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Whatcha readin now? (book, books, reading, read)


shuke

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Currently reading "A Confederacy of Dunces" by John Kennedy Toole and have really, really enjoyed it. Am about 50 pages from the finish and would recommend it to anybody. It's a real shame that the author's life ended so tragically as he obviously was an extremely talented individual (not that it isn't a shame when a talentless schmuck kicks the bucket). Prior to that I read "Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency". Next up is one of the following from a recent foray into a used book store.Ken Follet - can't recall the name but it was recommended here and had Pillars in the titleForsyth - Day of the JackalGaiman - American GodsLarry Brooks - Darkness BoundFinish reading "A Brief History of Time" from Hawking.

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I'm re-reading "Friendly Fascism" by Bertrand Gross. A bit dated (c. 1980), but a decent book that has proven to be somewhat prophetic.

Also reading "The Economics of Prohibition" by Mark Thornton.

On the lighter side, I just read "Pattern Recognition" by William Gibson. Decent read - a different style of writing than I'm accustomed to.

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FAST FOOD NATION :thumbup: Truly disturbing view into the world of the fast food companies’ world. I´m half way through it and I am already considering to stop my 200 dollar a year funding of these companies…

Hi OC,Great call. Food is fuel. These guys put out crappy fuel.J
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Since Christmas:

The DaVinci Code - Dan Brown

The Teeth of the Tiger - Tom Clancy

To America - Stephen Ambrose

The Hobbit - JRR Tolkien

Right now:

The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring - JRR Tolkien

Have started but have put down:

Flyboys - James Bradley (wrote Flags Of Our Fathers) This is one is hard to get into, it is about 9 Navy/Marine Corps pilots that were shot down over ChiChi Jima, 8 were captured, tortured and killed, one escaped(George HW Bush).

Undaunted Courage - Stephen Ambrose

On Deck:

The Lord of The Rings: The Two Towers - JRR Tolkien

The Lord of The Rings: The Return of the King - JRR Tolkien

Citizen Soldiers - Stephen Ambrose, this is the sequel to his book D-Day

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You guys made Ghost Soldiers seem intriguing..its on my list now.

Ghost Soldiers is an excellent book.The one thing that they felled to mention about the book is that besides the Bataan Death March and the Survival of the prisoners in the Cabanatuan POW Camp. It was also about the daring rescue of the POWs by a company of Rangers. It is written that, say, the odd chapters start with the fall of Corregidor and the Death March and Camp life, the even chapters start with the US Army landing in the Phillipines and the march of the Rangers to the camp.It is a excellent, but haunting book.
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'The Gospel of Joseph' by Gabriel Meyer "Cast as a translation of writings attributed to the husband of Jesus' mother and commentary about them, Meyer's unconventional fiction presents Jesus' early life as one of privilege and relates the effects reputedly sacred documents have on those who come in contact with them"I'm about 1/2 way through - pretty interesting.

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Ghost Soldiers is an excellent book.The one thing that they felled to mention about the book is that besides the Bataan Death March and the Survival of the prisoners in the Cabanatuan POW Camp. It was also about the daring rescue of the POWs by a company of Rangers. It is written that, say, the odd chapters start with the fall of Corregidor and the Death March and Camp life, the even chapters start with the US Army landing in the Phillipines and the march of the Rangers to the camp.It is a excellent, but haunting book.

Hi Stoneys,You really should check out Tenney's "My Hitch In Hell" if you liked Ghost Soldiers.Ghost Soldiers is to My Hitch in Hell as Sunday School Easter story is to the Passion movie. I was blown away by it.The cool thing about Ghost Soldiers is that it has the cool ending. No good news in Tenney's book. Sides spoke at the symposium at the Death March race about how he came to write Ghost Soldiers. He was talking to one of the survivors and was amazed at the story. But knew fully that it was not a marketable story. Who wants to buy a book about Japanese soldiers torturing American / Phillipine soldiers. There is no upside. Sides says he asked the guy, "you know that would make a great book, but there's got to be some sort of uplifting angle somewhere." The old vet says, "Nope. Well, I guess you might could talk about the Ranger's raid on the POW camp and how they rescued the guys that were left there..." Sides did the double take - "what did you say?"... That was kinda funny.Both are great books. Ghost Soldiers is a very good read. My Hitch in Hell will just piss you off (at least it did me) But worth reading as well.J
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  • 1 year later...

An Instance of the Fingerpost by Iain Pears.

i'm about halfway through this, and highly recommend it. I think the FFA readers would really like it.

It's a murder mystery set in England (Oxford, mostly) in the 1660s. The tale is told from 4 viewpoints, in their distinct voices. But who is telling the truth?

This is historical fiction at its finest.

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Just finished reading:

The Codex

Goes WAY off the deep end as far as believability is concerned, but still fun reading.

Although, for that area(amazon and adventure) I actually enjoyed this one more:

Amazonia

Their mission involves both unusual natural dangers--such as piranhas with legs

:eek:

As one Reviewer stated:

a book seemingly designed for those with ADD. Extreme action, mutated creatures, explosives, giant jaguars, violence( including dismemberment and head shrinking!)

:thumbup: Edited by snogger
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Just finished Faded Coat of Blue which is a Civil War novel. Was pretty good although I think the protagonist is a bit of a tool at times. I'll probably read the follow-up next while this one's fresh in my mind.

not trying to show off here or anything (with today's series of posts in this thread), but i'm a big fan of the Abel Jones series, of which Faded Coat of Blue is the first entry. I liked all 6 novels.

Jones is indeed a bit priggish, but it becomes part of his charm as you get used to the character.

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Just started reading Never Let Me Go.

I :h: Ishiguro.

that was pretty good. read it over the holidays.

made me ponder: am i blindly accepting my fate as dictated by societal and other pressures, or am i truly seeking my own desired path?

I've had it on my shelf for a while, but wound up re-reading a few things over the holidays. Ishiguro is a really good writer. Remains of the Day is one of my favorite books.
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Re-reading the Subtle Knife by Philip Pullman (just finished Northern lights - Amber Spyglass next). Haven't read them for a few years (prob. since about 2000) and am pleasantly surprised by how good they are upon second reading...Last "new" book I read was the latest from Jon Courtenay Grimwood - 9tail Fox :thumbup:

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snipped

:confused:

OK, explain this to me. The last post on this thread was 2/25/2004 and you are replying today, nearly two years later.

Did you do a search and find this thread?

Did you bookmark it for whenever you started reading a book?

Did you just click on a random page number and just pick an old thread to reply to?

I really would like to know.

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Just Finished: Mind Game: How the Boston Red Sox Got Smart, Won a World Series, and Created a New Blueprint for Winning Currently Reading:Nickel and Dimed by Barbara Ehrenreichon the queue: When Genius Failed; Sex, Drugs, and Cocoa Puffs; Fletch's Fortune; and The Roaring Nineties: A New History of the World's Most Prosperous Decade

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"Cloud Atlas" - by David Mitchell.Saw it recommended more than once in these book threads. It's a pretty good read, and an intriguing style of writing.I'm thinking I'll be using some of my 70 B&N Christmas $ on that "Fingerpost" book mentioned above. It's next.

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:confused:

OK, explain this to me. The last post on this thread was 2/25/2004 and you are replying today, nearly two years later.

Did you do a search and find this thread?

Did you bookmark it for whenever you started reading a book?

Did you just click on a random page number and just pick an old thread to reply to?

I really would like to know.

searched for a mention of the book i wanted to comment on. This thread was the only one i found. Didn't feel that it warranted a new thread, so here we are.
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Just finished: Harry Potter & The Half Blood Prince

Currently reading: The Historian, Elizabeth Kostova's finely detailed vampire novel.

On deck: either The Scorpion's Gate (Richard A. Clarke's novel about terrorism) or the first volume of George R. R. Martin's Game of Thrones series (aptly titled A Game of Thrones)

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just finished "BlackHawk Down"just started "Killing Pablo"anxiously awaiting delivery of:"Not a Good Day to Die : The Untold Story of Operation Anaconda"and"Stalingrad: The Fateful Siege, 1942-1943"kind of a war buff guy. :nerd:

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Just finished King's Tommyknockers

Just starting Joe R. Lansdale's A Fine Dark Line.

Joe Lansdale :thumbup:

:rant:

My wife purged some books from our burgeoning bookshelves over the weekend, including a couple of Lansdale hardcovers I had been saving for summer reading.

:o

divorce her.

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An Instance of the Fingerpost by Iain Pears.

i'm about halfway through this, and highly recommend it. I think the FFA readers would really like it.

It's a murder mystery set in England (Oxford, mostly) in the 1660s. The tale is told from 4 viewpoints, in their distinct voices. But who is telling the truth?

This is historical fiction at its finest.

this sounds great. gonna add to the wishlist.

im listening to ghost soldiers in the car and rereading a storm of swords in anticipation of reading a feast for crows.

to the bataan deathmarch readers id recommend the rape of nan king by iris chang. it deals with japanese brutality while they occupied china during the 1930s. citizens as well as soldiers were victims. the author recently commited suicide at age 36.

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