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Whatcha readin now? (book, books, reading, read)


shuke

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Almost finished with Gaiman's Neverwhere. Superb book.

Any recommendations for another good Gaiman?

I'm right in the middle of "American Gods" by him and am really enjoying it. I've also read "Good Omens" that he co-wrote with Terry Pratchett which was a humorous look at the appocolypse. It has sort of a Douglas Adam's feel to it so if you read and enjoyed "Hitchhiker's Guide..." then youll enjoy it.
Finished American Gods a couple of weeks ago and haven't had time since to start up a new book due to remodeling tasks. Loved that book and would highly recommend it and will definitely be looking up some of his other books.
:shrug:

Just got Angels and Visitations from the library today.

I enjoyed Neverwhere more than American Gods. My favorite from Gaiman is Anansi Boys.
Anansi Boys? Really? Interesting. It was my least favorite...easily. American Gods, then Sandman, then Neverwhere with Anansi Boys a distant 4th from what I've read. Maybe I missed something. But the plot was "my 'brother' is annoying and stealing my girlfriend...I need to risk everything in the world to get rid of him". No urgency, no tension. Just goofy witches and a tale of "inner self". Maybe I didn't read close enough though...
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The Road -- Cormac McCarthy

...damn...

Hope this doesn't change your "vision" of anything you're reading: http://www.cinematical.com/2007/09/12/vigg...rthys-the-road/

I am so pumped for this to hit the screen that I can't put it into words. I hope they don't screw it up.

BTW...when you're finished...post your thoughts about the ending. It's the one time I disagree with McCarthy on just about anything he wrote.

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Almost finished with Gaiman's Neverwhere. Superb book.

Any recommendations for another good Gaiman?

I'm right in the middle of "American Gods" by him and am really enjoying it. I've also read "Good Omens" that he co-wrote with Terry Pratchett which was a humorous look at the appocolypse. It has sort of a Douglas Adam's feel to it so if you read and enjoyed "Hitchhiker's Guide..." then youll enjoy it.
Finished American Gods a couple of weeks ago and haven't had time since to start up a new book due to remodeling tasks. Loved that book and would highly recommend it and will definitely be looking up some of his other books.
:goodposting:

Just got Angels and Visitations from the library today.

I enjoyed Neverwhere more than American Gods. My favorite from Gaiman is Anansi Boys.
Anansi Boys? Really? Interesting. It was my least favorite...easily. American Gods, then Sandman, then Neverwhere with Anansi Boys a distant 4th from what I've read. Maybe I missed something. But the plot was "my 'brother' is annoying and stealing my girlfriend...I need to risk everything in the world to get rid of him". No urgency, no tension. Just goofy witches and a tale of "inner self". Maybe I didn't read close enough though...
I have to qualify this by saying this is one of my Audio books reads and the narrator was excellent. I'm sure part of my enjoyment came from that.

The surface plot was my dad just died and I just found out he is ancient African god. I also just found out I have an uber-cool brother who does everything great and is stealing my girlfriend and I'm such a spineless loser that I can't possibly do anything about it.

The story was about strength of character, confidence, true love, and ultimately about family. It's also about looking deeper than whats on the surface to see the true story.

On the surface its Fat Charlie + Spider = Anansi, so what traits one has the other must be lacking. As the story progresses and the characters develop we realize that even though these brothers look like opposites they aren't. Is Fat Charlie really that pathetic? Is Spider really that confident?

And even though Anansi died at the start, you really get to know him and love him. I loved the folk tales, old world and new.

I think the depth of the characters is what really made this a great book for me. Gaiman helps you see the good in all his characters while making sure they can be very annoying at times.

I was never any good at book reviews so this may not be such a ringing endorsement, but for me it is so far the best work from one of my top ten favorite authors.

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Almost finished with Gaiman's Neverwhere. Superb book.

Any recommendations for another good Gaiman?

I'm right in the middle of "American Gods" by him and am really enjoying it. I've also read "Good Omens" that he co-wrote with Terry Pratchett which was a humorous look at the appocolypse. It has sort of a Douglas Adam's feel to it so if you read and enjoyed "Hitchhiker's Guide..." then youll enjoy it.
Finished American Gods a couple of weeks ago and haven't had time since to start up a new book due to remodeling tasks. Loved that book and would highly recommend it and will definitely be looking up some of his other books.
:lmao:

Just got Angels and Visitations from the library today.

I enjoyed Neverwhere more than American Gods. My favorite from Gaiman is Anansi Boys.
Anansi Boys? Really? Interesting. It was my least favorite...easily. American Gods, then Sandman, then Neverwhere with Anansi Boys a distant 4th from what I've read. Maybe I missed something. But the plot was "my 'brother' is annoying and stealing my girlfriend...I need to risk everything in the world to get rid of him". No urgency, no tension. Just goofy witches and a tale of "inner self". Maybe I didn't read close enough though...
I have to qualify this by saying this is one of my Audio books reads and the narrator was excellent. I'm sure part of my enjoyment came from that.

The surface plot was my dad just died and I just found out he is ancient African god. I also just found out I have an uber-cool brother who does everything great and is stealing my girlfriend and I'm such a spineless loser that I can't possibly do anything about it.

The story was about strength of character, confidence, true love, and ultimately about family. It's also about looking deeper than whats on the surface to see the true story.

On the surface its Fat Charlie + Spider = Anansi, so what traits one has the other must be lacking. As the story progresses and the characters develop we realize that even though these brothers look like opposites they aren't. Is Fat Charlie really that pathetic? Is Spider really that confident?

And even though Anansi died at the start, you really get to know him and love him. I loved the folk tales, old world and new.

I think the depth of the characters is what really made this a great book for me. Gaiman helps you see the good in all his characters while making sure they can be very annoying at times.

I was never any good at book reviews so this may not be such a ringing endorsement, but for me it is so far the best work from one of my top ten favorite authors.

Thanks for the insight. Much appreciated. Your review was good...it's just what I took from the story. Like you, I liked the folk tales and the imagery...but unlike you, I didn't feel any reason to really care about what the outcome was. In American Gods, there was murder and desperation and urgency. In Anansi Boys there was "will he learn more about himself and his ancestry"...all the action seemed contrived because Fat Charlie never really had any reason to keep diving into things the way he did. In other words...I liked the backstory and the characters, but I didn't like what they were doing. It's nitpicking. I enjoyed the book...I just wouldn't put it close to American Gods. One other caveat...I don't really enjoy Gaiman as much as most people do. I think he's got an amazing imagination and tells good stories...but that he's gimmicky.
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The Road -- Cormac McCarthy

...damn...

Hope this doesn't change your "vision" of anything you're reading: http://www.cinematical.com/2007/09/12/vigg...rthys-the-road/

I am so pumped for this to hit the screen that I can't put it into words. I hope they don't screw it up.

BTW...when you're finished...post your thoughts about the ending. It's the one time I disagree with McCarthy on just about anything he wrote.

Any idea when this movie is due?
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The Road -- Cormac McCarthy

...damn...

Hope this doesn't change your "vision" of anything you're reading: http://www.cinematical.com/2007/09/12/vigg...rthys-the-road/

I am so pumped for this to hit the screen that I can't put it into words. I hope they don't screw it up.

BTW...when you're finished...post your thoughts about the ending. It's the one time I disagree with McCarthy on just about anything he wrote.

Any idea when this movie is due?
I couldn't really find a concrete date. Just "sometime in 2009". Charlize Theron and Robert Duvall are also playing roles in it. They won't be in it much though. A "newcomer" is playing the part of the son.
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The Road -- Cormac McCarthy

...damn...

Hope this doesn't change your "vision" of anything you're reading: http://www.cinematical.com/2007/09/12/vigg...rthys-the-road/

I am so pumped for this to hit the screen that I can't put it into words. I hope they don't screw it up.

BTW...when you're finished...post your thoughts about the ending. It's the one time I disagree with McCarthy on just about anything he wrote.

Any idea when this movie is due?
I couldn't really find a concrete date. Just "sometime in 2009". Charlize Theron and Robert Duvall are also playing roles in it. They won't be in it much though. A "newcomer" is playing the part of the son.
This seems like a movie they can really F up. A lot of the book isn't all that action packed...it's more the imagery and dreariness of the settings and circumstances that really works. Hollywood will probably try to spruce it up....and I hope they don't overdue it. One of the things i loved about the book is the simplicity....a fathers love for his son in the worst of circumstances. I can see them making more confrontations with others then were in the book. I really would love to see how they are going to do the ashes everywhere theme. Gray and dark. Edited by Neo
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Speaking of movies in 2009:

If you have any interest at all in graphic novels or Alternate Reality stories and haven't yet read the Watchmen series by Alan Moore, do yourself a favor and read all 12 issues prior to the film's debut in March of next year.

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The Road -- Cormac McCarthy

...damn...

Hope this doesn't change your "vision" of anything you're reading: http://www.cinematical.com/2007/09/12/vigg...rthys-the-road/

I am so pumped for this to hit the screen that I can't put it into words. I hope they don't screw it up.

BTW...when you're finished...post your thoughts about the ending. It's the one time I disagree with McCarthy on just about anything he wrote.

Any idea when this movie is due?
I couldn't really find a concrete date. Just "sometime in 2009". Charlize Theron and Robert Duvall are also playing roles in it. They won't be in it much though. A "newcomer" is playing the part of the son.
This seems like a movie they can really F up. A lot of the book isn't all that action packed...it's more the imagery and dreariness of the settings and circumstances that really works. Hollywood will probably try to spruce it up....and I hope they don't overdue it. One of the things i loved about the book is the simplicity....a fathers love for his son in the worst of circumstances. I can see them making more confrontations with others then were in the book. I really would love to see how they are going to do the ashes everywhere theme. Gray and dark.
Viggo as the dad and the guy who adapted no country is doing the script (hes doing blood meridian also - ridley scott to direct)

should be excellent

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The Road -- Cormac McCarthy

...damn...

Hope this doesn't change your "vision" of anything you're reading: http://www.cinematical.com/2007/09/12/vigg...rthys-the-road/

I am so pumped for this to hit the screen that I can't put it into words. I hope they don't screw it up.

BTW...when you're finished...post your thoughts about the ending. It's the one time I disagree with McCarthy on just about anything he wrote.

Any idea when this movie is due?
I couldn't really find a concrete date. Just "sometime in 2009". Charlize Theron and Robert Duvall are also playing roles in it. They won't be in it much though. A "newcomer" is playing the part of the son.
This seems like a movie they can really F up. A lot of the book isn't all that action packed...it's more the imagery and dreariness of the settings and circumstances that really works. Hollywood will probably try to spruce it up....and I hope they don't overdue it. One of the things i loved about the book is the simplicity....a fathers love for his son in the worst of circumstances. I can see them making more confrontations with others then were in the book. I really would love to see how they are going to do the ashes everywhere theme. Gray and dark.
:unsure: I am worried the Theron will screw it up. I hope you are correct that they wont be in it much. The book is about father and son. The mother has a very very very brief part. I am worried that the mother will be in the movie more then the book.
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I'm reading The Reluctant Admiral, a biography of Admiral Yamamoto. I've always found him to be an interesting guy, but I didn't know the half of it.

Considering how much he was villified in the U.S. as the leader and architect of the Pearl Harbor attack, he's actually a very accessible persona to a westerner, and not the rigid and distant military leader that so many Japanese seem to be. It's also an easy read. :popcorn:

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Check out 'The Good Rat' by Jimmy Breslin. Very good account of a guy that was associated with the mob testifying against a couple of crooked cops that did hits and passed on information regarding criminal investigations. Gotti was mentioned quite a bit, as well as other known mafia guys.

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The Universe In a Nutshell. Stephen Hawking. Sort of a simplifiied sequel to A Brief History of Time which I have not read.I'll need to read it more than once.

I've read them and they both made me feel stupid, even on the second reading. Hawking covers a lot of territory at a high level and most of it is pretty easy to follow but there are parts where I was just scratching my head and wishing there were some nice pictures... e.g. He spends a good chunk of time explaing the Theory of General Relativity, but I'm still not getting it.
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Deep Storm

Just finished. By Lincoln Child, one of the writer on the Pendergast/Relic team. I know a lot like me enjoy those books, but this one (not Pendergast Universe) is a real stinker. I would avoid, very big let down. Im going to read The Wheel of Darkness next, and hold out hope it will be as good as the other Pendergast stuff.

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Just finnished The Year of Living Biblicaly by AJ Jacobs. Its the author's account of following the Bible literally and his quest to find religion. He statets his family is of Jewish background but that he is "as Jewish as the Olive Garden is Italian."

Really interesting stuff for those interested in religion. He visits the Creationism Museum, Hasidic Jews for several Old Testiment holidays, Snake Handlers in TN, and his uncle in Jerusalem who is a former cult leader.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Just finished 2 books this weekend

The Memory of Running (Ron McLarty)

Really enjoyed this, about a loner who has let his life go to hell, suffers some serious losses and takes off from Rhode Is. to LA on a bike. On the way he crosses paths with different people, some great, some not so much. Along the way he almost accidentally starts to undo the damage he's done to himself and reengage with people.

My only complaint was the ending was a little too neat.

Another one about a loser, High Fidelity (Nick Hornby)

Enjoyed this one as well, but spent a good part of the middle of this book, annoyed with the central character who was 36 going on 20 with no real excuse for being in the rut he's in, but too apathetic to do anything about it. It gets beyond that though, and turns out well. Not the neat ending above, more of a "things might be heading this way, but draw your own conclusions" type thing.

Interesting characters and situations (the dumb stuff that actually happens to people!). Thing that stuck with me from this book was that the past (anybody's) almost certainly didn't happen the way you remember it. It gets filtered and molded and used in the rationalizations we make later until the memory has hardly a trace left of the actual event.

Memory of Running had a better story, but High Fidelity had better characters, dialog etc.

Cheers,

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Just finished 2 books this weekend

The Memory of Running (Ron McLarty)

Really enjoyed this, about a loner who has let his life go to hell, suffers some serious losses and takes off from Rhode Is. to LA on a bike. On the way he crosses paths with different people, some great, some not so much. Along the way he almost accidentally starts to undo the damage he's done to himself and reengage with people.

My only complaint was the ending was a little too neat.

Cheers,

I loved that book. I want to read his latest I think its called traveller.

I just read Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's The Hound of the Baskervilles. Quick fun read. How can you not love holmes and watson?

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As mentioned before I just read The Road by Cormac McCarthy. So, now I'm hooked.Tell me in what order you'd read his other books -- and, is there a clunker to just skip?Thanks

Blood Meridian. Go get it tonight.
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Just completed The Foundation Series by Isaac Asimov. The series is highly acclaimed, winning the one-time Hugo Award for "Best All-Time Series" in 1965.

I thoroughly enjoyed this series. Set in the future when the galaxy is guided by a new branch of science described below:

The premise of the series is that scientist Hari Seldon spent his life developing a branch of mathematics known as psychohistory, a concept devised by Asimov and his editor John W. Campbell. Using the law of mass action, it can predict the future, but only on a large scale; it is error-prone for anything smaller than a planet or an empire. It works on the principle that the behaviour of a mass of people is predictable and the quantity of this mass tends to be very huge (equal to the population of the galaxy). The larger the mass the more predictable is the future.

Some pretty colorful characters in this series. Probably the coolest of them all is a being called "The Mule". A mutant that Hari Seldon the master Psychohistorian couldn't predict in his equations.

This series was written back in the forties when nuclear power was relatively new, thus a lot of the advanced characters had atomic powered devices to do crazy things.

ETA: Starting Herman Wouk's The Winds of War now. After that I suppose I'll be compelled to read War and Remembrance volumes one and two.

Edited by Pooch
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Just finished: Surely You're Joking Mr. Feinman - Richard Feinman. I was hoping to learn a bit about physics and the thinking process behind discoveries. This book had a lot more to do with picking up chicks.

Now reading: Atlas Shrugged. I've been meaning to read this one for a while and have finally gotten into it. I'm about half way through and it is pretty much complete garbage. I'm not sure I'll be able to finish it. Sorry to the fans but how can you stand this repetitive, insulting crap?

Also reading: Sole Survivor - Ruthanne Lum McCunn (audiobook). Not great, not bad. It's a book about a chinese shipwreck survivor who survives on a raft for months after his boat is torpedoed during WWII.

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Just completed The Foundation Series by Isaac Asimov. The series is highly acclaimed, winning the one-time Hugo Award for "Best All-Time Series" in 1965.

I thoroughly enjoyed this series. Set in the future when the galaxy is guided by a new branch of science described below:

The premise of the series is that scientist Hari Seldon spent his life developing a branch of mathematics known as psychohistory, a concept devised by Asimov and his editor John W. Campbell. Using the law of mass action, it can predict the future, but only on a large scale; it is error-prone for anything smaller than a planet or an empire. It works on the principle that the behaviour of a mass of people is predictable and the quantity of this mass tends to be very huge (equal to the population of the galaxy). The larger the mass the more predictable is the future.

Some pretty colorful characters in this series. Probably the coolest of them all is a being called "The Mule". A mutant that Hari Seldon the master Psychohistorian couldn't predict in his equations.

This series was written back in the forties when nuclear power was relatively new, thus a lot of the advanced characters had atomic powered devices to do crazy things.

I'd be surprised if you found very many on this forum who are not familiar with Foundation.
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Just finished 2 books this weekend

The Memory of Running (Ron McLarty)

Really enjoyed this, about a loner who has let his life go to hell, suffers some serious losses and takes off from Rhode Is. to LA on a bike. On the way he crosses paths with different people, some great, some not so much. Along the way he almost accidentally starts to undo the damage he's done to himself and reengage with people.

My only complaint was the ending was a little too neat.

Cheers,

I loved that book. I want to read his latest I think its called traveller.

I just read Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's The Hound of the Baskervilles. Quick fun read. How can you not love holmes and watson?

Traveler was excellent as well. Probably just as good as the first one and it's one of my favorites of the last few years.

And he's got another new one coming out in July.

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Dracula is probably one of the coolest "classics" i've ever read. Van Helsing is the man. Speeding right through it, I love the way Stoker arranges the narrative.

love it
Agreed
Wow...guess I need to pick this up. Just finished The Great Gatsby for the first time...don't know how I didn't read this in high school.....must of used cliff notes back then. Glad I know how to appreciate a good book these days.
Actually I've never read Gatsby either. I'll be picking it up today.
Finally got around to reading this, and it won't be the last time. Great stuff.
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Now reading: Atlas Shrugged. I've been meaning to read this one for a while and have finally gotten into it. I'm about half way through and it is pretty much complete garbage. I'm not sure I'll be able to finish it. Sorry to the fans but how can you stand this repetitive, insulting crap?

I think both The Fountainhead and Atlas Shrugged are extremely entertaining reads. I don't agree with all of the philosophy expressed, but there is certainly much to think over. But the action and dialogue move the story along, and the stories are very interesting.

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Day of Empire by Amy Chua, a Yale law professor. Takes a unique look at the role of tolerance in building some of the great hyperpowers throughout history and relates it to America's role in the world today. But I think her best stuff is when she analyzes the probabilities of the USA being surpassed by one of our current rivals, the EU, China and India.

I give this one a :goodposting: to our political and history buffs.

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Now reading: Atlas Shrugged. I've been meaning to read this one for a while and have finally gotten into it. I'm about half way through and it is pretty much complete garbage. I'm not sure I'll be able to finish it. Sorry to the fans but how can you stand this repetitive, insulting crap?

pretty much my thoughts exactly.

I think both The Fountainhead and Atlas Shrugged are extremely entertaining reads. I don't agree with all of the philosophy expressed, but there is certainly much to think over. But the action and dialogue move the story along, and the stories are very interesting.

How does this square with the above? if it's repetitive and insulting, how is it entertaining?
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About halfway through the world without us. The author tries to look at and predict what would happen if for some reason humans suddenly dissapeared. Prety interesting, sort of depressing unexpectedly, his conclusions are pretty reasonable overall, and some of them I think dead on, a couple are "well, I guess it could, why not?"

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The Postman by David Brin. I've been on a little post-apocalypse run lately. Postman's ok. Not as interesting or well-written as WarDay or Swan Song (which I LOVED), and not as unique as The Road, but ok. DEFINITELY better than whatshisnames piece o' crud movie.

Up next is The Third Option by Vince Flynn.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Supposed to be studying for exams but picked up Crusade by Rick Atkinson at a used bookstore a few weeks ago and started it on Sunday. It's great. Recounts Desert Storm/Shield. Published in 1993. His two recent works on WWII are pretty good as well.

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About halfway through the world without us. The author tries to look at and predict what would happen if for some reason humans suddenly dissapeared. Prety interesting, sort of depressing unexpectedly, his conclusions are pretty reasonable overall, and some of them I think dead on, a couple are "well, I guess it could, why not?"

started reading this a few months ago and stopped about halfway through. might pick it up again soon. was a bit slow....
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Twelve Mighty Orphans by Jim Dent, a Fort Worth sportswriter. About a Masonic orphanage that put together a pretty impressive high school football run in Depression-era Texas, with limited manpower and resources. They were routinely beating some of the biggest public schools in the state with 12-14 man rosters but they used a version of the spread offense that gave other teams fits at the time. A pretty decent read overall.
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Finished:

How Doctors Think by Jerome Groopman

Good book about how frequently doctors screw up and why they do.

The Belgariad and The Mallorean by David Eddings

Loved this as a kid. Irritated and bored by it as an adult.

Sandman by Neil Gaiman

Finished the whole series. Some of the stories were great, some kind of sucked. Overall, it was decent. But graphic novels really aren't my thing.

World Without End by Ken Follett

Excellent book. I can't say that it's as good as Pillars of the Earth, but it certainly holds its own (and can be read as a stand-alone). He loses some of the shades of gray of his characters from the first book, and he didn't have all that many shades in that one. Plus, a few of the main characters were carbon copies of characters from the first book. But he's a great storyteller and I really flew through this 1000 page book. I think the setting of 14th century England is one of the things that makes the book so good.

Just started: Altered Carbon by Richard K. Morgan

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As mentioned before I just read The Road by Cormac McCarthy. So, now I'm hooked.Tell me in what order you'd read his other books -- and, is there a clunker to just skip?Thanks

Blood Meridian. Go get it tonight.
Just finished this. Wow....what a read. Seriously, this is a book to be digested. I found myself reading paragraphs over and over to fully get the imagery, settings and meaning. Every word used is important in this book. I actually have to read it again because I'm still sure I will catch a lot I missed.....serious masterpiece. The judge is an incredible character.
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Here is what I have read since Feb.

Deep Storm by Lincoln Child

Very enjoyable read. Interesting story line about digging into the Earths core and government secrecy.

Utopia, also by Lincoln Child

Think Westworld meets "Utopia". Really liked this one. Some great story lines, and action secqueces. Only thing I did think was weird to me is that the "bad" character is pretty well figured out by the reader chapters before the author lets us in on the secret.

Event by David Lynn Golemon It was OK. Kind of a XFiles, meets ET with a little Government Secrecy :unsure: thrown in.

Just picked up The Templar Legacy .. :o

Edited by snogger
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I've been reading primarily non-fiction and I want to start getting into fiction again. I'm really looking for crime stories. For a guy that needs to fill $14 to get Free Super Saver Shipping at Amazon, what can you recommend in this category?

TIA

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I've been reading primarily non-fiction and I want to start getting into fiction again. I'm really looking for crime stories. For a guy that needs to fill $14 to get Free Super Saver Shipping at Amazon, what can you recommend in this category?

TIA

Also looking at mysteries and thrillers too. Thanks.

Is this any good?

Edited by MrPhoenix
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