Jump to content
Fantasy Football - Footballguys Forums

The Best Coffee


Recommended Posts

Another vote for a Chemex here. Got mine about a year ago and have consistently had, by far, the best coffee of my life with it.

My progression in the last 5-6 years went from:

Dunkin Donuts takeout

Starbucks takeout

Keurig

Grinding my own beans with a Mr Coffee

A Moka Express

A French Press

A Chemex

I'm not nearly as scientific as some here, but just figured I'd show how I've gotten more interested. The Chemex makes an amazing cup of coffee for me. Not bitter at all. Very stable and consistent from batch to batch. And not much of a $$$ commitment either. Less than 40.00.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I personally only buy cafe bustelo espresso.

Is this good coffee?

You drink it and you don't know if it's good?
I think its good but im curious what the experts think.

I dont want to drink lousy coffee.

Last year I was obsessed with my moka pot, made cappuccino every morning with it. I used Cafe Bustelo. It's dirt cheap and it's the right grind for using a moka pot. I thought it was consistently great coffee, especially for the price.
Thats what i always thought. When considering value i think it knocks your socks off.

Ive met some people who think its crap coffee but ive also met a few converts.

My wife used to swear by this but has moved on to Mayorga coffee. Not sure the exact blend but I think it's cafecubano. It's really good.

We still go back whenever were out of the Mayorga coffee.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I personally only buy cafe bustelo espresso.

Is this good coffee?

You drink it and you don't know if it's good?
I think its good but im curious what the experts think.

I dont want to drink lousy coffee.

Last year I was obsessed with my moka pot, made cappuccino every morning with it. I used Cafe Bustelo. It's dirt cheap and it's the right grind for using a moka pot. I thought it was consistently great coffee, especially for the price.
Thats what i always thought. When considering value i think it knocks your socks off.

Ive met some people who think its crap coffee but ive also met a few converts.

My wife used to swear by this but has moved on to Mayorga coffee. Not sure the exact blend but I think it's cafecubano. It's really good.

We still go back whenever were out of the Mayorga coffee.

They dont have mayorga in the local bodega.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wife got me some Three Peckered Billy Goat from Raven's Brew for Christmas and we absolutely love it.

A brew that is too placid
may leave a billy flaccid.
But three willies on a billy,
is that too many for a nanny?
If not, then your billy should sup
from the cup that keeps him up.
So fill his cup or apply as a lotion,
then enjoy his three-stroke motion.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

So a Chemex is pretty much a drip coffee maker where you pour the water instead of letting the Mr. Coffee do it for you?

Serious question? Or making fun of the chemex?

With a manual pour over I can control the exact temperature of the water and the exact place it gets poured on the grounds, and it is way easier to clean. Even extraction and temperature control are two of the main factors in getting a consistent flavor from your coffee.

With a Mr Coffee, who knows what the temp is? I don't. You get whatever they say you should as long as your $25 plastic piece of equipment lasts, as long as the manufacturing consistency from China is spot on. You can't do different temperatures for different beans at all. Also, the water gets poured into the middle of the coffee in the same spot. The beans in the middle get over extracted, the beans on the outer edge get less extracted. That's not good for flavor.

Also, it's way easier to clean. When was the last time you cleaned your Mr Coffee? Coffee has a lot of oils that, like most, get rancid with time. If you are putting new coffee in and it is running over a plastic coffee maker that has a bunch of uncleaned rancid oil that hasn't been cleaned since who knows when, that's not good for flavor.

The Chemex also has a really thick paper filter that takes a lot of the oils out before it gets to your glass. Some people like this. Some people don't, they prefer a more full taste that does have bitter oils in it. You can get a metal filter for the chemex if you're one of these people, I love the clarity, brightness of flavor, and lack of bitterness of the paper filter.

Finally, you should just try it. Find a friend who has a chemex, then make some coffee according to this guide. At the same time, have your Mr Coffee brewing. If you can't taste a difference, stick with what you've got. If the difference is worth the slight bit of extra fussiness while making coffee (and the way less fussiness of cleaning the brewer) then you should buy one. If it's not, stick with what's been working for you.

So there are no drip coffee makers that take thicker filters or give you any control over water temp? And forgive me if I am little skeptical about the advantages of pouring the water in specific patterns.

It just seems like a nice way to separate hipsters from their money.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

After going the french press route, I'm starting to realize something I should have figured out a long time ago: beans matter a lot more than the preparation method. Since coffee has only 2 ingredients, this should have been more obvious, but hey, I'm slow.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So a Chemex is pretty much a drip coffee maker where you pour the water instead of letting the Mr. Coffee do it for you?

Serious question? Or making fun of the chemex?

With a manual pour over I can control the exact temperature of the water and the exact place it gets poured on the grounds, and it is way easier to clean. Even extraction and temperature control are two of the main factors in getting a consistent flavor from your coffee.

With a Mr Coffee, who knows what the temp is? I don't. You get whatever they say you should as long as your $25 plastic piece of equipment lasts, as long as the manufacturing consistency from China is spot on. You can't do different temperatures for different beans at all. Also, the water gets poured into the middle of the coffee in the same spot. The beans in the middle get over extracted, the beans on the outer edge get less extracted. That's not good for flavor.

Also, it's way easier to clean. When was the last time you cleaned your Mr Coffee? Coffee has a lot of oils that, like most, get rancid with time. If you are putting new coffee in and it is running over a plastic coffee maker that has a bunch of uncleaned rancid oil that hasn't been cleaned since who knows when, that's not good for flavor.

The Chemex also has a really thick paper filter that takes a lot of the oils out before it gets to your glass. Some people like this. Some people don't, they prefer a more full taste that does have bitter oils in it. You can get a metal filter for the chemex if you're one of these people, I love the clarity, brightness of flavor, and lack of bitterness of the paper filter.

Finally, you should just try it. Find a friend who has a chemex, then make some coffee according to this guide. At the same time, have your Mr Coffee brewing. If you can't taste a difference, stick with what you've got. If the difference is worth the slight bit of extra fussiness while making coffee (and the way less fussiness of cleaning the brewer) then you should buy one. If it's not, stick with what's been working for you.

So there are no drip coffee makers that take thicker filters or give you any control over water temp? And forgive me if I am little skeptical about the advantages of pouring the water in specific patterns.

It just seems like a nice way to separate hipsters from their money.

This is really the big deal IMO -- and no, there aren't at a comparable price. French Press / Chemex and electric kettle are the way to go IMO. Controlling the temperature and time personally vs. just trusting a cheap machine to do it correctly is a no-brainer to me, and I'm nowhere near as much of a coffee guru as some of the folks here, just a guy who likes good black coffee.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So a Chemex is pretty much a drip coffee maker where you pour the water instead of letting the Mr. Coffee do it for you?

Serious question? Or making fun of the chemex?

With a manual pour over I can control the exact temperature of the water and the exact place it gets poured on the grounds, and it is way easier to clean. Even extraction and temperature control are two of the main factors in getting a consistent flavor from your coffee.

With a Mr Coffee, who knows what the temp is? I don't. You get whatever they say you should as long as your $25 plastic piece of equipment lasts, as long as the manufacturing consistency from China is spot on. You can't do different temperatures for different beans at all. Also, the water gets poured into the middle of the coffee in the same spot. The beans in the middle get over extracted, the beans on the outer edge get less extracted. That's not good for flavor.

Also, it's way easier to clean. When was the last time you cleaned your Mr Coffee? Coffee has a lot of oils that, like most, get rancid with time. If you are putting new coffee in and it is running over a plastic coffee maker that has a bunch of uncleaned rancid oil that hasn't been cleaned since who knows when, that's not good for flavor.

The Chemex also has a really thick paper filter that takes a lot of the oils out before it gets to your glass. Some people like this. Some people don't, they prefer a more full taste that does have bitter oils in it. You can get a metal filter for the chemex if you're one of these people, I love the clarity, brightness of flavor, and lack of bitterness of the paper filter.

Finally, you should just try it. Find a friend who has a chemex, then make some coffee according to this guide. At the same time, have your Mr Coffee brewing. If you can't taste a difference, stick with what you've got. If the difference is worth the slight bit of extra fussiness while making coffee (and the way less fussiness of cleaning the brewer) then you should buy one. If it's not, stick with what's been working for you.

So there are no drip coffee makers that take thicker filters or give you any control over water temp? And forgive me if I am little skeptical about the advantages of pouring the water in specific patterns.

It just seems like a nice way to separate hipsters from their money.

A chemex costs like 40 bucks. Other pour-over solutions (which are typically cup by cup) are even cheaper.

For a drip machine. I don't really believe in adjusting temperature by bean, but you do need a machine that can at least get between 195 and 202 or so. Surprisingly few machines do that consistently and most that do (and have been certified by the SCA) are fairly expensive. Your Technivorms, Bonavitas. Looks like OXO has a few new ones that have been certified. The pattern of these machine's "shower heads" is something that a lot of people worry about. You don't need a super special technique when doing a pour over, but you do get to assure that you're saturating the coffee evenly. You don't have that control with a drip machine, and I've seen even expensive machines have wetter and drier areas of the grounds when done.

The Behmor Brazen coffee maker is adjustable for temperature, bloom time, and any number of other things. It's most useful if you live at altitude or something where that might mater more, as I understand it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We've used a Chemex + burr grinder with beans from a local roaster for over 10 years. I never knew it was a hipster thing. I don't worry about temperature at all - just boil and let it cool a bit before pouring. The coffee is great - our coffee at home is better for our taste than just about any other coffee I've had. We take it camping, to hotels, everywhere we go.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ordering a pour over at a coffee shop might be considered a hipster thing. You pay more. You wait longer. You do generally get (IMO) a better cup of coffee. Many of these shops may have a number of options. Mini-French presses. A few vacuum brewers. All of these techniques produce different qualities in coffee that you may prefer or dislike. Just as different single origin coffees may be more to your taste.

A chemex is distinct from a pour over, IMO, because as proninja pointed out, it's filters give you a front palate forward, "clean" cup of coffee. Similar, IMO, to the results from Starbucks Clover-brewed coffee. If that's what you like, a Chemex is an awesome solution.

There is nothing wrong with loving the results from your Keurig or from using pre ground beans in your Mr. Coffee. Drink what you enjoy. I drink super cheap beer. Beer snobs would be appalled. That doesn't mean I think beer snobs are "hipsters." The beers they enjoy certainly taste a lot different than what I enjoy. They should drink what they enjoy and pay what they feel is appropriate for it. I don't understand why it's so hard for people to understand that coffee is exactly the same concept.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

FWIW, I've had a Technivorm for 9 years at this point. Love the machine. Still produces hot enough water, etc. The filter holder does have controls for the flow of coffee after it's touched the grounds. So my habit has been keep it closed until the grounds are wet, then open to either half or all the open. Still a great piece of machinery that's lasted longer than anything else I've owned.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 months later...

Bumping this for the coffee chat, and vast amounts of knowledge being doled out.

i started drinking my coffee black recently, after years and years of killing it with tons of sugar and cream. I use a Keurig maker, and love the convenience, but the pods are expensive and not the greatest cup of coffee I've ever had. I had a buddy up north who used to make me a great cup of coffee with his own roasted beans and a French press. Thinking of making that my morning routine. 

So, I need: beans that I like, burr grinder, egg timer, water kettle that measures in ounces and sets to about 200(?) degrees F, and a French press? Any new revelations/recommendations from the last time this post was at the top? I like really dark roast coffee.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 1/8/2016 at 8:34 AM, Sammy3469 said:

FWIW, I've had a Technivorm for 9 years at this point. Love the machine. Still produces hot enough water, etc. The filter holder does have controls for the flow of coffee after it's touched the grounds. So my habit has been keep it closed until the grounds are wet, then open to either half or all the open. Still a great piece of machinery that's lasted longer than anything else I've owned.

Still happy with mine of roughly the same period, although there are cheaper machines now that do the same thing.  Never messed out around with the flow but I'll try out the keeping it closed until it covered the grounds method.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

20 minutes ago, proninja said:

Of those listed, the most important things are to buy good, fresh beans and grind it immediately before use. I've been drinking coffee out of a drip machine all weekend that is really good. Because fresh beans and fresh grind. 

The rest is just preference and fussiness. 

Thanks, proninja! I like the taste of the beans they sell at Costco and Sam's Club. Plus, they're dirty cheap. I used to grind my own for drip coffee maker before we got the Keurig.

Is there a best way to store beans? I used to keep them in the freezer, but remember hearing it's a waste of time. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On January 8, 2016 at 8:19 AM, Ramsay Hunt Experience said:

Ordering a pour over at a coffee shop might be considered a hipster thing. You pay more. You wait longer. You do generally get (IMO) a better cup of coffee. Many of these shops may have a number of options. Mini-French presses. A few vacuum brewers. All of these techniques produce different qualities in coffee that you may prefer or dislike. Just as different single origin coffees may be more to your taste.

A chemex is distinct from a pour over, IMO, because as proninja pointed out, it's filters give you a front palate forward, "clean" cup of coffee. Similar, IMO, to the results from Starbucks Clover-brewed coffee. If that's what you like, a Chemex is an awesome solution.

There is nothing wrong with loving the results from your Keurig or from using pre ground beans in your Mr. Coffee. Drink what you enjoy. I drink super cheap beer. Beer snobs would be appalled. That doesn't mean I think beer snobs are "hipsters." The beers they enjoy certainly taste a lot different than what I enjoy. They should drink what they enjoy and pay what they feel is appropriate for it. I don't understand why it's so hard for people to understand that coffee is exactly the same concept.

I agree with this and also drink super cheap beer and mass market coffee. If I had the time or inclination, I'd use pour overs and drink a really good cup (a good coffee is a lot like a good beer), but really, it's a function of time, price, and preference and the marginal utility that the quality of the product adds to your life. 

I also don't think people should judge other people based on their preference in coffee or that beer snobs should judge people on their tastes alone nor vice-versa, though it almost seems inevitable in our consumerist (or anti-consumerist) world, where people equate consumption with personality and soul. I enjoy a really good beer or a really good cup of coffee as much as the next guy, but in limited doses. The same goes for really well-prepared local, in-season food vs. mass market food.  It's a strange consumerist world we live in still.  

But that's my two cents. Back to the coffee knowledge, which I find illuminating.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've gotten into doing the cold brew process...much better taste.  Just get a toddy or filtron and thank me later.  It uses a course ground and the finished coffee can be kept sealed for a couple of days.  It does take awhile, but like I said when you make it m, it's for a couple of days.  Basically a much lower acidic coffee

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 months later...
11 hours ago, Soootch said:

So I've got a burr grinder and a french press. If I want to splurge on some premium exotic beans that will make the richest, most amazingly decadent cup of coffee I've ever tasted, whaddya got? :coffee: 

Its been covered earlier but Kopi Luwak coffee.  

"During the digestion process, the coffee cherries and the pulp are removed but the coffee beans are not digested.  During this process some kind of unique fermentation occurs which is responsible for giving the civet coffee it special flavor."

Enjoy!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Tried a bag of Kimera Coffee which touts the fact that it adds nootropics (smart drugs) L-Theanine, Alpha GPC, DMAE and Taurine (the latter is for cardiovascular health) and I gotta say that I really like it.  

Bought it without knowing what a nootropic was or that it had them added, the wifeish said to get some so I did (happy wifeish happy lifeish).  I am not 100% sure but I feel that I have been much more focused in general since I started drinking it.  I only researched the ingredients yesterday so I don't think it's placebo either.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 5 months later...

I've had a Keurig for a few years, and I absolutely love it ... as a substitute for a kettle. It produces 192-degree water at the press of a button, which is great for brewing various kinds of teas and herbal beverages, and also for rehydrating dried cherries and other fruit. For coffee, it's passable. I actually made a decent cappuccino-style drink this morning (Kirkland bold Pacific blend) by setting it to strong, four ounces, and then adding frothed milk. Not exactly a cappuccino, but a pretty good drink nonetheless.

Anyway, I decided to get an Aeropress with a cheap, handheld burr grinder (and a cheap scale with a timer). They came yesterday. I could buy green coffee beans and roast them in my popcorn popper (I have a model that's supposed to work well for that), but I have access to good, freshly roasted beans around here; so I think I'll stick with those, at least to start.

My plan is to keep using the Keurig instead of a kettle to produce hot water. It's 192 degrees inside the Keurig, but will probably cool to 185 (or lower) by the time it goes into the Aeropress. That seems fine. The originator of the Aeropress recommends 175 degrees, and while some like it hotter, the World Aeropress Champions have been in the 175-180 degree range for the last three years.

I like milk-based drinks (not just cappuccinos and lattes, but also hot cocoa, chai tea lattes, even just milk and honey...) so I also got this cute milk pan (which works on an induction stove) and this well reviewed milk frother. I use them all the time and consider both the milk pan and frother to be excellent purchases.

I don't have coffee beans yet. I'll get some within the next few days and then try the Aeropress out. I'm thinking of using the Shuichi Sasaki right-side-up recipe to start (YouTube). I'll report back afterwards...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I got coffee beans yesterday and tried the Shuichi Sasaki recipe just now. I didn't use a timer. It came out a bit weak. I don't think I pressed for nearly 70 seconds -- it just went naturally pretty quickly. My grind probably wasn't fine enough. Nonetheless, there was no bitterness and the taste was good. I'll try again tomorrow.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

48 minutes ago, Maurile Tremblay said:

I got coffee beans yesterday and tried the Shuichi Sasaki recipe just now. I didn't use a timer. It came out a bit weak. I don't think I pressed for nearly 70 seconds -- it just went naturally pretty quickly. My grind probably wasn't fine enough. Nonetheless, there was no bitterness and the taste was good. I'll try again tomorrow.

I've never used an Aeropress, but it's amazing how much different coffee is when you don't use a Keurig or drip machine. Fresh ground beans with an Aeropress, pour over, French press, etc. is a totally different animal.

When my friend first made me a cup of coffee using high quality beans and a Chemex, I realized for the first time why someone would drink their coffee black. Only low quality, acidic and burnt tasting coffee needs all that cream and sugar.

(Not saying that a good cappucino, latte, machiatto, etc isn't nice too)

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, GroveDiesel said:

I've never used an Aeropress, but it's amazing how much different coffee is when you don't use a Keurig or drip machine. Fresh ground beans with an Aeropress, pour over, French press, etc. is a totally different animal.

When my friend first made me a cup of coffee using high quality beans and a Chemex, I realized for the first time why someone would drink their coffee black. Only low quality, acidic and burnt tasting coffee needs all that cream and sugar.

(Not saying that a good cappucino, latte, machiatto, etc isn't nice too)

this.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've decided to just get a Chemex and try it out.  Was going to probably buy the standard 6 cup guy. What else do I need?

Coffee grinder -- any recs?

Coffee filter -- I know Chemex sells these

Something to boil water in -- already have this!

Coffee beans -- I know where to buy this!

Anything else?  Are there any custom or specific to Chemex things to keep in mind w/r/t the above? I think I read somewhere that you need to do medium grind for the Chemex.  And I know there are both paper and metal filters; sounds like I should give the paper ones a try and see how it goes.

Anything else I need to know? What about the actual pouring process?

TIA.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Chase Stuart said:

I've decided to just get a Chemex and try it out.  Was going to probably buy the standard 6 cup guy. What else do I need?

Coffee grinder -- any recs?

Coffee filter -- I know Chemex sells these

Something to boil water in -- already have this!

Coffee beans -- I know where to buy this!

Anything else?  Are there any custom or specific to Chemex things to keep in mind w/r/t the above? I think I read somewhere that you need to do medium grind for the Chemex.  And I know there are both paper and metal filters; sounds like I should give the paper ones a try and see how it goes.

Anything else I need to know? What about the actual pouring process?

TIA.

 

Prima Coffee is a good source of info, imo.

Technique

Begin by thoroughly rinsing the filter. This eliminates papery taste and preheats the server. After dumping this water, add ground coffee and even the bed. Use hot water to evenly wet all of the coffee (using about 10% of the total water volume) and start a timer. After 30-45 seconds pour the rest of the water in a slow and controlled motion. Aim to finish pouring around the 3:00 mark, with the last drop falling somewhere close to 4:00. Toss the filter and grounds, give the Chemex a few swirls, and serve.

Advantage

Because the thick paper filter sits flush against the walls of the server, water flows through the grounds more slowly and the dwell time is longer than other pour over methods. This is helpful, as brewing a tasty cup is less dependent on the skill of the user and more on precise and well-chosen parameters. The Chemex highlights the "higher" and "brighter" notes in coffee and yields a clean, sweet cup.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A couple weeks ago, our basic Cuisinart drip coffee maker burnt up when the auto shutoff didn't shutoff. Seems to be a general problem with Cuisinart. We got a Bonavita to replace it. Also got a burr grinder to replace our blade grinder. Coffee tastes excellent with no after taste. Bonavita was 50% off at Williams-Sonoma.

Edited by Phil Elliott
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Phil Elliott said:

A couple weeks ago, our basic Cuisinart drip coffee maker burnt up when the auto shutoff didn't shutoff. Seems to be a general problem with Cuisinart. We got a Bonavita to replace it. Also got a burr grinder to replace our blade grinder. Coffee tastes excellent with no after taste. Bonavita was 50% off at Williams-Sonoma.

I just got a Bonavita. The 8 cup. Seems like simple little nothing drip maker, but I have to admit, the coffee it produces is much better than most standard drip machines.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 minutes ago, CurlyNight said:

For Keurig, surprisingly Trader Joe's individual cups are delish.

How regular do you do the middle eastern coffee thing?  Not sure of the variations across parts of the Middle East.  Do you hit the local ME market?  If so, what do you get?  

Love Turkish coffee.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Binky The Doormat said:

How regular do you do the middle eastern coffee thing?  Not sure of the variations across parts of the Middle East.  Do you hit the local ME market?  If so, what do you get?  

Love Turkish coffee.  

Actually, Iranians in general don't do much coffee. We are big time fresh brewed tea people so I can help with our teas. In fact, in some ME markets here (not Iranian) they don't sell any ME coffee. I saw Folgers at one and Tasters Choice at another. Living in the Bay Area I'm sure there are markets that sell it as it's so international here. I'd call around. Or go online. But as with anything, it's trial and error with taste. Not all Iranian teas I find to be great.

Edited by CurlyNight
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just found this thread and didn't bother to read it (sorry).  However, as coffee preferences vary a lot from person to person I think the best thing you can do once you find a brand/blend you like, is to buy whole beans and grind them yourself before brewing.  Switching from ground coffee to whole beans and grinding them myself has been the best improvement in coffee I have found.  It is real easy and kind of fun too.

Edited by GreenNGold
Link to comment
Share on other sites

23 hours ago, jwb said:

I just got a Bonavita. The 8 cup. Seems like simple little nothing drip maker, but I have to admit, the coffee it produces is much better than most standard drip machines.

Yes when I looked at it I thought it was pretty basic too. Correctly heats water to about 200f, pre-wets the grounds for fuller taste and has several holes on the lid so grounds get a more complete dispersion of water instead of a single stream. Still seems rather basic but the coffee is great. We have the carafe vs the glass which can make coffee bitter due to the constant heat. Only complaint is we would prefer 10 or 12 cups.

Edited by Phil Elliott
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Phil Elliott said:

Yes when I looked at it I thought it was pretty basic too. Correctly heats water to about 200f, pre-wets the grounds for fuller taste and has several holes on the lid so grounds get a more complete dispersion of water instead of a single stream. Still seems rather basic but the coffee is great. We have the carafe vs the glass which can make coffee bitter due to the constant heat. Only complaint is we would prefer 10 or 12 cups.

Heh heh - yup, the only downside.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 2/12/2017 at 11:38 AM, Maurile Tremblay said:

I got coffee beans yesterday and tried the Shuichi Sasaki recipe just now. I didn't use a timer. It came out a bit weak. I don't think I pressed for nearly 70 seconds -- it just went naturally pretty quickly. My grind probably wasn't fine enough. Nonetheless, there was no bitterness and the taste was good. I'll try again tomorrow.

I'm getting better. A finer grind and a longer steep time have helped. I keep overpouring the water, though, failing to take into account that there's a small delay between my pour and its reflection on my scale. So it's still very slightly watered down compared to the Americano taste I'm going for -- and while lacking any undue bitterness, it's just a touch more sour than I'd like.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Question maybe someone here can help. I've been using a Keurig for awhile. It's convenient but I've had better coffee and it's a horrendous waste of plastic. So who can recommend to me an alternative? I want better coffee and less waste, but speed and convenience is still important. 

Thank you 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
  • Create New...