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The Great Novel Draft


timschochet

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One of these does not belong with the others. Can you tell which one is not like the others?

ROUND 1

1. Thorn Ulysses

2. Claydon John Steinbeck

3. BobbyLayne War and Peace

4. Hell Toupee The Great Gatsby

5. timschochet Ten Little ######s

6. Eephus The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

7. pantagrapher In Search of Lost Time

8. Krista/OH Don Quixote

one is an author.

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(Wikkid and I are switching draft slots)

1.09 - Catcher in the Rye, JD Salinger - Coming of Age Novel

I haven't exactly been shy about there being one particular book I really wanted here, and this is it. Out of the books that you routinely find at the top of "greatest ever" lists, many of which I haven't read and most of the ones that I have I didn't much care for. This one, on the other hand, I loved. The funny thing is that the first time I read this I expected Holden to blow up a school or something at the end because it seemed like everyone blamed this book for any young person going crazy. I was much relieved when it ended the way it did, because I enjoyed this book in a way that I rarely do, making it not only one of my favorite books but a recognized classic, and basically the perfect round 1 choice.

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1.08 El ingenioso hidalgo don Quijote de la Mancha (The Ingenious Hidalgo Don Quixote of La Mancha) - Novel written in a language other than English through 1899

Write-up to come.

Nice pick. This was the other one I would've considered first overall.
Thanks! :goodposting:
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(Wikkid and I are switching draft slots)

1.09 - Catcher in the Rye, JD Salinger - Coming of Age Novel

I haven't exactly been shy about there being one particular book I really wanted here, and this is it. Out of the books that you routinely find at the top of "greatest ever" lists, many of which I haven't read and most of the ones that I have I didn't much care for. This one, on the other hand, I loved. The funny thing is that the first time I read this I expected Holden to blow up a school or something at the end because it seemed like everyone blamed this book for any young person going crazy. I was much relieved when it ended the way it did, because I enjoyed this book in a way that I rarely do, making it not only one of my favorite books but a recognized classic, and basically the perfect round 1 choice.

Well, I guess I knew there was no chance I'd get this in Round 2. Happy you got what you wanted, and it's a great choice--this and Huck Finn are 1a and 1b to me.
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One of these does not belong with the others. Can you tell which one is not like the others?

ROUND 1

1. Thorn Ulysses

2. Claydon John Steinbeck

3. BobbyLayne War and Peace

4. Hell Toupee The Great Gatsby

5. timschochet Ten Little ######s

6. Eephus The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

7. pantagrapher In Search of Lost Time

8. Krista/OH Don Quixote

tim's, because instead of choosing a dense novel that no one has actually read, he chose a crowd pleaser that is clearly better than the million other Christie books (let alone the many other great authors in this category) and will score an obvious top score?
I don't know if you are being sarcastic or not, but who exactly is going to reward an Agatha Christie novel with a top score?

There's probably not a good way to rank her works, but i think it's generally thought that her best novel is The Murder of Roger Ackroyd.

I'm still baffled how he picked this so early. It doesn't make sense on any level other than to just randomly select something off of his list without regard to optimizing his draft.

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One of these does not belong with the others. Can you tell which one is not like the others?

ROUND 1

1. Thorn Ulysses

2. Claydon John Steinbeck

3. BobbyLayne War and Peace

4. Hell Toupee The Great Gatsby

5. timschochet Ten Little ######s

6. Eephus The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

7. pantagrapher In Search of Lost Time

8. Krista/OH Don Quixote

tim's, because instead of choosing a dense novel that no one has actually read, he chose a crowd pleaser that is clearly better than the million other Christie books (let alone the many other great authors in this category) and will score an obvious top score?
I don't know if you are being sarcastic or not, but who exactly is going to reward an Agatha Christie novel with a top score?

There's probably not a good way to rank her works, but i think it's generally thought that her best novel is The Murder of Roger Ackroyd.

I'm still baffled how he picked this so early. It doesn't make sense on any level other than to just randomly select something off of his list without regard to optimizing his draft.

Sarcasm detector needs a'fixin'.
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One of these does not belong with the others. Can you tell which one is not like the others?

ROUND 1

1. Thorn Ulysses

2. Claydon John Steinbeck

3. BobbyLayne War and Peace

4. Hell Toupee The Great Gatsby

5. timschochet Ten Little ######s

6. Eephus The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

7. pantagrapher In Search of Lost Time

8. Krista/OH Don Quixote

tim's, because instead of choosing a dense novel that no one has actually read, he chose a crowd pleaser that is clearly better than the million other Christie books (let alone the many other great authors in this category) and will score an obvious top score?
I don't know if you are being sarcastic or not, but who exactly is going to reward an Agatha Christie novel with a top score?

There's probably not a good way to rank her works, but i think it's generally thought that her best novel is The Murder of Roger Ackroyd.

I'm still baffled how he picked this so early. It doesn't make sense on any level other than to just randomly select something off of his list without regard to optimizing his draft.

Sarcasm detector needs a'fixin'.
No, I think it's fine. It seemed that's what you were going for, but I read it a few times both ways and neither really worked.
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tim's, because instead of choosing a dense novel that no one has actually read, he chose a crowd pleaser that is clearly better than the million other Christie books (let alone the many other great authors in this category) and will score an obvious top score?

I don't know if you are being sarcastic or not, but who exactly is going to reward an Agatha Christie novel with a top score?There's probably not a good way to rank her works, but i think it's generally thought that her best novel is The Murder of Roger Ackroyd.I'm still baffled how he picked this so early. It doesn't make sense on any level other than to just randomly select something off of his list without regard to optimizing his draft.
Sarcasm detector needs a'fixin'.
No, I think it's fine. It seemed that's what you were going for, but I read it a few times both ways and neither really worked.
I don't think you've followed these drafts before, which might say something good about you. Would have been obvious if you had.
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well, both my books are still there, unbelievably (not surprised by the Quixote pick, but had K/O going another way) - maybe one of em will drop to me. since i dont have a blue-ray player maybe i should offer that version of Inception to Bob Lee "Assassin" Swagger for the yo'leven pick.

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1.08 El ingenioso hidalgo don Quijote de la Mancha (The Ingenious Hidalgo Don Quixote of La Mancha) - Novel written in a language other than English through 1899

Write-up to come.

Actually surprised it lasted this long.

agree...nice pick.

:thumbup: to both of you.

rikishi, this is a draft with a one-hour clock, but I hope you'll consider participating anyway. I think you're in Japan(?), but you can work the time differences through sending lists to people. There are watchers here you could use for your picks rather than sending to another drafter, too.

Yes I am in Japan. We are 14 hours ahead of New York. With that said I would like to go ahead and give it a try...I don't really expect to win, because this is a little bit out of my league. However, I enjoy reading and its for fun. Also I will send my picks to someone and if they are taken, please skip me. I will make up my pick when I can.

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well, both my books are still there, unbelievably (not surprised by the Quixote pick, but had K/O going another way) - maybe one of em will drop to me. since i dont have a blue-ray player maybe i should offer that version of Inception to Bob Lee "Assassin" Swagger for the yo'leven pick.

I'd love a PM since you pick twice before me. Really curious about what your two are.
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1.08 El ingenioso hidalgo don Quijote de la Mancha (The Ingenious Hidalgo Don Quixote of La Mancha) - Novel written in a language other than English through 1899

Write-up to come.

Actually surprised it lasted this long.
Yes I am in Japan. We are 14 hours ahead of New York. With that said I would like to go ahead and give it a try...I don't really expect to win, because this is a little bit out of my league. However, I enjoy reading and its for fun. Also I will send my picks to someone and if they are taken, please skip me. I will make up my pick when I can.

agree...nice pick.

:thumbup: to both of you.

rikishi, this is a draft with a one-hour clock, but I hope you'll consider participating anyway. I think you're in Japan(?), but you can work the time differences through sending lists to people. There are watchers here you could use for your picks rather than sending to another drafter, too.

Awesome. I've loved your drafts in the past so am glad you'll be participating in this one. I'm definitely not in this one to "win", either.
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well, both my books are still there, unbelievably (not surprised by the Quixote pick, but had K/O going another way) - maybe one of em will drop to me. since i dont have a blue-ray player maybe i should offer that version of Inception to Bob Lee "Assassin" Swagger for the yo'leven pick.

:towelwave: I think I have an inkling of where you might be going.
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:popcorn: there is a 1 hour clock?did I miss something where the great novel season starts next weekend

Don't forget that great novel opening day starts on Thursday.
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First, I regard it as the greatest mystery ever. Second, there really aren't going to be too many of my choices that might not be around for several rounds. This is probably the closest thing to it. Get ready...

Tell the truth, you just wanted to type the N-word.
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One morning, as Gregor Samsa was waking up from anxious dreams, he discovered that in his bed he had been changed into a monstrous verminous bug. He lay on his armour-hard back and saw, as he lifted his head up a little, his brown, arched abdomen divided up into rigid bow-like sections. From this height the blanket, just about ready to slide off completely, could hardly stay in place. His numerous legs, pitifully thin in comparison to the rest of his circumference, flickered helplessly before his eyes.

“What’s happened to me,” he thought. It was no dream ...

1.10 - Novella: The Metamorphosis
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One morning, as Gregor Samsa was waking up from anxious dreams, he discovered that in his bed he had been changed into a monstrous verminous bug. He lay on his armour-hard back and saw, as he lifted his head up a little, his brown, arched abdomen divided up into rigid bow-like sections. From this height the blanket, just about ready to slide off completely, could hardly stay in place. His numerous legs, pitifully thin in comparison to the rest of his circumference, flickered helplessly before his eyes.

“What’s happened to me,” he thought. It was no dream ...

1.10 - Novella: The Metamorphosis
I read this. I liked it.
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IIRC the clock is only on 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. (eastern time) - correct?ETA: MONDAY to FRIDAY onlyWelcome aboard, rikishiboy. What part of Japan?

I live in Yokohama.
CoolWe have some good friends who live about an hour north of you (western suburbs of Tokyo)Last year they sent our daughter a set of dolls for the girls day festival - forget the name of it, early MarchAnyway, that is our next major vacationYou've been there long?
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One morning, as Gregor Samsa was waking up from anxious dreams, he discovered that in his bed he had been changed into a monstrous verminous bug. He lay on his armour-hard back and saw, as he lifted his head up a little, his brown, arched abdomen divided up into rigid bow-like sections. From this height the blanket, just about ready to slide off completely, could hardly stay in place. His numerous legs, pitifully thin in comparison to the rest of his circumference, flickered helplessly before his eyes.

“What’s happened to me,” he thought. It was no dream ...

1.10 - Novella: The Metamorphosis
i'm writing the sequel:

Metamattressis

One morning, as Gregory Samson was waking up from anxious dreams, he discovered that in his bed he had been changed into a monstrous verminous bedbug, reclining aside Patti Smith in the Chelsea Hotel. He lay on his armour-hard back and saw, as he lifted his head up a little, his brown, arched abdomen divided up into rigid bow-like sections. From this height the blanket, which Patti was tugging at desperately, could hardly stay in place. His numerous legs, pitifully thin in comparison to the rest of his circumference, were not much help after Ms. Smith finally yanked off the bedclothes and attempted to suck each of his extremities.

“What’s happened to me,” he thought. It was no dream, for his lover's armpit hair became entangled in his thorax, whereupon she began strumming his abdomen like a washboard and started to sing.

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I have to admit that Tim's reverence of Ten Little ######s is what got me to actually read it, but I don't see how it's top ten material in a draft of this massive scope.

There is a mystery category, and the top selection in that category is worth just as many points as every other category. Not saying it will be the top pick, but it certainly will be up there.

As far as the "greatest novels ever" I have seen several lists of these in my lifetime, and almost none of them include novels which are among my personal favorites. Therefore I plan on drafting almost none of them.

Ten Little ######s would have been there about 10 rounds later, conservatively. Draft much?
As I explained before, of my planned 30 draft picks, this one was one of the few that had a likely chance of being drafted by other people at all.

Why don't you become a drafter? You'll have a lot of fun.

Because I'm positive I'd hate you afterward.
:rolleyes: Please. Because my whole shtick is carping from the sidelines down?
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Some comments about recent picks, and also regarding the continuing criticism of my pick:

1. Never read Don Quixote, so I can't comment about it. Another of the many on my list.

2. I enjoyed Catcher In The Rye. There are some coming of age novels I enjoy more than the two taken so far. But I liked it. Good read.

3. Kafka's novella was both disturbing and terrific. A fine work. For years I refused to read it, or any works by this author, because during college a friend of mine and I joined a creative writing class for the sole reason of trying to meet girls- there were many beautiful girls in that class. Unfortunately they all seemed enamored with this guy from Ireland who wore black turtlenecks and was always going on about Kafka, Proust, Joyce, etc. He wrote crappy short stories and all the girls sighed and talked about how "Kafkaesque" he was- it got so I hated that word. But when I read the novel, it was a good one.

4. Pickles is wrong about Ackroyd; that has the most shocking ending ever to an Agatha Christie novel, but otherwise it's a pretty ordinary work. My selection is generally regarded as her finest work and also quite often as the best murder mystery ever.

But again, I already know I'm not going to "win" this draft. I'm still not sure we're going to find any judges (to be a judge, you had better have read every book in the category) but even if you do, not enough of my picks are going to be highly regarded. In fact, if this draft continues as it currently is now, with most selections being of a "literary" nature, I will likely come in dead last. So why should I care what my order is. Pickles, if you want to criticize my order of picks, then you really should join us as a drafter yourself. Show some courage, and put your own picks out there, instead of ripping mine.

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One morning, as Gregor Samsa was waking up from anxious dreams, he discovered that in his bed he had been changed into a monstrous verminous bug. He lay on his armour-hard back and saw, as he lifted his head up a little, his brown, arched abdomen divided up into rigid bow-like sections. From this height the blanket, just about ready to slide off completely, could hardly stay in place. His numerous legs, pitifully thin in comparison to the rest of his circumference, flickered helplessly before his eyes.

“What’s happened to me,” he thought. It was no dream ...

1.10 - Novella: The Metamorphosis
i'm writing the sequel:

Metamattressis

One morning, as Gregory Samson was waking up from anxious dreams, he discovered that in his bed he had been changed into a monstrous verminous bedbug, reclining aside Patti Smith in the Chelsea Hotel. He lay on his armour-hard back and saw, as he lifted his head up a little, his brown, arched abdomen divided up into rigid bow-like sections. From this height the blanket, which Patti was tugging at desperately, could hardly stay in place. His numerous legs, pitifully thin in comparison to the rest of his circumference, were not much help after Ms. Smith finally yanked off the bedclothes and attempted to suck each of his extremities.

“What’s happened to me,” he thought. It was no dream, for his lover's armpit hair became entangled in his thorax, whereupon she began strumming his abdomen like a washboard and started to sing.

I like Patti Smith.
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Pickles, if you want to criticize my order of picks, then you really should join us as a drafter yourself. Show some courage, and put your own picks out there, instead of ripping mine.

It would be insufferable to be in this draft with you. I'll stick to this.
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Pickles, if you want to criticize my order of picks, then you really should join us as a drafter yourself. Show some courage, and put your own picks out there, instead of ripping mine.

It would be insufferable to be in this draft with you. I'll stick to this.
Yeah sure. I bet I know more about novels than you do about chemical engineering.
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1.11 - The Brothers Karamazov - Fyodor Dostoyevsky - Novel written in a language other than English through 1899

I think this probably could have gone in the top 5 (though almost everything picked so far could have gone in the top 5, so that's not exactly saying much). Widely regarded as one of the greatest novels ever written, and one of my personal favorites. I could read it again 100 times over and find a new thing to love about it each time. Just a brilliant, brilliant novel.

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1.11 - The Brothers Karamazov - Fyodor Dostoyevsky - Novel written in a language other than English through 1899

I think this probably could have gone in the top 5 (though almost everything picked so far could have gone in the top 5, so that's not exactly saying much). Widely regarded as one of the greatest novels ever written, and one of my personal favorites. I could read it again 100 times over and find a new thing to love about it each time. Just a brilliant, brilliant novel.

Another classic I've never read. I have read others by this author. Your enthusiam for this one makes me want to try it out.
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1.11 - The Brothers Karamazov - Fyodor Dostoyevsky - Novel written in a language other than English through 1899

I think this probably could have gone in the top 5 (though almost everything picked so far could have gone in the top 5, so that's not exactly saying much). Widely regarded as one of the greatest novels ever written, and one of my personal favorites. I could read it again 100 times over and find a new thing to love about it each time. Just a brilliant, brilliant novel.

Another classic I've never read. I have read others by this author. Your enthusiam for this one makes me want to try it out.
I think you'll enjoy it, tim, especially if you enjoyed some of his others. Definitely heavily philosophical, but in a way I think you'd appreciate.
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1.11 - The Brothers Karamazov - Fyodor Dostoyevsky - Novel written in a language other than English through 1899

I think this probably could have gone in the top 5 (though almost everything picked so far could have gone in the top 5, so that's not exactly saying much). Widely regarded as one of the greatest novels ever written, and one of my personal favorites. I could read it again 100 times over and find a new thing to love about it each time. Just a brilliant, brilliant novel.

:thumbup:

This is 1 of the 4 novels drafted that I've read. Of those 4, it would be at the top of my list.

I think it was meant to the be the 1st part of a trilogy (Dostoyevsky died shortly after finishing it).

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1.11 - The Brothers Karamazov - Fyodor Dostoyevsky - Novel written in a language other than English through 1899

I think this probably could have gone in the top 5 (though almost everything picked so far could have gone in the top 5, so that's not exactly saying much). Widely regarded as one of the greatest novels ever written, and one of my personal favorites. I could read it again 100 times over and find a new thing to love about it each time. Just a brilliant, brilliant novel.

:goodposting: Great book. I think "The Grand Inquisitor" could be the greatest chapter of anything I've ever read. Profound stuff.
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I wasn't sure what direction I wanted to go with my first pick, but eventually I decided to go with the book that made me want to become an English major.

1.12 Absalom, Absalom-Novel between 1900 and 1945

Although this isn't Faulkner's best known work, it is my favorite of his. It tells the story of young Quentin Compson obeying the request of Rosa Coldfield to hear a story she has kept inside for over forty years. Once Quentin arrives he is told the story of Thomas Sutpen, a larger-than-life character who rose from mysterious obscurity to become the largest planter and land-owner in the county. His rise to prominence is abruptly ended by the Civil War, and the Sutpen who returns to his plantation after the Civil War finds himself attempting to re-create an existence that is no longer possible. Sutpen is an allegory both for the South and the United States as a whole, and he is, in my opinion, the most brilliant of Faulkner's characters. Like all of Faulkner's works, the prose can get very long, but Faulkner also creates some of the most beautiful sentences I have ever read.

"what is probably the most moving mass-sight of all human mass-experience, far more so than the spectacle of so many virgins going to be sacrificed to some heathen Principle, some Priapus--the sight of young men, the light quick bones, the bright gallant deluded blood and flesh dressed in a martial glitter of brass and plumes, marching away to a battle."

And Faulkner talking about the inevitably of racial integration

"I think that in time the Jim Bonds are going to conquer the western hemisphere. Of course it wont quite be in our time and of course as they spread toward the poles they will bleach out again like the rabbits and the birds do, so they wont show up so sharp against the snow. But it will still be Jim Bond; and so in a few thousand years, I who regard you will also have sprung from the loins of African kings."

Perhaps the best word to describe this work would be "haunting," because this stayed with me long after I finished reading it the first time. But, when you consider all of the skeletons in the United States' collective closet, it seems that this was precisely what Faulkner intended.
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One morning, as Gregor Samsa was waking up from anxious dreams, he discovered that in his bed he had been changed into a monstrous verminous bug. He lay on his armour-hard back and saw, as he lifted his head up a little, his brown, arched abdomen divided up into rigid bow-like sections. From this height the blanket, just about ready to slide off completely, could hardly stay in place. His numerous legs, pitifully thin in comparison to the rest of his circumference, flickered helplessly before his eyes.

“What’s happened to me,” he thought. It was no dream ...

1.10 - Novella: The Metamorphosis
Argggggggghhhhh. My three targets for round 2 were Frosty's pick, this one, and the second one on rikishi's list. :kicksrock:

I guess a lot of sniping is inevitable in the first few rounds.

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Pickles, if you want to criticize my order of picks, then you really should join us as a drafter yourself. Show some courage, and put your own picks out there, instead of ripping mine.

It would be insufferable to be in this draft with you. I'll stick to this.
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IIRC the clock is only on 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. (eastern time) - correct?ETA: MONDAY to FRIDAY onlyWelcome aboard, rikishiboy. What part of Japan?

I live in Yokohama.
CoolWe have some good friends who live about an hour north of you (western suburbs of Tokyo)Last year they sent our daughter a set of dolls for the girls day festival - forget the name of it, early MarchAnyway, that is our next major vacationYou've been there long?
When you going? We'll be in Tokyo and Kyoto in late May. :kicksrock:
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I wasn't sure what direction I wanted to go with my first pick, but eventually I decided to go with the book that made me want to become an English major.

1.12 Absalom, Absalom-Novel between 1900 and 1945

Although this isn't Faulkner's best known work, it is my favorite of his.

#######g awesome (and I'm by no means a big fan of Faulkner)

That's 11 out of 12 picks I could easily see being a top 5 pick.

Anybody send LB44 a invite PM yet?

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One morning, as Gregor Samsa was waking up from anxious dreams, he discovered that in his bed he had been changed into a monstrous verminous bug. He lay on his armour-hard back and saw, as he lifted his head up a little, his brown, arched abdomen divided up into rigid bow-like sections. From this height the blanket, just about ready to slide off completely, could hardly stay in place. His numerous legs, pitifully thin in comparison to the rest of his circumference, flickered helplessly before his eyes.

“What’s happened to me,” he thought. It was no dream ...

1.10 - Novella: The Metamorphosis
Heard Kurt Vonnegut lecture once. He had a blackboard up front with him and drew an x & y axis on it with x for time and y for happiness.

Stories, he says, have a fairly standard historical construction. At time zero, life is good, full of promise. Then there's the tragic misfortune plummeting the happiness down. There's some suffering, some anguish, but then ultimately redemption and rebirth. Think generally most of the Greek mortal pantheon. So his graph looked vaguely like the drawing of a crater.

More recently, and particularly in British/American fiction, he continued, you have the rags-to-riches story. You're born. You're an orphan. You get beaten. You have to go out and steal to survive. But then you find out that you're the heir to some wealthy old lady who just made you into a young gentleman. Graph for this one looked like a global population graph from 1000 BC to modern day..... low and flat, low and flat, low and flat, big explosion on the end.

"And then," he said, "you have the Germans. Your life sucks, your job sucks, your family sucks, your girlfriend sucks" (he's drawing a flat-line just over zero throughout) "and then one morning you wake up and you're a cockroach." Sends the line plummeting below zero and off the chalkboard.

:confused:
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IIRC the clock is only on 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. (eastern time) - correct?ETA: MONDAY to FRIDAY onlyWelcome aboard, rikishiboy. What part of Japan?

I live in Yokohama.
CoolWe have some good friends who live about an hour north of you (western suburbs of Tokyo)Last year they sent our daughter a set of dolls for the girls day festival - forget the name of it, early MarchAnyway, that is our next major vacationYou've been there long?
When you going? We'll be in Tokyo and Kyoto in late May. :confused:
We want to go before Chloe starts pre-K (Sept 2012), so probably right after the holidays or February next year. Jan-Mar always kind of drags except for skiing, so that is always a favorite time for me to get away.
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