Jump to content
Fantasy Football - Footballguys Forums

The Great Novel Draft


timschochet

Recommended Posts

Frosty, upon further reflection, we'd like to stay where we are or even move up in the draft. That might change if our first-rounder gets sniped, though. :bag:

Dang. Anybody else want to trade?
If our selection gets taken before 8, and I think there's a good chance it would, let's revisit if you haven't found anyone else. :goodposting:Also, I'm glad to have a non-literary-snob in the draft.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ulysses is a terrible first pick. I have tried to read it at least seven times, and have never gotten past page 20. It's completely unreadable. People keep telling me that I should purchase some companion work that explains each page. But why do I want to read a novel that needs another book to explain it? I really don't care that Molly Bloom is big with seed or whatever.

If it's so great, how come there's never been a movie? I rest my case. Sylvia Beach, what an idiot.

Get the audio book and you'll appreciate it much more. It is much better read out loud.
I bought the audiobook narrated by Shane MacGowan but he passed out midway through chapter 2
:lmao: And they just didn't stop recording. It's 3 hours of silence before he comes to.
3 hours of silence would be an improvement.
I read the book in college. I was two thirds way through before I found out by accident that the streams of consciousness were written for the iPod :hot: if you're not smart enough to figured this out, you can loose conciousness.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Frosty, upon further reflection, we'd like to stay where we are or even move up in the draft. That might change if our first-rounder gets sniped, though. :lmao:

Dang. Anybody else want to trade?
if u want the 9 hole, makes me no never mind, the crow cawed novelistically.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ulysses is a terrible first pick. I have tried to read it at least seven times, and have never gotten past page 20. It's completely unreadable. People keep telling me that I should purchase some companion work that explains each page. But why do I want to read a novel that needs another book to explain it? I really don't care that Molly Bloom is big with seed or whatever.

If it's so great, how come there's never been a movie? I rest my case. Sylvia Beach, what an idiot.

Get the audio book and you'll appreciate it much more. It is much better read out loud.
I bought the audiobook narrated by Shane MacGowan but he passed out midway through chapter 2
:lmao:
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Frosty, upon further reflection, we'd like to stay where we are or even move up in the draft. That might change if our first-rounder gets sniped, though. :lmao:

Dang. Anybody else want to trade?
if u want the 9 hole, makes me no never mind, the crow cawed novelistically.
If Team OH/Krista are jerks and won't trade, I'll gladly swap witchoo.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Frosty, upon further reflection, we'd like to stay where we are or even move up in the draft. That might change if our first-rounder gets sniped, though. :hot:

Dang. Anybody else want to trade?
if u want the 9 hole, makes me no never mind, the crow cawed novelistically.
If Team OH/Krista are jerks and won't trade, I'll gladly swap witchoo.
Will we go on your enemies list? :lmao:
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Frosty, upon further reflection, we'd like to stay where we are or even move up in the draft. That might change if our first-rounder gets sniped, though. :hot:

Dang. Anybody else want to trade?
if u want the 9 hole, makes me no never mind, the crow cawed novelistically.
If Team OH/Krista are jerks and won't trade, I'll gladly swap witchoo.
Will we go on your enemies list? :hophead:
Not if that's what you want.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'll speak up on behalf of team k4/OH to say we think Ulysses was an excellent choice as overall pick #1.

Of course you do. I'm guessing you enjoy reading it during breaks from your donkey movie.
:hophead:
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm willing to kick-in an unopened copy of Inception (combo pack: DVD + Blu-ray + digital copy) for anybody who will switch picks with me.

Done!
Sorry, Wikkid is ahead of you. You are ineligible for this deal.As a consolation prize, I can send you a blu-ray copy of either:a) The Town (opened, watched once)b) The Other Guys (unopened)Just send me your address in a PM and I'll ship it out as a thank you for being so kind, yet having a ####ty draft slot.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm willing to kick-in an unopened copy of Inception (combo pack: DVD + Blu-ray + digital copy) for anybody who will switch picks with me.

Done!
Sorry, Wikkid is ahead of you. You are ineligible for this deal.As a consolation prize, I can send you a blu-ray copy of either:a) The Town (opened, watched once)b) The Other Guys (unopened)Just send me your address in a PM and I'll ship it out as a thank you for being so kind, yet having a ####ty draft slot.
For real? Sweet!Frosty is clearly the winner of this thing.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

We'll give it to you without the DVD, if someone snipes us. As long as you DON'T put us on your enemies list. Please, oh please, there is nothing I would hate more than that.

:doublereversejinxtripledogdareyou'reitnotakebacks:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We'll give it to you without the DVD, if someone snipes us. As long as you DON'T put us on your enemies list. Please, oh please, there is nothing I would hate more than that.:doublereversejinxtripledogdareyou'reitnotakebacks:

How about if you do give me the pick, I'll put you on my enemies list?
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm going to go ahead and fill my greatest novelist spot. I could go with several options here, but I am going with my favorite.

1.02 - John Steinbeck

Nice.

Tim, for a couple of the splits in category, you've split between before and after 1900. Could you specify where a novel from 1900 would fit? Thanks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am very pleased to draft my favorite book (from any genre) of all-time. I first saw the epic movie shown on t.v. over several nights. I later read all four volumes (for pleasure) between 8th and 9th grade, much of it on an extended r.v. vacation of the eastern seaboard with my family. The trip has remained unsurpassed as the worst traveling experience of my life, and nothing has ever topped the book for sheer escapism. I also confirmed a valuable earlier lesson - a movie and the same book are two exercises which share only the vaguest of similarities.

1.03 - War and Peace - Historical Novel - Leo Tolstoy

Epic historical novel by Leo Tolstoy. Portions of an earlier version were serialized in the magazine The Russian Messenger between 1865 and 1867. The novel was first published in its entirety in 1869.

This panoramic study of early 19th-century Russian society is noted for its mastery of realistic detail and variety of psychological analysis. War and Peace is primarily concerned with the histories of five aristocratic families--particularly the Bezukhovs, the Bolkonskys, and the Rostovs--the members of which are portrayed against a vivid background of Russian social life during the war against Napoleon (1805-14). The theme of war, however, is subordinate to the story of family existence, which involves Tolstoy's optimistic belief in the life-asserting pattern of human existence. The heroine, Natasha Rostova, for example, reaches her greatest fulfillment through her marriage to Pierre Bezukhov and her motherhood. The novel also sets forth a theory of history, concluding that there is a minimum of free choice; all is ruled by an inexorable historical determinism.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Both book selections were ones I was strongly considering for my first pick. The author selection is a bit of a reach to me.

Thanks, and :goodposting:I just looked over his bibliography and I guess I have read eight Steinbeck books. One of his shorter works, read when I was perhaps eleven, had a profound impact on me. His descriptions of a scene or a person's outward appearance can run on for several pages, and its incredibly immersive.If you think of books as friends :lmao: then his have been some of the best I have ever known. I get more lost reading Steinbeck than anyone.I get what you are saying because a lot of X* spurt** lists prefer X and Y over Z, but if we were drafting while hooked up to a lie detector and the one requirement was it had to be a personal favorite, he would be my first pick. * an unknown quantity** a drip under pressure
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1.04 The Great Gatsby-F.Scott Fitzgerald --Novels written between 1900-1945

This book is often assigned to be read by high school students. I think this is a big mistake. Not many high schoolers have the life experience to really understand Gatsby's point of view. I remember reading this in high school and being left completely flat , didn't appreciate it at all. I picked this up again after a discussion on HS novels with my wife & gave it another chance & I can appreciate its place as a GAN. Loved the ending , one of my favorite endings of all time.

"Gatsby believed in the green light, the orgastic future that year by year recedes before us. It eluded us then, but that's no matter - to-morrow we will run faster, stretch our arms farther... And one fine morning -

So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Good morning. First, to answer Krista's question: we'll make 1900 the start of the new century. I'll change that in the OP shortly.

As far as pantagrapher's question, if it is one continuous work then you get it all, no matter how many volumes it was published in. However, if an author wrote several sequels after the fact, and then the publisher decided later on to link them all together as a "saga", then you can only choose one volume.

I've read 4 Steinbeck novels and enjoyed 3 of them. The three I enjoyed were all written in the late 1930s and two of the three are considered classics and will likely be drafted here; strangely enough, however, it was the one that likely won't be drafted, about a strike, which I enjoyed the most. The 4th Steinbeck was a propaganda novel written during WWII and turned out to be dull and dissappointing. I have Steinbeck's most famous post-1945 work sitting on my bookshelf waiting to be read; somehow I haven't gotten around to it. I also have a copy of Travels With Charley (nonfiction) which my mom keeps recommending. It was also need visiting Monterey, Ca, which is the site of one of his early novels and which features several places devoted to his memory.

I struggled through War and Peace; I didn't enjoy it. I should have; on paper it is everything I want most in a novel- epic, with lots of interesting characters, dealing with a subject matter which greatly interests me. But in terms of my personal enjoyment all of these fade away if the narrative doesn't "move" for me, and in this case it was far too slow. I recognize that it is one of the greatest novels of all time, but for me it wasn't a good read.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am very pleased to draft my favorite book (from any genre) of all-time. I first saw the epic movie shown on t.v. over several nights. I later read all four volumes (for pleasure) between 8th and 9th grade, much of it on an extended r.v. vacation of the eastern seaboard with my family. The trip has remained unsurpassed as the worst traveling experience of my life, and nothing has ever topped the book for sheer escapism. I also confirmed a valuable earlier lesson - a movie and the same book are two exercises which share only the vaguest of similarities.

1.03 - War and Peace - Historical Novel - Leo Tolstoy

Epic historical novel by Leo Tolstoy. Portions of an earlier version were serialized in the magazine The Russian Messenger between 1865 and 1867. The novel was first published in its entirety in 1869.

This panoramic study of early 19th-century Russian society is noted for its mastery of realistic detail and variety of psychological analysis. War and Peace is primarily concerned with the histories of five aristocratic families--particularly the Bezukhovs, the Bolkonskys, and the Rostovs--the members of which are portrayed against a vivid background of Russian social life during the war against Napoleon (1805-14). The theme of war, however, is subordinate to the story of family existence, which involves Tolstoy's optimistic belief in the life-asserting pattern of human existence. The heroine, Natasha Rostova, for example, reaches her greatest fulfillment through her marriage to Pierre Bezukhov and her motherhood. The novel also sets forth a theory of history, concluding that there is a minimum of free choice; all is ruled by an inexorable historical determinism.

:popcorn:

never read W&P and I've never had a desire to read it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I enjoyed The Great Gatsby; but Hell Toupee may be right. I first read it as a 35 year old adult, and I was aware of the Roaring 20s history and I did understand Gatsby, I think. Perhaps I would not have if I had been forced to. What fascinates me about this novel is that is considered literary but has few of the tendencies I despise in other "literary" works. It is written simply (though I have been made to understand that this is deceptive) with a strong, very readable narrative. Every selection that I make in this draft will have these same attributes. Gatsby is one of 10-12 books on the Random House list which I really enjoyed.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1.05 Ten Little ######s (by Agatha Christie)- Mystery

Ten Little ######s was the British title of this best-selling mystery of all time when it was first published in 1939. Due to complaints, Dame Christie quickly changed the title to Ten Little Indians. In the United States, it was published in 1940 as And Then There Were None, which remains its current title to this day. However, in 1982 I attended the Edinburgh Theatre Festival in Scotland and witnessed this work performed as a play under it's original title.

Ten people, strangers to each other are invited to an island off of Devon for a weekend. There, from a recording, they are made to understand that they were all murderers who got away with their crimes, but who are now sentenced to die. But they are the only ones on the island and there is no way to escape! Slowly but surely one by one they are killed, all according to a nursery rhyme. One of the unique aspects of this mystery is that there is no detective, and no happy ending. All ten of them die. The police in the epilogue are baffled, and only in a postscript (in the form of a message in a bottle) does the actual killer reveal herself or himself and explain the means by which the murders were committed. In the play and film versions, this aspect was changed; a surviving couple are not who they pretended to be and they catch the killer at the end. But I like the novel much better for its uniqueness in this regard.

The book is a puzzle; Christie uses a trick as she does in so many of her greatest works, and you will only catch it if you pay attention to all the clues. I never get tired of reading this mystery; it is sheer enjoyment for me from the first page to the last.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1.04 The Great Gatsby-F.Scott Fitzgerald --Novels written between 1900-1945

This book is often assigned to be read by high school students. I think this is a big mistake. Not many high schoolers have the life experience to really understand Gatsby's point of view. I remember reading this in high school and being left completely flat , didn't appreciate it at all. I picked this up again after a discussion on HS novels with my wife & gave it another chance & I can appreciate its place as a GAN. Loved the ending , one of my favorite endings of all time.

"Gatsby believed in the green light, the orgastic future that year by year recedes before us. It eluded us then, but that's no matter - to-morrow we will run faster, stretch our arms farther... And one fine morning -

So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past."

I've read Gatsby as a High School student and as a college student and the experience was completely different. I look forward to reading Gatsby again in the future, although I've heard some people say that TGG is best enjoyed when you're young. I have no doubt that I'll enjoy it once again in the future though.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ulysses is a terrible first pick. I have tried to read it at least seven times, and have never gotten past page 20. It's completely unreadable. People keep telling me that I should purchase some companion work that explains each page. But why do I want to read a novel that needs another book to explain it? I really don't care that Molly Bloom is big with seed or whatever.

If it's so great, how come there's never been a movie? I rest my case. Sylvia Beach, what an idiot.

:)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

People should be required to say if they've actually read what they're drafting. I'm a big fan of these Great Draft threads (I've looked through a few of them) but this one is different. I assume people have seen most of what was drafted in the television and movie drafts, the sports draft was logical because we're all sports fans and know enough about sports history to make educated choices, and the great works draft was so diverse that picks could be justified in a variety of ways. But you really can't judge a novel unless you've actually read it. I could be wrong, but I don't think many people here have enough first hand experience with these works to make good decisions in a draft like this. This looks like it's just going to be a done based on whatever "expert" lists people can find and probably Amazon reviews.

I'll freely admit I haven't read Ulysses from beginning to end. I have read other Joyce novels, one of which is one of my all time favorites. That other reading, plus some of the passages of Ulysses I've read, along with critical acclaim informed my choice. My guess would be that Ulysses will probably be the only choice I make that I haven't read. ;)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Where is the outcry of the terrible #1 pick? There is a definite #1 and this is not it. Where is the outcry?Long live Sun Tzu.

Why aren't you in this draft, my contrarian friend? My guess is you can have every single novel you want.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ulysses is a terrible first pick. I have tried to read it at least seven times, and have never gotten past page 20. It's completely unreadable. People keep telling me that I should purchase some companion work that explains each page. But why do I want to read a novel that needs another book to explain it? I really don't care that Molly Bloom is big with seed or whatever.

If it's so great, how come there's never been a movie? I rest my case. Sylvia Beach, what an idiot.

Get the audio book and you'll appreciate it much more. It is much better read out loud.
I bought the audiobook narrated by Shane MacGowan but he passed out midway through chapter 2
;):goodposting:
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm going to go ahead and fill my greatest novelist spot. I could go with several options here, but I am going with my favorite.

1.02 - John Steinbeck

Interesting. No denying he's a great author, I enjoy his works even though his political ideas are far from mine. Not sure I would pick a "specialty" category this early.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'll freely admit I haven't read Ulysses from beginning to end.

I KNEW it!! How revealing is this admission? I'll bet this is true of most people who have high regard for this novel. I'll bet 95% of those who celebrate "Bloomsday" have never read one page of this novel. I'll bet Joyce never read through the damn thing.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
  • Create New...