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President Obama Addresses Muslim World in Cairo


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I was surprised to see that there wasn't a thread started on Obama's address to the Muslim world in Cairo. I haven't watched the speech or read the transcript yet, but it seems like it was a pretty monumental speech. I'd be interested in hearing reactions from around here.

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Is this the speech where he talks about US being one of the biggest "Muslim" nations, reads a quote from the Quran and defends the Palistinians and NOT Isreal. Basically turning our back on Isreal?

Yeah, great speech Obama :thumbup:

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Is this the speech where he talks about US being one of the biggest "Muslim" nations, reads a quote from the Quran and defends the Palistinians and NOT Isreal. Basically turning our back on Isreal?

Yeah, great speech Obama ;)

Did you miss the entire part where he spoke about Israel:

America's strong bonds with Israel are well known. This bond is unbreakable. It is based upon cultural and historical ties, and the recognition that the aspiration for a Jewish homeland is rooted in a tragic history that cannot be denied....Around the world, the Jewish people were persecuted for centuries, and anti-Semitism in Europe culminated in an unprecedented Holocaust. Tomorrow, I will visit Buchenwald, which was part of a network of camps where Jews were enslaved, tortured, shot and gassed to death by the Third Reich. Six million Jews were killed - more than the entire Jewish population of Israel today. Denying that fact is baseless, ignorant, and hateful. Threatening Israel with destruction - or repeating vile stereotypes about Jews - is deeply wrong, and only serves to evoke in the minds of Israelis this most painful of memories while preventing the peace that the people of this region deserve.....Hamas does have support among some Palestinians, but they also have responsibilities. To play a role in fulfilling Palestinian aspirations, and to unify the Palestinian people, Hamas must put an end to violence, recognize past agreements, and recognize Israel's right to exist.

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Is this the speech where he talks about US being one of the biggest "Muslim" nations, reads a quote from the Quran and defends the Palistinians and NOT Isreal. Basically turning our back on Isreal?

Yeah, great speech Obama :unsure:

Did you miss the entire part where he spoke about Israel:

America's strong bonds with Israel are well known. This bond is unbreakable. It is based upon cultural and historical ties, and the recognition that the aspiration for a Jewish homeland is rooted in a tragic history that cannot be denied....Around the world, the Jewish people were persecuted for centuries, and anti-Semitism in Europe culminated in an unprecedented Holocaust. Tomorrow, I will visit Buchenwald, which was part of a network of camps where Jews were enslaved, tortured, shot and gassed to death by the Third Reich. Six million Jews were killed - more than the entire Jewish population of Israel today. Denying that fact is baseless, ignorant, and hateful. Threatening Israel with destruction - or repeating vile stereotypes about Jews - is deeply wrong, and only serves to evoke in the minds of Israelis this most painful of memories while preventing the peace that the people of this region deserve.....Hamas does have support among some Palestinians, but they also have responsibilities. To play a role in fulfilling Palestinian aspirations, and to unify the Palestinian people, Hamas must put an end to violence, recognize past agreements, and recognize Israel's right to exist.

You have an issue with Israel surviving?
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Any changes to policy, or is this just another butt kissing speech?

He's gonna come back with chapped lips lol
This line of thiking is so tired and used up. But if that's what get's you going......
I call it like i see it, it is what it is, blouses :bag:
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Any changes to policy, or is this just another butt kissing speech?

He's gonna come back with chapped lips lol
This line of thiking is so tired and used up. But if that's what get's you going......
So we aren't changing a thing, we are just going to be friendlier.. :goodposting: Meet the new boss...
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Any changes to policy, or is this just another butt kissing speech?

He's gonna come back with chapped lips lol
This line of thiking is so tired and used up. But if that's what get's you going......
So we aren't changing a thing, we are just going to be friendlier.. :goodposting: Meet the new boss...
I picture you with velcro straps on your sneakers.
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Any changes to policy, or is this just another butt kissing speech?

He's gonna come back with chapped lips lol
This line of thiking is so tired and used up. But if that's what get's you going......
So we aren't changing a thing, we are just going to be friendlier.. :lmao: Meet the new boss...
I picture you with velcro straps on your sneakers.
well, when you can't refute a point go after the messenger!! :) Don't forget to "be friendly to a Muslim" today! :lmao:
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After reading the transcript, I think it was a spectacular speech. Of course, the true merits of the speech will be determined by how the speech is received in the Muslim world and how America proceeds here on out, but hopefully it sends a message to the Muslim community.

The bottom line about the "War on Terror" is that it is a conflict that can never be won on the battlefield. No amount of troops or military attacks or law enforcement can ever defeat terrorism. Ultimately, the struggle against terrorism is a battle for the hearts and minds of the people. One of my biggest fears about the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan is that the violence, destruction, and imperialistic nature of the wars would serve to push young Muslims into the extremist camps and popularize the objectives of the Al-Qaeda camp of thinking. When you lose the hearts of minds of a generation because they have watched their own families be killed and be controlled by a foreign occupying country, you create the groundwork for generations of terror recruits. I hope that America can win over the minds of those Muslim centrists and the next generation of Muslim youths because that is the only way that we can effectively lessen the threat of terrorism over the long-term. We have no chance of minimalizing terrorism in the world without the support of the majority of the moderate Muslim community. I hope that Obama's speech can help lead us in that direction. Although he didn't really propose any significant policy changes, I hope that he conveyed a different picture of America to the Muslim world than what has been painted over the last few years and longer.

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After reading the transcript, I think it was a spectacular speech. Of course, the true merits of the speech will be determined by how the speech is received in the Muslim world and how America proceeds here on out, but hopefully it sends a message to the Muslim community.

The bottom line about the "War on Terror" is that it is a conflict that can never be won on the battlefield. No amount of troops or military attacks or law enforcement can ever defeat terrorism. Ultimately, the struggle against terrorism is a battle for the hearts and minds of the people. One of my biggest fears about the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan is that the violence, destruction, and imperialistic nature of the wars would serve to push young Muslims into the extremist camps and popularize the objectives of the Al-Qaeda camp of thinking. When you lose the hearts of minds of a generation because they have watched their own families be killed and be controlled by a foreign occupying country, you create the groundwork for generations of terror recruits. I hope that America can win over the minds of those Muslim centrists and the next generation of Muslim youths because that is the only way that we can effectively lessen the threat of terrorism over the long-term. We have no chance of minimalizing terrorism in the world without the support of the majority of the moderate Muslim community. I hope that Obama's speech can help lead us in that direction. Although he didn't really propose any significant policy changes, I hope that he conveyed a different picture of America to the Muslim world than what has been painted over the last few years and longer.

I have been saying this since 9/11/01. There is no way of fighting this conventionally as Cheney and Bush tried to do. No amount of "freedom" we give the middle east will change the way they feel towards the west. Its the way they have been taught for generations. We need a new approach.
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After reading the transcript, I think it was a spectacular speech. Of course, the true merits of the speech will be determined by how the speech is received in the Muslim world and how America proceeds here on out, but hopefully it sends a message to the Muslim community.

The bottom line about the "War on Terror" is that it is a conflict that can never be won on the battlefield. No amount of troops or military attacks or law enforcement can ever defeat terrorism. Ultimately, the struggle against terrorism is a battle for the hearts and minds of the people. One of my biggest fears about the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan is that the violence, destruction, and imperialistic nature of the wars would serve to push young Muslims into the extremist camps and popularize the objectives of the Al-Qaeda camp of thinking. When you lose the hearts of minds of a generation because they have watched their own families be killed and be controlled by a foreign occupying country, you create the groundwork for generations of terror recruits. I hope that America can win over the minds of those Muslim centrists and the next generation of Muslim youths because that is the only way that we can effectively lessen the threat of terrorism over the long-term. We have no chance of minimalizing terrorism in the world without the support of the majority of the moderate Muslim community. I hope that Obama's speech can help lead us in that direction. Although he didn't really propose any significant policy changes, I hope that he conveyed a different picture of America to the Muslim world than what has been painted over the last few years and longer.

I have been saying this since 9/11/01. There is no way of fighting this conventionally as Cheney and Bush tried to do. No amount of "freedom" we give the middle east will change the way they feel towards the west. Its the way they have been taught for generations. We need a new approach.
Like undoing the brainwashing they receive from infancy? I do not see anything working.
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After reading the transcript, I think it was a spectacular speech. Of course, the true merits of the speech will be determined by how the speech is received in the Muslim world and how America proceeds here on out, but hopefully it sends a message to the Muslim community.

The bottom line about the "War on Terror" is that it is a conflict that can never be won on the battlefield. No amount of troops or military attacks or law enforcement can ever defeat terrorism. Ultimately, the struggle against terrorism is a battle for the hearts and minds of the people. One of my biggest fears about the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan is that the violence, destruction, and imperialistic nature of the wars would serve to push young Muslims into the extremist camps and popularize the objectives of the Al-Qaeda camp of thinking. When you lose the hearts of minds of a generation because they have watched their own families be killed and be controlled by a foreign occupying country, you create the groundwork for generations of terror recruits. I hope that America can win over the minds of those Muslim centrists and the next generation of Muslim youths because that is the only way that we can effectively lessen the threat of terrorism over the long-term. We have no chance of minimalizing terrorism in the world without the support of the majority of the moderate Muslim community. I hope that Obama's speech can help lead us in that direction. Although he didn't really propose any significant policy changes, I hope that he conveyed a different picture of America to the Muslim world than what has been painted over the last few years and longer.

I have been saying this since 9/11/01. There is no way of fighting this conventionally as Cheney and Bush tried to do. No amount of "freedom" we give the middle east will change the way they feel towards the west. Its the way they have been taught for generations. We need a new approach.
Like undoing the brainwashing they receive from infancy? I do not see anything working.
I really have no idea what would work, but I know what doesnt. Invading and destroying countries in the Middle East.
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After reading the transcript, I think it was a spectacular speech. Of course, the true merits of the speech will be determined by how the speech is received in the Muslim world and how America proceeds here on out, but hopefully it sends a message to the Muslim community.

The bottom line about the "War on Terror" is that it is a conflict that can never be won on the battlefield. No amount of troops or military attacks or law enforcement can ever defeat terrorism. Ultimately, the struggle against terrorism is a battle for the hearts and minds of the people. One of my biggest fears about the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan is that the violence, destruction, and imperialistic nature of the wars would serve to push young Muslims into the extremist camps and popularize the objectives of the Al-Qaeda camp of thinking. When you lose the hearts of minds of a generation because they have watched their own families be killed and be controlled by a foreign occupying country, you create the groundwork for generations of terror recruits. I hope that America can win over the minds of those Muslim centrists and the next generation of Muslim youths because that is the only way that we can effectively lessen the threat of terrorism over the long-term. We have no chance of minimalizing terrorism in the world without the support of the majority of the moderate Muslim community. I hope that Obama's speech can help lead us in that direction. Although he didn't really propose any significant policy changes, I hope that he conveyed a different picture of America to the Muslim world than what has been painted over the last few years and longer.

I have been saying this since 9/11/01. There is no way of fighting this conventionally as Cheney and Bush tried to do. No amount of "freedom" we give the middle east will change the way they feel towards the west. Its the way they have been taught for generations. We need a new approach.
Like undoing the brainwashing they receive from infancy? I do not see anything working.
Don't we receive the same brainwashing?
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Don't lecture us: Arabs tell Obama

CAIRO (AFP) — "Obama is just a prettier face. I'm sure his intentions are in the right place but I don't expect much from the man," a Cairo electrician said on Wednesday as US President Barack Obama began his much-anticipated Middle East trip.

Newspapers, analysts and ordinary Arabs warned Obama -- whose election was hailed across the region -- against emulating the policies of Bush by lecturing Muslims on democracy, and also urged him to be tough with Israel.

Obama began his tour in Saudi Arabia and will deliver a speech in Cairo on Thursday to the world's 1.5 billion Muslims, after eight years of fraught ties under his predecessor George W. Bush.

"Don't be biased towards Israel, don't interfere in countries' internal affairs and don't give lessons in democracy," said an editorial in Egypt's state-owned Rose El-Youssef newspaper.

The chief editor of Egypt's state-owned Al-Ahram, Ossama Saraya, said Obama faced demands from his team to "put pressure on the Muslim world under the pretext of democratisation and respect for human rights.

"There's nothing more absurd than putting more pressure on the Arab-Muslim world," Saraya said.

Washington's key Arab allies Egypt and Saudi Arabia have repeatedly come under criticism from international rights organisations for their poor human rights records.

"He can't help the Palestinians because of the closeness of ties between Israel and America. He can't improve the situation here (Egypt) because he'll never convince the regime to change," said taxi drive Mohammed Abdullah."

Hamas, the Islamist rulers of the Gaza Strip boycotted by the West as a terrorist group, urged Obama to put "real pressure" on Israel.

"We will judge this visit on the basis of what he will say and concrete measures that he will take," spokesman Fawzi Barhum said.

In Amman, the Jordan Times hoped that Obama -- whose electoral promise of change has grabbed hearts in the troubled Middle East -- should deliver on his pledge.

"If Obama fails in his mission of peace, the parties, and the world, might just as well prepare for more suffering and turmoil."

In Lebanon, where Sunday's parliamentary election will be monitored closely by Washington as it pits a Western-backed majority against a Hezbollah-led alliance backed by Syria and Iran, reactions were divided.

"The Americans are testing the waters," said travel agent Moufeed Shbeir. "Obama is trying to take a different route than Bush, but we'll have to wait and see the results: are they going to bomb Iran?"

In non-Arab Iran, the head of North American Studies at Tehran University said Obama should have gone to the largest Muslim nation in the world -- Indonesia -- to address Muslims.

"I personally think Obama has made a mistake by choosing Saudi Arabia and Egypt. I don't think this is going to go down well in the Muslim and Arab world," Sayed Mohammad Marandi told AFP.

"Symbolically speaking, he could have gone somewhere like Indonesia," he said.

Saudi Arabia's Al-Riyadh newspaper warned Muslims against having high expectations. "The Islamic world should not think that Obama is coming to be an ally or a supporter," an editorial said.

United Arab Emirates Vice President Mohammed bin Rashid al-Maktoum warned Obama that the worsening economic situation would strengthen extremism in the Islamic world.

"Those young men, who are increasingly bored (due to growing unemployment), will be easy prey for those promoting extremism and hostility, mainly against the United States," he wrote in Al-Khaleej.

Beirut-based analyst Paul Salem, who heads the Carnegie Middle East Centre, said he expected Arabs to be disappointed by Obama's speech.

"What they want him to say is more than what he's going to say," he said.

"They want him to say that he's going to come down hard on the Israelis, that he's going to confront the settlement policy and that he's going to push the Israelis to withdraw from the West Bank.

"Of course that is what every Arab would like to hear."

On the streets of Cairo, which were getting a facelift ahead of Obama's speech, citizens were more concerned about traffic jams than regional diplomacy on Wednesday.

"What's he going to do for us? Lower the price of bread? If he does, then he's welcome here," said 38-year-old cafe worker Ahmed Abdel Salam.

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After reading the transcript, I think it was a spectacular speech. Of course, the true merits of the speech will be determined by how the speech is received in the Muslim world and how America proceeds here on out, but hopefully it sends a message to the Muslim community.

The bottom line about the "War on Terror" is that it is a conflict that can never be won on the battlefield. No amount of troops or military attacks or law enforcement can ever defeat terrorism. Ultimately, the struggle against terrorism is a battle for the hearts and minds of the people. One of my biggest fears about the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan is that the violence, destruction, and imperialistic nature of the wars would serve to push young Muslims into the extremist camps and popularize the objectives of the Al-Qaeda camp of thinking. When you lose the hearts of minds of a generation because they have watched their own families be killed and be controlled by a foreign occupying country, you create the groundwork for generations of terror recruits. I hope that America can win over the minds of those Muslim centrists and the next generation of Muslim youths because that is the only way that we can effectively lessen the threat of terrorism over the long-term. We have no chance of minimalizing terrorism in the world without the support of the majority of the moderate Muslim community. I hope that Obama's speech can help lead us in that direction. Although he didn't really propose any significant policy changes, I hope that he conveyed a different picture of America to the Muslim world than what has been painted over the last few years and longer.

I have been saying this since 9/11/01. There is no way of fighting this conventionally as Cheney and Bush tried to do. No amount of "freedom" we give the middle east will change the way they feel towards the west. Its the way they have been taught for generations. We need a new approach.
Like undoing the brainwashing they receive from infancy? I do not see anything working.
I really have no idea what would work, but I know what doesnt. Invading and destroying countries in the Middle East.
I think Obama did a good job of underlying what would work. The United States and other Western countries need to attempt to forge more beneficial cooperative relationships with Muslim countries as partners rather than as imperial or occupying force against in Muslim country. I think Obama's line about the historical relationship between the Western world and Muslim was very telling on this issue and underlies a major source of Muslim discontent towards Western nations:

The relationship between Islam and the West includes centuries of coexistence and co-operation, but also conflict and religious wars. More recently, tension has been fed by colonialism that denied rights and opportunities to many Muslims, and a Cold War in which Muslim-majority countries were too often treated as proxies without regard to their own aspirations.

While studying abroad at the University of St. Andrews, I took a class with world-renowned terrorist expert, Dr. Magnus Randstorp, who testified before the 9/11 Commission and who is one of the founders of St. Andrew's Centre for Terrorism and Poltical Violence. He was incredibly interesting, and one of the interesting things that I remember taking away from his class was a point he made on this issue. He said that often terrorists are viewed as these crazy mass murderers who just want to kill and destroy things because they are religious extremist crazy people, but in reality, almost all terrorist groups have very specific political agendas that aren't based on irrational religious beliefs but rather on logical political desires. Osama Bin Ladin began organizing Al-Qaeda because he objected to the large military bases that the U.S. had implemented in Saudi Arabia to establish their hard power, and arguably their imperialistic presence, in the Middle East. The United States' history in the Middle East has been marked by almost unwavering support for the state of Israel which has further marginalized Muslim communities. The Middle East has long been exploited by Western nations acting in an imperialistic fashion or who invested money only to fight proxy wars against communism during the Cold War. I can assure you that Al-Qaeda did not attack the United States because they "hate our freedoms." What Obama was calling for was a change to that dynamic, one in which the West and the Middle East engage in partnership towards achieving goals, one in which the West invests in the Middle East to foster international trade and innovation rather than to advance state political self-interests, one in which the U.S. does not advance their ideals solely through military hard power, and one in which the U.S. can attempt to act as an unbiased broker between Israeli and Palestinian relations. It is the overcoming the history of the relationship between the West and the Middle East that will advance and forging a stronger partnership that will advance our efforts against terrorism, not occupying Middle Eastern countries so we can root out and kill every terrorist we can find. That simply creates the breeding ground for political resentment and terrorist recruitment which will plague us for generations and propogate the anti-American brain-washing in the future. I think Obama's speech really caught the sense of this, and I hope that we can move in that direction for the sake of our struggle against international terrorism.
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The point I see some folks upset about:

Around the world, the Jewish people were persecuted for centuries, and anti-Semitism in Europe culminated in an unprecedented Holocaust. Tomorrow, I will visit Buchenwald, which was part of a network of camps where Jews were enslaved, tortured, shot and gassed to death by the Third Reich. Six million Jews were killed - more than the entire Jewish population of Israel today. Denying that fact is baseless, ignorant, and hateful. Threatening Israel with destruction - or repeating vile stereotypes about Jews - is deeply wrong, and only serves to evoke in the minds of Israelis this most painful of memories while preventing the peace that the people of this region deserve.

On the other hand, it is also undeniable that the Palestinian people - Muslims and Christians - have suffered in pursuit of a homeland. For more than sixty years they have endured the pain of dislocation. Many wait in refugee camps in the West Bank, Gaza, and neighboring lands for a life of peace and security that they have never been able to lead. They endure the daily humiliations - large and small - that come with occupation. So let there be no doubt: the situation for the Palestinian people is intolerable. America will not turn our backs on the legitimate Palestinian aspiration for dignity, opportunity, and a state of their own.

Maybe it was just not a good choice of words but it seems that "on the other hand" puts the Holocaust and what's happening in Palestine on relatively equal footing. I'm not saying that. I'm saying that's what I hear people saying.

J

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After reading the transcript, I think it was a spectacular speech. Of course, the true merits of the speech will be determined by how the speech is received in the Muslim world and how America proceeds here on out, but hopefully it sends a message to the Muslim community.

The bottom line about the "War on Terror" is that it is a conflict that can never be won on the battlefield. No amount of troops or military attacks or law enforcement can ever defeat terrorism. Ultimately, the struggle against terrorism is a battle for the hearts and minds of the people. One of my biggest fears about the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan is that the violence, destruction, and imperialistic nature of the wars would serve to push young Muslims into the extremist camps and popularize the objectives of the Al-Qaeda camp of thinking. When you lose the hearts of minds of a generation because they have watched their own families be killed and be controlled by a foreign occupying country, you create the groundwork for generations of terror recruits. I hope that America can win over the minds of those Muslim centrists and the next generation of Muslim youths because that is the only way that we can effectively lessen the threat of terrorism over the long-term. We have no chance of minimalizing terrorism in the world without the support of the majority of the moderate Muslim community. I hope that Obama's speech can help lead us in that direction. Although he didn't really propose any significant policy changes, I hope that he conveyed a different picture of America to the Muslim world than what has been painted over the last few years and longer.

I have been saying this since 9/11/01. There is no way of fighting this conventionally as Cheney and Bush tried to do. No amount of "freedom" we give the middle east will change the way they feel towards the west. Its the way they have been taught for generations. We need a new approach.
Interesting to note the words "terror" and "terrorism" where no where to be found in this speech. Small change in rhetoric but decoupling Muslim from terrorism and not using belligerent terms like War on Terror is a good step IMO.
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After reading the transcript, I think it was a spectacular speech. Of course, the true merits of the speech will be determined by how the speech is received in the Muslim world and how America proceeds here on out, but hopefully it sends a message to the Muslim community.

The bottom line about the "War on Terror" is that it is a conflict that can never be won on the battlefield. No amount of troops or military attacks or law enforcement can ever defeat terrorism. Ultimately, the struggle against terrorism is a battle for the hearts and minds of the people. One of my biggest fears about the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan is that the violence, destruction, and imperialistic nature of the wars would serve to push young Muslims into the extremist camps and popularize the objectives of the Al-Qaeda camp of thinking. When you lose the hearts of minds of a generation because they have watched their own families be killed and be controlled by a foreign occupying country, you create the groundwork for generations of terror recruits. I hope that America can win over the minds of those Muslim centrists and the next generation of Muslim youths because that is the only way that we can effectively lessen the threat of terrorism over the long-term. We have no chance of minimalizing terrorism in the world without the support of the majority of the moderate Muslim community. I hope that Obama's speech can help lead us in that direction. Although he didn't really propose any significant policy changes, I hope that he conveyed a different picture of America to the Muslim world than what has been painted over the last few years and longer.

I have been saying this since 9/11/01. There is no way of fighting this conventionally as Cheney and Bush tried to do. No amount of "freedom" we give the middle east will change the way they feel towards the west. Its the way they have been taught for generations. We need a new approach.
Interesting to note the words "terror" and "terrorism" where no where to be found in this speech. Small change in rhetoric but decoupling Muslim from terrorism and not using belligerent terms like War on Terror is a good step IMO.
Yeah, I certainly agree. It was definitely a conscious move by Obama to not use the word "terror" or "terrorism." The Obama administration has apparently already retired the use of the term "War on Terror." I was just using it to contrast the previous line of thinking with Obama's rhetoric.
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The point I see some folks upset about:

Around the world, the Jewish people were persecuted for centuries, and anti-Semitism in Europe culminated in an unprecedented Holocaust. Tomorrow, I will visit Buchenwald, which was part of a network of camps where Jews were enslaved, tortured, shot and gassed to death by the Third Reich. Six million Jews were killed - more than the entire Jewish population of Israel today. Denying that fact is baseless, ignorant, and hateful. Threatening Israel with destruction - or repeating vile stereotypes about Jews - is deeply wrong, and only serves to evoke in the minds of Israelis this most painful of memories while preventing the peace that the people of this region deserve.

On the other hand, it is also undeniable that the Palestinian people - Muslims and Christians - have suffered in pursuit of a homeland. For more than sixty years they have endured the pain of dislocation. Many wait in refugee camps in the West Bank, Gaza, and neighboring lands for a life of peace and security that they have never been able to lead. They endure the daily humiliations - large and small - that come with occupation. So let there be no doubt: the situation for the Palestinian people is intolerable. America will not turn our backs on the legitimate Palestinian aspiration for dignity, opportunity, and a state of their own.

Maybe it was just not a good choice of words but it seems that "on the other hand" puts the Holocaust and what's happening in Palestine on relatively equal footing. I'm not saying that. I'm saying that's what I hear people saying.

J

Yeah, I think that is a pretty big stretch of an interpretation. I don't think Obama's words imply that at all, nor was it intended to suggest that. I think he was just simply recognizing that both groups have suffered throughout history and thus was emphasizing the essential need for a peaceful co-existence rather than ongoing suffering on both sides.
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The point I see some folks upset about:

Around the world, the Jewish people were persecuted for centuries, and anti-Semitism in Europe culminated in an unprecedented Holocaust. Tomorrow, I will visit Buchenwald, which was part of a network of camps where Jews were enslaved, tortured, shot and gassed to death by the Third Reich. Six million Jews were killed - more than the entire Jewish population of Israel today. Denying that fact is baseless, ignorant, and hateful. Threatening Israel with destruction - or repeating vile stereotypes about Jews - is deeply wrong, and only serves to evoke in the minds of Israelis this most painful of memories while preventing the peace that the people of this region deserve.

On the other hand, it is also undeniable that the Palestinian people - Muslims and Christians - have suffered in pursuit of a homeland. For more than sixty years they have endured the pain of dislocation. Many wait in refugee camps in the West Bank, Gaza, and neighboring lands for a life of peace and security that they have never been able to lead. They endure the daily humiliations - large and small - that come with occupation. So let there be no doubt: the situation for the Palestinian people is intolerable. America will not turn our backs on the legitimate Palestinian aspiration for dignity, opportunity, and a state of their own.

Maybe it was just not a good choice of words but it seems that "on the other hand" puts the Holocaust and what's happening in Palestine on relatively equal footing. I'm not saying that. I'm saying that's what I hear people saying.

J

I read the bolded part as the language of mutual concilliation and not historical comparison, and Id hope that Israel sees it that way as well. In other words, lets not squabble over who has suffered more, rather lets work together so that neither side endures further suffering in the future.
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No surprise here, but I thought it was outstanding. The speech was centered on the idea of mutual interests in the peace process. He showed tremendous respect for Muslim culture and religion while holding a hard line and standing strongly behind Israel.

Thought it was fantastic. :rolleyes:

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I was surprised to see that there wasn't a thread started on Obama's address to the Muslim world in Cairo. I haven't watched the speech or read the transcript yet, but it seems like it was a pretty monumental speech. I'd be interested in hearing reactions from around here.

Transcript

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:popcorn:
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I don't see how any American citizen can say anything bad about the speech Obama gave. Hopefully it opens doors around the world instead of slamming them shut like in our recent past. Again, I do not see how anyone can say anything bad about the words and ideals Obama appears to be presenting.

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I don't see how any American citizen can say anything bad about the speech Obama gave. Hopefully it opens doors around the world instead of slamming them shut like in our recent past. Again, I do not see how anyone can say anything bad about the words and ideals Obama appears to be presenting.

:popcorn:
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I don't see how any American citizen can say anything bad about the speech Obama gave. Hopefully it opens doors around the world instead of slamming them shut like in our recent past. Again, I do not see how anyone can say anything bad about the words and ideals Obama appears to be presenting.

yes, it was a good speech. :shrug:
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I don't see how any American citizen can say anything bad about the speech Obama gave. Hopefully it opens doors around the world instead of slamming them shut like in our recent past. Again, I do not see how anyone can say anything bad about the words and ideals Obama appears to be presenting.

:sleep:
:shrug:
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I don't see how any American citizen can say anything bad about the speech Obama gave. Hopefully it opens doors around the world instead of slamming them shut like in our recent past. Again, I do not see how anyone can say anything bad about the words and ideals Obama appears to be presenting.

:sleep:
:shrug:
And, could you two give reasons as to why you do not favor the direction Obama is handling this situation, or are you going to hide behind the one-click-emoticon-replies?
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I don't see how any American citizen can say anything bad about the speech Obama gave. Hopefully it opens doors around the world instead of slamming them shut like in our recent past. Again, I do not see how anyone can say anything bad about the words and ideals Obama appears to be presenting.

I agree with that completely. One of the other reasons that I liked it is because the entire speech was so hard to disagree with not just by American citizens, but also by the Israeli and Muslim population. To the extent that I have read negative reactions from Muslim voices, it seems like most of them were not disagreeing with the content of the speech, but rather questioning Obama's ability and intent to carry through with the things he said. The content of the speech is incredibly hard to disagree with in a reasoned and logical way by a member of any nationality or religion.
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The point I see some folks upset about:

Around the world, the Jewish people were persecuted for centuries, and anti-Semitism in Europe culminated in an unprecedented Holocaust. Tomorrow, I will visit Buchenwald, which was part of a network of camps where Jews were enslaved, tortured, shot and gassed to death by the Third Reich. Six million Jews were killed - more than the entire Jewish population of Israel today. Denying that fact is baseless, ignorant, and hateful. Threatening Israel with destruction - or repeating vile stereotypes about Jews - is deeply wrong, and only serves to evoke in the minds of Israelis this most painful of memories while preventing the peace that the people of this region deserve.

On the other hand, it is also undeniable that the Palestinian people - Muslims and Christians - have suffered in pursuit of a homeland. For more than sixty years they have endured the pain of dislocation. Many wait in refugee camps in the West Bank, Gaza, and neighboring lands for a life of peace and security that they have never been able to lead. They endure the daily humiliations - large and small - that come with occupation. So let there be no doubt: the situation for the Palestinian people is intolerable. America will not turn our backs on the legitimate Palestinian aspiration for dignity, opportunity, and a state of their own.

Maybe it was just not a good choice of words but it seems that "on the other hand" puts the Holocaust and what's happening in Palestine on relatively equal footing. I'm not saying that. I'm saying that's what I hear people saying.

J

Rush was making this point earlier on his show, and I don't really see it that way, but he could have been more artful there.
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The speech is going to save lives. It's going to save lives because at least a few young Arab men are going to have more hope and more liking for the United States, and these emotions are going to produce one or two less terrorists. There is no higher praise I can give the speech, honestly.

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The point I see some folks upset about:

Around the world, the Jewish people were persecuted for centuries, and anti-Semitism in Europe culminated in an unprecedented Holocaust. Tomorrow, I will visit Buchenwald, which was part of a network of camps where Jews were enslaved, tortured, shot and gassed to death by the Third Reich. Six million Jews were killed - more than the entire Jewish population of Israel today. Denying that fact is baseless, ignorant, and hateful. Threatening Israel with destruction - or repeating vile stereotypes about Jews - is deeply wrong, and only serves to evoke in the minds of Israelis this most painful of memories while preventing the peace that the people of this region deserve.

On the other hand, it is also undeniable that the Palestinian people - Muslims and Christians - have suffered in pursuit of a homeland. For more than sixty years they have endured the pain of dislocation. Many wait in refugee camps in the West Bank, Gaza, and neighboring lands for a life of peace and security that they have never been able to lead. They endure the daily humiliations - large and small - that come with occupation. So let there be no doubt: the situation for the Palestinian people is intolerable. America will not turn our backs on the legitimate Palestinian aspiration for dignity, opportunity, and a state of their own.

Maybe it was just not a good choice of words but it seems that "on the other hand" puts the Holocaust and what's happening in Palestine on relatively equal footing. I'm not saying that. I'm saying that's what I hear people saying.

J

Rush was making this point earlier on his show, and I don't really see it that way, but he could have been more artful there.
Apparently, Rush is getting more and more desperate to find things to criticize. As I said above, it is hard to criticize the content of that speech in any reasoned or logical way. I think Rush's criticism unquestionably fails.
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