Laphroiag and Lagavulin. I recently had Ardbeg and loved that also. I can't wait to try more.

I've tried the Lagavulin but neither of the others. Did you have the 16 year or some other blend?
Yes sir. 16.

All the islays (at least the ones I've had) are really strong, really peaty. You know you're drinking scotch. Good stuff.

I know it's not scotch, but about a year ago for the first time I had Jameson 18. I've not looked back since then -- love the stuff.

So far I've found I prefer the Highlands because I like the smooth taste and the different textures. I don't like anything that makes me shake my head after I take a sip if you know what I mean. I usually add a splash of water and then enjoy one or two over a few hours just to take the edge off a long day.

X

Mary Kate Danaher: Could you use a little water in your whiskey?

Michaleen Flynn: When I drink whiskey, I drink whiskey; and when I drink water, I drink water.

Scotch snobs might disagree. I think it really depends on the4 blend but I have found a splash of water really opens up certain Scotchs and makes the experience a little better. Water may just be the French tickler of Scotch. :hifive:
It's definitely a way to slow yourself down during an evening of drinking. I may, MAY add ice, but I just can't bring myself to add water to a 1st class single malt.
Redman>Hi

you are a really smart guy and I know that you know ice=water. :banned::thanks:

:loco:
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Love all of them. Speyside, Highland, Islay, they're all different yet great in their own way. Drinking The Macallan right now but there's a bottle of Laphroaig in my bar at all times. I found a bottle of Macallan 18yr old last year for 115.00. Now you would be lucky to find it for under 170.00. it's ridiculously overpriced but better than 12 or 15 IMO. Just not 4 times better.The Islay scotches are a totally different animal. It takes awhile to adjust to the smokiness but once you do it's hard to get off of them. ;)

I saw the MacCallan 18 for 70 Euro today which is about $120. I was told by my Scotch snob friend that that Lagavulin 18 is better and that is slightly cheaper at around $100 even. I'm gonna buy a bottle of Mccallan 12 next week because I've never tried it. Like I said, I'm new to this.
I predict you'll like it quite a bit, especially being new to single malt scotch. Aged in sherry casks so it has a slight sherry note to it, and silky smooth. $120 is a great price for Mac18 in the states.The Macallan has its detractors. Mainly from the Islay proponents because it's not really smoky, peaty, but it consistently wins awards as best single malt.
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One cheaper Scotch I have and I like is the Abermour 10 year. Picked up a bottle for normal drinking for about $28 and it's not bad at all. I prefer this one strait.

Another one I picked up a few weeks ago that I like is the Balvenie 10, Founders' Reserve. Very smooth with that nice Spanish sherry cask taste.

Also was advised that people who drink Johnny Walker Blue are rich and uninformed. That makes sense.

Edited by Doctor Detroit
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One cheaper Scotch I have and I like is the Abermour 10 year. Picked up a bottle for normal drinking for about $28 and it's not bad at all. I prefer this one strait.

Another one I picked up a few weeks ago that I like is the Ballvine 10, Founders' Reserve. Very smooth with that nice Spanish sherry cask taste.

Also was advised that people who drink Johnny Walker Blue are rich and uninformed. That makes sense.

;)

Black label is all you need. It just doesn't hold up against the great Islays though.

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Next week I think I'm gonna pick up the Talisker 18 after I get my few bucks back for my 2007 taxes. I see it on-line for $90 and I can get it here for about $95 to $100 depending on the exchange rate. This was voted the best Scotch in the world for your money by some drunks with great plalates so I have to listen. The Balvenie 21 is one I can get also and I heard that one is pretty special.

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One cheaper Scotch I have and I like is the Abermour 10 year. Picked up a bottle for normal drinking for about $28 and it's not bad at all. I prefer this one strait.

Another one I picked up a few weeks ago that I like is the Ballvine 10, Founders' Reserve. Very smooth with that nice Spanish sherry cask taste.

Also was advised that people who drink Johnny Walker Blue are rich and uninformed. That makes sense.

:confused:

Black label is all you need. It just doesn't hold up against the great Islays though.

Yeah since I've become a low level Scotch connoisseur I asked what I could get in the States while I'm back and I was told that the Johnny black is gonna be my best bet at the run of the mill bar. Never touched the stuff so I guess I'll just be surprised when I try it next month at a bar with Jack Daniels reserve on their Scotch list. ;) I am going to Vegas so I'd guess they have some good stuff there but honestly I'm sold on Scotch. The Quinta Ruban is my favorite thus far but I have a lot to taste over the years. Might become a hobby. :shrug:
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86 the water.

I have heard, and read, varying opinions about the proper amount of water to add (or not add) when enjoying a single malt. Some suggest drinking it neat, some with a splash of water, some with an equal amount of water and single malt, etc. There are even suggestions about using certain types of bottled water. Given that enjoying a single malt is a unique personal experience and there's probably no one correct answer, what is your preference and/or recommendation? -- Steve Sirbaugh

The specific question from Steve was if water should be added to the Scotch single malt and, if so, how much water? There have been other similar questions to The Scotch Doc, so let me "lump" them all together and provide a rather detailed answer that should satisfy everyone - I hope. I will at least tell you all that I THINK I know about it and will include some opinions. I recommend the following:

Place about two ounces of single malt in a 12 oz. brandy snifter.

Swirl the contents three or four times.

Place the nose about twelve inches above the rim of the glass and sniff lightly as you slowly move your nose closer or farther from the rim of the glass.

Swirl the whisky again and smell again.

Now that you have found the "correct" distance for YOUR nose and THIS particular single malt, place about a half-teaspoon of good quality, room temperature water in the single malt. I keep a bottle of such in my single malt cabinet. Now quickly swirl the contents a couple of times and nose again. If the whisky has much character, you will now most likely have to move your glass farther from your nose. There may be an intense release of aromas from the malt- or maybe not so intense. This robust release of aromas is due to the old Chemistry 104 term called "heat of solution." In effect, this rule states that when two chemicals are mixed, they may "take on" or "release" energy, thus becoming cooler or warmer. In the case of a whisky and water mix, the solution becomes slightly warmer, thus releasing the ethyl alcohols which contain much of the aroma of the single malt. The "nosing" step of appreciating the single malt is very important. There are 32 primary aromas, but only four primary tastes (via the tongue). Taste is influenced by the sense of smell for more than most people are aware.

At this point, take a small sip (3/4 to 1 teaspoonful) of the single malt into your mouth and allow it to coat the tongue and mouth well (no mouthwash swishing, now). Swallow slowly and envision the "Bell Curve" (you would expect a "Bell Curve" comparison from a professor, huh?) as the intensity of the flavor builds to a pinnacle and then declines. The more flavor and the longer it takes for the flavor to reach its flavor peak, the "taller" the "bell" will be.

The length of time it takes the flavor to reach its peak, and the longer the flavor lasts after it attains the peak (referred to as the "finish" or "after-taste"), the broader the Bell will be. With careful attention and regular practice, a great deal of information concerning the idiosyncrasies of single malts can be learned. More importantly, however, is the tremendous level of appreciation for the single malt that will occur. The incomparable single malt was never meant to be "drank," like other liquids. It was meant to be savored and "experienced." In fact, if one takes the time to get educated concerning the taste, history and mystique of the Scotch single malt, they may come to actually revere it. To "chug" a Scotch single malt is sacrilege, and I distance myself from such an uncouth individual as quickly as possible before the historically, well-documented, McCoy Celtic ire is aroused.

I strongly recommend that the Scotch single malt be "approached" in the same manner that one would a member of the opposite sex that may intrigue you. An open mind, patience, sincere attention to detail and an opportunity for it to reveal and exhibit its unique special qualities may disclose an "individual" whose company you can enjoy on many occasions. It could also be that you will meet that individual who you will want to spend a lifetime with. That's what The Scotch Doc thinks. What is your opinion?

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:bye:i don't put water in my whiskey either.

I think it depends on the selection. Is someone saying they are more of a man because they don't water their whickey here? Just checking. Scotch snobs I know seem to think it depends on the brand and can make a Scotch better. :goodposting:
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:bye:i don't put water in my whiskey either.

I think it depends on the selection. Is someone saying they are more of a man because they don't water their whickey here? Just checking. Scotch snobs I know seem to think it depends on the brand and can make a Scotch better. :goodposting:
nah. i'm not making any statements about masculinity. just personal preference on how i choose to imbibe my scotch/whiskey.
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There's quite a few knowledgeable experts that advise putting a drop of water into scotch whiskey to help release the flavors. :towelwave:

Anything you would like to recommend? Have you tried the Quinta Ruban? That is my favorite so anything in that category would be good.
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86 the water.

I have heard, and read, varying opinions about the proper amount of water to add (or not add) when enjoying a single malt. Some suggest drinking it neat, some with a splash of water, some with an equal amount of water and single malt, etc. There are even suggestions about using certain types of bottled water. Given that enjoying a single malt is a unique personal experience and there's probably no one correct answer, what is your preference and/or recommendation? -- Steve Sirbaugh

The specific question from Steve was if water should be added to the Scotch single malt and, if so, how much water? There have been other similar questions to The Scotch Doc, so let me "lump" them all together and provide a rather detailed answer that should satisfy everyone - I hope. I will at least tell you all that I THINK I know about it and will include some opinions. I recommend the following:

Place about two ounces of single malt in a 12 oz. brandy snifter.

Swirl the contents three or four times.

Place the nose about twelve inches above the rim of the glass and sniff lightly as you slowly move your nose closer or farther from the rim of the glass.

Swirl the whisky again and smell again.

Now that you have found the "correct" distance for YOUR nose and THIS particular single malt, place about a half-teaspoon of good quality, room temperature water in the single malt. I keep a bottle of such in my single malt cabinet. Now quickly swirl the contents a couple of times and nose again. If the whisky has much character, you will now most likely have to move your glass farther from your nose. There may be an intense release of aromas from the malt- or maybe not so intense. This robust release of aromas is due to the old Chemistry 104 term called "heat of solution." In effect, this rule states that when two chemicals are mixed, they may "take on" or "release" energy, thus becoming cooler or warmer. In the case of a whisky and water mix, the solution becomes slightly warmer, thus releasing the ethyl alcohols which contain much of the aroma of the single malt. The "nosing" step of appreciating the single malt is very important. There are 32 primary aromas, but only four primary tastes (via the tongue). Taste is influenced by the sense of smell for more than most people are aware.

At this point, take a small sip (3/4 to 1 teaspoonful) of the single malt into your mouth and allow it to coat the tongue and mouth well (no mouthwash swishing, now). Swallow slowly and envision the "Bell Curve" (you would expect a "Bell Curve" comparison from a professor, huh?) as the intensity of the flavor builds to a pinnacle and then declines. The more flavor and the longer it takes for the flavor to reach its flavor peak, the "taller" the "bell" will be.

The length of time it takes the flavor to reach its peak, and the longer the flavor lasts after it attains the peak (referred to as the "finish" or "after-taste"), the broader the Bell will be. With careful attention and regular practice, a great deal of information concerning the idiosyncrasies of single malts can be learned. More importantly, however, is the tremendous level of appreciation for the single malt that will occur. The incomparable single malt was never meant to be "drank," like other liquids. It was meant to be savored and "experienced." In fact, if one takes the time to get educated concerning the taste, history and mystique of the Scotch single malt, they may come to actually revere it. To "chug" a Scotch single malt is sacrilege, and I distance myself from such an uncouth individual as quickly as possible before the historically, well-documented, McCoy Celtic ire is aroused.

I strongly recommend that the Scotch single malt be "approached" in the same manner that one would a member of the opposite sex that may intrigue you. An open mind, patience, sincere attention to detail and an opportunity for it to reveal and exhibit its unique special qualities may disclose an "individual" whose company you can enjoy on many occasions. It could also be that you will meet that individual who you will want to spend a lifetime with. That's what The Scotch Doc thinks. What is your opinion?

very very :goodposting:
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as for my current shelf...

The Macallan (18 > 12), Speyside. This is a sure thing. I am sure this is my go to choice every day... I have gone though more bottles than I should probably admit...

Glenmorangie (18), Highland. Try it, you will not regret it. Needs a touch of water and time. You don't want to rush this whiskey.

Laphroaig (15), Islay. This is my favorite Islay. Smoky, sweet, salty... nice... Lagavulin is close, but I would go Laphroaig if I have to pick one. Don't do the 10, IMHO.

Lagavulin (16), Islay. Very smoky, peaty. Well worth the money. Very close between Lagavulin and Laphroaig for me.

Glenlivet (12), Speyside. After dinner, nice and smooth, I like a touch of water.

Highland Park (12), Orkney. I didn't think I would like this one at first, but it has it's place. Kind of in between the smokey Islays and rounder sherry casket ones...

Talisker (10), Isle of Skye. Rich, strong, I believe this has more alcohol content too... need a touch of water as well.

Glenfarclas (25), Highland. YUM!!! Awesome! It's probably one of my favorite after dinner drinks.

Aberlour (15), Speyside. Soft but spicy... Sherry casket. Very mellow whiskey, and I like this neat. I need to try the "old" (30 years maybe?)

Dalwhinnie (15), Highland. Interesting taste for sure. Not something I would drink every day, but nice at times.

Bruichladdich (35), Islay. Recent purchase. Tasted once, so I'll have to get back on this one...

Strathisla (38), Speyside. Recent purchase but VERY promising... on the expensive side, like Bruichladdich...

Edited by charvik
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There's quite a few knowledgeable experts that advise putting a drop of water into scotch whiskey to help release the flavors. :goodposting:

Anything you would like to recommend? Have you tried the Quinta Ruban? That is my favorite so anything in that category would be good.
Quinta Ruban is a Glenmorangie product so give the Oban 14yr old a try. It's another tasty highland malt.
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as for my current shelf...

Lagavulin (16), Islay. Very smoky, peaty. Well worth the money. Very close between Lagavulin and Laphroaig for me.

Bought a bottle today and am currently enjoying my first few sips. It was between the 16 and a Tallisker 18 but this was the last Lagavulin on the shelf so I thought right or wrong I better pick it up. Although I have tried this before, drinking it in a non-social environment and kind of savoring it makes a big difference. A lot different from the Highland Scotchs I've bought but the smokiness really makes you kind of warmand I didn't see any need to add any water. It was $80 so I think I'll probably have this one on the shelf for awhile.

The Aberlour (10) really impressed me for an inexpensive bottle so I stepped up and bought a (12) to try also.

Glenfarclas (25), Highland. YUM!!! Awesome! It's probably one of my favorite after dinner drinks.

Never tried this one yet but it's on my list. A friend of mine has a bottle so I have to "drop in" and see him soon. :kicksrock:
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Just to let you know, it is spelled "whisky", no "e", when talking Scotch. This is because the Scots invented whisky, so only Scotch Whiskey can be spelled that way. All immitators have to add the "e". Check your bottles and you'll see this is true. Just an interesting bit of trivia for a Friday afternoon.

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All this talk has made me thirsty :) . Thank goodness I'm working from home today :mellow: I'm not a snob, but certainly have my favorites. Bang for the buck, I'll put Balvenie's 12 year old, double wood or their 15 year single barrel up against anything (approx. $36 and $50 respectively). I also have a deep fondness for Laphroaig's 10 year old. I LOVE their 15 year old as well, but it's reserved for special occasions.

edited to add, I prefer to drink each with a touch of water, though neat is just fine as well.

Edited by pigskinliquors
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Just to let you know, it is spelled "whisky", no "e", when talking Scotch. This is because the Scots invented whisky, so only Scotch Whiskey can be spelled that way. All immitators have to add the "e". Check your bottles and you'll see this is true. Just an interesting bit of trivia for a Friday afternoon.

Close but not quite. Canadian whisky is also spelled without the e. And the reason that scotch whisky is spelled without the e isn't because they invented it. Actually most whiskys American, Irish, or otherwise used to be spelled without the e.

The word "whiskey" is believed to have been coined by soldiers of King Henry II who invaded Ireland in the 12th century as they struggled to pronounce the native Irish words uisce beatha (IPA: [ɪʃkʲə bʲahə]) meaning "water of life". Over time, the pronunciation changed from "Whishkeyba" to "Whisky". The name itself is a gaelic translation of the Latin phrase aqua vitae, meaning "Water of Life".[1]

At one time, all whisky was spelled without the extra 'e', as "whisky". In around 1870, the reputation of Scottish whisky was very poor as Scottish distilleries flooded the market with cheaper spirits produced using the Coffey still. The Irish and American distilleries adopted the spelling "whiskey", with the extra "e", to distinguish their higher quality product.[12] Today, the spelling whisky (plural whiskies) is generally used for whiskies distilled in Scotland, Wales, Canada, and Japan, while whiskey is used for the spirits distilled in Ireland and America. Even though a 1968 directive of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms specifies "whisky" as the official U.S. spelling, it allows labeling as "whiskey" in deference to tradition and most U.S. producers still use the historical spelling. Exceptions such as Early Times, Maker's Mark, and George Dickel are usually indicative of a Scottish heritage.[citation needed]

In the late Victorian era, Irish whiskey was the world's whiskey of choice. Of the Irish whiskeys, Dublin whiskeys were regarded as the grands crus of whiskeys. In order to differentiate Dublin whiskey from other whiskies, the Dublin distilleries adopted the spelling "whiskey". The other Irish distilleries eventually followed suit. The last Irish "whisky" was Paddy, which adopted the "e" in 1966.[13]

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Balvanie is the greatest distillery in the world. The 21 year old port wood is nectar of the gods.

One of those Scotch snobs I spoke of earlier recommended the Balvenie 10 Founders Reserve which I must admit is one of my least favorites of the bottles I have. However I'm sure the 21 is much better and the snob in question says the 21 is his absolute favorite. The store where I buy my Scotch has an awesome selection and had the 21 up until recently but discontinued supply for some reason. They can order a case so we are talking about doing that if we can find two or three more guys to go in with us. I just want one bottle at that price but at this point I think I'd do it.
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Balvanie is the greatest distillery in the world. The 21 year old port wood is nectar of the gods.

One of those Scotch snobs I spoke of earlier recommended the Balvenie 10 Founders Reserve which I must admit is one of my least favorites of the bottles I have. However I'm sure the 21 is much better and the snob in question says the 21 is his absolute favorite. The store where I buy my Scotch has an awesome selection and had the 21 up until recently but discontinued supply for some reason. They can order a case so we are talking about doing that if we can find two or three more guys to go in with us. I just want one bottle at that price but at this point I think I'd do it.
The 10 is good for a 10, but 10 year old scotch sucks.The 15 year old single cask is really good too. This one may be easier to get. There is some real variation bottle to bottle in this one though. There was a store a few yesra ago taht had a bunch of bottle out of the same cask that were truly fantastic. I bought them out.
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Balvanie is the greatest distillery in the world. The 21 year old port wood is nectar of the gods.

One of those Scotch snobs I spoke of earlier recommended the Balvenie 10 Founders Reserve which I must admit is one of my least favorites of the bottles I have. However I'm sure the 21 is much better and the snob in question says the 21 is his absolute favorite. The store where I buy my Scotch has an awesome selection and had the 21 up until recently but discontinued supply for some reason. They can order a case so we are talking about doing that if we can find two or three more guys to go in with us. I just want one bottle at that price but at this point I think I'd do it.
The 10 is good for a 10, but 10 year old scotch sucks.The 15 year old single cask is really good too. This one may be easier to get. There is some real variation bottle to bottle in this one though. There was a store a few yesra ago taht had a bunch of bottle out of the same cask that were truly fantastic. I bought them out.
Still learning the ropes, this kind of feedback is appreciated. :moneybag:
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Wow the Lagavulin is just so different from the Highlands and Speyside Scotchs that I've tried. Wow.

Very smokey and a great smell. This one is gonna take me awhile to adjust my palette to but I like the possibilities.

I think my next bottle will be the Glenfarclus because I've read a lot of really good reviews on that one. I'd like to try the Oban as well which was recommended in here. Happy drinking. :goodposting:

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Balvanie is the greatest distillery in the world. The 21 year old port wood is nectar of the gods.

Agreed. As mentioned above, they are an excellent value.

Balvanie is the greatest distillery in the world. The 21 year old port wood is nectar of the gods.

One of those Scotch snobs I spoke of earlier recommended the Balvenie 10 Founders Reserve which I must admit is one of my least favorites of the bottles I have. However I'm sure the 21 is much better and the snob in question says the 21 is his absolute favorite. The store where I buy my Scotch has an awesome selection and had the 21 up until recently but discontinued supply for some reason. They can order a case so we are talking about doing that if we can find two or three more guys to go in with us. I just want one bottle at that price but at this point I think I'd do it.

The 10 is good for a 10, but 10 year old scotch sucks.

The 15 year old single cask is really good too. This one may be easier to get. There is some real variation bottle to bottle in this one though. There was a store a few yesra ago taht had a bunch of bottle out of the same cask that were truly fantastic. I bought them out.

I also don't like their 10 y/o, but disagree that all 10 y/o's suck. Laphroaig's 10 y/o is one of my favorites!
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Any other Cragganmore fans on here? This has pretty much become my Speyside of choice (replacing The Macallan).

Have not tried that one. I'm a Speyside fan though. What's it like?
It has a very complex and moderately intense aroma. Starts sweet, slightly astringent with a short, slightly bitter finish. Very full flavor. I would say it is lot more mellow than Macallan 12, and I prefer it over Macallan 18, but you would certainly get an argument from Macallan fans on that. If you like Speyside malts, you really need to give it a try. And it is reasonably affordable at around $40 to $45.

ETA: Here is the whisky.com page for Cragganmore

Edited by Walter Slovotsky
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Any other Cragganmore fans on here? This has pretty much become my Speyside of choice (replacing The Macallan).

Have not tried that one. I'm a Speyside fan though. What's it like?
It has a very complex and moderately intense aroma. Starts sweet, slightly astringent with a short, slightly bitter finish. Very full flavor. I would say it is lot more mellow than Macallan 12, and I prefer it over Macallan 18, but you would certainly get an argument from Macallan fans on that. If you like Speyside malts, you really need to give it a try. And it is reasonably affordable at around $40 to $45.

ETA: Here is the whisky.com page for Cragganmore

Thanks for the reply. I will give it a whirl. Check out this tasting graphic I found on the scotchwhisky.com site. Pretty interesting way to graph out the tasting notes.

Taste graphic

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