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President Obama Addresses Muslim World in Cairo


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Any story that bends over for Obama like the one above isn't worth reading.

Obama sustained the rapt attention of his audience - most relying on simultaneous translation and the earnestness of his body language, his lean, appealing physical presence

Puh-leeze.edit: Oh, and a muslim agrees with obama? Shocking.
:mellow::lmao:
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Any story that bends over for Obama like the one above isn't worth reading.

Obama sustained the rapt attention of his audience - most relying on simultaneous translation and the earnestness of his body language, his lean, appealing physical presence

Puh-leeze.

edit: Oh, and a muslim agrees with obama? Shocking.

Yeah, what good could come out of a pro-US/Obama article from Al Jezeera?

That speech did more for our national security than the last 6 years we've spent occupying Iraq.

Gunz,

I like you, I do. However, you have the disease, it's called liberalism and you have one of the worst cases I have ever seen.

Respectfully,

AE

No problem GB. If you define liberalism as the polar opposite of your views, I don't want the antidote. :mellow:
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Any story that bends over for Obama like the one above isn't worth reading.

Obama sustained the rapt attention of his audience - most relying on simultaneous translation and the earnestness of his body language, his lean, appealing physical presence

Puh-leeze.

edit: Oh, and a muslim agrees with obama? Shocking.

Yeah, what good could come out of a pro-US/Obama article from Al Jezeera?

That speech did more for our national security than the last 6 years we've spent occupying Iraq.

Gunz,

I like you, I do. However, you have the disease, it's called liberalism and you have one of the worst cases I have ever seen.

Respectfully,

AE

No problem GB. If you define liberalism as the polar opposite of your views, I don't want the antidote. :mellow:
:antidote:
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Krauthammer ends this thread

Hovering on High: Obama Surveys the World

By Charles Krauthammer

WASHINGTON -- When President Obama returned from his first European trip, I observed that while over there he had been "acting the philosopher-king who hovers above the fray mediating" between America and the world. Now that Obama has returned from his "Muslim world" pilgrimage, even the left agrees. "Obama's standing above the country, above -- above the world. He's sort of God," Newsweek's Evan Thomas said to a concurring Chris Matthews, reflecting on Obama's lofty perception of himself as the great transcender.

Not that Obama considers himself divine. (He sees himself as merely messianic, or, at worst, apostolic.) But he does position himself as hovering above mere mortals, mere country, to gaze benignly upon the darkling plain beneath him where ignorant armies clash by night, blind to the common humanity that only he can see. Traveling the world, he brings the gospel of understanding and godly forbearance. We have all sinned against each other. We must now look beyond that and walk together to the sunny uplands of comity and understanding. He shall guide you. Thus:

(A) He told Iran that, on the one hand, America once helped overthrow an Iranian government, while on the other hand "Iran has played a role in acts of hostage-taking and violence against U.S. troops and civilians." (Played a role?!) We have both sinned; let us bury the past and begin anew.

(B) On religious tolerance, he gently referenced the Christians of Lebanon and Egypt, then lamented that the "divisions between Sunni and Shia have led to tragic violence" (note the use of the passive voice). He then criticized (in the active voice) Western religious intolerance for regulating the wearing of the hijab -- after citing America for making it difficult for Muslims to give to charity.

© Obama offered Muslims a careful admonition about women's rights, noting how denying women education impoverishes a country -- balanced, of course, with "meanwhile, the struggle for women's equality continues in many aspects of American life."

Well, yes. On the one hand, there certainly is some American university where the women's softball team has received insufficient Title IX funds -- while, on the other hand, Saudi women showing ankle are beaten in the street, Afghan school girls have acid thrown in their faces, and Iranian women are publicly stoned to death for adultery. (Gays, as well -- but then again we have Prop 8.) We all have our shortcomings, our national foibles. Who's to judge?

That's the problem with Obama's transcultural evenhandedness. It gives the veneer of professorial sophistication to the most simple-minded observation: Of course there are rights and wrongs in all human affairs. Our species is a fallen one. But that doesn't mean that these rights and wrongs are of equal weight.

A CIA rent-a-mob in a coup 56 years ago does not balance the hostage-takings, throat-slittings, terror bombings and wanton slaughters perpetrated for 30 years by a thug regime in Teheran (and its surrogates) that our own State Department calls the world's "most active state sponsor of terrorism."

True, France prohibits the wearing of the hijab in certain public places, in part to allow the force of law to protect Muslim women who might be coerced into wearing it by neighborhood fundamentalist gangs. But it borders on the obscene to compare this mild preference for secularization (seen in Muslim Turkey as well) to the violence that has been visited upon Copts, Maronites, Baha'i, Druze and other minorities in Muslim lands, and to the unspeakable cruelties perpetrated by Shiites and Sunnis upon each other.

Even on freedom of religion, Obama could not resist the compulsion to find fault with his own country: "For instance, in the United States, rules on charitable giving have made it harder for Muslims to fulfill their religious obligation" -- disgracefully giving the impression to a foreign audience not versed in our laws that there is active discrimination against Muslims, when the only restriction, applied to all donors regardless of religion, is on funding charities that serve as fronts for terror.

Obama undoubtedly thinks he is demonstrating historical magnanimity with all these moral equivalencies and self-flagellating apologetics. On the contrary. He's showing cheap condescension, an unseemly hunger for applause and a willingness to distort history for political effect.

Distorting history is not truth-telling, but the telling of soft lies. Creating false equivalencies is not moral leadership, but moral abdication. And hovering above it all, above country and history, is a sign not of transcendence but of a disturbing ambivalence toward one's own country.

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Any story that bends over for Obama like the one above isn't worth reading.

Obama sustained the rapt attention of his audience - most relying on simultaneous translation and the earnestness of his body language, his lean, appealing physical presence

Puh-leeze.edit: Oh, and a muslim agrees with obama? Shocking.
Yeah, what good could come out of a pro-US/Obama article from Al Jezeera?That speech did more for our national security than the last 6 years we've spent occupying Iraq.
awesome.. so when does Obama's NEW middle east policies kick in?
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Krauthammer ends this thread

Hovering on High: Obama Surveys the World

By Charles Krauthammer

WASHINGTON -- When President Obama returned from his first European trip, I observed that while over there he had been "acting the philosopher-king who hovers above the fray mediating" between America and the world. Now that Obama has returned from his "Muslim world" pilgrimage, even the left agrees. "Obama's standing above the country, above -- above the world. He's sort of God," Newsweek's Evan Thomas said to a concurring Chris Matthews, reflecting on Obama's lofty perception of himself as the great transcender.

Not that Obama considers himself divine. (He sees himself as merely messianic, or, at worst, apostolic.) But he does position himself as hovering above mere mortals, mere country, to gaze benignly upon the darkling plain beneath him where ignorant armies clash by night, blind to the common humanity that only he can see. Traveling the world, he brings the gospel of understanding and godly forbearance. We have all sinned against each other. We must now look beyond that and walk together to the sunny uplands of comity and understanding. He shall guide you. Thus:

(A) He told Iran that, on the one hand, America once helped overthrow an Iranian government, while on the other hand "Iran has played a role in acts of hostage-taking and violence against U.S. troops and civilians." (Played a role?!) We have both sinned; let us bury the past and begin anew.

(B) On religious tolerance, he gently referenced the Christians of Lebanon and Egypt, then lamented that the "divisions between Sunni and Shia have led to tragic violence" (note the use of the passive voice). He then criticized (in the active voice) Western religious intolerance for regulating the wearing of the hijab -- after citing America for making it difficult for Muslims to give to charity.

© Obama offered Muslims a careful admonition about women's rights, noting how denying women education impoverishes a country -- balanced, of course, with "meanwhile, the struggle for women's equality continues in many aspects of American life."

Well, yes. On the one hand, there certainly is some American university where the women's softball team has received insufficient Title IX funds -- while, on the other hand, Saudi women showing ankle are beaten in the street, Afghan school girls have acid thrown in their faces, and Iranian women are publicly stoned to death for adultery. (Gays, as well -- but then again we have Prop 8.) We all have our shortcomings, our national foibles. Who's to judge?

That's the problem with Obama's transcultural evenhandedness. It gives the veneer of professorial sophistication to the most simple-minded observation: Of course there are rights and wrongs in all human affairs. Our species is a fallen one. But that doesn't mean that these rights and wrongs are of equal weight.

A CIA rent-a-mob in a coup 56 years ago does not balance the hostage-takings, throat-slittings, terror bombings and wanton slaughters perpetrated for 30 years by a thug regime in Teheran (and its surrogates) that our own State Department calls the world's "most active state sponsor of terrorism."

True, France prohibits the wearing of the hijab in certain public places, in part to allow the force of law to protect Muslim women who might be coerced into wearing it by neighborhood fundamentalist gangs. But it borders on the obscene to compare this mild preference for secularization (seen in Muslim Turkey as well) to the violence that has been visited upon Copts, Maronites, Baha'i, Druze and other minorities in Muslim lands, and to the unspeakable cruelties perpetrated by Shiites and Sunnis upon each other.

Even on freedom of religion, Obama could not resist the compulsion to find fault with his own country: "For instance, in the United States, rules on charitable giving have made it harder for Muslims to fulfill their religious obligation" -- disgracefully giving the impression to a foreign audience not versed in our laws that there is active discrimination against Muslims, when the only restriction, applied to all donors regardless of religion, is on funding charities that serve as fronts for terror.

Obama undoubtedly thinks he is demonstrating historical magnanimity with all these moral equivalencies and self-flagellating apologetics. On the contrary. He's showing cheap condescension, an unseemly hunger for applause and a willingness to distort history for political effect.

Distorting history is not truth-telling, but the telling of soft lies. Creating false equivalencies is not moral leadership, but moral abdication. And hovering above it all, above country and history, is a sign not of transcendence but of a disturbing ambivalence toward one's own country.

Obama is about as shrewd as a politician gets.

:confused:

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Any story that bends over for Obama like the one above isn't worth reading.

Obama sustained the rapt attention of his audience - most relying on simultaneous translation and the earnestness of his body language, his lean, appealing physical presence

Puh-leeze.edit: Oh, and a muslim agrees with obama? Shocking.
Yeah, what good could come out of a pro-US/Obama article from Al Jezeera?That speech did more for our national security than the last 6 years we've spent occupying Iraq.
awesome.. so when does Obama's NEW middle east policies kick in?
Figures... when you ask for specifics, the Obama crowd is nowhere to be seen..you really think that the middle east countries are not looking for some serious policy changes, or do you think they are just in awe of a 'good speech'.. :no:
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Figures... when you ask for specifics, the Obama crowd is nowhere to be seen..you really think that the middle east countries are not looking for some serious policy changes, or do you think they are just in awe of a 'good speech'..

You do realize it is Friday night, right? This is the deadest night of the week plus it is the summer.Anyway, a huge policy change will be to remove our military from the region. Obama has stated that will happen and that is one huge issue of contention that the Middle East has had for the past six or so years.Another huge policy change will be to see how Obama handles Iran after the election is decided. He has not gone on television or made speeches to anyone proclaiming this is a turning point in Iranian history and it is their time to make a change. He is letting the voters decide without throwing his two-cents into the mix. Again, that is something that is a good change of pace compared to how America has handled past elections in that region. What else would you like him to change in a couple of weeks?
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Figures... when you ask for specifics, the Obama crowd is nowhere to be seen..you really think that the middle east countries are not looking for some serious policy changes, or do you think they are just in awe of a 'good speech'..

You do realize it is Friday night, right? This is the deadest night of the week plus it is the summer.Anyway, a huge policy change will be to remove our military from the region. Obama has stated that will happen and that is one huge issue of contention that the Middle East has had for the past six or so years.Another huge policy change will be to see how Obama handles Iran after the election is decided. He has not gone on television or made speeches to anyone proclaiming this is a turning point in Iranian history and it is their time to make a change. He is letting the voters decide without throwing his two-cents into the mix. Again, that is something that is a good change of pace compared to how America has handled past elections in that region. What else would you like him to change in a couple of weeks?
so, it was just a speech.. thanks!! :goodposting:
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Figures... when you ask for specifics, the Obama crowd is nowhere to be seen..you really think that the middle east countries are not looking for some serious policy changes, or do you think they are just in awe of a 'good speech'..

You do realize it is Friday night, right? This is the deadest night of the week plus it is the summer.Anyway, a huge policy change will be to remove our military from the region. Obama has stated that will happen and that is one huge issue of contention that the Middle East has had for the past six or so years.Another huge policy change will be to see how Obama handles Iran after the election is decided. He has not gone on television or made speeches to anyone proclaiming this is a turning point in Iranian history and it is their time to make a change. He is letting the voters decide without throwing his two-cents into the mix. Again, that is something that is a good change of pace compared to how America has handled past elections in that region. What else would you like him to change in a couple of weeks?
so, it was just a speech.. thanks!! :lmao:
Not at all. Obama outlined what he is going to do. Policy does not equate to "once said, done tomorrow" although you may want immediate action, the action Obama mentioned he did give a time line for it (i.e. leaving the region). The elections had not been held and his action of not saying anything is much better than him voicing his opinion about said election.Your problems with his speech is because he did not do of what he said he would do the following day. Rome was not built in one day and policy cannot change in that same amount of time. Your other problem is because Obama is going to change the way America handles the region while he is President. He is not going to bomb the hell out of the region like some would like him to do. In other words, he is going to try, and has said as much, to be the Costanza (if that is easier language for you to understand) of the future... and that is "if what has been done has not worked... the opposite must work." As a country we should be 100% with this idea because, unless you are looking at the situation with complete blinders on, America's actions of the last few years have not benefited America or the Middle East lately.You and others cannot be this dense unless these comments are fishing trips.
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Figures... when you ask for specifics, the Obama crowd is nowhere to be seen..

you really think that the middle east countries are not looking for some serious policy changes, or do you think they are just in awe of a 'good speech'..

You do realize it is Friday night, right? This is the deadest night of the week plus it is the summer.

Anyway, a huge policy change will be to remove our military from the region. Obama has stated that will happen and that is one huge issue of contention that the Middle East has had for the past six or so years.

Another huge policy change will be to see how Obama handles Iran after the election is decided. He has not gone on television or made speeches to anyone proclaiming this is a turning point in Iranian history and it is their time to make a change. He is letting the voters decide without throwing his two-cents into the mix. Again, that is something that is a good change of pace compared to how America has handled past elections in that region.

What else would you like him to change in a couple of weeks?

so, it was just a speech.. thanks!! :bag:
Not at all. Obama outlined what he is going to do. Policy does not equate to "once said, done tomorrow" although you may want immediate action, the action Obama mentioned he did give a time line for it (i.e. leaving the region). The elections had not been held and his action of not saying anything is much better than him voicing his opinion about said election.

Your problems with his speech is because he did not do of what he said he would do the following day. Rome was not built in one day and policy cannot change in that same amount of time. Your other problem is because Obama is going to change the way America handles the region while he is President. He is not going to bomb the hell out of the region like some would like him to do.

In other words, he is going to try, and has said as much, to be the Costanza (if that is easier language for you to understand) of the future... and that is "if what has been done has not worked... the opposite must work." As a country we should be 100% with this idea because, unless you are looking at the situation with complete blinders on, America's actions of the last few years have not benefited America or the Middle East lately.

You and others cannot be this dense unless these comments are fishing trips.

:thumbdown: ask for facts and you libs always get snippy.. bottom line is it WAS a speech, and while it was a beautiful speech, it did not lay out anything different that what Bush said.. oh by the way, did you see the election results in Iran? Hope and change? Win their hearts?

once again... :hophead:

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