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Are you laid off,looking for a new career, look inside


SHIZNITTTT

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When I got out of the Army in 1996 I asked the career counselor for jobs that were in high demand (since I had friends with BA's and BS degrees still working at Red Lobster). Two things that were at the top of the list were Semi Drivers and Registered Nurses. Well I chose nursing. It has been quit fun, and the pay is descent start out at around 50K (50K is the Oklahoma average expect more in your state) a year, and the work environment is great. There are tons of job opportunities from ICU, ER, Surgery, PACU, family health clinics, and many more.

I have seen a couple of threads started about people getting laid off, or just let go all together due to the economy. So, with that in mind nursing has never been a better option for work stability. Every state has a shortage, and RN's are in very high demand (some reports say there will be a RN shortage of 500K by 2010). I have a friend that does travel nursing and makes around 150k a year, taking assignments across the US for 13 weeks at a time. The travel agency pays his room and board (usually a very nice condo), and gives him extra money for food and incidentals.

A person can become a RN in as little as 2 years through many local community colleges. I have my BSN, because I wanted to go into management, but starting out the pay is not really any different from the associate degree RN and the bachelor’s degree RN.

If anyone would like any other info please don't hesitate to ask.

Oh, and by the way I didn't think that I would be able to stand being around sick people, blood, vomit etc., but there is so many jobs in the nursing field that some RN's don't even do patient care.

Hey and GL to those that are laid off or lost your jobs.

Oh edit to add

Many hospitals are so short of RN's that a lot of the hospitals will pay for a person to go to college, and work a year for them when they graduate. Also, I did a work study program (nurse extern) while in school that paid pretty well so that I could afford my apartment and car payment.

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my old gf from college is an RN, she works for a temporary/traveling nurse company and makes a killing.

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"Not a lot of men in your profession, is there, Fokker?"

...

Seriously, nursing is a great line of work to pursue.

Though, I have heard that the colleges have been tightening up who they allow into the nursing programs, since the number of applicants has blown up in recent years.

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the biggest stumbling block to going to school to become an RN is the lack of seats at schools. At least around here.

Yeah it can be tough, I would look at a "competitive program" where the school looks at your overall GPA, and not just who signed up first to get into the Nursing program. I signed up at 3 schools and went with the "competitive program", some schools have a waiting list that is 1 or 2 years long. GL
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Oh, and by the way I didn't think that I would be able to stand being around sick people, blood, vomit etc., but there is so many jobs in the nursing field that some RN's don't even do patient care.

Just estimating, what % of nursing jobs do you think would fall into this category and are they significantly more difficult to obtain than the traditional nursing gig?
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Oh, and by the way I didn't think that I would be able to stand being around sick people, blood, vomit etc., but there is so many jobs in the nursing field that some RN's don't even do patient care.

Just estimating, what % of nursing jobs do you think would fall into this category and are they significantly more difficult to obtain than the traditional nursing gig?
I would think around 5 to 10 percent of nursing jobs fall into the category of non patient care jobs. Usually something like risk management, employee health, research, education, and management. These jobs are not really hard to get they just require higher degrees BSN, MSN, etc
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Wait... so you didn't get laid off? You're just pimping your field?

The thread title confused me.

I was :kicksrock: and then I read through. Hey, nothing wrong with pimping your field.
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And as far as the other occupation listed by the OP (Semi Drivers) go, I can tell you that there is always a high demand for them. Whether the economy is up or down, if you are a qualified driver with a good driving record, you can always find employment. And if you decide to be an owner/operator, a semi driver is one of the few professions where you can make 6 digits within a few years and with minimal investment of time and education.

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Yup, can't go wrong with the nursing gig. I graduated in May with my Associates in Nursing (aka 2 year RN). I immediately had a job at the hospital I did my clinical work in. I currently work on an Oncology Unit. I'm not rich. I'll never be rich. But I make enough money to support my family and live a decent middle-class, small-city existence.

There's a big shortage of nurses, and a whole lot of sick people. That means job security. I'd recommend it to anyone.

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Wait... so you didn't get laid off? You're just pimping your field?

The thread title confused me.

I was :thumbup: and then I read through. Hey, nothing wrong with pimping your field.
Especially if pimping is your field.
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Getting a job as a traveling RN seems like the perfect job as a single guy - housing paid, great pay and lots of new nurses in every city.

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I've kicked around looking into nursing for a year or so. How would one go about finding one of those hospitals that pays for school?

Talk with the Nursing Department at the college you are going to attend. They usually know which hospitals work best with students, and which hospital is offerfing scholarships.
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Also, I forgot to tell you guys/girls that there are usually bonuses offered at most hospitals just for signing a contract.

I got 7,500 dollars at my last job to stay for 1 year.

I thought what the hell, I gotta work somewhere, I might as well stick it out hear for a year and pick up some extra change.

A lot of the "private" hospitals give out bonuses several times a year (we do it quarterly), so if the hospital does well, everyone gets a nice bonus. Usually the bonus is around 1 months pay, but if you add that in 4 times a year to your salary that is some nice folding money.

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Before I moved from Alabama back to Ohio this summer I was back in school taking my nursing pre-reqs. I am now looking at Univ. of Cincinnati's accelerated Masters in Nursing program for a lot of the reason's you mentioned. There are a couple schools around here that have the accelerated programs so I just have to figure out which one I want to do. I have a Master's degree in I/O Psychology and I just really didn't like the field and don't like that jobs are far & few between. If you already have a BA/BS or MA/MS Degree...you can get your BSN or MSN in about the same time (not counting your pre-reqs) it would take to earn an Associates to become and RN as more & more schools are geared towards people switching careers.

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Before I moved from Alabama back to Ohio this summer I was back in school taking my nursing pre-reqs. I am now looking at Univ. of Cincinnati's accelerated Masters in Nursing program for a lot of the reason's you mentioned. There are a couple schools around here that have the accelerated programs so I just have to figure out which one I want to do. I have a Master's degree in I/O Psychology and I just really didn't like the field and don't like that jobs are far & few between. If you already have a BA/BS or MA/MS Degree...you can get your BSN or MSN in about the same time (not counting your pre-reqs) it would take to earn an Associates to become and RN as more & more schools are geared towards people switching careers.

:goodposting: Although, some schools will want you to retake certain courses over if you have taken them outside a 3 year window, (A&P, Microbiology, etc) but these are probably more to benefit the college's coffers than to help the student.
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Before I moved from Alabama back to Ohio this summer I was back in school taking my nursing pre-reqs. I am now looking at Univ. of Cincinnati's accelerated Masters in Nursing program for a lot of the reason's you mentioned. There are a couple schools around here that have the accelerated programs so I just have to figure out which one I want to do. I have a Master's degree in I/O Psychology and I just really didn't like the field and don't like that jobs are far & few between. If you already have a BA/BS or MA/MS Degree...you can get your BSN or MSN in about the same time (not counting your pre-reqs) it would take to earn an Associates to become and RN as more & more schools are geared towards people switching careers.

:cry: Although, some schools will want you to retake certain courses over if you have taken them outside a 3 year window, (A&P, Microbiology, etc) but these are probably more to benefit the college's coffers than to help the student.
Yeah and don't forget if you want to do the MSN programs, if your GRE is over 5 years old (mine was 5 yrs last month) you have to retake it. Some programs waive the GRE records if you already have a grad degree though which is nice. I noticed that UC had "suggested" pre-reqs that aren't required but want you to take. Some programs will let you test out of some courses, take some online, and will allow you to take them from a community college (much cheaper!) and transfer the credit in which helps with flexibility of older students.
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I would love to do something like this but time and money are not in my favor... especially money right now. For a community college type curriculum... how much would that be in total barring any class retakes?

I have current school loans and every month bills like everyone so I don't know how much I could get deferred and whatever else.

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I would love to do something like this but time and money are not in my favor... especially money right now. For a community college type curriculum... how much would that be in total barring any class retakes?I have current school loans and every month bills like everyone so I don't know how much I could get deferred and whatever else.

Every program is different as far as cost goes. You could probably get more student loans if you absolutely had to and any existing student loans that you have should go into in school deferrment until 6 months after you finish. There are also scholarships and hospitals that will pay for your education if you agree to work X amount of time there after you finish your program. The best thing to do is just start looking around at programs in your area and see what's available.
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The other cool thing is that you can be an RN in just 2 years with an associates (although the bachelors is definitely better).

I've always thought working 3 twelve hour shifts a week would be cool too. I'd prefer that over 5 day, 40 hour weeks.

I'm still in accounting and actually took the pre RN test (forgot the name of it) and did pretty well but I had a hard time find classes that were at night. Decided to stay in accounting at the end.

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Before you guys do set out to be nurses make sure you have the right temperament and not in it just for money. As a nurse you will spend more time with patients than any other medical position so you see the best and worst of everyone.

To be a nurse you have to be comfortable dealing with all different types of people and often when they are at the worst point in their lives or a very vulnerable state. People react differently when faced with these adversities or in the hospital where they are at the mercy of the medical staff. You or the patient may or may not know it, but as a nurse you have a ton of power and influence so you need to be sure to handle it with responsibility.

As for the job description it's VERY similar to waiting/serving tables at a restaurant as far as general skill set in addition to the nursing related knowledge and skills you would learn in nursing school.

You need to be able to be comfortable dealing with all types of people, have good time management, the ability to multi-task, and problem solve. If you have these skills and a sensitivity and awareness of others you will fit perfectly in nursing, IMO.

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Before you guys do set out to be nurses make sure you have the right temperament and not in it just for money. As a nurse you will spend more time with patients than any other medical position so you see the best and worst of everyone.

To be a nurse you have to be comfortable dealing with all different types of people and often when they are at the worst point in their lives or a very vulnerable state. People react differently when faced with these adversities or in the hospital where they are at the mercy of the medical staff. You or the patient may or may not know it, but as a nurse you have a ton of power and influence so you need to be sure to handle it with responsibility.

As for the job description it's VERY similar to waiting/serving tables at a restaurant as far as general skill set in addition to the nursing related knowledge and skills you would learn in nursing school.

You need to be able to be comfortable dealing with all types of people, have good time management, the ability to multi-task, and problem solve. If you have these skills and a sensitivity and awareness of others you will fit perfectly in nursing, IMO.

I think that if you are in a job as a RN and you feel as if you are waiter maybe it is time to try a different field of nursing. Most men for whatever reason seem to migrate towards ER, Surgery, ICU where your skill set is more of a 1 on 1 patient ratio.

I guess if you let yourself get put into a job on a nursing floor where you could end up with several patients it could feel like waiting tables?

But there are so many types of nursing fields that one could work for 20 years and not do all of them.

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Before you guys do set out to be nurses make sure you have the right temperament and not in it just for money. As a nurse you will spend more time with patients than any other medical position so you see the best and worst of everyone.

To be a nurse you have to be comfortable dealing with all different types of people and often when they are at the worst point in their lives or a very vulnerable state. People react differently when faced with these adversities or in the hospital where they are at the mercy of the medical staff. You or the patient may or may not know it, but as a nurse you have a ton of power and influence so you need to be sure to handle it with responsibility.

As for the job description it's VERY similar to waiting/serving tables at a restaurant as far as general skill set in addition to the nursing related knowledge and skills you would learn in nursing school.

You need to be able to be comfortable dealing with all types of people, have good time management, the ability to multi-task, and problem solve. If you have these skills and a sensitivity and awareness of others you will fit perfectly in nursing, IMO.

I think that if you are in a job as a RN and you feel as if you are waiter maybe it is time to try a different field of nursing. Most men for whatever reason seem to migrate towards ER, Surgery, ICU where your skill set is more of a 1 on 1 patient ratio.

I guess if you let yourself get put into a job on a nursing floor where you could end up with several patients it could feel like waiting tables?

But there are so many types of nursing fields that one could work for 20 years and not do all of them.

I'm still in nursing school and most of my experience is in general med-surg, peds, and L&D but I didn't mean to imply that it ever felt like waiting tables just that you need a lot of the same skills.... ability to connect/deal with people, time management, multi-tasking, and problem solving.

Even when you're in ICU and have 1 to 1 ratio you need to manage all the different IV lines and fluids, medications, general care, pain management, and whatever life decides to throw at you for the day.

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Before you guys do set out to be nurses make sure you have the right temperament and not in it just for money. As a nurse you will spend more time with patients than any other medical position so you see the best and worst of everyone.

To be a nurse you have to be comfortable dealing with all different types of people and often when they are at the worst point in their lives or a very vulnerable state. People react differently when faced with these adversities or in the hospital where they are at the mercy of the medical staff. You or the patient may or may not know it, but as a nurse you have a ton of power and influence so you need to be sure to handle it with responsibility.

As for the job description it's VERY similar to waiting/serving tables at a restaurant as far as general skill set in addition to the nursing related knowledge and skills you would learn in nursing school.

You need to be able to be comfortable dealing with all types of people, have good time management, the ability to multi-task, and problem solve. If you have these skills and a sensitivity and awareness of others you will fit perfectly in nursing, IMO.

I think that if you are in a job as a RN and you feel as if you are waiter maybe it is time to try a different field of nursing. Most men for whatever reason seem to migrate towards ER, Surgery, ICU where your skill set is more of a 1 on 1 patient ratio.

I guess if you let yourself get put into a job on a nursing floor where you could end up with several patients it could feel like waiting tables?

But there are so many types of nursing fields that one could work for 20 years and not do all of them.

I'm still in nursing school and most of my experience is in general med-surg, peds, and L&D but I didn't mean to imply that it ever felt like waiting tables just that you need a lot of the same skills.... ability to connect/deal with people, time management, multi-tasking, and problem solving.
No problem, but you haven't even scratched the surface yet. Wait until you get to do ICU clinicals and you will see the difference. I worked in surgery for 5 years doing open heart, but the call was kicking my butt. GL to school and if you need any help don't hesistate to ask. Oh, have you had a hospital sign you up yet for an extern program or received any scholarships? If not you should really check into them, and once you graduate if you have any military time you can use that if you go to work for a government hospital (VA, Indian Hospital etc).
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I work in the healthcare software business and am in hospitals every day. Couldn't agree more with the OP, this is a great field for those laid off or in industries with uncertain futures to go into. Huge shortage, and pay is increasing. I would also think that nurses get a great deal of satisfaction from what they do. I know we have had 2 daughters undergo some pretty serious procedures, and couldn't be more thankful for the care the nurses provided. Overall patient experience is probably tied more to nursing staff than doctors.

There are some caveats. It is not an easy job, and patient/nursing staffing ratios make multi-tasking critical. Still, great career.

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A little more detail please. Most of the programs I have looked at tonight are 4 year type programs. And, these are programs that are full time student learning. Am wondering what your experiences have been with school and if there are two year part time programs, two year full time programs, or what exactly. Thanks.

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A little more detail please. Most of the programs I have looked at tonight are 4 year type programs. And, these are programs that are full time student learning. Am wondering what your experiences have been with school and if there are two year part time programs, two year full time programs, or what exactly. Thanks.

My wife has been a nurse for about 5 years. She took a 3 year program. She already had her bachelors in Elementary Ed and Sociology. Her program was only 3 years, but there was a "fast track" program at another college as well. She loves it and there are so many opportunities at hospitals for career advancement.
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A little more detail please. Most of the programs I have looked at tonight are 4 year type programs. And, these are programs that are full time student learning. Am wondering what your experiences have been with school and if there are two year part time programs, two year full time programs, or what exactly. Thanks.

Community colleges offer 2 year AA RN courses and I believe they are considered full-time or a majority of classes are during the day.State Universities at least in CA are 2.5 - 3 year programs for a BSN in Nursing and at least at SJSU you never have a full 12 units, but you are usually hovering around 9-11 units at any given time. You also typically have 2 clinical days a week and those can be either AM or PM. Then you have vocational schools that can do LVN (a step below RN degree wise) and these are typically a year and also mostly full-time. Hospitals these days at least in northern CA are shying away from LVNs so typically most people go the LVN route to bypass the waiting to get into a RN program or if they have failed to get into a RN program then plan to do bridge into an RN program later.Nursing school is typically 2-3 years and if you haven't taken any science courses then you probably need another year or two to finish up the pre-reqs for Nursing.
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There are some caveats. It is not an easy job.

Some of the things nurses have to do make cleaning toilets sound like a day at the beach. One of the most disgusting stories I've ever heard came from a nursing student who was in a room with a 600 lbs woman patient who had been in bed for weeks and was starting to produce a nasty stench. The doctor literally said the words "find her ######" to this nursing student. Apparently the woman patient had a massive yeast infection that was causing the smell. The nursing student spoke of having to use her elbows to hold up rolls of fat as she used her hands to continue the search.
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My wife did the CA State University program and I think it took 3 years. It's a set program, meaning you can't load up each semester to get done faster.

Also, it is definitely difficult to get into the program (at least up here in NorCal). The last I heard, they were using a lottery system to determine who got into the program. They would literally give the applicants a number and draw for who got in. My understanding is that there aren't enough teachers to teach these nursing courses.

If I had the chance to go back to college and do it all over again, I'd have gone the Gaylord Fokker route for sure.

It will definitely be cheaper if you start off at a community college and then transfer to a university.

Good luck everyone.

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If I had the chance to go back to college and do it all over again, I'd have gone the Gaylord Fokker route for sure.

It's funny how, in a bad economy, being a male nurse isn't looked down upon as much.
Never really thought the nursing profession was looked down upon.
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Border Patrol. Pay sucks, but you get to supplement your earnings by taking bribes from the druggies and coyotes.

Game Warden. Pay sucks, but you get all the free venison and fresh trout you can eat.

School teacher. Pay sucks, but you...get to teach ungrateful children of ungrateful parents.

Landscaper. Pay sucks, but you get to learn a second language and there isn't alot of stress.

Security guard. Pay sucks, but you get to wear that tight uniform which helps get all the hot chicks.

Lifeguard. Pay sucks, but is sitting in the sun at the beach really a job?

This is kinda fun. So, why am I doing something that I loathe? Oh yeah, it pays well. That really sucks.

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If I had the chance to go back to college and do it all over again, I'd have gone the Gaylord Fokker route for sure.

It's funny how, in a bad economy, being a male nurse isn't looked down upon as much.
Sexist much?
I have nipples greg, can you milk me?
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Not an RN, but I work in a Nursing Admin office and do projections of census and staffing needs and the OP is 100% right that demand is going up along with pay. Good pay, good working conditions, good benefits, 3 day work week and job security as long as you aren't a complete moron.

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