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The Great Novel Draft


timschochet

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Ulysses is a terrible first pick. I have tried to read it at least seven times, and have never gotten past page 20. It's completely unreadable. People keep telling me that I should purchase some companion work that explains each page. But why do I want to read a novel that needs another book to explain it? I really don't care that Molly Bloom is big with seed or whatever.

If it's so great, how come there's never been a movie? I rest my case. Sylvia Beach, what an idiot.

Is this shtick or is Tim on the level here?
Not schtick. He started a novel draft but he hates [most] literature.
No comment then.
I don't hate most literature. I don't like Ulysses. Some of that was shtick though. The part about the movie.
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9 User(s) are reading this topic (1 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)

8 Members: Doug B, Matthias, Grahamburn, Lehigh98, Tremendous Upside, Thorn, Bonzai, Eephus

...

Stick around, Matthias ... after DCT's skip, the next two picks should fall quickly. Then you'll be up for two picks (you make 1.17 and 2.01 together).

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Rikishiboy selects Charlotte's Web, children's novel.

Quote: I loved this as a young child and wanted to pick something that I actually read when I was a child, not a young adult as I suspect many from this category will be.

I can only add a few comments:

Terrific!

Radiant!

Some Novel!

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1.16 Anna Karenina

I adore this book

Happy families are all alike; every unhappy family is unhappy in its own way.

Damn! Great pick. Should've known it wouldn't fall back to me :(
:blackdot:

I feel like I have a strong second pick, but Karenina would have been hard to pass up.

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Happy families are all alike; every unhappy family is unhappy in its own way.

Nice alliteration here in the Russian:

се счастливые семьи похожи друг на друга, каждая несчастливая семья несчастлива по-своему"

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1.16 Anna Karenina

I adore this book

Happy families are all alike; every unhappy family is unhappy in its own way.

After some internal delibrations, that was going to be my wrap-around. Oh well.

I'll assist you with the wrap around if you want

:wink:

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So this next pick is one that I'm frankly shocked fell to me. Never having had the termity to tackle Ulysses, it sits for me as the #1 Novel Overall. Because when you win a Booker Prize, I pay attention. And when on the 25th Anniversary of the Booker Prize, the committee selects the best Booker out of the group and selects one, I pay attention. And when I read the novel and am blown away by the crossing metaphors, adeptness at language, and weaving in of pop culture, I consider this the best novel I've ever read.

Midnight's Children, Salman Rushdie

Novels written between 1981-1990

I'll edit this to put in some good quotes later today or tonight.

Have to think about my wrap-around pick with Anna K being sniped.

:popcorn: That was going to be my next pick. Another great book, and a brilliant allegory for the Indian nation.
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Not too many actual novels other than this one jump to my mind.

They're out there ... this draft is only 17 drafters deep. Most categories should be loaded with quality.
:popcorn:I would love to see what a draft like this would be like with 30 or so drafters.
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For those of you who want to rip me for "not liking literature"- I LOVE The Grapes of Wrath. It is a great story, strong narrative, fascinating history, great characters, epic, makes an argument (which I don't agree with BTW)- just a terrific novel in every sense. Better than nearly everything taken (which I have read anyhow) so far. Brilliant.

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For those of you who want to rip me for "not liking literature"- I LOVE The Grapes of Wrath. It is a great story, strong narrative, fascinating history, great characters, epic, makes an argument (which I don't agree with BTW)- just a terrific novel in every sense. Better than nearly everything taken (which I have read anyhow) so far. Brilliant.

I'm not ripping you and I hope you took my earlier post in the good humor it was written with.
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2.02 Madame Bovary

Was torn here, have about 3-4 books I really want, hopefully at least one falls to my next pick

Couldn't pass up Flaubert's masterpiece though

I remember waiting to read this for a long time because I didn't think I would like it

What a mistake

Such a rich, brilliant novel

And it's influence can hardly be overstated

Happy to get Karenina and Bovary here at the 1/2 turn

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2.02 Madame Bovary

Was torn here, have about 3-4 books I really want, hopefully at least one falls to my next pick

Couldn't pass up Flaubert's masterpiece though

I remember waiting to read this for a long time because I didn't think I would like it

What a mistake

Such a rich, brilliant novel

And it's influence can hardly be overstated

Happy to get Karenina and Bovary here at the 1/2 turn

You are a horrible human being. I thought for sure I'd be able to nab that in the third. Also, did you see there's a new Lydia Davis translation? Just picked it up over the holiday. It's getting great press.

ETA: category?

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2.02 Madame Bovary

Was torn here, have about 3-4 books I really want, hopefully at least one falls to my next pick

Couldn't pass up Flaubert's masterpiece though

I remember waiting to read this for a long time because I didn't think I would like it

What a mistake

Such a rich, brilliant novel

And it's influence can hardly be overstated

Happy to get Karenina and Bovary here at the 1/2 turn

:shrug: Great minds, I suppose.

Seriously, great book.

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Ulysses first? Really?

I submit that there is not a single person on this planet, including the author, who actually read that book and when done said to themselves,"now that was a great read!"

They should read that to detainees in Gitmo - that would be torture.

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2.02 Madame Bovary

Can't let this go without posting a favorite short-story allusion. Apolgies for the length ... it's worth it:

Persky went to the back room, and Kugelmass heard the sounds of boxes and furniture being moved around. Persky reappeared, pushing before him a large object on squeaky roller-skate wheels. He removed some old silk handkerchiefs that were lying on its top and blew away a bit of dust. It was a cheap-looking Chinese cabinet, badly lacquered.

"Persky," Kugelmass said, "what's your scam?"

"Pay attention," Persky said. "This is some beautiful effect. I developed it for a Knights of Pythias date last year, but the booking fell through. Get into the cabinet."

"Why, so you can stick it full of swords or something?"

"You see any swords?"

Kugelmass made a face and, grunting, climbed into the cabinet. He couldn't help noticing a couple of ugly rhinestones glued onto the raw plywood just in front of his face. "If this is a joke," he said.

"Some joke. Now, here's the point. If I throw any novel into this cabinet with you, shut the doors, and tap it three times, you will find yourself projected into that book."

Kugelmass made a grimace of disbelief.

"It's the emess," Persky said. "My hand to God. Not just a novel, either. A short story, a play, a poem. You can meet any of the women created by the world's best writers. Whoever you dreamed of. You could carry on all you like with a real winner. Then when you've had enough you give a yell, and I'll see you're back here in a split second."

"Persky, are you some kind of outpatient?"

"I'm telling you it's on the level," Persky said.

Kugelmass remained skeptical. "What are you telling me-that this cheesy homemade box can take me on a ride like you're describing?"

"For a double sawbuck."

Kugelmass reached for his wallet. "I'll believe this when I see it," he said.

Persky tucked the bills in his pants pocket and turned toward his bookcase. "So who do you want to meet? ..."

"French. I want to have an affair with a French lover." ...

"What about Natasha in War and Peace?"

"I said French. I know! What about Emma Bovary? That sounds to me perfect."

"You got it, Kugelmass. Give me a holler when you've had enough." Persky tossed in a paperback copy of Flaubert's novel.

"You sure this is safe?" Kugelmass asked as Persky began shutting the cabinet doors.

"Safe. Is anything safe in this crazy world?" Persky rapped three times on the cabinet and then flung open the doors.

Kugelmass was gone. At the same moment, he appeared in the bedroom of Charles and Emma Bovary's house at Yonville. Before him was a beautiful woman, standing alone with her back turned to him as she folded some linen. I can't believe this, thought Kugelmass, staring at the doctor's ravishing wife. This is uncanny. I'm here. It's her.

Emma turned in surprise. "Goodness, you startled me," she said. "Who are you?" She spoke in the same fine English translation as the paperback.

It's simply devastating, he thought. Then, realizing that it was he whom she had addressed, he said, "Excuse me. I'm Sidney Kugelmass. I'm from City College. A professor of humanities. C.C.N.Y.? Uptown. I-oh, boy!"

Emma Bovary smiled flirtatiously and said, "Would you like a drink? A glass of wine, perhaps?"

She is beautiful, Kugelmass thought. What a contrast with the troglodyte who shared his bed! He felt a sudden impulse to take this vision into his arms and tell her she was the kind of woman he had dreamed of all his life.

EDIT: cleaned up a little spotlighting, added paragraph breaks for ease of reading
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Ulysses first? Really?

I submit that there is not a single person on this planet, including the author, who actually read that book and when done said to themselves,"now that was a great read!"

They should read that to detainees in Gitmo - that would be torture.

Perhaps you'd prefer the Great Cartoons draft.
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Ulysses first? Really?

I submit that there is not a single person on this planet, including the author, who actually read that book and when done said to themselves,"now that was a great read!"

They should read that to detainees in Gitmo - that would be torture.

Perhaps you'd prefer the Great Cartoons draft.
in
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Ulysses first? Really?

I submit that there is not a single person on this planet, including the author, who actually read that book and when done said to themselves,"now that was a great read!"

They should read that to detainees in Gitmo - that would be torture.

Perhaps you'd prefer the Great Cartoons draft.
in
Ditto. That would be fun. Debating the merits of Bugs Bunny vs. Mickey Mouse is far more entertaining then actually having to discuss an abortion of a book that's better used in a fireplace then being read while sitting by one.
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PMed DCThunder again ... not sure if he is yet on autoskip or not.

DC Thunder is on autoskip. Once you skip once, you're automatically skipped.
I PM'ed wikkid to let him know he's OTC
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1.14--Charles Dickens--Novelist

One of the most prolific authors in th English language, Dickens created inumerable memorable iconic characters in over 16 novels and many short stories. I can't list novels or characters for spotlighting purposes, but everyone knows the works that Dickens created. Born in 1812, he died in 1870 and his stories told of a particular time in English history, that of the Industrial Revolution and the reaction of the people to it.

Many of his novels, with their recurrent concern for social reform, first appeared in magazines in serialised form, a popular format at the time. Unlike other authors who completed entire novels before serialisation, Dickens often created the episodes as they were being serialized. The practice lent his stories a particular rhythm, punctuated by cliffhangers to keep the public looking forward to the next instalment.[2] The continuing popularity of his novels and short stories is such that they have never gone out of print.[3] Dickens loved the style of 18th century Gothic romance,[citation needed] although it had already become a target for parody.[citation needed] One "character" vividly drawn throughout his novels is London itself. From the coaching inns on the outskirts of the city to the lower reaches of the Thames, all aspects of the capital are described over the course of his body of work.

His writing style is florid and poetic, with a strong comic touch. His satires of British aristocratic snobbery—he calls one character the "Noble Refrigerator"—are often popular. Comparing orphans to stocks and shares, people to tug boats, or dinner-party guests to furniture are just some of Dickens's acclaimed flights of fancy. Many of his characters' names provide the reader with a hint as to the roles played in advancing the storyline, such as Mr. Murdstone in the novel XXXXXXX, which is clearly a combination of "murder" and stony coldness. His literary style is also a mixture of fantasy and realism.

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2.04--The Lord of the Rings (The Fellowship of the Ring, The Two Towers, The Return of the King)--JRR Tolkein--Fantasy

You know the story, you've all read the books. Not everyones cup of tea, but the fantasy series that set the template for all the others that have followed...

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2.04--The Lord of the Rings (The Fellowship of the Ring, The Two Towers, The Return of the King)--JRR Tolkein--Fantasy

You know the story, you've all read the books. Not everyones cup of tea, but the fantasy series that set the template for all the others that have followed...

Can't go wrong in these drafts taking the pick that defines its category.
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So this next pick is one that I'm frankly shocked fell to me. Never having had the termity to tackle Ulysses, it sits for me as the #1 Novel Overall. Because when you win a Booker Prize, I pay attention. And when on the 25th Anniversary of the Booker Prize, the committee selects the best Booker out of the group and selects one, I pay attention. And when I read the novel and am blown away by the crossing metaphors, adeptness at language, and weaving in of pop culture, I consider this the best novel I've ever read.

Midnight's Children, Salman Rushdie

Novels written between 1981-1990

I'll edit this to put in some good quotes later today or tonight.

Have to think about my wrap-around pick with Anna K being sniped.

I'm not surprised it fell. Despite winning the Booker of Booker's, I don't think it's the best regarded modern English novel. I also don't think it's Rushdie's best novel (and I'm not talking about his super controversial one either).
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