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Christians are the most persecuted religious group worldwide


CrossEyed

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This isn't a "woe is me" post, because Americans face far less persecution than Christians around the world. But for those who think the claims of Christian persecution are overstated, here you go.

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Christianity 'close to extinction' in Middle East

The study warns that Christians suffer greater hostility across the world than any other religious group.

And it claims politicians have been “blind” to the extent of violence faced by Christians in Africa, Asia and the Middle East.

The most common threat to Christians abroad is militant Islam, it says, claiming that oppression in Muslim countries is often ignored because of a fear that criticism will be seen as “racism”.

It warns that converts from Islam face being killed in Saudi Arabia, Mauritania and Iran and risk severe legal penalties in other countries across the Middle East.

The report, by the think tank Civitas, says: “It is generally accepted that many faith-based groups face discrimination or persecution to some degree.

"A far less widely grasped fact is that Christians are targeted more than any other body of believers.”

It cites estimates that 200 million Christians, or 10 per cent of Christians worldwide, are “socially disadvantaged, harassed or actively oppressed for their beliefs.”

“Exposing and combating the problem ought in my view to be political priorities across large areas of the world. That this is not the case tells us much about a questionable hierarchy of victimhood,” says the author, Rupert Shortt, a journalist and visiting fellow of Blackfriars Hall, Oxford.

He adds: “The blind spot displayed by governments and other influential players is causing them to squander a broader opportunity. Religious freedom is the canary in the mine for human rights generally.”

The report, entitled Christianophobia, highlights a fear among oppressive regimes that Christianity is a “Western creed” which can be used to undermine them.

State hostility towards Christianity is particularly rife in China, where more Christians are imprisoned than in any other country in the world, according to the report.

It quotes Ma Hucheng, an advisor to the Chinese government, who claimed in an article last year that the US has backed the growth of the Protestant Church in China as a vehicle for political dissidence.

“Western powers, with America at their head, deliberately export Christianity to China and carry out all kinds of illegal evangelistic activities,” he wrote in the China Social Sciences Press.

“Their basic aim is to use Christianity to change the character of the regime...in China and overturn it,” he added.

The “lion’s share” of persecution faced by Christians arises in countries where Islam is the dominant faith, the report says, quoting estimates that between a half and two-thirds of Christians in the Middle East have left the region or been killed in the past century.

“There is now a serious risk that Christianity will disappear from its biblical heartlands,” it claims.

The report shows that “Muslim-majority” states make up 12 of the 20 countries judged to be “unfree” on the grounds of religious tolerance by Freedom House, the human rights think tank.

It catalogues hundreds of attacks on Christians by religious fanatics over recent years, focusing on seven countries: Egypt, Iraq, Pakistan, Nigeria, India, Burma and China.

It claims George Bush’s use of the word “crusade” after the September 11 attacks on New York created the impression for Muslims in the Middle East of a “Christian assault on the Muslim world”.

“But however the motivation for violence is measured, the early twenty-first century has seen a steady rise in the strife endured by Christians,” the report says.

The 2003 invasion of Iraq left Iraqi Christians “more vulnerable than ever”, highlighted by the 2006 beheading of a kidnapped Orthodox priest, Fr Boulos Iskander, and the kidnapping of 17 further priests and two bishops between 2006 and 2010.

“In most cases, those responsible declared that they wanted all Christians to be expelled from the country,” the report says.

In Pakistan, the murder last year of Shahbaz Bhatti, the country’s Catholic minister for minorities, “vividly reflected” religious intolerance in Pakistan.

Shortly after his death it emerged that Mr Bhatti had recorded a video in which he declared: “I am living for my community and for suffering people and I will die to defend their rights.

"I prefer to die for my principles and for the justice of my community rather than to compromise. I want to share that I believe in Jesus Christ, who has given his own life for us.”

The report also warns that Christians in India have faced years of violence from Hindu extremists. In 2010 scores of attacks on Christians and church property were carried out in Karnataka, a state in south west India.

And while many people are aware of the oppression faced in Burma by Aung San Suu Kyi and other pro-democracy activists, targeted abuse of Christians in the country has been given little exposure, the report says.

In some areas of Burma the government has clamped down on Christian protesters by restricting the building of new churches.

“Openly professing Christians employed in government service find it virtually impossible to get promotion,” it adds.

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This isn't a "woe is me" post, because Americans face far less persecution than Christians around the world. But for those who think the claims of Christian persecution are overstated, here you go.

Who thinks the claims of Christian persecution in the Middle East, China, Burma, etc. are overstated?
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This isn't a "woe is me" post, because Americans face far less persecution than Christians around the world. But for those who think the claims of Christian persecution are overstated, here you go.

Who thinks the claims of Christian persecution in the Middle East, China, Burma, etc. are overstated?
I had this question halfway typed out and then realized nobody does. :fishy:
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It claims George Bush's use of the word "crusade" after the September 11 attacks on New York created the impression for Muslims in the Middle East of a "Christian assault on the Muslim world".

This was one of the biggest errors of an administration riddled with diplomatic errors. How Bush's speechwriters could not have known the consequences of this word is astounding. If they did know, and used it anyhow, its even worse.
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Christianity 'close to extinction' in Middle East

Back in 2010, Reza Aslan wrote for The Daily Beast that Secretary of State Clinton needed to do something about the ongoing genocide of the AssyrianChristians in Iraq. Since then and over the course of the Egyptian revolution, Egypt's Coptic Christians which precede that nation's Muslim population have been the victims of attacks. The sad truth is that attacks on some groups garner far less attention from the media, "human rights" organizations, and many people who claim to be opposed to such discrimination.

Aslan's Daily Beast article...

A full-scale genocide is under way in Iraq: a well-planned, well-financed, deliberate plot to cleanse the country of its Christian citizens. And thus far, neither the Iraqi government nor the United States is doing anything to stop it.

On Wednesday, al Qaeda militants launch a synchronized bombing attack on 11 Christian communities throughout Iraq, killing six and wounding more than 30. That attack followed on the heels of the ghastly assault last month on Christian worshippers attending a service at Our Lady of Salvation church in Baghdad, in which 58 people were brutally murdered and another 60 wounded.

After that attack, Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki issued a statement condemning the violence: “Those with deviant thoughts from al Qaeda and their allies belonging to the followers of the ousted regime targeted our Christian brothers in a terrorist crime that aims at undermining security and stability, inciting strife and chaos and sending Iraqis away from their home.”

Yet beyond these empty words, the Iraqi government has done absolutely nothing to protect the besieged Christian community from further attack, despite a promise from al Qaeda in Iraq that “all Christian centers, organizations and institutions, leaders and followers, are legitimate targets for Mujahedeen wherever they can reach them.” Indeed, just a couple of days after Maliki’s speech, three more bombs aimed at Christians went off in western Baghdad.

Americans of all faiths must band together and pressure the State Department to do something about the wanton murder of Iraqi Christians before there are no more Christians in Iraq to protect.

FULL ARTICLE

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Religious freedom is the canary in the mine for human rights generally.

Crosseyed: Just curious what your take on this quote from your original post would be here in the United States. For individuals who are either members of other religions, or follow no religion at all.The way I take it is that we'd be better served worrying about the planks in our own eyes before concerning ourselves with the specks in others. Even though the "specks" in others' eyes are planks by every right as well.
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Religious freedom is the canary in the mine for human rights generally.

Crosseyed: Just curious what your take on this quote from your original post would be here in the United States. For individuals who are either members of other religions, or follow no religion at all.The way I take it is that we'd be better served worrying about the planks in our own eyes before concerning ourselves with the specks in others. Even though the "specks" in others' eyes are planks by every right as well.
I'm not sure exactly what you're asking me.
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:lmao: :lmao: :lmao: at taking worldwide persecution and trying to imply American Christians are persecuted.

Pretty sure that I took that off the table with the first sentence. :confused:
Okay then. In that case I'll echo bigbottom and ask "Who thinks the claims of Christian persecution in the Middle East, China, Burma, etc. are overstated?"
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Religious freedom is the canary in the mine for human rights generally.

Crosseyed: Just curious what your take on this quote from your original post would be here in the United States. For individuals who are either members of other religions, or follow no religion at all.The way I take it is that we'd be better served worrying about the planks in our own eyes before concerning ourselves with the specks in others. Even though the "specks" in others' eyes are planks by every right as well.
I'm not sure exactly what you're asking me.
In many regions of the United States, you aren't treated equally if you aren't a Christian. TECHNICALLY, you are (under the letter of the law). But you're not. Anyone who has lived in the Bible Belt for more than a couple weeks knows that. About on-par with if you're gay, or if you might have brown skin. Technically? You're an equal. But you're not.So on issues such as prayer in school, are groups advocating it also advocating for Muslim prayer? Hindu prayer? Buddhism or Shinto prayer? And if they aren't (they are only advocating CHRISTIAN prayer), how might that be related to the "canary in the coal mine" quote from the author you quoted in your OP? :popcorn:
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:lmao: :lmao: :lmao: at taking worldwide persecution and trying to imply American Christians are persecuted.

Stuff like this would never happen here:

In some areas of Burma the government has clamped down on Christian protesters by restricting the building of new churches.

This whole "It's not a woe is me because its actually a huge reach but I'm still gonna make it sound like woe is me" persecution complex reminds me of something. I want to say The Spread of Christianity, but no, that can't be right. Christians wouldn't possibly complain when they get treated how they've treated others, would they? Lets get mx in here to settle this.

Why, just the other day Pat Robertson himself was discussing this. He rightly pointed out that Christians are more persecuted than the Nazis ever did the Jews. That Cheiistians were the most oppressed minority group in the history of man. What an awful burden it must be for you guys.

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It claims George Bush's use of the word "crusade" after the September 11 attacks on New York created the impression for Muslims in the Middle East of a "Christian assault on the Muslim world".

This was one of the biggest errors of an administration riddled with diplomatic errors. How Bush's speechwriters could not have known the consequences of this word is astounding. If they did know, and used it anyhow, its even worse.
The man was a warmonger, of course they knew.
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“Openly professing Christians employed in government service find it virtually impossible to get promotion,” it adds.

It's like America, except the exact opposite.
One day, with God on our side, the US government will be able to have an openly Christian man serve as President (the ultimate gov't promotion). And then another 40+ in a row. ** point adapted from Jon Stewart quote.
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Religious freedom is the canary in the mine for human rights generally.

Crosseyed: Just curious what your take on this quote from your original post would be here in the United States. For individuals who are either members of other religions, or follow no religion at all.The way I take it is that we'd be better served worrying about the planks in our own eyes before concerning ourselves with the specks in others. Even though the "specks" in others' eyes are planks by every right as well.
I'm not sure exactly what you're asking me.
In many regions of the United States, you aren't treated equally if you aren't a Christian. TECHNICALLY, you are (under the letter of the law). But you're not. Anyone who has lived in the Bible Belt for more than a couple weeks knows that. About on-par with if you're gay, or if you might have brown skin. Technically? You're an equal. But you're not.So on issues such as prayer in school, are groups advocating it also advocating for Muslim prayer? Hindu prayer? Buddhism or Shinto prayer? And if they aren't (they are only advocating CHRISTIAN prayer), how might that be related to the "canary in the coal mine" quote from the author you quoted in your OP? :popcorn:
I think students of all faiths should be able to express their faith in personal ways. Regarding prayer, why not just have a time of prayer/reflection when the students can pray on their own, or not pray at all if they don't want?
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Religious freedom is the canary in the mine for human rights generally.

Crosseyed: Just curious what your take on this quote from your original post would be here in the United States. For individuals who are either members of other religions, or follow no religion at all.The way I take it is that we'd be better served worrying about the planks in our own eyes before concerning ourselves with the specks in others. Even though the "specks" in others' eyes are planks by every right as well.
I'm not sure exactly what you're asking me.
In many regions of the United States, you aren't treated equally if you aren't a Christian. TECHNICALLY, you are (under the letter of the law). But you're not. Anyone who has lived in the Bible Belt for more than a couple weeks knows that. About on-par with if you're gay, or if you might have brown skin. Technically? You're an equal. But you're not.So on issues such as prayer in school, are groups advocating it also advocating for Muslim prayer? Hindu prayer? Buddhism or Shinto prayer? And if they aren't (they are only advocating CHRISTIAN prayer), how might that be related to the "canary in the coal mine" quote from the author you quoted in your OP? :popcorn:
I think students of all faiths should be able to express their faith in personal ways. Regarding prayer, why not just have a time of prayer/reflection when the students can pray on their own, or not pray at all if they don't want?
Why can't they do it when they are at their lockers between classes?
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I think students of all faiths should be able to express their faith in personal ways. Regarding prayer, why not just have a time of prayer/reflection when the students can pray on their own, or not pray at all if they don't want?

I guess my follow-up question to your last comment would be: "what makes you think they don't have the right to pray in school already?" :shrug:

Heck, I say a quick prayer every time I go into my daughters' school to speak to students about what I do for work, or whatever other topic they want me to talk about. And I haven't had any lawsuits filed against me...nor is the ACLU on my case. But I say a silent prayer, to myself, without even closing my eyes on many occasions. Which ANY student/teacher in any public classroom in the United States currently can do as often as they see fit. Because who would even know they're saying a quick prayer before a test/meal/speech/???

That's not what the people backing prayer in school are asking for...since it's a right that everyone already has (or even if they didn't, good luck enforcing such a law/rule...ever). No...what people are asking for is the ability to say a prayer, outloud, in front of a class or one's classmates. Which is a different matter entirely...unless one affords that same right/privilege to individuals of all faiths. Which is effectively impossible, since people WITHOUT faith (atheists) would not be treated equally. Hence, the laws as they are currently written. To protect the minority from the majority.

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Atheists are far more persecuted.

Where? How many have been killed. Or do you considered force to use currency which says in god we trust persecution?
Here is a map of countries where they can kill you for being an atheist.http://www.patheos.com/blogs/friendlyatheist/2012/12/11/the-countries-where-they-kill-you-for-being-an-atheist/
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Atheists are far more persecuted.

Where? How many have been killed. Or do you considered force to use currency which says in god we trust persecution?
The truth is that anyone who is not a Muslim is often persecuted in Muslim countries. Christians, Jews, atheists, Buddhists- doesn't matter. Christians are the most persecuted because they are the largest non-Muslim group. Atheists are probably the least persecuted, mostly because they're not public about it. But interestingly enough, both Christians and Jews are considered by Muslims to be "People of the Book". Muhammad taught that they are to be treated well and protected, so long as they submit to an Islamic authority. Other religions, and atheists, are not protected.
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Atheists are far more persecuted.

Where? How many have been killed. Or do you considered force to use currency which says in god we trust persecution?
Here is a map of countries where they can kill you for being an atheist.http://www.patheos.com/blogs/friendlyatheist/2012/12/11/the-countries-where-they-kill-you-for-being-an-atheist/
Those hell holes will kill anyone for anything. Do 't act like you are special.
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Atheists are far more persecuted.

Where? How many have been killed. Or do you considered force to use currency which says in god we trust persecution?
Here is a map of countries where they can kill you for being an atheist.http://www.patheos.com/blogs/friendlyatheist/2012/12/11/the-countries-where-they-kill-you-for-being-an-atheist/
from what I know, every single one of those countries persecute Christians in the same way. Just an FYI.
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Imagine religion being used as a tool to encourage fear and misunderstanding, as a weapon in world conflict, and a shield to hide behind and excuse hateful acts. Who'd have thunk this was possible?I am shocked..

Imagine bigotry being used. Imagine economic justice being used. Imagine environmentalism being used. Nothing unique about religion. Religion is not the root cause.
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I think students of all faiths should be able to express their faith in personal ways. Regarding prayer, why not just have a time of prayer/reflection when the students can pray on their own, or not pray at all if they don't want?

You actually need a scheduled time to pray? Do you need an appointment or something to talk to the big man up stairs?
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Atheists are far more persecuted.

Where? How many have been killed. Or do you considered force to use currency which says in god we trust persecution?
Here is a map of countries where they can kill you for being an atheist.http://www.patheos.com/blogs/friendlyatheist/2012/12/11/the-countries-where-they-kill-you-for-being-an-atheist/
from what I know, every single one of those countries persecute Christians in the same way. Just an FYI.
God works in mysterious ways. Who are we to question his plan to persecute Christians? Is it not just to get the other Christians to repent?
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Atheists are far more persecuted.

Where? How many have been killed. Or do you considered force to use currency which says in god we trust persecution?
Here is a map of countries where they can kill you for being an atheist.http://www.patheos.com/blogs/friendlyatheist/2012/12/11/the-countries-where-they-kill-you-for-being-an-atheist/
from what I know, every single one of those countries persecute Christians in the same way. Just an FYI.
God works in mysterious ways. Who are we to question his plan to persecute Christians? Is it not just to get the other Christians to repent?
:goodposting: I am so sick of people questioning Gods plan.
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Imagine religion being used as a tool to encourage fear and misunderstanding, as a weapon in world conflict, and a shield to hide behind and excuse hateful acts. Who'd have thunk this was possible?I am shocked..

Imagine bigotry being used. Imagine economic justice being used. Imagine environmentalism being used. Nothing unique about religion. Religion is not the root cause.
Bigots promise those that are being treated with intolerance that if they only endure in this life they will be rewarded in the next?
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Atheists are far more persecuted.

Where? How many have been killed. Or do you considered force to use currency which says in god we trust persecution?
Here is a map of countries where they can kill you for being an atheist.http://www.patheos.com/blogs/friendlyatheist/2012/12/11/the-countries-where-they-kill-you-for-being-an-atheist/
from what I know, every single one of those countries persecute Christians in the same way. Just an FYI.
God works in mysterious ways. Who are we to question his plan to persecute Christians? Is it not just to get the other Christians to repent?
:goodposting: I am so sick of people questioning Gods plan.
Romans 13
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I think students of all faiths should be able to express their faith in personal ways. Regarding prayer, why not just have a time of prayer/reflection when the students can pray on their own, or not pray at all if they don't want?

You actually need a scheduled time to pray? Do you need an appointment or something to talk to the big man up stairs?
When you're Roman Catholic you do. Confessing your sins to the big man himself doesn't do. You have to sit in a toll booth and tell them to a mortal who is just as much if not more of a sinner than you. Married an Episcopalian. Like being Catholic without the church striking fear in you every chance they get, and without the bull#### stuff like confession.
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I think students of all faiths should be able to express their faith in personal ways. Regarding prayer, why not just have a time of prayer/reflection when the students can pray on their own, or not pray at all if they don't want?

You actually need a scheduled time to pray? Do you need an appointment or something to talk to the big man up stairs?
When you're Roman Catholic you do. Confessing your sins to the big man himself doesn't do. You have to sit in a toll booth and tell them to a mortal who is just as much if not more of a sinner than you. Married an Episcopalian. Like being Catholic without the church striking fear in you every chance they get, and without the bull#### stuff like confession.
Forgive me father for I have sinned. I had sex with the neighbors wife.......Go say five hail mary and 10 our fathers and you should be good to go.
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Imagine religion being used as a tool to encourage fear and misunderstanding, as a weapon in world conflict, and a shield to hide behind and excuse hateful acts. Who'd have thunk this was possible?I am shocked..

Religion is not the root cause.
Nope, it is a tool to manipulate, a weapon, a shield. As I mentioned above.Glad you finally get it. :thumbup:
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