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1 hour ago, jrt103 said:

Think there would be any issues for a tall person to ride?  (6'3")

So for the RadMission they say it can be ridden by someone up to 6’4” (maybe 6’3”) their website has a sizing thing. I think that would be pushing it but it depends how much you mind being bent forward.

I’m 6’2” I have the seat post up pretty high and feels great to me. I prefer a more bent forward riding position as opposed to the more cruiser style though. But, comfort and preferred riding position are so personal so YMMV.

 

 

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16 minutes ago, Apple Jack said:

I think I found a bike I've been looking for finally through a retailer on the web. I guess you have it shipped to a local shop and have them put it together?

Unless you literally get a pile of parts, you can assemble a bike. You have to put on the wheel, handle bars, pedals, seat, remove some packaging and you’re set. Watch a video or two and you can do it. Something like this.

https://youtu.be/EKPA9_a2i_M

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2 hours ago, Apple Jack said:

I think I found a bike I've been looking for finally through a retailer on the web. I guess you have it shipped to a local shop and have them put it together?

What are you getting?

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16 hours ago, Apple Jack said:

I think I found a bike I've been looking for finally through a retailer on the web. I guess you have it shipped to a local shop and have them put it together?

Hydraulic brakes are the only tricky part in assembling a bike.  Even that has videos you can follow - Youtube is great for bike assembly and maintenance.

I recommend getting a tool kit rather than buying individual tools - less expensive in the long run.  I bought one at a time and eventually bought everything in a kit for double the price.  Maybe something like this or this.  A bike stand is also expensive, but sure pays off in the long run.  I'm guessing I put about $250 into stand plus tools, and between all of my family's bikes (3 newer heavy-use MTB, 2 older light-use MTBs), probably save about $200 per year in repair and tuneup costs.

I do end up taking in about one bike per year for a fix I can't handle - I'm a spoke idiot, so I'd rather pay to get spokes replaced, for example. 

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5 minutes ago, Tick said:

Hydraulic brakes are the only tricky part in assembling a bike.  Even that has videos you can follow - Youtube is great for bike assembly and maintenance.

I recommend getting a tool kit rather than buying individual tools - less expensive in the long run.  I bought one at a time and eventually bought everything in a kit for double the price.  Maybe something like this or this.  A bike stand is also expensive, but sure pays off in the long run.  I'm guessing I put about $250 into stand plus tools, and between all of my family's bikes (3 newer heavy-use MTB, 2 older light-use MTBs), probably save about $200 per year in repair and tuneup costs.

I do end up taking in about one bike per year for a fix I can't handle - I'm a spoke idiot, so I'd rather pay to get spokes replaced, for example. 

I ordered the knock-off of that stand for $30 direct from China. Waiting for it to land, will give a stellar review when acquired. I'd second the tool kit. Allen wrenches are essential but what I always have to borrow from a friend (always = twice in last 2 years) is the tool you need to change out a cassette. Just by itself I think those are $20 so buying a kit for a little more is a no brainer.

The Trek bikes I've assembled all came with the tools needed to be assembled but if you plan to do your own maintenance (which I recommend as much as possible) investing in tools and a stand are a good idea.

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2 minutes ago, The Commish said:

Still waiting on the bike I ordered the first week of January after them saying it'd be about a month to get it :kicksrock: 

They say which month? :P

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9 minutes ago, beer 30 said:

I ordered the knock-off of that stand for $30 direct from China. Waiting for it to land, will give a stellar review when acquired. I'd second the tool kit. Allen wrenches are essential but what I always have to borrow from a friend (always = twice in last 2 years) is the tool you need to change out a cassette. Just by itself I think those are $20 so buying a kit for a little more is a no brainer.

The Trek bikes I've assembled all came with the tools needed to be assembled but if you plan to do your own maintenance (which I recommend as much as possible) investing in tools and a stand are a good idea.

I've been accumulating bike servicing equipment/tools as well.  I picked up a used Park Tool repair stand for $50 off craigslist, I've got a chain cleaner, lockring removal socket, chainwhip, bottom bracket socket, crankarm puller, etc.  There are still a few more tools that I need, but those repairs haven't been necessary.  My shifter cable on my mountain bike is frayed at the derailleur, so my next project is going to be replacing that, so I assume I'll need at least a good pair of cable cutters.  I'm pretty sure I've already saved money making my own repairs versus taking my bikes in for service.

I highly recommend the cassette lockring removal socket and a chainwhip, as I find removing the cassette cogs so much easier when it comes to cleaning.

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21 minutes ago, The Commish said:

Still waiting on the bike I ordered the first week of January after them saying it'd be about a month to get it :kicksrock: 

What did you end up going with?  My neighbor ordered a mountain bike at the beginning of December and was told it was scheduled to arrive in the shop on January 15th.  He just got it on Friday.  

Most of the bike forums/groups that I follow report similar (or worse) delays.

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9 minutes ago, Dickies said:

I highly recommend the cassette lockring removal socket and a chainwhip, as I find removing the cassette cogs so much easier when it comes to cleaning.

Yes, the only two things I have to borrow. Chain cleaner is another must have. Just cleaned mine yesterday, love the look and feel of a clean chain. Oh, also by the tools to change out a chain

So you remove your cassette to clean it? Makes sense, just seems like a lot of work. I recently got a long bristle brush that is really stiff to use for this. Hoping to avoid that but I see you'd get a deep cleaning that way.

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18 minutes ago, Dickies said:

What did you end up going with?  My neighbor ordered a mountain bike at the beginning of December and was told it was scheduled to arrive in the shop on January 15th.  He just got it on Friday.  

Most of the bike forums/groups that I follow report similar (or worse) delays.

A Giant hybrid that I can also take on some trails.  I forget who offered up that suggestion, but it turned out to be a good discussion because I've found some areas here I want to go riding on and I think that functionality will be useful.  

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20 minutes ago, beer 30 said:

Yes, the only two things I have to borrow. Chain cleaner is another must have. Just cleaned mine yesterday, love the look and feel of a clean chain. Oh, also by the tools to change out a chain

So you remove your cassette to clean it? Makes sense, just seems like a lot of work. I recently got a long bristle brush that is really stiff to use for this. Hoping to avoid that but I see you'd get a deep cleaning that way.

Every time I try to clean my cassette I manage to get lube on my disc brake rotors.  Even if I am really diligent and clean the rotor afterwards, somehow i wind up with no braking power..... I can't explain it.  I then have to take the wheel off again, take the brake pads out, and re-clean the brake system.  I don't see it as much more work to just take the cassette off and soak the cogs in degreaser, plus I find that it comes out much cleaner.

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34 minutes ago, Dickies said:

Every time I try to clean my cassette I manage to get lube on my disc brake rotors.  Even if I am really diligent and clean the rotor afterwards, somehow i wind up with no braking power..... I can't explain it.  I then have to take the wheel off again, take the brake pads out, and re-clean the brake system.  I don't see it as much more work to just take the cassette off and soak the cogs in degreaser, plus I find that it comes out much cleaner.

Yea, if you're pulling the wheel to clean brakes I can see the benefit. I ride 99% of my miles on a trainer right now so little easier to manage cleaning the chain and cassette. The bike I ride on the roads could probably use a good cleaning like you outline but I have a redneck stand that doesn't really hold the bike well for that kind of stuff so will wait until I get the cheap one from above and maybe pull it all apart for spring cleaning.

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4 minutes ago, beer 30 said:

Yea, if you're pulling the wheel to clean brakes I can see the benefit. I ride 99% of my miles on a trainer right now so little easier to manage cleaning the chain and cassette. The bike I ride on the roads could probably use a good cleaning like you outline but I have a redneck stand that doesn't really hold the bike well for that kind of stuff so will wait until I get the cheap one from above and maybe pull it all apart for spring cleaning.

Before I got my stand I would use a 6' ladder, and just hang the seat from the crossbar.to get the rear wheel off the ground.  Obviously the repair stand works better, but the ladder worked remarkably well.

Since getting my mountain bike I've become hopelessly addicted to it, so needless to say I clean a lot of chains.  The whole process of removing and soaking the cassette is second nature now, and it takes me no more than 5 minutes to get the bike in the stand, the wheel off the bike, and the cassette off the wheel.  I get the cassette soaking in degreaser, and by the time I finish cleaning the chain I scrub the cassette, rinse/dry and slap it back on the bike.  Start to finish I'd say it takes me 20 minutes, then 10 minutes to wash the bike, and another minute to apply the lube once the bike is fully dried off.

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1 hour ago, beer 30 said:

Yes, the only two things I have to borrow. Chain cleaner is another must have. Just cleaned mine yesterday, love the look and feel of a clean chain. Oh, also by the tools to change out a chain

So you remove your cassette to clean it? Makes sense, just seems like a lot of work. I recently got a long bristle brush that is really stiff to use for this. Hoping to avoid that but I see you'd get a deep cleaning that way.

I use little rope things that get between the gears.  These.

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On 3/7/2021 at 8:34 PM, Apple Jack said:

I think I found a bike I've been looking for finally through a retailer on the web. I guess you have it shipped to a local shop and have them put it together?

I just thought of this since we were discussing it earlier this week. That is what your bike should look like when it arrives. You put on the front wheel, handle bars, pedals and seat.

https://li0.rightinthebox.com/images/wholesale/201611/18.jpg

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Does anybody have any opinion on Trek bikes?  I'm leaning toward the Trek FX disc from a nearby shop

Was debating between the FX and the Dual sport but from reading the front shock on the Dual sport is not that good for street riding

This bike will mostly be used for 4 mile commute on city streets and sidewalks full of potholes 

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On 3/8/2021 at 1:00 PM, Tick said:

Hydraulic brakes are the only tricky part in assembling a bike.  Even that has videos you can follow - Youtube is great for bike assembly and maintenance.

they should  come already setup.   you just need to attach the calibers to the fork and frame.   

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1 hour ago, jrt103 said:

Does anybody have any opinion on Trek bikes?  I'm leaning toward the Trek FX disc from a nearby shop

Was debating between the FX and the Dual sport but from reading the front shock on the Dual sport is not that good for street riding

This bike will mostly be used for 4 mile commute on city streets and sidewalks full of potholes 

You should be able to lock the front shocks.

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15 minutes ago, Apple Jack said:

You should be able to lock the front shocks.

I believe that the base model dual sport is not able to be locked.  Its only listed as lockable on the DS2 and DS3 but Im' not 100% sure

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3 hours ago, jrt103 said:

Does anybody have any opinion on Trek bikes?  I'm leaning toward the Trek FX disc from a nearby shop

Was debating between the FX and the Dual sport but from reading the front shock on the Dual sport is not that good for street riding

This bike will mostly be used for 4 mile commute on city streets and sidewalks full of potholes 

Trek, Specialized, and Giant are the three big good brands.  You should be happy with the quality from any of them.

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3 hours ago, beer 30 said:

Have a Trek FX4 Sport, is my favorite bike out of the three I own (all Trek’s). Great commuter bike.

very nice, how do you like the hydraulic disc brakes?  I read that  your supposed to change the brake fluid every 6 months and it sounds kind of silly

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I got a Trek Marlin 5 for Christmas.  I've done a few rides but took it on a trail for the first time today.

Aaaand, this happened.  I bought a multi-tool with a chain repair function so I fixed it by taking apart my chain and reassembling.

Googling around, it appears a dirty chain can be a cause of chain-suck. I did down-shift while peddling hard up a hill so it could be that too.  I gotta be better about that, I guess.  I hope I didn't bend the sproket.

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8 hours ago, jrt103 said:

very nice, how do you like the hydraulic disc brakes?  I read that  your supposed to change the brake fluid every 6 months and it sounds kind of silly

Nah

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20 hours ago, jrt103 said:

very nice, how do you like the hydraulic disc brakes?  I read that  your supposed to change the brake fluid every 6 months and it sounds kind of silly

Love them but you need to get used to them, they will stop you on a dime. Have no plans to change fluid unless needed to. It's a self contained unit, not sure why you would need to do anything unless there was a leak.

14 hours ago, moleculo said:

I got a Trek Marlin 5 for Christmas.  I've done a few rides but took it on a trail for the first time today.

Aaaand, this happened.  I bought a multi-tool with a chain repair function so I fixed it by taking apart my chain and reassembling.

Googling around, it appears a dirty chain can be a cause of chain-suck. I did down-shift while peddling hard up a hill so it could be that too.  I gotta be better about that, I guess.  I hope I didn't bend the sproket.

So did the chain hop off the sprocket? Unpack this some.

Same color as my Trek Marlin 7. Pretty bike, hard on your ### :lmao:

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6 minutes ago, beer 30 said:

 

So did the chain hop off the sprocket? Unpack this some.

Same color as my Trek Marlin 7. Pretty bike, hard on your ### :lmao:

It stuck on the sprocket while down shifting and got wedged on the wrong side of the frame.  "Chain suck" I think it's called.

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7 minutes ago, moleculo said:

It stuck on the sprocket while down shifting and got wedged on the wrong side of the frame.  "Chain suck" I think it's called.

Ouch, never heard of that before. Not how you want to break the bike in on a trail, eh? Good exercise to fill the knowledge bank but hate having to make repairs like that out in the wild.

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14 minutes ago, beer 30 said:

Ouch, never heard of that before. Not how you want to break the bike in on a trail, eh? Good exercise to fill the knowledge bank but hate having to make repairs like that out in the wild.

for sure.  I was on the trails by RiverWalk - lots of fun.  I was with my daughter - she rides a $150 walmart special so we aren't doing anything crazy.  Lots of walking up the hills, for example.  A bit frustruating that I have a (low-end) nice mountain bike that breaks down on me while here POS walmart is fine.

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1 hour ago, moleculo said:

It stuck on the sprocket while down shifting and got wedged on the wrong side of the frame.  "Chain suck" I think it's called.

I've had a couple near misses with this recently. Thinking the chain may have stretched a bit since I bought the bike a couple year ago. No idea if that is a thing. Need to take in for a tune-up anyway.

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On 3/13/2021 at 7:07 AM, jrt103 said:

Does anybody have any opinion on Trek bikes?  I'm leaning toward the Trek FX disc from a nearby shop

Was debating between the FX and the Dual sport but from reading the front shock on the Dual sport is not that good for street riding

This bike will mostly be used for 4 mile commute on city streets and sidewalks full of potholes 

FX >>>>> DS

The suspension forks on low end bikes don't really provide much benefit and they weigh a lot more.  If you're riding almost exclusively pavement then there is really zero need for a suspension fork.  There is a reason road bikes never have them.

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16 minutes ago, Apple Jack said:

I've had a couple near misses with this recently. Thinking the chain may have stretched a bit since I bought the bike a couple year ago. No idea if that is a thing. Need to take in for a tune-up anyway.

Chain stretch is a thing.  They make a tool to measure it.   If you catch it early enough, you might not have to replace the cassette as well but I just run a low budget cassette so I swap out both once I start having shifting issues that can't be remedied with just a derailleur adjustment.   

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19 minutes ago, Apple Jack said:

I've had a couple near misses with this recently. Thinking the chain may have stretched a bit since I bought the bike a couple year ago. No idea if that is a thing. Need to take in for a tune-up anyway.

Assuming your chain is lubed and derailleur properly adjusted, then you very well may have a stretched chain.  Riding with a stretched chain can also prematurely wear out your cassette and front chain rings, so it's one of those things that's better to address early.

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23 minutes ago, Dickies said:

Assuming your chain is lubed and derailleur properly adjusted, then you very well may have a stretched chain.  Riding with a stretched chain can also prematurely wear out your cassette and front chain rings, so it's one of those things that's better to address early.

You don't usually see it until there is 1-2k miles on a chain, though.  Anything is possible, but chains are typically pretty hardy.

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On 3/8/2021 at 1:31 PM, Apple Jack said:
On 3/7/2021 at 10:27 PM, Dickies said:

What are you getting?

Was looking at a Kona but after determining it's no lighter than my bike I'm going to pass.

The weight of a bike should be a very small decider in what bike you ride. Unless you are training for a triathlon or road racing, a bike weighing a couple extra pounds is no big deal. I say this as someone who has two Konas (aluminum fat tire and steel gravel).

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22 hours ago, jrt103 said:

very nice, how do you like the hydraulic disc brakes?  I read that  your supposed to change the brake fluid every 6 months and it sounds kind of silly

I don't think this is true.  You'll hear people say they bleed/flush theirs anywhere from multiple times a month (usually mountain bikes) to every 6 months, every year, or every 2+ years.  My impression from what I've read is that as long as the brakes are working properly and don't feel squishy then there is no need to do anything.  That said, periodic brake fluid maintenance can't be a bad thing.

Supposedly there is a difference between the SRAM discs and the other major manufacturers in that they use DOT fluid, which breaks down due to heat.  Most other hydraulic disc systems use mineral oil, which doesn't break down.

My mountain bike has about 500 hard-ridden miles on it and I haven't done anything with the brake fluid, but since I value my ability to safely brake while coming down steep single track, I will probably flush the fluid when I replace pads (probably only have 25% left).

My hybrid has over 2,000 road miles, but I just don't see the need to do anything until the brakes start feeling soft/unresponsive.  Even if one of my brakes started acting up, I don't foresee a situation where I couldn't safely stop the bike and get back home in one piece.

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2 hours ago, the moops said:

The weight of a bike should be a very small decider in what bike you ride. Unless you are training for a triathlon or road racing, a bike weighing a couple extra pounds is no big deal. I say this as someone who has two Konas (aluminum fat tire and steel gravel).

I have to carry mine up two flights of stairs on my loop just prior to a half hour up uphill coming home. I think I have another season with 33 pounds before being ready to shell out for lighter frame and wheels.

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6 hours ago, the moops said:

The weight of a bike should be a very small decider in what bike you ride. Unless you are training for a triathlon or road racing, a bike weighing a couple extra pounds is no big deal. I say this as someone who has two Konas (aluminum fat tire and steel gravel).

Weight really doesn't matter too much in tri bikes, unless you're doing Savageman, i.e. super hilly.  Aero is everything and on flat ground with acceleration not a big deal weight just doesn't matter.  It makes a big difference for hilly rides (roadie, MTB) and with hard accelerations (crits, so roadie again).  

:looksatstomach:  :X

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6 hours ago, Dickies said:

I don't think this is true.  You'll hear people say they bleed/flush theirs anywhere from multiple times a month (usually mountain bikes) to every 6 months, every year, or every 2+ years.  My impression from what I've read is that as long as the brakes are working properly and don't feel squishy then there is no need to do anything.  That said, periodic brake fluid maintenance can't be a bad thing.

Supposedly there is a difference between the SRAM discs and the other major manufacturers in that they use DOT fluid, which breaks down due to heat.  Most other hydraulic disc systems use mineral oil, which doesn't break down.

My mountain bike has about 500 hard-ridden miles on it and I haven't done anything with the brake fluid, but since I value my ability to safely brake while coming down steep single track, I will probably flush the fluid when I replace pads (probably only have 25% left).

My hybrid has over 2,000 road miles, but I just don't see the need to do anything until the brakes start feeling soft/unresponsive.  Even if one of my brakes started acting up, I don't foresee a situation where I couldn't safely stop the bike and get back home in one piece.

Most important part of a bike:  front brake.  About 1000% more important than any other part.  I have the road rash to prove it.

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10 hours ago, moleculo said:

It stuck on the sprocket while down shifting and got wedged on the wrong side of the frame.  "Chain suck" I think it's called.

I did this on a really hard climb and really cranked down on the chain... had to replace all my spokes over time from the chain damage to them, I wish I had just bought a new wheel.

Yes, I felt dumb.

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eBike update. May be taboo in here :lol:

I definitely enjoy riding my regular commuter still. For exercise still getting out on it pretty much every day for a 45 minute ride at lunch.

The eBike I have ridden to meet up with people and on a few longer rides and it is just awesome. I’m cruising up hills at probably 20 mph. Still get a bit of exercise I suppose, I don’t come out of the saddle at all so maybe working different parts of the legs a bit.

The fun factor of just blasting up hills and very quickly accelerating is just great. 

 

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2 hours ago, CletiusMaximus said:

Is it just me being forgetful or have tubes doubled in price over the past year or so?

I really miss Nashbar.  

I found Nashbar just as they were consolidating warehouses after being bought, and I just loaded up on clearance stuff.  I'm going to cry when I run out of cheap tubes and tires.

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5 hours ago, CletiusMaximus said:

Is it just me being forgetful or have tubes doubled in price over the past year or so?

I really miss Nashbar.  

 

I don't remember the price of tubes in the past, but I don't think they've doubled.  There was a good amount of time last year where it was nearly impossible to find various tube sizes, so given the lack of availability it makes sense that they might be a bit more expensive now.

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10 hours ago, CletiusMaximus said:

Is it just me being forgetful or have tubes doubled in price over the past year or so?

I really miss Nashbar.  

 

They've gone way up.  BTW, I found the tubes at REI to be very cost competitive for general use.

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