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The Highest Tide by Jim Lynch

From Publishers Weekly:

Starred Review. The fertile strangeness of marine tidal life becomes a subtly executed metaphor for the bewilderments of adolescence in this tender and authentic coming-of-age novel, Lynch's first. As a precocious, undersized 13-year-old living on the shore of Puget Sound, in Washington State, Miles O'Malley has developed a consuming passion for the abundant life of the tidal flats. His simple pleasure in observing is tested and complicated over the course of a remarkable summer, when he finds a giant squid, a discovery that brings him the unwelcome attention of scientists, TV reporters and a local cult. Meanwhile, Miles's remote parents are considering a divorce; his best friend, Florence, an elderly retired psychic, is dying of a degenerative disease; his sex-obsessed buddy, Phelps, mocks his science-geek knowledge; and his desperate crush on Angie Stegner, the troubled girl next door, both inspires and humiliates him. Events build toward the date of a record high tide, and Miles slowly sorts out his place in the adult world. While occasionally Lynch packs too much into a small story, this moving, unusual take on the summers of childhood conveys a contagious sense of wonder at the variety and mystery of the natural world.

Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Pretty good book, but nothing all that special or memorable.

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Snow Crash by Neal Stephenson

Better than I thought it would be. I liked this one a lot more than either The Big U or Zodiac. Now I'm really looking forward to Cryptonomicon.

Has anyone read either of the books he wrote under the Stephen Bury pseudonym? My library doesn't carry them and I'm curious if the books are worth having them order it from another library.

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I just finished The Last Night of the Yankee Dynasty by Buster Olney.

It tells the story of the late 90s Yankees dynasty by interweaving backstories throughout the story of Game 7 of the 2001 WS.

It was excellent, except for the fact that it keeps mentioning Curt Schilling, who I ####### despise.

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Read a few the past couple of weeks.

High Fidelity- I've read books before after seeing the movie and enjoyed them. But this was the first time the movie was as meaty as the book. The movie covered most of the interesting parts of the book and with Black and Robbins' performances it was more entertaining. Only thing I didn't like about the movie was the casting of Cusack's love interest. She wasn't cute enough. Anyways this book is not worth reading if you've seen the movie.

A Short History of Nearly Everything- A little drier then I had hoped but it was still very interesting. Best snippet:

"Perhaps the most arresting of quantum possibilities is the idea, arising from Wolfgang Pauli's Exclusion Principle of 1925, that the subatomic particles in certain pairs, even when separated by the most considerable distances, can each instantly 'know' what the other is doing. Particles have a quality known as spin and, according to quantum theory, the moment you determine the spin of one particle, its sister particle, no matter how distant away, will immediately begin spinning in the opposite direction and at the same rate."

100 Years of Solitude- I'm about halfway through this one. It's gorgeaous but I don't really know what it amounts to or where it is heading. It's a bit perverted too. Not really in a good way either. Every other chapter involves incest. I hope I get more out of the second half of the book.

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Read a few the past couple of weeks.

High Fidelity- Anyways this book is not worth reading if you've seen the movie.

Couldn't disagree more.

While I really like the movie, the music and pop-culture geekery comes off much more effectively as written word. Also, Barry is a bit different, the London setting adds something, and there's another girl on the list, whose omission in the film, although not that big of a loss, makes a few things less understandable.

Essentially he steals a girl away froma friend when he's young and the social repurcussion are big. As he's older, this kind of thing can't happen because adults' worlds are larger, and they can just find new circles of friends. It makes a lot of the comments he makes more understandable, e.g. "If you really wanted to mess me up, you should have got to me earlier."

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The Five Dysfunctions of a Team by Patrick Lencioni

From Publishers Weekly:

In keeping with the parable style, Lencioni (The Five Temptations of a CEO) begins by telling the fable of a woman who, as CEO of a struggling Silicon Valley firm, took control of a dysfunctional executive committee and helped its members succeed as a team. Story time over, Lencioni offers explicit instructions for overcoming the human behavioral tendencies that he says corrupt teams (absence of trust, fear of conflict, lack of commitment, avoidance of accountability and inattention to results). Succinct yet sympathetic, this guide will be a boon for those struggling with the inherent difficulties of leading a group. 100,000 first printing.

Pretty good book. Definitely recommended for those of you that like to read books on the corporate world.

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After hearing references to "Atlas Shrugged" by Ayn Rand all my life I finally picked up a used copy awhile back. I finished it the other day and still don't realize what all the fuss was about. The characters in that book are so over the top it's ridiculous.

That was on purpose. She didn't write realistic characters. She explains why in her non-fiction book, The Romantic Manifesto.

Maybe "The Fountainhead" is better. Haven't read it yet.

They're pretty similar. The movie is well done; I'd suggest watching that instead of reading the book.
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After hearing references to "Atlas Shrugged" by Ayn Rand all my life I finally picked up a used copy awhile back. I finished it the other day and still don't realize what all the fuss was about. The characters in that book are so over the top it's ridiculous.

That was on purpose. She didn't write realistic characters. She explains why in her non-fiction book, The Romantic Manifesto.

Maybe "The Fountainhead" is better. Haven't read it yet.

They're pretty similar. The movie is well done; I'd suggest watching that instead of reading the book.
I always heard that if you had to explain what you wrote than you didn't write it that well. FWIW, I haven't read any Ayn Rand.
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Did a search, but couldn't see it listed, but I recently read King Dork by Frank Portman after reading a blurb about it in Time. Felt sorta awkward when the soul-patched, balding book guy at Border's led me to the Adolescent section to find it. Overall, it was really a good read for me. Very funny in parts. Ending sorta crappy, but I think that might have been the point.

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After hearing references to "Atlas Shrugged" by Ayn Rand all my life I finally picked up a used copy awhile back. I finished it the other day and still don't realize what all the fuss was about. The characters in that book are so over the top it's ridiculous.

That was on purpose. She didn't write realistic characters. She explains why in her non-fiction book, The Romantic Manifesto.

Maybe "The Fountainhead" is better. Haven't read it yet.

They're pretty similar. The movie is well done; I'd suggest watching that instead of reading the book.
I always heard that if you had to explain what you wrote than you didn't write it that well. FWIW, I haven't read any Ayn Rand.
Rand's best book is Anthem because it's the shortest and therefore least preachy.
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Ironically, given the recent discussion, I also just finished Ender's Game. In a word ... meh. OK, no where near as good as expected (given the hype).

Now reading "The Collector" by John Fowles. Good book so far.

American Gods was probably my least favorite gaiman. You really need to read the sandman comics (released in graphic novels). We actually read them in a college course if that gives you any idea how well respected they are.

I liked Neverwhere much better than AG. Also if you are in the mood for some great comedy I would recommend Gaiman and Pratchet's Good Omens. One of the funniest books I've read.

While I didn't think American Gods was anything special, I'm about 100 pages into Neverwhere and love it.
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Ironically, given the recent discussion, I also just finished Ender's Game. In a word ... meh. OK, no where near as good as expected (given the hype).

Now reading "The Collector" by John Fowles. Good book so far.

American Gods was probably my least favorite gaiman. You really need to read the sandman comics (released in graphic novels). We actually read them in a college course if that gives you any idea how well respected they are.

I liked Neverwhere much better than AG. Also if you are in the mood for some great comedy I would recommend Gaiman and Pratchet's Good Omens. One of the funniest books I've read.

While I didn't think American Gods was anything special, I'm about 100 pages into Neverwhere and love it.
Neverwhere is next on my list. And I agree with the earlier poster that Good Omens is hilarious. Pratchett and Gaiman make a great team.
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I'm reading a VERY cool little book right now. It's only 93 pages and IMO should probably be in the "5 books to read before you die" thread. Lot of life lessons in this one, and written in a somewhat poetic manner.

The Prophet by Kahlil Gibran

The Prophet is a book of 26 poetic essays written in 1923 by the Lebanese-born American artist, philosopher and writer Khalil Gibran. In the book, the prophet Almustafa, who has lived in the foreign city of Orphalese for 12 years, is about to board a ship which will carry him home. He is stopped by a group of people, with whom he discusses many issues of life and the human condition, including issues such as love, marriage, and work. One of Gibran's best known works, he followed it with Garden of Prophet, and was due to produce a third part when he died.

The book's popularity among adherents of 1960s counterculture inspired a parody, The Profit by "Kehlog Albran", which furnished a number of quotations for the Unix fortune program.

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I just finished Cross by James Patterson - meh, ok for a light read. I finished it in 3 workouts while on the elliptical machine. If you like his otherstuff you'll probably think this is ok, and if you don't at least you won't have a lot of time invested.

I'm a little over halfway through More Twisted by Jeffery Deaver I love short stories and suspense novels and so far I'm enjoying this one quite a bit. Most of the stories are around 20-25 pages long.

Next up is Big Games by Michael Bradley - I may just read the OSU /Michigan chapters and check it out again next fall.

On hold at the library, Wildfire by Nelson Demille - I started reading his books with Charm School and have been hooked ever since. Demille is one of my favorite suspense writers.

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Just finished "The Ruins" by Scott Smith (Simple Plan). Man, what a page turning thriller! I had a very hard time putting this one down and almost did an all-nighter with it reading it in a day and half - which is very fast for me.

Highly recommend, I'm sure we'll eventually see a movie too.

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Tonight, I start The Recognitions

Hope you are enjoying it. I'm about halfway through.

Found this Recognitions Guide on-line and have been reviewing their take on the chapters (synopses) as I get through some chapters. Very helpful. I'm catching a lot of the connections and references, but there's plenty I've missed (the Bosch table's history) which is nice to know moving forward.

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- The President's Last Love by Andrey Kurkov. The story is told in three paralel plots one about the presidents youth late 1970ies to 1992 (breakdown of the SU) , one about his uprising throgh the hirarchy 1999-2006 and the last one being President of the Ukraine, fightingof enemies and illnes in 2012-2016. For every phase there is a woman he is in love with.

Great book about politics, polititians and corruption in the ukraine and eastern europe in general. Very entertaining, I laught a lot. Better then "Death and the Pinguin" also by Kurkov which I have read befor.

- Taiga Blues by Alexander Ikonnikow: short but very funny stories about experiences of a teacher in Siberia during the 1990ies. laught my ### of

- currently reading Russian Disco by Vladimir Kaminer, funny book with short every day stories about Russian immigrants in Berlin during the 1990ies. Liked it so far

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200 pages into "Shantaram" by Gregory David Roberts. :lmao: I can honestly say that this is my favorite book since Stephenson published "Cryptonomicon." It's different, set in Bombay, India. Great characterization, very lyric writing (some a bit over the top, but still enjoyable), funny, touching, thought-provoking, thrilling stuff. I just cannot recommend this book highly enough.

Shantaram

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I'm reading a VERY cool little book right now. It's only 93 pages and IMO should probably be in the "5 books to read before you die" thread. Lot of life lessons in this one, and written in a somewhat poetic manner.

The Prophet by Kahlil Gibran

The Prophet is a book of 26 poetic essays written in 1923 by the Lebanese-born American artist, philosopher and writer Khalil Gibran. In the book, the prophet Almustafa, who has lived in the foreign city of Orphalese for 12 years, is about to board a ship which will carry him home. He is stopped by a group of people, with whom he discusses many issues of life and the human condition, including issues such as love, marriage, and work. One of Gibran's best known works, he followed it with Garden of Prophet, and was due to produce a third part when he died.

The book's popularity among adherents of 1960s counterculture inspired a parody, The Profit by "Kehlog Albran", which furnished a number of quotations for the Unix fortune program.

we had non religious wedding - justice of the peace

at any rate, my sister in law read several passages from the prophet at our wedding

i agree that its an amazing book

after not reading anything for the first 8 months of my sons life im now back on the wagon and tearing through steven erikson's midnight tides. the previous book in the malazan series house of chains was my favorite but this one tops that easily. fans of george rr martin should check this series out. its more convoluted and a tougher read but equally rewarding.

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Marching Powder by Rusty Young & Thomas McFadden

2 chapters in and completely hooked. passed out reading it last nite or i would have read a lot more.

'From the Publisher

Rusty Young was backpacking in South America when he heard about Thomas McFadden, a convicted English drug trafficker who ran tours inside Bolivia's notorious San Pedro prison. Intrigued, the young Australian journalisted went to La Paz and joined one of Thomas's illegal tours. They formed an instant friendship and then became partners in an attempt to record Thomas's experiences in the jail. Rusty bribed the guards to allow him to stay and for the next three months he lived inside the prison, sharing a cell with Thomas and recording one of the strangest and most compelling prison stories of all time. The result is Marching Powder.

This book establishes that San Pedro is not your average prison. Inmates are expected to buy their cells from real estate agents. Others run shops and restaurants. Women and children live with imprisoned family members. It is a place where corrupt politicians and drug lords live in luxury apartments, while the poorest prisoners are subjected to squalor and deprivation. Violence is a constant threat, and sections of San Pedro that echo with the sound of children by day house some of Bolivia's busiest cocaine laboratories by night. In San Pedro, cocaine--"Bolivian marching powder"--makes life bearable. Even the prison cat is addicted.

Yet Marching Powder is also the tale of friendship, a place where horror is countered by humor and cruelty and compassion can inhabit the same cell. This is cutting-edge travel-writing and a fascinating account of infiltration into the South American drug culture."

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I just finished:

Tyrannosaur Canyon

Very enjoyable book.. But the ending, like most written by Douglas Preston & Child left a bad taste..

I would like to have had them continue on with what became of what they found..

They always seem to leave their books with sort of an open ended ending so as to possibly write a Sequel.

But over all I'd give it a 3 our 4. :thumbup:

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On hold at the library, Wildfire by Nelson Demille - I started reading his books with Charm School and have been hooked ever since. Demille is one of my favorite suspense writers.

I just finished Wildfire, and it's pretty good. I've liked Demille since The General's Daughter and Plum Island. While Wildfire is a good read, I still like The Lion's Gate and NightFall better.

Just started The Cell by Stephen King. It's not bad...but it's something to read right now. :goodposting:

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On hold at the library, Wildfire by Nelson Demille - I started reading his books with Charm School and have been hooked ever since. Demille is one of my favorite suspense writers.

I just finished Wildfire, and it's pretty good. I've liked Demille since The General's Daughter and Plum Island. While Wildfire is a good read, I still like The Lion's Gate and NightFall better.

Just started The Cell by Stephen King. It's not bad...but it's something to read right now. :shrug:

Finished Wildfire last week and enjoyed it for the most part. I found myself chuckling quite a bit at the smart alec comments/thoughts of Detective Corey.

I'm about halfway through Hannibal Rising and I've really enjoyed it so far. Compared to Harris' other novels, this is considerably different (so far), but I'm really enjoying it. I think that it is more cerebral (maybe) than Red Dragon & Hannibal (I've not read Silence...). It's not what I expected but enjoyable none-the-less

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Tonight, I start The Recognitions

Hope you are enjoying it. I'm about halfway through.

Found this Recognitions Guide on-line and have been reviewing their take on the chapters (synopses) as I get through some chapters. Very helpful. I'm catching a lot of the connections and references, but there's plenty I've missed (the Bosch table's history) which is nice to know moving forward.

Finished The Recognitions. I can see why it is referred to as a prelude to postmodernism. Also some very black humor in the book.

But its no JR.

Now on to A Passage to India.

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Just finished Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card. I was pleasantly surprised.

For a book written so long ago, I thought it was wonderfully prescient. I'm not normally

into sci-fi (at least in book form), but I really liked the book. My only problem was that

I guessed the plot twist long before it was revealed near the end of the book, but that in

no way detracted from my enjoyment. I was thinking I'd pick up the other Orson Scott

Card books, particularly the Ender ones. Has anyone else read them??

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just finished rereading factotum & almost done with post office by bukowski (bloom's avatar)

in the middle of zen & the art of motorcycle maintenence, a sprawling philosophical inquiry/travelogue

on deck...

ambidextrous universe by martin gardner, a classic in its third & probably last revision (author about 90)

reread origin of consciousness & breakdown of the bicameral mind by julian jaynes, a controversial work that posits humanity wasn't "conscious" in a conventional sense until just several thousand years ago... an audacious thesis, but one of the most brilliant & original books i've ever read...

reread the rise of the west by william mcneill, easily the best history book i've ever read, not a dry, pedantic recitation of dates, names, places, battles, inventions, cities & nations, but breathes life into the narrative with an active, searching intellect that finds many patterns & connections on nearly every page of about a 1,000 page work...

act of creation by arthur koestler... the positive flip side of human nature to the dark ghost in the machine (memorialized by a police album & anime movie)... looks for parallels throughout history in fields of science, invention, art & humor... koestler is one of the smartest individuals & has one of the most encyclopedic minds i have ever come across, & is also a gifted writer...

neal stephenson's baroque cycle/trilogy (loved snow crash, diamond age & cryptonomicon)

on the road by jack kerouac

one flew over the cukoos nest by ken kesey

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Manhunt: The 12 Day Chase for Lincoln's Killer by James Swanson

Very good book. Highly recommended. As you can probably tell from the title, it's about Lincoln's assassination and the subsequent hunt for Booth. This book had a wonderful pace to it. It managed to cram all of the relevant historical information without getting dry or bogged down at all.

These are the kind's of history books that I enjoy reading.

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