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I’m studying for the SIE exam, gateway to becoming a financial advisor. I may leave teaching altogether and jump in feet first, or do part-time financial stuff while keeping my day job. Happy to accept advice from the wise folks here. 

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7 minutes ago, pecorino said:

I’m studying for the SIE exam, gateway to becoming a financial advisor. I may leave teaching altogether and jump in feet first, or do part-time financial stuff while keeping my day job. Happy to accept advice from the wise folks here. 

Good luck! I took it right before Covid hit as I was looking to switch jobs but Covid has put that on hold for now. Hopefully late this year or next year. 

 

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4 hours ago, b-snatchers said:

I have some EE bonds that will be reaching final maturity (no more interest) each month this year. They are $100 bonds (bought them for 50) and I am wondering what to do once they mature?

Can they be somehow rolled into something that I do not have to pay tax on them? I worried about cashing them in and then owing some taxes on them?

 

Any advice?

 

I don't think there's a way to do this.  The good news:  No state or local taxes.  

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Posted (edited)
On 5/25/2021 at 3:12 PM, jm192 said:

Any of you guys on EE Bonds?

I think they're potentially useful.  

If you leave your money in the bonds for 20 years, the treasury guarantees the bond value to double at year 20.  Up until that point, you get 0.1% on it.  Which sucks.  But if you are in a situation to leave it parked for the full 20 years, then it works out to about 3.5x%.  Which is better than a lot of bond funds today.

Sounds incredibly illiquid. Not as much as collectibles or land but won't appreciate like those could. Hard pass for me. 

Edited by -OZ-
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7 minutes ago, -OZ- said:

Sounds incredibly illiquid. Not as much as collectibles or land but won't appreciate like those could. Hard pass for me. 

Yeah, the more I’ve researched it, the less I love it.

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I didn’t see a way to do this but wanted to check in with the wizards here. Is there a way I could open an account, we will use Vanguard for the sake of discussion for my adult niece and put a deposit into the settlement fund without having to store my bank info there?  I’m thinking I’m going to need her email, social security, etc. since she is an adult and there’s no way I could do this without her knowing. Guess I could get her info, link my account first and then cancel it and entered hers after, but was wondering if anyone has a work around. Thanks for any guidance.

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My wife’s previous company got bought out and her 403b got moved into a fixed asset IRA as the default.  Our options seem to be....

1. Take a check. No. 
2. Move it into the 401k of her new job

3. Open some other kind of IRA account and dump it in there so we can actually invest it. 
4. Leave it as is. Probably dumb

 

If it matters, 35 yo and it’s about 100k in the account in question. 
 

Any thoughts?

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26 minutes ago, cheese said:

My wife’s previous company got bought out and her 403b got moved into a fixed asset IRA as the default.  Our options seem to be....

1. Take a check. No. 
2. Move it into the 401k of her new job

3. Open some other kind of IRA account and dump it in there so we can actually invest it. 
4. Leave it as is. Probably dumb

 

If it matters, 35 yo and it’s about 100k in the account in question. 
 

Any thoughts?

I'd probably move it into the 401K.  Though if it's possible--it would be good to figure out what options are available in their 401K.  

My job uses Schwab, which I can tell you things I don't like about--but I'm overall very happy with it.  Tons of options.

Wife's job uses Prudential:  There are like 4 index fund options to invest in and a bunch of target date set ups you can choose from.  I hate it.  

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29 minutes ago, cheese said:

My wife’s previous company got bought out and her 403b got moved into a fixed asset IRA as the default.  Our options seem to be....

1. Take a check. No. 
2. Move it into the 401k of her new job

3. Open some other kind of IRA account and dump it in there so we can actually invest it. 
4. Leave it as is. Probably dumb

 

If it matters, 35 yo and it’s about 100k in the account in question. 
 

Any thoughts?

It really depends on the funds in the 401k and whether you want to manage 3 retirement accounts. 

If the 401k had a low fee SP500 and target date funds I'd probably just put 80% in the target and 20% in the SP500, but I'm a pretty lazy investor overall. 

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, cheese said:

My wife’s previous company got bought out and her 403b got moved into a fixed asset IRA as the default.  Our options seem to be....

1. Take a check. No. 
2. Move it into the 401k of her new job

3. Open some other kind of IRA account and dump it in there so we can actually invest it. 
4. Leave it as is. Probably dumb

 

If it matters, 35 yo and it’s about 100k in the account in question. 
 

Any thoughts?

 

35 minutes ago, jm192 said:

I'd probably move it into the 401K.  Though if it's possible--it would be good to figure out what options are available in their 401K.  

My job uses Schwab, which I can tell you things I don't like about--but I'm overall very happy with it.  Tons of options.

Wife's job uses Prudential:  There are like 4 index fund options to invest in and a bunch of target date set ups you can choose from.  I hate it.  

First, consider the funds in the 401k, including the fees. If there's a low cost broad market fund available, that's probably a good option. 

If not, IRA. and then buy into a low cost broad market fund like VTI/VTSAX. 

There's nothing really wrong with target date funds, but they can have high fees and I find them too conservative for me. Others will differ. 

A great option, if available in the 401k is to follow Paul Merriman, 2 funds. Target date plus small cap value. 1.5 X your age in a TDF, and the remaining in SCV. so, at 35 it's 53% TDF, 47% SCV. but again, check the costs first.

Worth listening, get your : 🤓 on. https://paulmerriman.com/?powerpress_pinw=20003-podcast

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Thanks for the responses. I don’t have a good handle on the fees, but the funds to choose from look fine to use the 401k.  They have about 20 funds similar to what I’m used to from mine and the exact target date options you described.  

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25 minutes ago, cheese said:

Thanks for the responses. I don’t have a good handle on the fees, but the funds to choose from look fine to use the 401k.  They have about 20 funds similar to what I’m used to from mine and the exact target date options you described.  

The fees should be readily available in the plan literature. Look for "expense ratio". Good low cost funds have E.R. well under 0.1%, and ones that track an index can get under 0.05%.

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3 hours ago, Philo Beddoe said:

I need to park 200k somewhere safe for a year or until the housing market cools off. It’s currently sitting in my checking account and giving me anxiety. CD a good option?

CD is good.  High yield savings account is also good.  As long as they are FDIC insured you're good.

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Sooooo I have sold a rental house.  Prices are really, really good now and somebody bit on the price tag we put on it.  So now I'm playing the game of "hide the cheese" from the IRS.  Legally.  I've thought about maxing retirement accounts, HSA, charity, tax loss harvesting in the stock accounts.  What else am I missing?

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Just now, Sand said:

Sooooo I have sold a rental house.  Prices are really, really good now and somebody bit on the price tag we put on it.  So now I'm playing the game of "hide the cheese" from the IRS.  Legally.  I've thought about maxing retirement accounts, HSA, charity, tax loss harvesting in the stock accounts.  What else am I missing?

Buy another property?

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On 6/6/2021 at 1:42 PM, Philo Beddoe said:

I need to park 200k somewhere safe for a year or until the housing market cools off. It’s currently sitting in my checking account and giving me anxiety. CD a good option?

I'll pm you my PayPal.

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3 hours ago, Sand said:

Sooooo I have sold a rental house.  Prices are really, really good now and somebody bit on the price tag we put on it.  So now I'm playing the game of "hide the cheese" from the IRS.  Legally.  I've thought about maxing retirement accounts, HSA, charity, tax loss harvesting in the stock accounts.  What else am I missing?

Help my understanding.  Just to clarify, you've sold the property and we're trying to minimize taxes on the gains?

I'm not sure how retirement accounts/HSA prevent taxes on your capital gains here.  I'm sure there's some mechanism in which they get notified, alerted to the existence of the transaction.  But I'm sure there's something I'm missing or don't know about.  Feel free to clarify for me.

My gut reaction is to say tax loss harvest.  

Don't forget--you can deduct the cost of repairs/fix-ups and any costs involved in selling it.  

 

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35 minutes ago, jm192 said:

Help my understanding.  Just to clarify, you've sold the property and we're trying to minimize taxes on the gains?

I'm not sure how retirement accounts/HSA prevent taxes on your capital gains here.  I'm sure there's some mechanism in which they get notified, alerted to the existence of the transaction.  But I'm sure there's something I'm missing or don't know about.  Feel free to clarify for me.

My gut reaction is to say tax loss harvest.  

Don't forget--you can deduct the cost of repairs/fix-ups and any costs involved in selling it.  

 

Yes, minimizing taxes on a LTCG of reasonable size.

Unless I misunderstand the tax laws my income + LTCG pushes me into the 20% range (+ the 3.8% NIIT addon, as well).  I think.

Not sure how it will turn out.  I have managed to carry tax losses from tax loss harvesting since 2008, and added a ton of paper losses in 2020.  This will help a lot and I will be adding to those as I can this year.

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8 hours ago, jm192 said:

Help my understanding.  Just to clarify, you've sold the property and we're trying to minimize taxes on the gains?

I'm not sure how retirement accounts/HSA prevent taxes on your capital gains here.  I'm sure there's some mechanism in which they get notified, alerted to the existence of the transaction.  But I'm sure there's something I'm missing or don't know about.  Feel free to clarify for me.

My gut reaction is to say tax loss harvest.  

Don't forget--you can deduct the cost of repairs/fix-ups and any costs involved in selling it.  

 

The ideas Sand mentioned lower his total taxable income for the year.  Using the proceeds of a LT capital gain transaction to reduce ordinary income should result in a larger tax savings than reducing the gain itself. Of course that is assuming he wasn't already maxing those accounts.

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On 6/10/2021 at 11:22 PM, Sand said:

Yes, minimizing taxes on a LTCG of reasonable size.

Unless I misunderstand the tax laws my income + LTCG pushes me into the 20% range (+ the 3.8% NIIT addon, as well).  I think.

Not sure how it will turn out.  I have managed to carry tax losses from tax loss harvesting since 2008, and added a ton of paper losses in 2020.  This will help a lot and I will be adding to those as I can this year.

I gotcha.  

You CAN put the money in a traditional IRA and deduct it--but I think you're typically better off going the Roth route.  

If you're in a situation to do HSA, I'm very pro HSA.  I always favor maxing these.  

 

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1 hour ago, jm192 said:

I gotcha.  

You CAN put the money in a traditional IRA and deduct it--but I think you're typically better off going the Roth route.  

If you're in a situation to do HSA, I'm very pro HSA.  I always favor maxing these.  

HSA - maxed out.  401k - maxed out.  tIRA - can't do that one, sadly.

Tax loss harvested the crap out of my gambooling account this morning, so that will help.  We'll see how those issues do in the next 31 days.  :scared:

Doing charity stuff in a big way this year.  Gonna gather up old clothes, itemize those, and donate.

After that I think I'm just writing a check...  

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1 hour ago, Sand said:

HSA - maxed out.  401k - maxed out.  tIRA - can't do that one, sadly.

Tax loss harvested the crap out of my gambooling account this morning, so that will help.  We'll see how those issues do in the next 31 days.  :scared:

Doing charity stuff in a big way this year.  Gonna gather up old clothes, itemize those, and donate.

After that I think I'm just writing a check...  

I didn't even think about charity. 

You can donate appreciated assets to charity.  That way you get the tax deduction and don't owe for the capital gains.  

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io got crushed on taxes last year.

Have a small bu=iz and wrote off tons of things but the gambling   stocks got me big time.

MY question is...

If I buy $1000 in stock and it doubles....

And then I sell $1000 of it and free roll the rest.  Is my taxable $0? until I sell the freeroll of course

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41 minutes ago, KGB said:

io got crushed on taxes last year.

Have a small bu=iz and wrote off tons of things but the gambling   stocks got me big time.

MY question is...

If I buy $1000 in stock and it doubles....

And then I sell $1000 of it and free roll the rest.  Is my taxable $0? until I sell the freeroll of course

You are way overthinking the taxes. Let’s say you had 100 shares. You bought them at $10 and sold 50 shares at $20 and kept 50 shares. You aren’t really free rolling. You made $500 in gains on those 50 shares that you bought for $500 and sold for $1000. You still have another $500 in unrealized gains in the 50 shares you kept. When you sell the second 50, you’ll figure out the gains based on that sales price.

There is no gain on any shares that you haven’t sold. It’s all based on the shares you did sell and the gains are the sales price minus the buy price and then multiplied by the number of shares.

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2 minutes ago, stbugs said:

You are way overthinking the taxes. Let’s say you had 100 shares. You bought them at $10 and sold 50 shares at $20 and kept 50 shares. You aren’t really free rolling. You made $500 in gains on those 50 shares that you bought for $500 and sold for $1000. You still have another $500 in unrealized gains in the 50 shares you kept. When you sell the second 50, you’ll figure out the gains based on that sales price.

There is no gain on any shares that you haven’t sold. It’s all based on the shares you did sell and the gains are the sales price minus the buy price and then multiplied by the number of shares.

I guess in my personal circumstance, Id like to...  Purchase a stock, only sell what I put in, and let the rest ride, therefore having no taxes.  I just want to make sure Im thinking correctly.

This is my betting part of my retirement, I have everything else taken care of.

Am I thinking incorrectly?

TY for the advice 

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16 minutes ago, KGB said:

I guess in my personal circumstance, Id like to...  Purchase a stock, only sell what I put in, and let the rest ride, therefore having no taxes.  I just want to make sure Im thinking correctly.

This is my betting part of my retirement, I have everything else taken care of.

Am I thinking incorrectly?

TY for the advice 

You aren’t thinking correctly. Each set of shares you sell has a cost when you bought them and has a sales price. That’s how you get the gain. The length of time you hold the shares dictates the type of gain, long or short.

There is no concept of free rolling in taxes. Those shares just have a cost but no sales price. You are confusing selling half when it doubles with taxes. Free rolling means that if the second half goes to $0, you didn’t lose money and this you pay no taxes. Your second half still has value so you need to pay taxes on the first half you sold and then figure out taxes on the second half when you cell that.

Think about it, how would ever know how much the gain is on the shares you kept until you sell?

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1 minute ago, stbugs said:

You aren’t thinking correctly. Each set of shares you sell has a cost when you bought them and has a sales price. That’s how you get the gain. The length of time you hold the shares dictates the type of gain, long or short.

There is no concept of free rolling in taxes. Those shares just have a cost but no sales price. You are confusing selling half when it doubles with taxes. Free rolling means that if the second half goes to $0, you didn’t lose money and this you pay no taxes. Your second half still has value so you need to pay taxes on the first half you sold and then figure out taxes on the second half when you cell that.

Think about it, how would ever know how much the gain is on the shares you kept until you sell?

Gotcha.  So, If I sell 50 for 100% gain, I owe on the gain on the 50.  Makes sense.

Oh well, worth an ask.

 

Thanks for the info 😍

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1 hour ago, KGB said:

Gotcha.  So, If I sell 50 for 100% gain, I owe on the gain on the 50.  Makes sense.

Oh well, worth an ask.

 

Thanks for the info 😍

And, if you're at day 363, do go ahead and wait to sell for a profit until you are at 1 year and 1 day.  

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5 hours ago, jm192 said:

I didn't even think about charity. 

You can donate appreciated assets to charity.  That way you get the tax deduction and don't owe for the capital gains.  

Old t-shirts appreciate, right? 

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i've been looking into Roth 401k and Roth 457 recently. I will have other retirement sources so I'm not likely to ever touch this money and want to make as easy as possible (tax wise) to pass along when I die. From what I understand, it's more seamless to do this and then transfer to my Roth IRA down the road (and mandatory distribution not required at 70.5 or 72...whatever the age is that I can't recall off the top of my head)

Has anyone else been doing Roth 401k / Roth 457 (or perhaps doing a mix of 401k/Roth401k 457/Roth457 with their employer)? I'm pretty sure can move 401k to Roth IRA down the road regardless (I'd just have to foot the large tax bill at once) but was curious if anyone is doing the Roth 401k/Roth457 present day instead.

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4 hours ago, Craig_MiamiFL said:

i've been looking into Roth 401k and Roth 457 recently. I will have other retirement sources so I'm not likely to ever touch this money and want to make as easy as possible (tax wise) to pass along when I die. From what I understand, it's more seamless to do this and then transfer to my Roth IRA down the road (and mandatory distribution not required at 70.5 or 72...whatever the age is that I can't recall off the top of my head)

Has anyone else been doing Roth 401k / Roth 457 (or perhaps doing a mix of 401k/Roth401k 457/Roth457 with their employer)? I'm pretty sure can move 401k to Roth IRA down the road regardless (I'd just have to foot the large tax bill at once) but was curious if anyone is doing the Roth 401k/Roth457 present day instead.

I’m not currently doing this but based on what you described I think it’s a great way to leave a legacy for the reasons you mentioned (no RMDs, no taxes for the benys). 
 

Having access to a 401k and a 457 is a real nice bonus too if that’s the case (I may be making the wrong assumption).

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On 6/14/2021 at 7:29 PM, jm192 said:

I didn't even think about charity. 

You can donate appreciated assets to charity.  That way you get the tax deduction and don't owe for the capital gains.  

This. And if you regularly make charitable contributions, you can lump give this year (IE pay forward your expected giving over the next few years this year). One way to do this is through a donor advised fund. After funding the DAF, that money is no longer yours and is earmarked to give to charity but you get to decide to which charities and when. Fidelity and Vanguard both offer DAFs, which makes it easy to donate appreciated shares.

Lumping is also a good strategy to lower tax burden if you regularly give but not enough to meet the standard deduction. By lumping 2-3 years worth's of contributions into one tax year you can exceed the standard deduction and get "credit" for at least some of your giving.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Anyone have anything new or interesting happening?

We finally got to a point we could do our 2021 contributions for our IRA accounts.  Submitted the money today, will be a couple of days before I can do the conversions and invest.  But glad to get it moving.

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Anybody have experience with some of the alternative asset FinTech platforms?  I listen to the Animal Spirits podcast and their weekly "Talk your book" episode has exposed me to a lot of these ranging from BlockFi to Masterworks to Groundfloor.  I have some cash sitting in a savings account earning nothing, and my current total portfolio is about 82% equities, 6% bonds, 12% cash, and a tiny bit of crypto, most of that in retirement accounts.  I'd like to diversify a bit more, and thinking some of these, especially those not highly correlated to equities, might be a good place to put money to work.  Secondary question, are there ways to incorporate any of these into an IRA?    

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42 minutes ago, SFBayDuck said:

Anybody have experience with some of the alternative asset FinTech platforms?  I listen to the Animal Spirits podcast and their weekly "Talk your book" episode has exposed me to a lot of these ranging from BlockFi to Masterworks to Groundfloor.  I have some cash sitting in a savings account earning nothing, and my current total portfolio is about 82% equities, 6% bonds, 12% cash, and a tiny bit of crypto, most of that in retirement accounts.  I'd like to diversify a bit more, and thinking some of these, especially those not highly correlated to equities, might be a good place to put money to work.  Secondary question, are there ways to incorporate any of these into an IRA?    

I don't know if you're including Fundrise and other RE platforms, but I've been using Fundrise for a couple years now.

I wouldn't put more than 5% into any platform like these. But I might be more risk averse at this point than many.

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On 7/2/2021 at 5:22 PM, jm192 said:

Anyone have anything new or interesting happening?

 

🤓 Alert!

I've perfected my spread sheet to provide a few outputs after all the inputs.  The outputs show what happened if I stop bringing in income, how far away from "FI" we are, and how those get impacted if I die (insurance pays but they lose the pension and my income).  If we paid the mortgage off (out of FI funds) and kept living like we do, our withdrawal rate would be just under 4% (the usual goal). If I died and my wife paid off the mortgage out of insurance, her withdrawal rate would be 4.5% if she didn't work (she will, but doesn't get paid a lot).  

So, really the only reason I keep working is to pay for college (5x), for satisfaction, and so we can do more fun things. 

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27 minutes ago, -OZ- said:

I don't know if you're including Fundrise and other RE platforms, but I've been using Fundrise for a couple years now.

I wouldn't put more than 5% into any platform like these. But I might be more risk averse at this point than many.

Yup, that's another.  Groundfloor was the most recent one, and it's a different kind of RE play in that they're loaning money to people buying/flipping houses.  And that's about what I'm thinking for now - ease in to it and maybe build up to 5% allocation across a couple of these.  

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On 6/19/2021 at 8:34 AM, D_House said:

This. And if you regularly make charitable contributions, you can lump give this year (IE pay forward your expected giving over the next few years this year). One way to do this is through a donor advised fund. After funding the DAF, that money is no longer yours and is earmarked to give to charity but you get to decide to which charities and when. Fidelity and Vanguard both offer DAFs, which makes it easy to donate appreciated shares.

Lumping is also a good strategy to lower tax burden if you regularly give but not enough to meet the standard deduction. By lumping 2-3 years worth's of contributions into one tax year you can exceed the standard deduction and get "credit" for at least some of your giving.

I do lump 2 years into one to get away from the standard deduction.  First year of the new standard deduction I came in right on top of it.  Worst place to be, BTW.  With the lumping I'm way into itemized one year and way below the standard the next.  That's worth a couple K a year.

I'll look into DAFs.  Not sure I want to plot out giving that far in advance (my wife will want me to just give it all and then give more down the road), but it's certainly something to look into.  Thanks!

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4 minutes ago, Sand said:

I do lump 2 years into one to get away from the standard deduction.  First year of the new standard deduction I came in right on top of it.  Worst place to be, BTW.  With the lumping I'm way into itemized one year and way below the standard the next.  That's worth a couple K a year.

I'll look into DAFs.  Not sure I want to plot out giving that far in advance (my wife will want me to just give it all and then give more down the road), but it's certainly something to look into.  Thanks!

DAFs probably make a lot of sense in your situation. But your point is well received. I expect to set one up in the next few years, after thing #2 goes to college and we start to see the actual expenses. Right now it seems like an extra headache, but it probably would help with taxes. 

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Posted (edited)
On 7/6/2021 at 10:27 AM, SFBayDuck said:

Yup, that's another.  Groundfloor was the most recent one, and it's a different kind of RE play in that they're loaning money to people buying/flipping houses.  And that's about what I'm thinking for now - ease in to it and maybe build up to 5% allocation across a couple of these.  

I moved $5K into Groundfloor (took about 24 hours) and just used their investment tool to invest $100 or $110 in 47 different loans with an expected rate of return of 9.8%.  I think I'll start looking into specific projects a bit, but figured this was a good way to get in and see how it works while spreading my risk across a bunch of loans.

Edited by SFBayDuck
ETA: worst part is the 47 separate emails I got from Groundfloor, one for each loan
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On 7/6/2021 at 12:25 PM, -OZ- said:

🤓 Alert!

I've perfected my spread sheet to provide a few outputs after all the inputs.  The outputs show what happened if I stop bringing in income, how far away from "FI" we are, and how those get impacted if I die (insurance pays but they lose the pension and my income).  If we paid the mortgage off (out of FI funds) and kept living like we do, our withdrawal rate would be just under 4% (the usual goal). If I died and my wife paid off the mortgage out of insurance, her withdrawal rate would be 4.5% if she didn't work (she will, but doesn't get paid a lot).  

So, really the only reason I keep working is to pay for college (5x), for satisfaction, and so we can do more fun things. 

And apparently from you spending even more time building out spread sheets. I mean, what spread sheets could we expect if you had more time on your hands?

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Haha I love a good spread sheet.

I have a spread sheet with our account values and asset allocation.  It's been hard to account for the Mrs. 401K.

My wife's 401K is in a Target Date fund and the options all suck.  I recently realized you can look up the investments/asset allocation within the target date fund.  I set it up such that the assets are a calculation based on the percentage of each asset x the total value.  So as the amount changes, I can just edit the overall amount.

Of course, it's a target date fund.  So it will change.  But it solves a problem for now.  I plan on taking the account over from Prudential soon and just handling the future investments.  The target date fund is ~30% INTL funds.  And my 401K through Schwab that I've let Schwab do the things with so far at about 28% INTL. I'd like to get that down to 20-25.  

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8 hours ago, jm192 said:

Haha I love a good spread sheet.

I have a spread sheet with our account values and asset allocation.  It's been hard to account for the Mrs. 401K.

My wife's 401K is in a Target Date fund and the options all suck.  I recently realized you can look up the investments/asset allocation within the target date fund.  I set it up such that the assets are a calculation based on the percentage of each asset x the total value.  So as the amount changes, I can just edit the overall amount.

Of course, it's a target date fund.  So it will change.  But it solves a problem for now.  I plan on taking the account over from Prudential soon and just handling the future investments.  The target date fund is ~30% INTL funds.  And my 401K through Schwab that I've let Schwab do the things with so far at about 28% INTL. I'd like to get that down to 20-25.  

401k's can suck if the business doesn't ensure they don't.  It's surprising when they don't have an inexpensive broad market fund similar to VTSAX. I think it shows laziness by management as the accounts can be not only taking better care of employees but probably help retention among those who care about these things. 

My "401k" has limited options but they're good options. (TSP)

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Posted (edited)

401k guys: From my understanding, deferrals must be received no later than the 15th business day after the month of deferral according to DOL. (Company is around 5k employees)

For reference, I've still yet to receive my contributions/deferrals from my 6.18.21 paycheck (and now 7.2.21 paycheck....which is at least understandable to me). And seems to be more and more irregular with my deferrals being received/posted. It is a couple thousand $$. Fortunately I don't have a big chunk built overall yet. Hoping it doesn't come to it but I fully plan to go to DOL if isn't received by July 23. It is my 3rd employer so I really have no attachment to them outside of a check.

For background this company changed 401k financial providers in May. Deferrals were about 10 business days to post (which IMO is slow) with old 401k provider and they passed it off as "waiting for 401k provider to post deferrals"....wasn't ideal but whatever. Now with new 401k company....it's even slower & 100% believe it is my company's delaying it and really just want it investigated so I'm getting a legit response. Eventually I'm going to leave this company and move the $$ to either other employers (where I don't have any issues with 457/HSA contributions posting on payday at all).

 

Edited by Craig_MiamiFL
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On 7/8/2021 at 6:00 AM, -OZ- said:

401k's can suck if the business doesn't ensure they don't.  It's surprising when they don't have an inexpensive broad market fund similar to VTSAX. I think it shows laziness by management as the accounts can be not only taking better care of employees but probably help retention among those who care about these things. 

My "401k" has limited options but they're good options. (TSP)

Such a huge cash cow for so many investment banks. :rant:

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Going back to the Wife's 401K

Spent the day looking at everything.  There's a large cap blend, small cap blend, mid cap blend, a couple of bond fonds, International blend, and Emerging Markets.  

The expense ratios are high on everything except the large cap blend.  "Blackrock Equity Index fund J" it's called.  It has done a great job of tracking the S&P 500.  It has performed slightly better than VFIAX--the Vanguard equivalent.  And it has a lower expense ratio.  With everything else having significantly higher expense ratios than Index funds and ETF's I can get elsewhere--I'm considering placing 100% of this account into the large cap fund.  

My current investing plan calls for 45% Total US/Large Cap US stocks.  Her 401K will basically be all of it.  Is there some reason I'm missing that it would be bad to put all of our large cap stocks into this 1 fund at this point?  I guess I also have a little bit of pause because it's a relatively new fund and not something I've heard of or seen anywhere else.

I'm hoping to start a taxable account later in the year and that would obviously change the percentages.  

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