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Immigration Reform


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A little disclosure: I have a friend who, along with is family, lives in the U.S. on an expired visa. They are here illegally. For the last several years, we have been searching for means by which they might remain in the country and have their status moved from "non-immigrant" (i.e. illegal) to "immigrant" (i.e. legal) status. We've hit road-block after road-block in this effort, and a few times now have been told "Wait for the government to reform their immigration laws. Then this family will be fine." We've been told this since before the '06 election. And we're still waiting.

My question isn't so much WHAT should be done with immigration...that's been argued to death. I'm curious as to how likely real immigration reform really is, considering who might become president and what congress might look like after November.

Are we really going to see immigration reform?

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Depends on what you mean by reform. There is a strong movement in this country that says we need to have control of our borders, especially the southern one. Many people, myself included, will fight tooth and nail for no other changes to our immigration rules/laws until such time as that is done. At that point we can assess our policies and needs and decide on what other reforms may be in our best interest.

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A little disclosure: I have a friend who, along with is family, lives in the U.S. on an expired visa. They are here illegally. For the last several years, we have been searching for means by which they might remain in the country and have their status moved from "non-immigrant" (i.e. illegal) to "immigrant" (i.e. legal) status. We've hit road-block after road-block in this effort, and a few times now have been told "Wait for the government to reform their immigration laws. Then this family will be fine." We've been told this since before the '06 election. And we're still waiting.My question isn't so much WHAT should be done with immigration...that's been argued to death. I'm curious as to how likely real immigration reform really is, considering who might become president and what congress might look like after November. Are we really going to see immigration reform?

What sort of reform are you looking for? You either renew your visa by getting someone to sponsor you, or you leave the country, is there something I am missing?
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What sort of reform are you looking for? You either renew your visa by getting someone to sponsor you, or you leave the country, is there something I am missing?

I think you are probably missing his implicit reference to some form of amnesty for current residents, which is often a component of various immigration reform proposals.
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Republicans want cheap labor and Democrats want cheap votes. It ain't gonna happen anytime soon.

But when Congress does pass a law, they will either do nothing effective or go way overboard.
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A little disclosure: I have a friend who, along with is family, lives in the U.S. on an expired visa. They are here illegally. For the last several years, we have been searching for means by which they might remain in the country and have their status moved from "non-immigrant" (i.e. illegal) to "immigrant" (i.e. legal) status. We've hit road-block after road-block in this effort, and a few times now have been told "Wait for the government to reform their immigration laws. Then this family will be fine." We've been told this since before the '06 election. And we're still waiting.My question isn't so much WHAT should be done with immigration...that's been argued to death. I'm curious as to how likely real immigration reform really is, considering who might become president and what congress might look like after November. Are we really going to see immigration reform?

If the Dems win - NoIf McCain wins, later. We really need to solve the Border issue. It is a major problem.
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Republicans want cheap labor and Democrats want cheap votes. It ain't gonna happen anytime soon.

I think it's a little more complicated than that, but I've been wrong before.
That's pretty much it. The people want change, but the status quo benefits both parties so it stays.
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A little disclosure: I have a friend who, along with is family, lives in the U.S. on an expired visa. They are here illegally. For the last several years, we have been searching for means by which they might remain in the country and have their status moved from "non-immigrant" (i.e. illegal) to "immigrant" (i.e. legal) status. We've hit road-block after road-block in this effort, and a few times now have been told "Wait for the government to reform their immigration laws. Then this family will be fine." We've been told this since before the '06 election. And we're still waiting.My question isn't so much WHAT should be done with immigration...that's been argued to death. I'm curious as to how likely real immigration reform really is, considering who might become president and what congress might look like after November. Are we really going to see immigration reform?

If the Dems win - NoIf McCain wins, later. We really need to solve the Border issue. It is a major problem.
What is so major about the border?
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A little disclosure: I have a friend who, along with is family, lives in the U.S. on an expired visa. They are here illegally. For the last several years, we have been searching for means by which they might remain in the country and have their status moved from "non-immigrant" (i.e. illegal) to "immigrant" (i.e. legal) status. We've hit road-block after road-block in this effort, and a few times now have been told "Wait for the government to reform their immigration laws. Then this family will be fine." We've been told this since before the '06 election. And we're still waiting.My question isn't so much WHAT should be done with immigration...that's been argued to death. I'm curious as to how likely real immigration reform really is, considering who might become president and what congress might look like after November. Are we really going to see immigration reform?

If the Dems win - NoIf McCain wins, later. We really need to solve the Border issue. It is a major problem.
What is so major about the border?
I see you live near the border. I believe we should tighten (not close) it for national security reasons. We shouldn't have to pay for the illegals either.
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A little disclosure: I have a friend who, along with is family, lives in the U.S. on an expired visa. They are here illegally. For the last several years, we have been searching for means by which they might remain in the country and have their status moved from "non-immigrant" (i.e. illegal) to "immigrant" (i.e. legal) status. We've hit road-block after road-block in this effort, and a few times now have been told "Wait for the government to reform their immigration laws. Then this family will be fine." We've been told this since before the '06 election. And we're still waiting.My question isn't so much WHAT should be done with immigration...that's been argued to death. I'm curious as to how likely real immigration reform really is, considering who might become president and what congress might look like after November. Are we really going to see immigration reform?

If the Dems win - NoIf McCain wins, later. We really need to solve the Border issue. It is a major problem.
What is so major about the border?
I see you live near the border. I believe we should tighten (not close) it for national security reasons. We shouldn't have to pay for the illegals either.
A 2000 mile fence isn't going to keep out a terrorist who is hell bent on doing harm on American soil and is prepared to die to acheive his purpose.And the issue of whether illegals ultimately cost tax payers or contribute more than they cost is up for debate.
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A 2000 mile fence isn't going to keep out a terrorist who is hell bent on doing harm on American soil and is prepared to die to acheive his purpose.

A deadbolt lock isn't going to keep out a burglar who is hellbent on stealing your tv.......yet you still lock the door, don't you?
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A little disclosure: I have a friend who, along with is family, lives in the U.S. on an expired visa. They are here illegally. For the last several years, we have been searching for means by which they might remain in the country and have their status moved from "non-immigrant" (i.e. illegal) to "immigrant" (i.e. legal) status. We've hit road-block after road-block in this effort, and a few times now have been told "Wait for the government to reform their immigration laws. Then this family will be fine." We've been told this since before the '06 election. And we're still waiting.My question isn't so much WHAT should be done with immigration...that's been argued to death. I'm curious as to how likely real immigration reform really is, considering who might become president and what congress might look like after November. Are we really going to see immigration reform?

If the Dems win - NoIf McCain wins, later. We really need to solve the Border issue. It is a major problem.
What is so major about the border?
I see you live near the border. I believe we should tighten (not close) it for national security reasons. We shouldn't have to pay for the illegals either.
A 2000 mile fence isn't going to keep out a terrorist who is hell bent on doing harm on American soil and is prepared to die to acheive his purpose.And the issue of whether illegals ultimately cost tax payers or contribute more than they cost is up for debate.
Study: 25% of LA's Welfare Goes to Undocumented ImmigrantsMay 6, 2008, 5:42 AM PDTStudy: 25% of LA's Welfare Goes to Undocumented Immigrants L.A. County Supervisor Mike Antonovich says the county spends more than $1 billion a year on benefits to undocumented immigrants.According to new data from the Department of Public Social Services, nearly twenty five percent of Los Angeles County 's welfare and food stamp benefits goes directly to the children of undocumented immigrants, at a cost of $36 million a month -- for a projected annual cost of $432 million."The total cost for illegal immigrants to County taxpayers far exceeds $1 billion a year - not including the millions of dollars for education," said Antonovich."With $220 million for public safety, $400 million for healthcare, and $432 million in welfare allocations, illegal immigration continues to have a devastating impact on Los Angeles County taxpayers."The supervisor said, in March, undocumented immigrants collected over $19 million in welfare assistance and over $16 million in food stamp allocations.Story from KHTS
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A little disclosure: I have a friend who, along with is family, lives in the U.S. on an expired visa. They are here illegally. For the last several years, we have been searching for means by which they might remain in the country and have their status moved from "non-immigrant" (i.e. illegal) to "immigrant" (i.e. legal) status. We've hit road-block after road-block in this effort, and a few times now have been told "Wait for the government to reform their immigration laws. Then this family will be fine." We've been told this since before the '06 election. And we're still waiting.My question isn't so much WHAT should be done with immigration...that's been argued to death. I'm curious as to how likely real immigration reform really is, considering who might become president and what congress might look like after November. Are we really going to see immigration reform?

If the Dems win - NoIf McCain wins, later. We really need to solve the Border issue. It is a major problem.
What is so major about the border?
I see you live near the border. I believe we should tighten (not close) it for national security reasons. We shouldn't have to pay for the illegals either.
A 2000 mile fence isn't going to keep out a terrorist who is hell bent on doing harm on American soil and is prepared to die to acheive his purpose.And the issue of whether illegals ultimately cost tax payers or contribute more than they cost is up for debate.
Study: 25% of LA's Welfare Goes to Undocumented ImmigrantsMay 6, 2008, 5:42 AM PDTStudy: 25% of LA's Welfare Goes to Undocumented Immigrants L.A. County Supervisor Mike Antonovich says the county spends more than $1 billion a year on benefits to undocumented immigrants.According to new data from the Department of Public Social Services, nearly twenty five percent of Los Angeles County 's welfare and food stamp benefits goes directly to the children of undocumented immigrants, at a cost of $36 million a month -- for a projected annual cost of $432 million."The total cost for illegal immigrants to County taxpayers far exceeds $1 billion a year - not including the millions of dollars for education," said Antonovich."With $220 million for public safety, $400 million for healthcare, and $432 million in welfare allocations, illegal immigration continues to have a devastating impact on Los Angeles County taxpayers."The supervisor said, in March, undocumented immigrants collected over $19 million in welfare assistance and over $16 million in food stamp allocations.Story from KHTS
I saw this article already. Please don't quote it as gospel.
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A 2000 mile fence isn't going to keep out a terrorist who is hell bent on doing harm on American soil and is prepared to die to acheive his purpose.

A deadbolt lock isn't going to keep out a burglar who is hellbent on stealing your tv.......yet you still lock the door, don't you?
Actually it's the burglar that I lock the door against, the guy who is hell bent on killing me will not be deterred.In the case of the border fence the burglars are the ones who come here to work and they will probably be kept out but the truly dangerous ones will not be deterred.
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What sort of reform are you looking for? You either renew your visa by getting someone to sponsor you, or you leave the country, is there something I am missing?

I think you are probably missing his implicit reference to some form of amnesty for current residents, which is often a component of various immigration reform proposals.
Yes, CM, that is the kind of reform I'm alluding to. I'm not even saying I'm in favor of amnesty, but that's not the point of this thread. I'm simply curious as to the likelihood that we see ANY change in the status quo in the near future: deporting all illegals, amnesty for all illegals, or anything in between. Again, not arguing the various positions, just wondering how likely any change may be.
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What sort of reform are you looking for? You either renew your visa by getting someone to sponsor you, or you leave the country, is there something I am missing?

I think you are probably missing his implicit reference to some form of amnesty for current residents, which is often a component of various immigration reform proposals.
Yes, CM, that is the kind of reform I'm alluding to. I'm not even saying I'm in favor of amnesty, but that's not the point of this thread. I'm simply curious as to the likelihood that we see ANY change in the status quo in the near future: deporting all illegals, amnesty for all illegals, or anything in between. Again, not arguing the various positions, just wondering how likely any change may be.
Reform is written on a piece of paper, implementation of said reform requires resources and manpower and I am not sure where those are going to come from.
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I think an Amnesty is a lot more likely with a Democrat in the White House, because it would splinter the Republican party if they did it. The rank-and-file America-First Republicans want to shoot illegals on sight (exaggerating here) and the fat-cat Republicans like their workers to have illegal status so that they can be more fully exploited. If a Democrat did it, he might have 10 million more votes in 2012.

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