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Appendectomy--any FBG have experience with this?.


Courtjester

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Yesterday morning, I started having pains in my right side (a couple inches to the right of the belly button) that just radiates into my right side. It literally drops me to my knees if I cough. Well, I am not a big hospital guy, so I went to work and just tried to tough it out. I spent the day on the web--just trying to come up with a theory and I believe it could be my appendix. I came home last night and still wasn't feeling great, but nothing I couldn't deal with. Laying down seems to help and I am not running a fever. The last thing I wanted to do was go to the ER at night and sit there for 8 hours to be told I had bad gas or something stupid, but I still was worried about something rupturing.

This morning I woke up--same pain. My doctor has scheduled me for this morning to come in. I know I am doing the dreaded internet self-diagnosis and it could end up being something simple. However, if my suspicion is correct, has anyone had experience with an appendectomy. Time in the hospital? Time to get back to work?

Boy, do I hope it is just a bad muscle pull or something.....

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Yes. My appendix went bad* 4 years or so ago. The pain was so bad I didn't care that it involved surgery. I just wanted to get it out.

I went into the ER late afternoon from work. The appendix came out in the early AM hours and I went home later that same day. They did the type of surgery where it just took 3 small incisions instead of one large incision so the recovery wasn't too bad. Though I don't remember how long I was off work. I'm guessing just a day or two as I have a desk job. You'll be off longer if you have to lift for your job.

*It had not burst. Recoveries take much longer if they burst. I know a guy who nearly died by waiting too long, so if you suspect the appendix, I'd get it checked out.

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I had an appendectomy in 2005. The initial pain was excrutiating. I had to go to the ER. Had the appendectomy that same evening. I think I was in the Hospital for a day or two and at home for a week to recover. I wasnt allowed to lift anything more than a gallon of milk. The surgery is pretty easy and the recovery isnt bad. They just insert a drainage tube when the procedure is over. When I was discharged from the hospital they just pulled the tube out and left the tiny incission to close on its own.

It wasnt too bad.

My recovery was longer because I had a job that required me to be mobile and lift moderately heavy things. No lifting of heavy things allowed while recovering.

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skip the doc - go straight to the ER - sounds like you are getting your appendix out.

ETA: Dudes only go to the doc for 3 reasons: 1) they need boner meds 2) they are being nagged to do so and 3) something is really wrong

You are in category 3 and I wouldn't be waiting around for my wife to drive me to the doc who is going to send you the hospital for a CT scan anyway....

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Had mine out 9 years ago. It hurt so bad I wanted to die, and I had given birth 10 days earlier. Birth wasn't that bad. The surgery was fine, the pain meds were great! I went to the Er at 4:15pm, surgery at 2am, home by 3:00pm, so all totaled less than 24 hours. Don't be wimpy.

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One of my favorite stories
If you think House and the guy who James Franco played in 127 Hours are tough, you haven't heard of Leonid Rogozov.In 1961, Rogozov was stationed at a newly constructed Russian base in Antarctica. The 12 men inside were cut off from the outside world by the polar winter by March of that year. In April, the 27-year-old Rogozov began to feel ill, very ill. His symptoms were classic: he had acute appendicitis. "He knew that if he was to survive he had to undergo an operation," the British Medical Journal recounted. "But he was in the frontier conditions of a newly founded Antarctic colony on the brink of the polar night. Transportation was impossible. Flying was out of the question, because of the snowstorms. And there was one further problem: he was the only physician on the base."There was no question that he'd have to operate. The pain was intolerable and he knew he was getting worse. He recorded his thoughts in his journal: "I did not sleep at all last night. It hurts like the devil! A snowstorm whipping through my soul, wailing like a hundred jackals. Still no obvious symptoms that perforation is imminent, but an oppressive feeling of foreboding hangs over me ... This is it ... I have to think through the only possible way out: to operate on myself ... It's almost impossible ... but I can't just fold my arms and give up."Operating mostly by feeling around, Rogozov worked for an hour and 45 minutes, cutting himself open and removing the appendix. The men he'd chosen as assistants watched as the "calm and focused" doctor completed the operation, resting every five minutes for a few seconds as he battled vertigo and weakness. He recalled the operation in a journal entry: "I worked without gloves. It was hard to see. The mirror helps, but it also hinders -- after all, it's showing things backwards. I work mainly by touch. The bleeding is quite heavy, but I take my time -- I try to work surely. Opening the peritoneum, I injured the blind gut and had to sew it up. Suddenly it flashed through my mind: there are more injuries here and I didn't notice them ... I grow weaker and weaker, my head starts to spin. Every 4-5 minutes I rest for 20-25 seconds. Finally, here it is, the cursed appendage! With horror I notice the dark stain at its base. That means just a day longer and it would have burst and ... At the worst moment of removing the appendix I flagged: my heart seized up and noticeably slowed; my hands felt like rubber. Well, I thought, it's going to end badly. And all that was left was removing the appendix ... And then I realised that, basically, I was already saved."Two weeks later, he was back on regular duty. He died at the age of 66 in St. Petersburg in 2000.Just a little reminder that humans can complete some pretty amazing physical feats when their lives hang in the balance.
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If it's excruciating pain in that front/side area and it hasn't subsided, as mentioned it probably is what you think it is. Had mine out about 3 years ago. Couple small incisions and no scarring at all. Except they went through my navel so my days as a belly button ring model were pretty much toast

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Going to the doc to get it checked is a prioirity. I'll relay my own hellish experience as it's somewhat related.

A few years ago, my 5 year old son had stomach pain like yours. The next day my wife took him to the doctor who concluded he was probably just backed up and to give him some Miralax.

Two days later I took him to Urgent care at night to have another doctor look at him. Same thing - he's just backed up.

The next day my wife took him to ANOTHER pediatrician who finally sent us to Children's Hospital for a scan.

He was in the operating room within an hour of that scan with an abscessed appendix. The doctors told us he was very, very lucky.

My son spent 30 days in the hospital after the surgery recovering.

So...get it checked out. And if the doc says it's nothing, get a second opinion (or third in my case).

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One of my favorite stories

If you think House and the guy who James Franco played in 127 Hours are tough, you haven't heard of Leonid Rogozov.

In 1961, Rogozov was stationed at a newly constructed Russian base in Antarctica. The 12 men inside were cut off from the outside world by the polar winter by March of that year. In April, the 27-year-old Rogozov began to feel ill, very ill. His symptoms were classic: he had acute appendicitis. "He knew that if he was to survive he had to undergo an operation," the British Medical Journal recounted. "But he was in the frontier conditions of a newly founded Antarctic colony on the brink of the polar night. Transportation was impossible. Flying was out of the question, because of the snowstorms. And there was one further problem: he was the only physician on the base."

There was no question that he'd have to operate. The pain was intolerable and he knew he was getting worse. He recorded his thoughts in his journal:

"I did not sleep at all last night. It hurts like the devil! A snowstorm whipping through my soul, wailing like a hundred jackals. Still no obvious symptoms that perforation is imminent, but an oppressive feeling of foreboding hangs over me ... This is it ... I have to think through the only possible way out: to operate on myself ... It's almost impossible ... but I can't just fold my arms and give up."

Operating mostly by feeling around, Rogozov worked for an hour and 45 minutes, cutting himself open and removing the appendix. The men he'd chosen as assistants watched as the "calm and focused" doctor completed the operation, resting every five minutes for a few seconds as he battled vertigo and weakness. He recalled the operation in a journal entry:

"I worked without gloves. It was hard to see. The mirror helps, but it also hinders -- after all, it's showing things backwards. I work mainly by touch. The bleeding is quite heavy, but I take my time -- I try to work surely. Opening the peritoneum, I injured the blind gut and had to sew it up. Suddenly it flashed through my mind: there are more injuries here and I didn't notice them ... I grow weaker and weaker, my head starts to spin. Every 4-5 minutes I rest for 20-25 seconds. Finally, here it is, the cursed appendage! With horror I notice the dark stain at its base. That means just a day longer and it would have burst and ...

At the worst moment of removing the appendix I flagged: my heart seized up and noticeably slowed; my hands felt like rubber. Well, I thought, it's going to end badly. And all that was left was removing the appendix ... And then I realised that, basically, I was already saved."

Two weeks later, he was back on regular duty. He died at the age of 66 in St. Petersburg in 2000.

Just a little reminder that humans can complete some pretty amazing physical feats when their lives hang in the balance.

I wonder, how come he couldn't get his assistants to help? Seems like they could've done more than stand around holding a mirror. :shrug:

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One of my favorite stories

If you think House and the guy who James Franco played in 127 Hours are tough, you haven't heard of Leonid Rogozov.

In 1961, Rogozov was stationed at a newly constructed Russian base in Antarctica. The 12 men inside were cut off from the outside world by the polar winter by March of that year. In April, the 27-year-old Rogozov began to feel ill, very ill. His symptoms were classic: he had acute appendicitis. "He knew that if he was to survive he had to undergo an operation," the British Medical Journal recounted. "But he was in the frontier conditions of a newly founded Antarctic colony on the brink of the polar night. Transportation was impossible. Flying was out of the question, because of the snowstorms. And there was one further problem: he was the only physician on the base."

There was no question that he'd have to operate. The pain was intolerable and he knew he was getting worse. He recorded his thoughts in his journal:

"I did not sleep at all last night. It hurts like the devil! A snowstorm whipping through my soul, wailing like a hundred jackals. Still no obvious symptoms that perforation is imminent, but an oppressive feeling of foreboding hangs over me ... This is it ... I have to think through the only possible way out: to operate on myself ... It's almost impossible ... but I can't just fold my arms and give up."

Operating mostly by feeling around, Rogozov worked for an hour and 45 minutes, cutting himself open and removing the appendix. The men he'd chosen as assistants watched as the "calm and focused" doctor completed the operation, resting every five minutes for a few seconds as he battled vertigo and weakness. He recalled the operation in a journal entry:

"I worked without gloves. It was hard to see. The mirror helps, but it also hinders -- after all, it's showing things backwards. I work mainly by touch. The bleeding is quite heavy, but I take my time -- I try to work surely. Opening the peritoneum, I injured the blind gut and had to sew it up. Suddenly it flashed through my mind: there are more injuries here and I didn't notice them ... I grow weaker and weaker, my head starts to spin. Every 4-5 minutes I rest for 20-25 seconds. Finally, here it is, the cursed appendage! With horror I notice the dark stain at its base. That means just a day longer and it would have burst and ...

At the worst moment of removing the appendix I flagged: my heart seized up and noticeably slowed; my hands felt like rubber. Well, I thought, it's going to end badly. And all that was left was removing the appendix ... And then I realised that, basically, I was already saved."

Two weeks later, he was back on regular duty. He died at the age of 66 in St. Petersburg in 2000.

Just a little reminder that humans can complete some pretty amazing physical feats when their lives hang in the balance.

I wonder, how come he couldn't get his assistants to help? Seems like they could've done more than stand around holding a mirror. :shrug:
They were Russian soldiers who had zero medical training and only got one day's notice before going into the surgery.
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Well, back from the doctor and I am relieved with the results and I hope it is the correct call.

His diagnosis is damaged rib cartilage as a result from a fall or trauma of some sort. He says the particular damaged rib cartilage is attached to other muscles that are attached to the stomach wall and that is why I am in the pain down the side of the stomach towards the belly button. When I got there my temp was a little higher than normal 99.6 and his reasoning for that was that the cartilage can become inflamed and infected and cause a mild fever.

He says the pain is too high for an appendix and too far back to be gall bladder and boy, when he touched the edge of one of my front ribs, I thought I was coming off that table. I am glad, but I am going to watch to see if anything else happens. It just seems a little weird for the pain to be so far widespread from the supposed damaged site. Pain meds, ice and rest are what he ordered.

I don't remember falling or running into anything, but I have been a Type 1 diabetic for 36 years and my nerve endings tend to be a little numb. I once broke my hand in multiple places and I worked the next two days until the swelling became too much and I had to get a cast. I am a complete clumsy person, so who knows what I did this weekend.

Thanks so much for the suggestions and thoughts. This place is awesome!!

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