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The Great Novel Draft


timschochet

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1.11 - The Brothers Karamazov - Fyodor Dostoyevsky - Novel written in a language other than English through 1899

I think this probably could have gone in the top 5 (though almost everything picked so far could have gone in the top 5, so that's not exactly saying much). Widely regarded as one of the greatest novels ever written, and one of my personal favorites. I could read it again 100 times over and find a new thing to love about it each time. Just a brilliant, brilliant novel.

Another classic I've never read. I have read others by this author. Your enthusiam for this one makes me want to try it out.
You should. One of the best "classics" IMO.
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I wasn't sure what direction I wanted to go with my first pick, but eventually I decided to go with the book that made me want to become an English major.

1.12 Absalom, Absalom-Novel between 1900 and 1945

Although this isn't Faulkner's best known work, it is my favorite of his.

#######g awesome (and I'm by no means a big fan of Faulkner)

That's 11 out of 12 picks I could easily see being a top 5 pick.

Anybody send LB44 a invite PM yet?

:confused: Great pick.
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Haven't read the Faulkner either. I've read two others by him: one in high school, one because it's so highly regarded. The one I read in high school I barely remember. The one I read on my own I will never forget, and greatly admire its craft, though I can't say reading it was a particularly enjoyable experience.

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I'm in...Do I go last??

Number 15. Last for now. Welcome!
hey Tim what about me?...I figured I would go 15. I don't mind 16, just wanna know.
You didn't confirm that you were joining. Now that you have made it official, you are #16.
It's not terribly important, but I interpreted his 10:06 p.m. post last night as stating he was joining.His 11:54 p.m. post (my interpretation) was meant as he wasn't official you hadn't acknowledged it yet.
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I'm in...Do I go last??

Number 15. Last for now. Welcome!
hey Tim what about me?...I figured I would go 15. I don't mind 16, just wanna know.
You didn't confirm that you were joining. Now that you have made it official, you are #16.
It's not terribly important, but I interpreted his 10:06 p.m. post last night as stating he was joining.His 11:54 p.m. post (my interpretation) was meant as he wasn't official you hadn't acknowledged it yet.
Ahhh- I missed the first post because it was placed as part of a reply. Therefore I misinterpreted his 2nd post as that he hadn't made up his mind yet. In that case, Rikishiboy will be #15 and Tremendous Upside gets the turn. For now.
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In that case, Rikishiboy will be #15 and Tremendous Upside gets the turn. For now.

I wonder if we should make it clear that no one should make the turn until Monday? That way we can leave it open for the rest of the day for new drafters.
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1.11 - The Brothers Karamazov - Fyodor Dostoyevsky - Novel written in a language other than English through 1899

I think this probably could have gone in the top 5 (though almost everything picked so far could have gone in the top 5, so that's not exactly saying much). Widely regarded as one of the greatest novels ever written, and one of my personal favorites. I could read it again 100 times over and find a new thing to love about it each time. Just a brilliant, brilliant novel.

dayum - it never should have gotten close to my pick but, once it did, i had my fingers crossed. Easily the best novel i've ever read. mines the soul, feeds the mine & never stops being a pageturner. dongitnobettah.

"The more I detest men individually the more ardent becomes my love for humanity."

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In that case, Rikishiboy will be #15 and Tremendous Upside gets the turn. For now.

I wonder if we should make it clear that no one should make the turn until Monday? That way we can leave it open for the rest of the day for new drafters.
No. We're not going to spend a full day waiting around. At the point we get to the turn the draft closes with whatever number we have.
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I didn't know that anyone actually "read" Ulysses, much less enjoyed it.

:bye:

And for the record, an excellent first pick. Anything else would have been ridiculed. (Disregard the fact that I picked it in the 3rd round here; that's just smart drafting.)

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IIRC the clock is only on 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. (eastern time) - correct?ETA: MONDAY to FRIDAY onlyWelcome aboard, rikishiboy. What part of Japan?

I live in Yokohama.
CoolWe have some good friends who live about an hour north of you (western suburbs of Tokyo)Last year they sent our daughter a set of dolls for the girls day festival - forget the name of it, early MarchAnyway, that is our next major vacationYou've been there long?
When you going? We'll be in Tokyo and Kyoto in late May. :bye:
We want to go before Chloe starts pre-K (Sept 2012), so probably right after the holidays or February next year. Jan-Mar always kind of drags except for skiing, so that is always a favorite time for me to get away.
februrary is not too bad a time. It is the coldest month here, but that does not mean much. hotels are cheaper then, unless you go to Hokkaido early feb (ice festival time) Late May is nice...warmer weather and before the brutal summer humidity kicks in.
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I didn't know that anyone actually "read" Ulysses, much less enjoyed it.

:bye:

And for the record, an excellent first pick. Anything else would have been ridiculed. (Disregard the fact that I picked it in the 3rd round here; that's just smart drafting.)

A very different draft..I took War and Peace with the last pick. Good memories, though!!!
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I live in Yokohama.

CoolWe have some good friends who live about an hour north of you (western suburbs of Tokyo)Last year they sent our daughter a set of dolls for the girls day festival - forget the name of it, early MarchAnyway, that is our next major vacationYou've been there long?
When you going? We'll be in Tokyo and Kyoto in late May. ;)
We want to go before Chloe starts pre-K (Sept 2012), so probably right after the holidays or February next year. Jan-Mar always kind of drags except for skiing, so that is always a favorite time for me to get away.
februrary is not too bad a time. It is the coldest month here, but that does not mean much. hotels are cheaper then, unless you go to Hokkaido early feb (ice festival time) Late May is nice...warmer weather and before the brutal summer humidity kicks in.
We want to get some downhill in while we're there. Chloe is only 27 months, but she just learned pizza slice (snowplow) and french fries (go fast!) on the bunny hill.Spring would be awesome. We go to the Sakura Matsuri Cherry Blossom festival at Brooklyn Botanical Garden each spring - scores of Japanese cultural events - but have always wanted to experience something more authentic. Mrs. BL is American born Chinese, but we're both very interested in Japan.
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I feel daunted by filling out every one of those slots but if anyone wants to add a co-manager/drafter, there's some picks that I'm dying to share.

Oh, join in! You don't have to know a lot about all the slots. We, for instance, can only come up with one fantasy book either of us has read, and it will be taken long before we'd be willing to take it. I'm sure you'll have lots of great picks to share and add to the discussion.
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I feel daunted by filling out every one of those slots but if anyone wants to add a co-manager/drafter, there's some picks that I'm dying to share.

Oh, join in! You don't have to know a lot about all the slots. We, for instance, can only come up with one fantasy book either of us has read, and it will be taken long before we'd be willing to take it. I'm sure you'll have lots of great picks to share and add to the discussion.
:thumbup: I must know which picks you're dying to share.
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1.13 MOBY DICK, Herman Melville (1851) - Novel written before 1900

"All that most maddens and torments; all that stirs up the lees of things; all truth with malice in it; all that cracks the sinews and cakes the brain; all the subtle demonisms of life and thought; all evil, to crazy Ahab, were visibly personified, and made practically assailable in Moby Dick. He piled upon the whale’s white hump the sum of all the general rage and hate felt by his whole race from Adam down; and then, as if his chest had been a mortar, he burst his hot heart’s shell upon it."

After my wife died and i subsequently gave up my partying ways, i needed peace in my soul. As i did not have God, i needed beauty in my life to instill the faith & belief which leads to peace. I went to the arts, but quickly realized my lack of education (quit school @ 16) to be a hindrance. I decided to take a few years and educate myself. I read more than 50 hours a week for the next 2-3 yrs. Once my reading made me want to write again, i had a choice - do i continue reading fiction and run the risk that it poison my own work? I made up my mind to make a list of the fiction i wanted to read, get it all out of the way & stop reading fiction once i began writing (and, except for re-reading the works of my favorite author since childhood, i've read but one novel in the proceeding 10 yrs), so that i would not ape, in my writing, the style of what i'd be reading, as i am wont to do.

There is a big reason why so many of us no longer read verse or have trouble with some of the older classics - it is our sense of time. The two major revolutions in how humans operate differently now than they did a century go is how we deal with time and pain. We are now impatient beyond limits & have almost completely lost our skills for the endurance which was so much of life for most of human history. I think books were more ponderous then because their function was largely to kill time. Time. Time Time. Time. I kept slogging thru Melville's lessons in cetology & harpoon care without reward until i recognized that it was narrated by someone who endured months of blank time punctuated by moments of frantic terror hunting leviathans from dinghys. There was no choice but to go over and over and over what one had learned of the whaling trade because there could be months to kill before we kill but then one was going to require it all. Eventually, i settled in to Ishmael Standard Time and all was revealed. Why we needed faith and the rage in faith betrayed. I sailed with Ahab, felt his need to beat God, watched him ride the beast to the bottom of nothingness. And i've never been the same.

"Towards thee I roll, thou all-destroying but unconquering whale; to the last I grapple with thee; from hell’s heart I stab at thee; for hate’s sake I spit my last breath at thee. Sink all coffins and all hearses to one common pool! and since neither can be mine, let me then tow to pieces, while still chasing thee, though tied to thee, thou damned whale! Thus, I give up the spear!"

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We want to get some downhill in while we're there. Chloe is only 27 months, but she just learned pizza slice (snowplow) and french fries (go fast!) on the bunny hill.

Spring would be awesome. We go to the Sakura Matsuri Cherry Blossom festival at Brooklyn Botanical Garden each spring - scores of Japanese cultural events - but have always wanted to experience something more authentic. Mrs. BL is American born Chinese, but we're both very interested in Japan.

Best skiing here is definately in Hokkaido...also best scenery and food too.

Cherry Blossom Festival is usually late March around here.

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1.13 MOBY DICK, Herman Melville (1851) - Novel written before 1900

"All that most maddens and torments; all that stirs up the lees of things; all truth with malice in it; all that cracks the sinews and cakes the brain; all the subtle demonisms of life and thought; all evil, to crazy Ahab, were visibly personified, and made practically assailable in Moby Dick. He piled upon the whale’s white hump the sum of all the general rage and hate felt by his whole race from Adam down; and then, as if his chest had been a mortar, he burst his hot heart’s shell upon it."

After my wife died and i subsequently gave up my partying ways, i needed peace in my soul. As i did not have God, i needed beauty in my life to instill the faith & belief which leads to peace. I went to the arts, but quickly realized my lack of education (quit school @ 16) to be a hindrance. I decided to take a few years and educate myself. I read more than 50 hours a week for the next 2-3 yrs. Once my reading made me want to write again, i had a choice - do i continue reading fiction and run the risk that it poison my own work? I made up my mind to make a list of the fiction i wanted to read, get it all out of the way & stop reading fiction once i began writing (and, except for re-reading the works of my favorite author since childhood, i've read but one novel in the proceeding 10 yrs), so that i would not ape, in my writing, the style of what i'd be reading, as i am wont to do.

There is a big reason why so many of us no longer read verse or have trouble with some of the older classics - it is our sense of time. The two major revolutions in how humans operate differently now than they did a century go is how we deal with time and pain. We are now impatient beyond limits & have almost completely lost our skills for the endurance which was so much of life for most of human history. I think books were more ponderous then because their function was largely to kill time. Time. Time Time. Time. I kept slogging thru Melville's lessons in cetology & harpoon care without reward until i recognized that it was narrated by someone who endured months of blank time punctuated by moments of frantic terror hunting leviathans from dinghys. There was no choice but to go over and over and over what one had learned of the whaling trade because there could be months to kill before we kill but then one was going to require it all. Eventually, i settled in to Ishmael Standard Time and all was revealed. Why we needed faith and the rage in faith betrayed. I sailed with Ahab, felt his need to beat God, watched him ride the beast to the bottom of nothingness. And i've never been the same.

"Towards thee I roll, thou all-destroying but unconquering whale; to the last I grapple with thee; from hell’s heart I stab at thee; for hate’s sake I spit my last breath at thee. Sink all coffins and all hearses to one common pool! and since neither can be mine, let me then tow to pieces, while still chasing thee, though tied to thee, thou damned whale! Thus, I give up the spear!"

:lmao: :lmao: :lmao: :lmao: :goodposting:

I was hoping to take Moby Dick after the turn. I'm 21 years old and I had a similar experience with losing someone dear to me that led to me turning to the arts for a time, and my experience with Moby Dick was very similar to the one you spoke of. I especially identified with Starbuck, and I found the scene where Starbuck beseeches Ahab to "think back to old Nantucket" to be one of the most heart-wrenching scenes I've ever read.

"Oh, my Captain! my Captain! noble soul! grand old heart, after all! why should any one give chase to that hated fish! Away with me! let us fly these deadly waters! let us home! Wife and child, too, are Starbuck's- wife and child of his brotherly, sisterly, play-fellow youth; even as thine, sir, are the wife and child of thy loving, longing, paternal old age! Away! let us away!- this instant let me alter the course! How cheerily, how hilariously, O my Captain, would we bowl on our way to see old Nantucket again! I think, sir, they have some such mild blue days, even as this, in Nantucket."

"They have, they have. I have seen them- some summer days in the morning. About this time- yes, it is his noon nap now- the boy vivaciously wakes; sits up in bed; and his mother tells him of me, of cannibal old me; how I am abroad upon the deep, but will yet come back to dance him again."

"'Tis my Mary, my Mary herself! She promised that my boy, every morning, should be carried to the hill to catch the first glimpse of his father's sail! Yes, yes! no more! it is done! we head for Nantucket! Come, my Captain, study out the course, and let us away! See, see! the boy's face from the window! the boy's hand on the hill!"

But Ahab's glance was averted; like a blighted fruit tree he shook, and cast his last, cindered apple to the soil.

"What is it, what nameless, inscrutable, unearthly thing is it; what cozening, hidden lord and master, and cruel, remorseless emperor commands me; that against all natural lovings and longings, I so keep pushing, and crowding, and jamming myself on all the time; recklessly making me ready to do what in my own proper, natural heart, I durst not so much as dare? Is Ahab, Ahab? Is it I, God, or who, that lifts this arm? But if the great sun move not of himself; but is an errand-boy in heaven; nor one single star can revolve, but by some invisible power; how then can this one small heart beat; this one small brain think thoughts; unless God does that beating, does that thinking, does that living, and not I. By heaven, man, we are turned round and round in this world, like yonder windlass, and Fate is the handspike. And all the time, lo! that smiling sky, and this unsounded sea! Look! see yon Albicore! who put it into him to chase and fang that flying-fish? Where do murderers go, man! Who's to doom, when the judge himself is dragged to the bar? But it is a mild, mild wind, and a mild looking sky; and the airs smells now, as if it blew from a far-away meadow; they have been making hay somewhere under the slopes of the Andes, Starbuck, and the mowers are sleeping among the new-mown hay. Sleeping? Aye, toil we how we may, we all sleep at last on the field. Sleep? Aye, and rust amid greenness; as last year's scythes flung down, and left in the half-cut swarths- Starbuck!"

But blanched to a corpse's hue with despair, the Mate had stolen away.

I've never met another person my age who feels the same way I do about this incredible book, but all I can really say to them is that if you approach reading this like a chore, it will probably feel like one. If you open your mind to this book, it's one of the most rewarding experiences you can have.
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I'm a big fan of including selected quotes from the works chosen.

:lmao: The one from The Brothers Karamazov is great. I've read it twice and don't recall it, though just about every page has at least one quotable line. With all the bickering about literary vs. entertaining, seems like the most sought after picks should be those that are both critically praised and beloved by readers. Catcher in the Rye and The Brothers Karamazov fit that mold more than any so far and would have been my 1 and 2.
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Curious to know which book each drafter would have taken if they had the 1.01. As stated, my favorite book is Brothers Karamazov, but i might have taken Ulysses cuz it bites off more than any before or since and, for my tastes, delivers. Once everyone's first rounder is out of the way, so there's no spotlighting, i'd like to hear what others' would be.

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One morning, as Gregor Samsa was waking up from anxious dreams, he discovered that in his bed he had been changed into a monstrous verminous bug. He lay on his armour-hard back and saw, as he lifted his head up a little, his brown, arched abdomen divided up into rigid bow-like sections. From this height the blanket, just about ready to slide off completely, could hardly stay in place. His numerous legs, pitifully thin in comparison to the rest of his circumference, flickered helplessly before his eyes.

“What’s happened to me,” he thought. It was no dream ...

1.10 - Novella: The Metamorphosis
i'm writing the sequel:

Metamattressis

One morning, as Gregory Samson was waking up from anxious dreams, he discovered that in his bed he had been changed into a monstrous verminous bedbug, reclining aside Patti Smith in the Chelsea Hotel. He lay on his armour-hard back and saw, as he lifted his head up a little, his brown, arched abdomen divided up into rigid bow-like sections. From this height the blanket, which Patti was tugging at desperately, could hardly stay in place. His numerous legs, pitifully thin in comparison to the rest of his circumference, were not much help after Ms. Smith finally yanked off the bedclothes and attempted to suck each of his extremities.

“What’s happened to me,” he thought. It was no dream, for his lover's armpit hair became entangled in his thorax, whereupon she began strumming his abdomen like a washboard and started to sing.

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Welcome aboard Matthias!

The first pick I made would have been the same if I had 1.01.

I'm afraid that Moby Dick is another book I was unable to get through. Just not my cup of tea, I guess. I do have one question about it, though: it happens to be the favorite novel of my hippie uncle, who attended Berkeley in the late 60s, dropped out in order to travel around Nepal, and then finished up and now teaches English at a community college in the Napa Valley. He claims Ishmael was a homosexual. Is Uncle Barry right?

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He claims Ishmael was a homosexual. Is Uncle Barry right?

A ship at sea is like prison. Dont matter if youre straight or not goin in, youll dock in that port eventually.
The whole novel is a sausage-fest. Other than the woman who runs a boarding house in the beginning of the story, I don't think there's another female character in the whole story.
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I'm a big fan of including selected quotes from the works chosen.

:lmao: The one from The Brothers Karamazov is great. I've read it twice and don't recall it, though just about every page has at least one quotable line. With all the bickering about literary vs. entertaining, seems like the most sought after picks should be those that are both critically praised and beloved by readers. Catcher in the Rye and The Brothers Karamazov fit that mold more than any so far and would have been my 1 and 2.
Catcher in the Rye was a great pick because it was a great novel and because the "coming of age" category could be simply renamed, "Catcher in the Rye"-like novel.
:wub:
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I'm a big fan of including selected quotes from the works chosen.

:moneybag:

The one from The Brothers Karamazov is great. I've read it twice and don't recall it, though just about every page has at least one quotable line.

With all the bickering about literary vs. entertaining, seems like the most sought after picks should be those that are both critically praised and beloved by readers. Catcher in the Rye and The Brothers Karamazov fit that mold more than any so far and would have been my 1 and 2.

Catcher in the Rye was a great pick because it was a great novel and because the "coming of age" category could be simply renamed, "Catcher in the Rye"-like novel.
:whistle:
Not everyone agrees with this. Per Wiki:

Writer Bruce Brooks held that Holden's attitude remains unchanged at story's end, implying no maturation, thus differentiating the novel from young adult fiction

The two possible choices I have in mind for this category (I have not decided between them) have a very different way of "coming of age"- what I might term the more traditional, romantic approach.

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The narrative of the novel takes place over a very short period of time (a week? five days? ten days?) so there's not going to be exceptional growth over the course of it but it's also being told retrospectively. The POV at the onset of the novel is Holden talking about things that happened before... before he got sent away? before he got treatment? I don't think it's ever explicit. But it's certainly being told by someone who no longer thinks as Holden did.

Additionally, Holden's POV from the time that things are happening is a teen struggling with externality, exploration, and issues of self and self within society. I would say even if those questions are left unanswered it still fits within (indeed, is the definition of) a novel about someone coming of age. But it's your draft.

:2cents:

Oh I'm not arguing the pick at all. It's an excellent choice, and it will probably "win" the category (though I note that, at least for now, Huck Finn was also selected in this category.)

I was simply replying to your comment that this novel defines the "coming of age" novel. There are other fine novels out there that are also coming of age, but have very little in common with this one.

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Have we defined novella?

Yes, see initial thread. Taking the Potter Stewart approach.
For the non-legal in the draft, that means the "I know it when I see it" approach. :unsure:PS how would you like to be named Potter? God that would suck.
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Have we defined novella?

Yes, see initial thread. Taking the Potter Stewart approach.
For the non-legal in the draft, that means the "I know it when I see it" approach. :wub:PS how would you like to be named Potter? God that would suck.
Better than being named Weasley :lmao:
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Crap we shoulda had a sports novel category.

IMO, there just aren't that many good ones. I have been really disappointed by the novels I have read that were highly regarded about sports. The best sports fiction I have ever read involved sports scenes in novels whose overall theme was not about sports. I may very well be selecting some of those novels for this draft, and if I do, I will mention these scenes.
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Good morning. The clock starts this morning in 54 minutes; DC Thunder is on the clock. Once we get to the bottom of the draft order, the draft will be locked with no additional drafters added. Between now and then, anyone lurking is welcome to join.

As of yet we have no official judges. Because of the unusual nature of this draft I think we should wait until the end of the draft before accepting volunteers for this. The problem is, of course, that we need people who have read every novel selected in each category. I think the solution may be to have multiple judges in most of the categories, each one evaluating works that they have read, but we'll wait and see what happens.

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Tim, quick fix on the first page - under BobbyLayne's picks, slide W&P (1869) to the "Non-English before 1900" category. Currently it reads like so:

Non-English before 1899

Non-English 1900-2011 - War and Peace

That novel is so endlessly long that it stretches over into the next category.
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The problem is, of course, that we need people who have read every novel selected in each category.

I've seen this written in this thread a few times, and I don't agree. Personal experience is not the only way to evaluate a work. IMHO, it's possible to look over critical reviews and "borrow" the reflections and assessments of others in judging a work. For instance, I've not read In Search of Lost Time -- but I don't need to read it to know that it's got tons more cachet in the literary world than bodice-rippers with Fabio on the cover.

I've not seen Citizen Kane, either -- but if I were judging it in a movie category, it would get a high score pretty much regardless. I could easily find enough information about the movie's artisitic relevance and it's impact, influence, and importance to support it's lofty place in cinema.

I think the solution may be to have multiple judges in most of the categories, each one evaluating works that they have read, but we'll wait and see what happens.

This is another way. If everyone plays ball, it could actually work well. You could have everyone assign a score from 1 through 17 (17 being best) for each book they read. Everyone would understand that in each category, there could only be one 17, one 16, one 3, one 2, etc. So judges would have to avoid scoring all their books 17 points each because they were all "awesome" and "must reads". They'd have to, as best they can, fairly evaluate their books' places in the literary Pantheon. For instance, if I were part of a team judging books in the same category with In Search of Lost Time, I wouldn't simply rely on my own experience with my assigned books and declare that they were all better than ISLT. That book's got a towering rep, and anything I score in front of it needs to be supportable in some way. "I liked it better" or "I'm more familiar with it" is not sufficient reason to rank a great but lesser book in front of the recognized titans.
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The problem is, of course, that we need people who have read every novel selected in each category.

I've seen this written in this thread a few times, and I don't agree. Personal experience is not the only way to evaluate a work. IMHO, it's possible to look over critical reviews and "borrow" the reflections and assessments of others in judging a work. For instance, I've not read In Search of Lost Time -- but I don't need to read it to know that it's got tons more cachet in the literary world than bodice-rippers with Fabio on the cover.

I've not seen Citizen Kane, either -- but if I were judging it in a movie category, it would get a high score pretty much regardless. I could easily find enough information about the movie's artisitic relevance and it's impact, influence, and importance to support it's lofty place in cinema.

I think the solution may be to have multiple judges in most of the categories, each one evaluating works that they have read, but we'll wait and see what happens.

This is another way. If everyone plays ball, it could actually work well. You could have everyone assign a score from 1 through 17 (17 being best) for each book they read. Everyone would understand that in each category, there could only be one 17, one 16, one 3, one 2, etc. So judges would have to avoid scoring all their books 17 points each because they were all "awesome" and "must reads". They'd have to, as best they can, fairly evaluate their books' places in the literary Pantheon. For instance, if I were part of a team judging books in the same category with In Search of Lost Time, I wouldn't simply rely on my own experience with my assigned books and declare that they were all better than ISLT. That book's got a towering rep, and anything I score in front of it needs to be supportable in some way. "I liked it better" or "I'm more familiar with it" is not sufficient reason to rank a great but lesser book in front of the recognized titans.
I think that's a great solution. Well done! Let's do it.
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We are about to leave for the day, so I am going to send rikishiboy's picks to Doug B and tim, and my picks to tim and BobbyLayne. If team k4/OH comes up and all our picks are gone, just skip us as I won't be checking in again until this evening.

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Ulysses is a terrible first pick. I have tried to read it at least seven times, and have never gotten past page 20. It's completely unreadable. People keep telling me that I should purchase some companion work that explains each page. But why do I want to read a novel that needs another book to explain it? I really don't care that Molly Bloom is big with seed or whatever.

If it's so great, how come there's never been a movie? I rest my case. Sylvia Beach, what an idiot.

Is this shtick or is Tim on the level here?
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1.08 El ingenioso hidalgo don Quijote de la Mancha (The Ingenious Hidalgo Don Quixote of La Mancha) - Novel written in a language other than English through 1899

Write-up to come.

Not surprised to see you guys taking the #1 overall with the 8th pick. Setting yourselves up for a great draft.
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Ulysses is a terrible first pick. I have tried to read it at least seven times, and have never gotten past page 20. It's completely unreadable. People keep telling me that I should purchase some companion work that explains each page. But why do I want to read a novel that needs another book to explain it? I really don't care that Molly Bloom is big with seed or whatever.

If it's so great, how come there's never been a movie? I rest my case. Sylvia Beach, what an idiot.

Is this shtick or is Tim on the level here?
Not schtick. He started a novel draft but he hates [most] literature.
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Ulysses is a terrible first pick. I have tried to read it at least seven times, and have never gotten past page 20. It's completely unreadable. People keep telling me that I should purchase some companion work that explains each page. But why do I want to read a novel that needs another book to explain it? I really don't care that Molly Bloom is big with seed or whatever.

If it's so great, how come there's never been a movie? I rest my case. Sylvia Beach, what an idiot.

Is this shtick or is Tim on the level here?
Not schtick. He started a novel draft but he hates [most] literature.
No comment then.
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