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The Great Novel Draft


timschochet

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1.05 Ten Little ######s (by Agatha Christie)- Mystery

Ten Little ######s was the British title of this best-selling mystery of all time when it was first published in 1939. Due to complaints, Dame Christie quickly changed the title to Ten Little Indians. In the United States, it was published in 1940 as And Then There Were None, which remains its current title to this day. However, in 1982 I attended the Edinburgh Theatre Festival in Scotland and witnessed this work performed as a play under it's original title.

Ten people, strangers to each other are invited to an island off of Devon for a weekend. There, from a recording, they are made to understand that they were all murderers who got away with their crimes, but who are now sentenced to die. But they are the only ones on the island and there is no way to escape! Slowly but surely one by one they are killed, all according to a nursery rhyme. One of the unique aspects of this mystery is that there is no detective, and no happy ending. All ten of them die. The police in the epilogue are baffled, and only in a postscript (in the form of a message in a bottle) does the actual killer reveal herself or himself and explain the means by which the murders were committed. In the play and film versions, this aspect was changed; a surviving couple are not who they pretended to be and they catch the killer at the end. But I like the novel much better for its uniqueness in this regard.

The book is a puzzle; Christie uses a trick as she does in so many of her greatest works, and you will only catch it if you pay attention to all the clues. I never get tired of reading this mystery; it is sheer enjoyment for me from the first page to the last.

Seriously? I get that you want to pick novels you personally enjoy, but you don't think this would have been around for many more rounds?
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1.05 Ten Little ######s (by Agatha Christie)- Mystery

Ten Little ######s was the British title of this best-selling mystery of all time when it was first published in 1939. Due to complaints, Dame Christie quickly changed the title to Ten Little Indians. In the United States, it was published in 1940 as And Then There Were None, which remains its current title to this day. However, in 1982 I attended the Edinburgh Theatre Festival in Scotland and witnessed this work performed as a play under it's original title.

Ten people, strangers to each other are invited to an island off of Devon for a weekend. There, from a recording, they are made to understand that they were all murderers who got away with their crimes, but who are now sentenced to die. But they are the only ones on the island and there is no way to escape! Slowly but surely one by one they are killed, all according to a nursery rhyme. One of the unique aspects of this mystery is that there is no detective, and no happy ending. All ten of them die. The police in the epilogue are baffled, and only in a postscript (in the form of a message in a bottle) does the actual killer reveal herself or himself and explain the means by which the murders were committed. In the play and film versions, this aspect was changed; a surviving couple are not who they pretended to be and they catch the killer at the end. But I like the novel much better for its uniqueness in this regard.

The book is a puzzle; Christie uses a trick as she does in so many of her greatest works, and you will only catch it if you pay attention to all the clues. I never get tired of reading this mystery; it is sheer enjoyment for me from the first page to the last.

Seriously? I get that you want to pick novels you personally enjoy, but you don't think this would have been around for many more rounds?
Christie wrote 80 novels. What makes this one stand out from the rest?
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1.05 Ten Little ######s (by Agatha Christie)- Mystery

Ten Little ######s was the British title of this best-selling mystery of all time when it was first published in 1939. Due to complaints, Dame Christie quickly changed the title to Ten Little Indians. In the United States, it was published in 1940 as And Then There Were None, which remains its current title to this day. However, in 1982 I attended the Edinburgh Theatre Festival in Scotland and witnessed this work performed as a play under it's original title.

Ten people, strangers to each other are invited to an island off of Devon for a weekend. There, from a recording, they are made to understand that they were all murderers who got away with their crimes, but who are now sentenced to die. But they are the only ones on the island and there is no way to escape! Slowly but surely one by one they are killed, all according to a nursery rhyme. One of the unique aspects of this mystery is that there is no detective, and no happy ending. All ten of them die. The police in the epilogue are baffled, and only in a postscript (in the form of a message in a bottle) does the actual killer reveal herself or himself and explain the means by which the murders were committed. In the play and film versions, this aspect was changed; a surviving couple are not who they pretended to be and they catch the killer at the end. But I like the novel much better for its uniqueness in this regard.

The book is a puzzle; Christie uses a trick as she does in so many of her greatest works, and you will only catch it if you pay attention to all the clues. I never get tired of reading this mystery; it is sheer enjoyment for me from the first page to the last.

Seriously? I get that you want to pick novels you personally enjoy, but you don't think this would have been around for many more rounds?
First, I regard it as the greatest mystery ever. Second, there really aren't going to be too many of my choices that might not be around for several rounds. This is probably the closest thing to it. Get ready...
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1.07 In Search of Lost Time—Marcel ProustNovel written in a language other than English 1900- present

The lost time is the amount of hours I spent actually trying to read the first volume of this never ending work.
A couple hundred pages into Swann's Way, I wondered if I'd even be able to finish the first volume. But then something clicked. I was completely immersed and it's been the most rewarding reading experience of my adulthood.
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1.07 In Search of Lost Time—Marcel ProustNovel written in a language other than English 1900- present

The lost time is the amount of hours I spent actually trying to read the first volume of this never ending work.
I am beginning to think maybe you're miscasted in this draft.
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1.05 Ten Little ######s (by Agatha Christie)- Mystery

Ten Little ######s was the British title of this best-selling mystery of all time when it was first published in 1939. Due to complaints, Dame Christie quickly changed the title to Ten Little Indians. In the United States, it was published in 1940 as And Then There Were None, which remains its current title to this day. However, in 1982 I attended the Edinburgh Theatre Festival in Scotland and witnessed this work performed as a play under it's original title.

Ten people, strangers to each other are invited to an island off of Devon for a weekend. There, from a recording, they are made to understand that they were all murderers who got away with their crimes, but who are now sentenced to die. But they are the only ones on the island and there is no way to escape! Slowly but surely one by one they are killed, all according to a nursery rhyme. One of the unique aspects of this mystery is that there is no detective, and no happy ending. All ten of them die. The police in the epilogue are baffled, and only in a postscript (in the form of a message in a bottle) does the actual killer reveal herself or himself and explain the means by which the murders were committed. In the play and film versions, this aspect was changed; a surviving couple are not who they pretended to be and they catch the killer at the end. But I like the novel much better for its uniqueness in this regard.

The book is a puzzle; Christie uses a trick as she does in so many of her greatest works, and you will only catch it if you pay attention to all the clues. I never get tired of reading this mystery; it is sheer enjoyment for me from the first page to the last.

Seriously? I get that you want to pick novels you personally enjoy, but you don't think this would have been around for many more rounds?
First, I regard it as the greatest mystery ever. Second, there really aren't going to be too many of my choices that might not be around for several rounds. This is probably the closest thing to it. Get ready...
But you could have traded down and gotten a DVD out of this. I guess you don't like Inception
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1.07 In Search of Lost Time—Marcel ProustNovel written in a language other than English 1900- present

The lost time is the amount of hours I spent actually trying to read the first volume of this never ending work.
A couple hundred pages into Swann's Way, I wondered if I'd even be able to finish the first volume. But then something clicked. I was completely immersed and it's been the most rewarding reading experience of my adulthood.
Well, that is what I always hope for. I admit to being far too impatient. Perhaps at future date I will try it again. I don't like to criticize novels I haven't at least TRIED to read and I won't do it. If a novel is highly regarded I will probably make an attempt to read it at some point.
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Team Krista and/or Wikkid, the novel I want to select is still there, so I'll trade with whoever.

surprised that both my first choices are still there (and i'm almost certain one of them will be athe K/O pick), guaranteeing me one of them @ 1.09, but a deal's a deal.
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Team Krista and/or Wikkid, the novel I want to select is still there, so I'll trade with whoever.

surprised that both my first choices are still there (and i'm almost certain one of them will be athe K/O pick), guaranteeing me one of them @ 1.09, but a deal's a deal.
I won't hold you to it if you'd rather stay where you are.
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Where is the outcry of the terrible #1 pick? There is a definite #1 and this is not it. Where is the outcry?

Why aren't you in this draft, my contrarian friend? My guess is you can have every single novel you want.
No real reason why I am not in it. SOD is still there though. Outcry, I say!!
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Team Krista and/or Wikkid, the novel I want to select is still there, so I'll trade with whoever.

surprised that both my first choices are still there (and i'm almost certain one of them will be athe K/O pick), guaranteeing me one of them @ 1.09, but a deal's a deal.
I won't hold you to it if you'd rather stay where you are.
no. im good - that's why i offered. a near-elbow slot fits me better for this and, no matter my passion for these two titles, there's a great wide world to choose from.
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I have to admit that Tim's reverence of Ten Little ######s is what got me to actually read it, but I don't see how it's top ten material in a draft of this massive scope.

There is a mystery category, and the top selection in that category is worth just as many points as every other category. Not saying it will be the top pick, but it certainly will be up there. As far as the "greatest novels ever" I have seen several lists of these in my lifetime, and almost none of them include novels which are among my personal favorites. Therefore I plan on drafting almost none of them.
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I have to admit that Tim's reverence of Ten Little ######s is what got me to actually read it, but I don't see how it's top ten material in a draft of this massive scope.

There is a mystery category, and the top selection in that category is worth just as many points as every other category. Not saying it will be the top pick, but it certainly will be up there. As far as the "greatest novels ever" I have seen several lists of these in my lifetime, and almost none of them include novels which are among my personal favorites. Therefore I plan on drafting almost none of them.
Ten Little ######s would have been there about 10 rounds later, conservatively. Draft much?
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I have to admit that Tim's reverence of Ten Little ######s is what got me to actually read it, but I don't see how it's top ten material in a draft of this massive scope.

There is a mystery category, and the top selection in that category is worth just as many points as every other category. Not saying it will be the top pick, but it certainly will be up there.

As far as the "greatest novels ever" I have seen several lists of these in my lifetime, and almost none of them include novels which are among my personal favorites. Therefore I plan on drafting almost none of them.

Ten Little ######s would have been there about 10 rounds later, conservatively. Draft much?
As I explained before, of my planned 30 draft picks, this one was one of the few that had a likely chance of being drafted by other people at all.

Why don't you become a drafter? You'll have a lot of fun.

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attention-by-contrarianism act still holding up, timmy? proud of you -

That's really not the case. My picks are not designed to be contrarian to anyone. I am an avid reader and I'm going to select what I enjoy the best. What's contrarian about that? Thorn admitted he's never read all ofUlysses, and while I appreciate his honesty, that's not for me. This draft is unique from all the others we've run- reading novels is a very personal experience. If you don't enjoy what you're drafting, what's the point?

I think Krista and Thorn and a few others really do enjoy these difficult to get into, naturalistic novels that are always high on everyone's lists. But let's face it, most people don't. I hope everyone here drafts what that personally like the best; that will make it much more fun.

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1.07 In Search of Lost Time—Marcel Proust

Novel written in a language other than English 1900- present

The lost time is the amount of hours I spent actually trying to read the first volume of this never ending work.
A couple hundred pages into Swann's Way, I wondered if I'd even be able to finish the first volume. But then something clicked. I was completely immersed and it's been the most rewarding reading experience of my adulthood.
The Guermantes Way way is my personal favorite, though Sodom and Gomorrah is more gripping/suspenseful.

timschochet, you rip this one every time it shows up in a draft based on on one halfhearted effort at the overture? You really should revisit it sometime. I think you'll happily find you've been wrong about this one for years.

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I have to admit that Tim's reverence of Ten Little ######s is what got me to actually read it, but I don't see how it's top ten material in a draft of this massive scope.

There is a mystery category, and the top selection in that category is worth just as many points as every other category. Not saying it will be the top pick, but it certainly will be up there.

As far as the "greatest novels ever" I have seen several lists of these in my lifetime, and almost none of them include novels which are among my personal favorites. Therefore I plan on drafting almost none of them.

Ten Little ######s would have been there about 10 rounds later, conservatively. Draft much?
As I explained before, of my planned 30 draft picks, this one was one of the few that had a likely chance of being drafted by other people at all.

Why don't you become a drafter? You'll have a lot of fun.

Because I'm positive I'd hate you afterward.
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1.07 In Search of Lost Time—Marcel Proust

Novel written in a language other than English 1900- present

The lost time is the amount of hours I spent actually trying to read the first volume of this never ending work.
A couple hundred pages into Swann's Way, I wondered if I'd even be able to finish the first volume. But then something clicked. I was completely immersed and it's been the most rewarding reading experience of my adulthood.
The Guermantes Way way is my personal favorite, though Sodom and Gomorrah is more gripping/suspenseful.

timschochet, you rip this one every time it shows up in a draft based on on one halfhearted effort at the overture? You really should revisit it sometime. I think you'll happily find you've been wrong about this one for years.

I promise that I will try it again.
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As I explained before, of my planned 30 draft picks, this one was one of the few that had a likely chance of being drafted by other people at all.

So instead of doing rankings/lists/tiers, you're just going off a script a la the WCO?
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I have to admit that Tim's reverence of Ten Little ######s is what got me to actually read it, but I don't see how it's top ten material in a draft of this massive scope.

There is a mystery category, and the top selection in that category is worth just as many points as every other category. Not saying it will be the top pick, but it certainly will be up there.

As far as the "greatest novels ever" I have seen several lists of these in my lifetime, and almost none of them include novels which are among my personal favorites. Therefore I plan on drafting almost none of them.

Ten Little ######s would have been there about 10 rounds later, conservatively. Draft much?
As I explained before, of my planned 30 draft picks, this one was one of the few that had a likely chance of being drafted by other people at all.

Why don't you become a drafter? You'll have a lot of fun.

Because I'm positive I'd hate you afterward.
That's not a good reason.
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As I explained before, of my planned 30 draft picks, this one was one of the few that had a likely chance of being drafted by other people at all.

So instead of doing rankings/lists/tiers, you're just going off a script a la the WCO?
I have certain picks in mind. If they get taken, I will have to revise. There are books that I love the most in every category and I would hate not to have them.
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I'm embarrassed to say that I have never read The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Like so many others, it has sat on my bookshelf for years, staring accusingly at me. I realize that it is considered by some the greatest American novel ever written. I have no excuse.

I plan on being brutally honest in this draft...

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I'm embarrassed to say that I have never read The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Like so many others, it has sat on my bookshelf for years, staring accusingly at me. I realize that it is considered by some the greatest American novel ever written. I have no excuse.

I plan on being brutally honest in this draft...

I have never read Ten Little ######'s. Please forgive me Father for I have sinned. I need to end my life now with this admission. I am not worthy.
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I'm embarrassed to say that I have never read The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Like so many others, it has sat on my bookshelf for years, staring accusingly at me. I realize that it is considered by some the greatest American novel ever written. I have no excuse.

I plan on being brutally honest in this draft...

I have never read Ten Little ######'s. Please forgive me Father for I have sinned. I need to end my life now with this admission. I am not worthy.
Have you read Sun Tzu's The Art of War? Some say that Sun Tzu is the most significant person who ever lived, even more than Jesus or Isaac Newton.
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I'm embarrassed to say that I have never read The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Like so many others, it has sat on my bookshelf for years, staring accusingly at me. I realize that it is considered by some the greatest American novel ever written. I have no excuse.

I plan on being brutally honest in this draft...

I have never read Ten Little ######'s. Please forgive me Father for I have sinned. I need to end my life now with this admission. I am not worthy.
Have you read Sun Tzu's ### ### ## ###? Some say that Sun Tzu is the most significant person who ever lived, even more than Jesus or Isaac Newton.
### ### ## ### = S. O. D.
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I didn't know that anyone actually "read" Ulysses, much less enjoyed it. Even the Sparknotes are brutal.

After reading the Sparknotes I'd rather have someone :stirspot: than have to read the whole thing.
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Team k4/OH checking in from Laguna de Apoyo, Nicaragua, where we attended a Granada v. Managua baseball game this afternoon. Best thing ever, which I'll cover in another thread tomorrow.

Anyway, need a minute to catch up, but it appears we were not sniped so will probably keep the pick. Sorry, Frosty...hope you get your selection. :goodposting:

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Team Krista and/or Wikkid, the novel I want to select is still there, so I'll trade with whoever.

surprised that both my first choices are still there (and i'm almost certain one of them will be athe K/O pick), guaranteeing me one of them @ 1.09, but a deal's a deal.
You are a better man than I. :)
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1.08 El ingenioso hidalgo don Quijote de la Mancha (The Ingenious Hidalgo Don Quixote of La Mancha) - Novel written in a language other than English through 1899

Write-up to come.

Actually surprised it lasted this long.

agree...nice pick.

:goodposting: to both of you.

rikishi, this is a draft with a one-hour clock, but I hope you'll consider participating anyway. I think you're in Japan(?), but you can work the time differences through sending lists to people. There are watchers here you could use for your picks rather than sending to another drafter, too.

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One of these does not belong with the others. Can you tell which one is not like the others?

ROUND 1

1. Thorn Ulysses

2. Claydon John Steinbeck

3. BobbyLayne War and Peace

4. Hell Toupee The Great Gatsby

5. timschochet Ten Little ######s

6. Eephus The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

7. pantagrapher In Search of Lost Time

8. Krista/OH Don Quixote

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One of these does not belong with the others. Can you tell which one is not like the others?

ROUND 1

1. Thorn Ulysses

2. Claydon John Steinbeck

3. BobbyLayne War and Peace

4. Hell Toupee The Great Gatsby

5. timschochet Ten Little ######s

6. Eephus The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

7. pantagrapher In Search of Lost Time

8. Krista/OH Don Quixote

tim's, because instead of choosing a dense novel that no one has actually read, he chose a crowd pleaser that is clearly better than the million other Christie books (let alone the many other great authors in this category) and will score an obvious top score?

Inspired choice/category with War and Peace, BTW. Somehow that completely slipped off my radar.

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