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1 hour ago, matuski said:

Bump.

Buddy did this and was able to buy a few houses cash out of his 401k rollover to the IRA.  He is renting them out and really doing well.  

Trying to get a larger sample size than just my one friend... seems like taking part of my 401k out and buying a couple rental homes is a fairly no brainer kind of deal?

One of the main advantages of investing directly in real estate is the multitude of tax benefits. You’d lose those if your properties are held in a tax preferred account. 
 

But if you want real estate as part of your portfolio, want as much control as possible over that real estate, and all your retirement investments are currently tax-preferred, then it might make sense.

Here’s a good article on the topic

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Well, today we paid off the last 22 years of our mortgage.  We sold/closed our investment property last week that we bought in 2013.  We did well on it and rolled that money up with some savings and p

Can't really talk about it with RL friends and most of it is pre-tax, but sat down with the wife and figured out that the household is officially in the two comma club. Ten years ago I was unemployed

My big win was in getting educated on personal finance, getting organized, and making a plan. Details: 1. Learned the value of an HSA and contributed for 2019 and 2020. 2. Got my wife’s

Hey guys, what is currently the best option for a website or app for general retirement planning?  Looking for something where I can play around with estimating expenses in retirement, how much we should have to start at retirement to cover them, what to save up between now and then and how it affects everything else, etc.  TIA!

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15 minutes ago, Vegas Trip said:

Hey guys, what is currently the best option for a website or app for general retirement planning?  Looking for something where I can play around with estimating expenses in retirement, how much we should have to start at retirement to cover them, what to save up between now and then and how it affects everything else, etc.  TIA!

Firecalc

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38 minutes ago, Vegas Trip said:

Hey guys, what is currently the best option for a website or app for general retirement planning?  Looking for something where I can play around with estimating expenses in retirement, how much we should have to start at retirement to cover them, what to save up between now and then and how it affects everything else, etc.  TIA!

Excel, or Google Docs if you don't have it

 

It's just a few fairly simple formulas.  The beauty is by doing the math you learn what are the key things to control vs a computer doing the math for you

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3 hours ago, Gawain said:

Firecalc

I'm a fan, but you can get some crazy results when you're forecasting 50 years out. Iirc, my last run had results where we die with like $50 million, or barely making it without being broke.

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3 hours ago, Gawain said:

Firecalc

Decent calculator, but it's a bit optimistic.  100% on Firecalc is a starting point to then really see if you have enough. It also doesn't capture even an estimation of the effect of taxes.

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40 minutes ago, -OZ- said:

I'm a fan, but you can get some crazy results when you're forecasting 50 years out. Iirc, my last run had results where we die with like $50 million, or barely making it without being broke.

If you are forecasting using the total market method, you are going to have some wild results looking at individual possibilities. The point is to get to a percentage of historic results that you are comfortable with.

14 minutes ago, Sand said:

Decent calculator, but it's a bit optimistic.  100% on Firecalc is a starting point to then really see if you have enough. It also doesn't capture even an estimation of the effect of taxes.

I think it's as optimistic or pessimistic as the inputs and assumptions you use. 100% on firecalc could still be a terrible representation if your assumptions are that your portfolio grows at 20% per year and inflation is 0% per year.

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43 minutes ago, -OZ- said:

I'm a fan, but you can get some crazy results when you're forecasting 50 years out. Iirc, my last run had results where we die with like $50 million, or barely making it without being broke.

Lol. I just tried it. There were some nice endings. The one thing that rang true was the don’t be a chicken #### investment wise when you enter retirement. They take all the 35 year periods so you can see what happens. I can only hope I leave my kids that much even while spending like a normal person.

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Anyone have any advice or good resources to research annuities?

I know, I know, annuities are terrible, right?

But, my situation is different than most. 40s, single, no kids. Don't expect those last two to change, ever. So my old age care is completely on me. I am entirely reliant on my own finances to get me through retirement and elderly/long-term care. Also, with grandparents who lived into their 90s and 100s and parents who are fully active in their 70s and who knows what medical advances are on the horizon... I might need to plan to live up to 100 and maybe a few years beyond. With no backstop... no kids to pawn off figuring out my care... I have a very real concern that I might outlive my cash. 

I looked up some long-term care stats and projections and given inflation, for example, one year of nursing home care could be expected to cost $500,000 per year by 2070. What if I end up living 5 years in that kind of environment? That's a lot of savings I'll need to bank just for the very end if I was going to self-insure my own care, not even counting what could be 30 years of retirement before that.

On the other hand... I don't need a death benefit... I don't care if I end up with nothing to "pass on" to my "heirs" as there won't be any.

 

Given I can start planning now in my early 40s and can look at something that doesn't need to pay out for 40 years... what am I look at here? It looks like a lot of companies are discontinuing long-term care insurance, deferred income annuities, etc. Any options I should look into, and reputable insurance companies offering these products that for sure will be around for the next 70 years? Is there a product that will guarantee paying out consistently no matter how long I live? I'm legit concerned that something that says "We'll for sure cover your care for at least 20 years" might not actually last long enough for how long I might end up needing it... again, I have no backstop or plan B. It's entirely on me. 

 

 

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1 hour ago, Worm said:

If you are forecasting using the total market method, you are going to have some wild results looking at individual possibilities. The point is to get to a percentage of historic results that you are comfortable with.

I think it's as optimistic or pessimistic as the inputs and assumptions you use. 100% on firecalc could still be a terrible representation if your assumptions are that your portfolio grows at 20% per year and inflation is 0% per year.

Agreed on the bold. 

I figure, start with the 4% rule, then go to firecalc. If both of those estimates look good, you're probably okay. But you'll be better off if you can adjust along the way without emotional pain.

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I'm probably overthinking this but bear with me.

Assume you want your 401k evenly split between Roth and traditional each year. 

Would you be better off, assuming a more steady year ahead, going full Roth first, then traditional. More growth in the Roth account, with an equal tax benefit for the year (vs evenly split throughout). The only issue I can see is having less money after tax early in the year, but if your expenses are more towards the end of the year (property taxes, Christmas, fall vacation, etc) might this make sense? 

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1 hour ago, shades said:

Anyone have any advice or good resources to research annuities?

I know, I know, annuities are terrible, right?

But, my situation is different than most. 40s, single, no kids. Don't expect those last two to change, ever. So my old age care is completely on me. I am entirely reliant on my own finances to get me through retirement and elderly/long-term care. Also, with grandparents who lived into their 90s and 100s and parents who are fully active in their 70s and who knows what medical advances are on the horizon... I might need to plan to live up to 100 and maybe a few years beyond. With no backstop... no kids to pawn off figuring out my care... I have a very real concern that I might outlive my cash. 

I looked up some long-term care stats and projections and given inflation, for example, one year of nursing home care could be expected to cost $500,000 per year by 2070. What if I end up living 5 years in that kind of environment? That's a lot of savings I'll need to bank just for the very end if I was going to self-insure my own care, not even counting what could be 30 years of retirement before that.

On the other hand... I don't need a death benefit... I don't care if I end up with nothing to "pass on" to my "heirs" as there won't be any.

 

Given I can start planning now in my early 40s and can look at something that doesn't need to pay out for 40 years... what am I look at here? It looks like a lot of companies are discontinuing long-term care insurance, deferred income annuities, etc. Any options I should look into, and reputable insurance companies offering these products that for sure will be around for the next 70 years? Is there a product that will guarantee paying out consistently no matter how long I live? I'm legit concerned that something that says "We'll for sure cover your care for at least 20 years" might not actually last long enough for how long I might end up needing it... again, I have no backstop or plan B. It's entirely on me. 

 

 

Single premium immediate annuities are what you seek: SPIAs

The linked blog has a lot of info on the withdrawal stage of retirement, tax considerations, and Social Security. 

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59 minutes ago, D_House said:

Single premium immediate annuities are what you seek: SPIAs

The linked blog has a lot of info on the withdrawal stage of retirement, tax considerations, and Social Security. 

If I'm reading right, I don't have to buy this in my 40s and wait until my 80s? I can buy one at, say, 75 with a lump sum and it'll start paying out right away for as long as I live, right?

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22 minutes ago, shades said:

If I'm reading right, I don't have to buy this in my 40s and wait until my 80s? I can buy one at, say, 75 with a lump sum and it'll start paying out right away for as long as I live, right?

A podcast (I'm not sure which one, I listen to many) made a pretty convincing argument about a year ago that annuities can make good sense when you're older. When you're young they'll be expensive and lack upside. When you're older they're cheaper because on average they don't pay out as long but make sense if you do live long. Pretty much the opposite of Life insurance.

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Just now, -OZ- said:

A podcast (I'm not sure which one, I listen to many) made a pretty convincing argument about a year ago that annuities can make good sense when you're older. When you're young they'll be expensive and lack upside. When you're older they're cheaper because on average they don't pay out as long but make sense if you do live long. Pretty much the opposite of Life insurance.

Yeah it looks like this SPIA thing doesn't have that accumulation phase. Which is what my concern was... if I'm 45 and can contribute for 40 years and then start getting paid at 85, that's one plan I need to pull the trigger on fairly soon. However, if I can punt until I'm 84 and buy one then... that option could be better for me. 

Honestly, I'm not really concerned about which is better vs. the market or better vs. the average or has a tenth of a percent better return or whatever. I absolutely need an iron-clad guarantee that if I retire, lose some physical health and can't take care of myself, but... medical miracles keep me alive to 110 or 115... that I can pay for it. I don't care if instead I die at 86 and all my money goes to the insurance company. That's fine. They can have all my net worth for all I care by then. I'm not passing it on to anyone anyway.

 

It's really tough to plan in 2020 for something that realistically I won't be touching until 2060. So many things can/will happen by then.

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54 minutes ago, shades said:

If I'm reading right, I don't have to buy this in my 40s and wait until my 80s? I can buy one at, say, 75 with a lump sum and it'll start paying out right away for as long as I live, right?

Right. I’ve also read that the best rate of returns are achieved purchased in your 70s-80s. It’s longevity insurance essentially, no payout if you die early. And sounds like that’s exactly what you’re after.

Stolen from another personal finance blog:

With a SPIA, you pay an insurance company a lump sum, and then they send you a check every month for the rest of your life.  The older and sicker you are when you buy the SPIA, the larger the check. Interest rates affect your SPIA rate a great deal when you are relatively young (like 50) but much less as you get to be 70 or older. At those ages, the mortality credits have much more to do with the annuity rate than interest rates.  Despite today's historically low interest rates, a 70-year-old male can buy a SPIA on himself that pays him 8.12% of the lump sum per year, over double the “4% SWR rate” frequently discussed.  That isn't indexed to inflation.  If you want the annuity to adjust with the CPI-U, the current rate for that 70-year-old male is 5.9%.

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1 hour ago, D_House said:

Right. I’ve also read that the best rate of returns are achieved purchased in your 70s-80s. It’s longevity insurance essentially, no payout if you die early. And sounds like that’s exactly what you’re after.

 

 

Much appreciated. Now I just have to hope that someone is still selling these in 30 years.

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7 hours ago, Worm said:

I think it's as optimistic or pessimistic as the inputs and assumptions you use. 100% on firecalc could still be a terrible representation if your assumptions are that your portfolio grows at 20% per year and inflation is 0% per year.

I find it to be optimistic on an absolute scale.  I've delved into this area about as deeply as anyone.

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12 hours ago, shades said:

Yeah it looks like this SPIA thing doesn't have that accumulation phase. Which is what my concern was... if I'm 45 and can contribute for 40 years and then start getting paid at 85, that's one plan I need to pull the trigger on fairly soon. However, if I can punt until I'm 84 and buy one then... that option could be better for me. 

Honestly, I'm not really concerned about which is better vs. the market or better vs. the average or has a tenth of a percent better return or whatever. I absolutely need an iron-clad guarantee that if I retire, lose some physical health and can't take care of myself, but... medical miracles keep me alive to 110 or 115... that I can pay for it. I don't care if instead I die at 86 and all my money goes to the insurance company. That's fine. They can have all my net worth for all I care by then. I'm not passing it on to anyone anyway.

 

It's really tough to plan in 2020 for something that realistically I won't be touching until 2060. So many things can/will happen by then.

I mean, you could certainly fall in love later in life? Or feel very compelled to leave it to a certain charity? I wouldn't just completely blow off any money left when you die. 

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9 hours ago, Sand said:

I find it to be optimistic on an absolute scale.  I've delved into this area about as deeply as anyone.

 

34 minutes ago, ConstruxBoy said:

So what adjustments would you make when using it?

I would be interested in a further explanation of what you mean as well. It is basically an excel sheet with a front end userface so I'm not sure what parts you're referring to. I do agree that you need to consider taxes separately, and make sure you understand the present/future value of money correctly and how it's being handled in the interface.

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3 hours ago, ConstruxBoy said:

So what adjustments would you make when using it?

:2cents:

The problem isn't the program, it's darn good as a planning / forecasting tool.

Just don't take it blindly. You'll still need to adjust as you go. The good thing is we're all capable of changing course when needed. (The changes themselves will vary, some are harder than others to make)

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13 minutes ago, -OZ- said:

:2cents:

The problem isn't the program, it's darn good as a planning / forecasting tool.

Just don't take it blindly. You'll still need to adjust as you go. The good thing is we're all capable of changing course when needed. (The changes themselves will vary, some are harder than others to make)

Oh sure, totally agree. I was just wondering if @Sand had some specific tips for the tool itself. 

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19 hours ago, shades said:

I know, I know, annuities are terrible, right?

This applies, in general, to variable annuities and the other exotic products that have a 100+ page contract.  Single Premium Immediate Annuities and Deferred Annuities are simple products, so you can easily get a good idea of what you get.

The others are so convoluted you don't know what you're getting and they tend to underperform (in most cases badly).

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9 minutes ago, ConstruxBoy said:

Oh sure, totally agree. I was just wondering if @Sand had some specific tips for the tool itself. 

Yeah - but only in comparison with other tools.  I need to think about how to formulate the answer to this.

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On 12/16/2020 at 10:20 AM, ConstruxBoy said:

Oh sure, totally agree. I was just wondering if @Sand had some specific tips for the tool itself. 

I went through it a bit.  When I go through the investigate option and select for the highest spending that can support a 95% success rate it comes up with about double what I think it should be.  If I run the Firecalc number through my own historical calculator I get a 77% failure rate.  My number matches up with other calculators like Pralana Gold.  That's a major disconnect and if that's the same calc used for the rest of it it's a bit optimistic.  

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Aren't they using actual historic timeframes, though? I didn't think it was a model so much as a collection of every historical period of time for like 100+ years matching your own retirement timespan. Would you have failed from 1901-1941? 1902-1942? And so on. 

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11 hours ago, Lomez said:

Aren't they using actual historic timeframes, though? I didn't think it was a model so much as a collection of every historical period of time for like 100+ years matching your own retirement timespan. Would you have failed from 1901-1941? 1902-1942? And so on. 

Correct.  I have written my own algorithm for this and it doesn't match up - I'm very comfortable that my math is right.  I spent a months writing mine and it's more extensive than Firecalc.

Try it yourself and use that function.  It's way, way optimistic.

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12 hours ago, Sand said:

I went through it a bit.  When I go through the investigate option and select for the highest spending that can support a 95% success rate it comes up with about double what I think it should be.  If I run the Firecalc number through my own historical calculator I get a 77% failure rate.  My number matches up with other calculators like Pralana Gold.  That's a major disconnect and if that's the same calc used for the rest of it it's a bit optimistic.  

 

I seem to remember something weird about the firecalc settings, like you had to make sure you were looking at the right future. Like, sure, if you retired today with $X you're fine, but, if you're retiring in 2045 with the same $X you had to make sure firecalc was also including the inflation between now and 2045 and the cost of things at the end of the run in 2075 when it does the math. 

Anyway, firecalc's setup and parameters are not intuitive and it's definitely easy to think you're setting it up to do one thing, when it's really running an entirely different scenario.

 

That said, yeah, it also seems way too optimistic on top of that. For sure.

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Just now, -OZ- said:

Alright gang. Let's hear your financial wins for 2020.

Including contributions, we gained 6% more in 2020 than we had gained in 2019. In 19 we bought a RAV4, in 2020 we only bought a new HVAC system so that's part of the difference. 

 

From the end of 18 to now (assuming the markets don't tank this week) we've increased investments 50% (again, includes contributions). 

 

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10 minutes ago, shades said:

My net worth increased by my annual salary. Last month. So far, this month too. Hoping that streak continues, for sure. 

That's impressive!

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My big win was in getting educated on personal finance, getting organized, and making a plan.

Details:

1. Learned the value of an HSA and contributed for 2019 and 2020.

2. Got my wife’s tIRA out of CDs and rolled into her 403b where her funds are now invested in higher growth investments. 

3. Opened backdoor Roth IRAs for wife and I.

4. Got insured - increased liability on home and cars and added an umbrella policy (with a new carrier at a lower annual cost then our prior coverage); got term life for me and wife, and LT disability for me.

5. Started a taxable brokerage account and was able to harvest losses in September.

6. Started 529s for the kids.

7. Wrote an investment plan and automated as much as possible for all of the above.

So the agenda for 2021 is estate planning (have nothing done for this yet) and otherwise stick with the plan.

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3 hours ago, -OZ- said:

Alright gang. Let's hear your financial wins for 2020.

Maxed my 401K for the 6th(?) year in a row.

Maxed HSA for 2nd year in a row (didn't have one until I finally got smart last year)

In July/August I started actively managing my Roth IRA, left the rest of my retirement in Mutual Funds and ETFs.  Roth is up 33% YTD, the rest is up 11%.  Not pretending at all I totally know what I'm doing, but I'm learning every day.

Net worth increased 35% this year, up from 25% the year before.

Considering my partner (and her son) both lost their jobs this year, and how others have had it even worse in this #### show of a year, I'm pretty satisfied with how things have gone.

Next year my daughter heads to college, and we're planning a move to a more affordable area and buying our first home.  So a lot to learn and a lot to accomplish in 2021!

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19 minutes ago, D_House said:

My big win was in getting educated on personal finance, getting organized, and making a plan.

Details:

1. Learned the value of an HSA and contributed for 2019 and 2020.

2. Got my wife’s tIRA out of CDs and rolled into her 403b where her funds are now invested in higher growth investments. 

3. Opened backdoor Roth IRAs for wife and I.

4. Got insured - increased liability on home and cars and added an umbrella policy (with a new carrier at a lower annual cost then our prior coverage); got term life for me and wife, and LT disability for me.

5. Started a taxable brokerage account and was able to harvest losses in September.

6. Started 529s for the kids.

7. Wrote an investment plan and automated as much as possible for all of the above.

So the agenda for 2021 is estate planning (have nothing done for this yet) and otherwise stick with the plan.

Fantastic job, congrats!

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1 hour ago, D_House said:

My big win was in getting educated on personal finance, getting organized, and making a plan.

Details:

1. Learned the value of an HSA and contributed for 2019 and 2020.

2. Got my wife’s tIRA out of CDs and rolled into her 403b where her funds are now invested in higher growth investments. 

3. Opened backdoor Roth IRAs for wife and I.

4. Got insured - increased liability on home and cars and added an umbrella policy (with a new carrier at a lower annual cost then our prior coverage); got term life for me and wife, and LT disability for me.

5. Started a taxable brokerage account and was able to harvest losses in September.

6. Started 529s for the kids.

7. Wrote an investment plan and automated as much as possible for all of the above.

So the agenda for 2021 is estate planning (have nothing done for this yet) and otherwise stick with the plan.

:thumbup:

Awesome stuff. #7 is vastly underrated IMO. 90% of our stuff is automatic, and everything follows the IPS. (investor policy statement)

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1 hour ago, SFBayDuck said:

Maxed my 401K for the 6th(?) year in a row.

Maxed HSA for 2nd year in a row (didn't have one until I finally got smart last year)

In July/August I started actively managing my Roth IRA, left the rest of my retirement in Mutual Funds and ETFs.  Roth is up 33% YTD, the rest is up 11%.  Not pretending at all I totally know what I'm doing, but I'm learning every day.

Net worth increased 35% this year, up from 25% the year before.

Considering my partner (and her son) both lost their jobs this year, and how others have had it even worse in this #### show of a year, I'm pretty satisfied with how things have gone.

Next year my daughter heads to college, and we're planning a move to a more affordable area and buying our first home.  So a lot to learn and a lot to accomplish in 2021!

Great stuff! 

Does your daughter know where she plans to attend? (You may have mentioned it before, dog ate my notebook)

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44 minutes ago, -OZ- said:

Great stuff! 

Does your daughter know where she plans to attend? (You may have mentioned it before, dog ate my notebook)

Thanks!  And no, she's still finishing up her applications.  She's applying to three UC schools, U of O, and six private schools in California.  #1 on her list is currently UC Davis, so fingers crossed she gets accepted - both for her, and our finances!

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1 hour ago, SFBayDuck said:

Thanks!  And no, she's still finishing up her applications.  She's applying to three UC schools, U of O, and six private schools in California.  #1 on her list is currently UC Davis, so fingers crossed she gets accepted - both for her, and our finances!

Presumably you're in state. I won't be paying $44k for tuition for our kids :shock:

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1 minute ago, -OZ- said:
1 hour ago, SFBayDuck said:

Thanks!  And no, she's still finishing up her applications.  She's applying to three UC schools, U of O, and six private schools in California.  #1 on her list is currently UC Davis, so fingers crossed she gets accepted - both for her, and our finances!

Presumably you're in state. I won't be paying $44k for tuition for our kids :shock:

Well you also have a minivan full of them, I just have the one.  But yes Davis is $14,495 in state, with total cost of attendance estimated at $38K per year..  

Most of the private schools she's looking at come in between $70K-$80K annual total cost of attendance.  She'd better get some serious financial aid offers to make one of those make sense financially.

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Switched to a high deductible health plan with HSA option instead of a PPO - calendar year 2020 was our first year in the new plan. Work has offered 2 different high deductible plans for several years now, but I was gun-shy about making the switch. But during open enrollment just over a year ago, I finally did the math to account for the extra out of pocket costs up to the deductible, factoring in the lower monthly costs and employer contribution to an HSA, and decided it made sense. Also learned about the wonders of HSAs for the first time, and decided to max our contributions.

We absolutely worthwhile. Have not missed the HSA contributions from my paycheck, and that will help with a lower AGI that will assist in other ways. And the high deductible plan got tested early on, when 2 weeks into the new year my wife dislocated her shoulder. So we had to write a fat check for that ER visit early on, but since then have had $0 out of pocket for everything else in 2020, and it's all balanced out with the lower premiums and company HSA contribution.  Wish we had made the switch years ago. 

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11 minutes ago, themeanmachine said:

Switched to a high deductible health plan with HSA option instead of a PPO - calendar year 2020 was our first year in the new plan. Work has offered 2 different high deductible plans for several years now, but I was gun-shy about making the switch. But during open enrollment just over a year ago, I finally did the math to account for the extra out of pocket costs up to the deductible, factoring in the lower monthly costs and employer contribution to an HSA, and decided it made sense. Also learned about the wonders of HSAs for the first time, and decided to max our contributions.

We absolutely worthwhile. Have not missed the HSA contributions from my paycheck, and that will help with a lower AGI that will assist in other ways. And the high deductible plan got tested early on, when 2 weeks into the new year my wife dislocated her shoulder. So we had to write a fat check for that ER visit early on, but since then have had $0 out of pocket for everything else in 2020, and it's all balanced out with the lower premiums and company HSA contribution.  Wish we had made the switch years ago. 

Same thing I went through in 2019 - I was scared of having to cut the check for a big expense.  But especially with the company contribution it really becomes a no brainer.  Worst case is you have to pull from it to cover some costs with tax-free money, and last year I did have to do that with some of the funds.  Best case you let it ride and compound for years with double tax benefit.  It did take me until later in 2019 before I felt comfortable investing the money, but since then I have just kept the minimum amount required in cash and automatically invest the contributions.

I recently set up a folder in Google Drive and scan all medical receipts and store them there, along with a spreadsheet that keeps a running track of the total amount of receipts I have eligible for reimbursement.  I just wanted to have a better system than an envelope stuffed with receipts.

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2 hours ago, Lomez said:

We've reached the point in life where I'm jealous of posters' kids. I'd like to think there's a universe where, in my teens, I was exposed to possibilities like going to UC Davis for a Viticulture and Enology degree. 

Lol. I get it.

My older sister attended a private college. While not CA $$$, expensive fit the time. My parents paid for most of it. I was 3 years younger so I got to listen to dad ##### about paying for it. By the time came for me to go to college, I took the inexpensive state school which offered me almost a full ride. Before too long I got a full ride on the government, so I wouldn't have to listen to dad's complaining.  20+ years later we're doing quite well. I think she is too (mostly because her husband does well), but as a teacher who really didn't need the private school. 

I'm not trying to judge life choices, but those expensive schools usually aren't worth it. UC Davis seems like a really good deal imo.

 

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13 hours ago, Desert_Power said:

I was just glad that happened for us over the whole year. Each month means you won't be working much longer.

I think it means she/he doesn’t need to work 1 more day....  I’m trying to think of the combo of investments, balance, and salary that can yield this scenario. Best I am coming up with is $1MM invested entirely in Bitcoin and taking a job as a wal mart greeter 

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