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***Official Grilling and Smoking Thread***


bryhamm

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On 6/21/2020 at 9:51 PM, Dan Lambskin said:

Cutting and doing separate might be your best bet, especially if you have any kind of tiered racking in your smoker, or if they’re cut will they fit side by side?

could always cut and freeze the flat for something else too if you don’t need a ton of meat, I made this awhile back with a flat and it was really good
 

https://www.purewow.com/recipes/french-onion-brisket

Thanks.  I am going to cut a section of the flat off so the brisket will fit and use it another time.

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On 6/15/2020 at 11:34 AM, lardonastick said:

Tons of good info here: https://www.virtualweberbullet.com/

That's my go to site for cooking their BRITU (Best Ribs in the Universe) and Midnight Brisket. 

Love me WSM. It's a pain in the ### to clean the water pan after it gets all greasy but besides that, it works like a champ. I think I have the 18" and can usually fit a decent size brisket in the bottom rack and 3-4 racks of ribs, either spiraled or in a rack that stands them up. 

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3 hours ago, Wingnut said:

Just grilled some poppers...I didn't have thin cut bacon so I used regular...it didn't work quite as well, it shrank up some and didn't keep all the cheese contained...that said, theyre delicious.

Wrapped

About 30 min

delicious

Yeah, buddy.  Love those.  When I can't get thin enough bacon I par cook the thicker stuff a bit in the oven...maybe 10-15 minutes at 350 before assembling the poppers so it has a little headstart.  Also, if you are having trouble finding good thin stuff locally, Nueske's has some thin cut that is perfect and takes poppers to a whole 'nother level.

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First long cook on the Kamado Joe today...beautiful weather...smoking an 8 lb butt.  Still learning to get the temps just right...finally after 2 hours I may have it settled in at 250 (had a slow rise that got it to 290...though wondering if one of my wood chunks ignited which caused a little spike there as it was mostly at 275 before it spiked for a couple minutes.  But now holding pretty well for the last half hour at 250 and should be good to go cruising along today.

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15 hours ago, Senor Schmutzig said:

That's my go to site for cooking their BRITU (Best Ribs in the Universe) and Midnight Brisket. 

Love me WSM. It's a pain in the ### to clean the water pan after it gets all greasy but besides that, it works like a champ. I think I have the 18" and can usually fit a decent size brisket in the bottom rack and 3-4 racks of ribs, either spiraled or in a rack that stands them up. 

I hated dealing with the water pan as well. After reading up on amazingribs.com about the real value of a water pan, I decided to fill my water pan with sand and put foil over the top. It makes the WSM heavy as hell, but the sand doesn't cool the temp like water does and helps stabilize temperatures. I didn't notice any real differences once I switched from water to sand other than I didn't have to deal with the greasy cleanup. 

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24 minutes ago, Softballguy said:

I hated dealing with the water pan as well. After reading up on amazingribs.com about the real value of a water pan, I decided to fill my water pan with sand and put foil over the top. It makes the WSM heavy as hell, but the sand doesn't cool the temp like water does and helps stabilize temperatures. I didn't notice any real differences once I switched from water to sand other than I didn't have to deal with the greasy cleanup. 

Used to do the same.  I didn't notice any food difference once I dropped the water.  I didn't even put sand in there.  It made it just a little tougher to control temperature, but I was using FlameBoss for control and everything worked out fine. 

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7 hours ago, Softballguy said:

I hated dealing with the water pan as well. After reading up on amazingribs.com about the real value of a water pan, I decided to fill my water pan with sand and put foil over the top. It makes the WSM heavy as hell, but the sand doesn't cool the temp like water does and helps stabilize temperatures. I didn't notice any real differences once I switched from water to sand other than I didn't have to deal with the greasy cleanup. 

Line the water pan with foil for easy cleanup.

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Reverse seared a 24oz ribeye and 8oz filet today on the Akorn. Cooked them indirect at 240° until internal temp hit 115°, then seared em over hot coals, topped with butter, and let em rest for about 5 min. Had sauteed asparagus and crock pot cowboy beans on the side. Killer meal.

We have the meats!

pulled at 115°

Seared and resting

Ribeye on left, filet on right

Ribeye plated

Edited by Wingnut
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11 hours ago, sho nuff said:

First long cook on the Kamado Joe today...beautiful weather...smoking an 8 lb butt.  Still learning to get the temps just right...finally after 2 hours I may have it settled in at 250 (had a slow rise that got it to 290...though wondering if one of my wood chunks ignited which caused a little spike there as it was mostly at 275 before it spiked for a couple minutes.  But now holding pretty well for the last half hour at 250 and should be good to go cruising along today.

That didn't suck...12 hours and never having to open the grill, just minor adjustments to vents to hold temps all day...Im definitely hooked on this grill.

 

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12 hours ago, Wingnut said:

Line the water pan with foil for easy cleanup.

Easi-ER but you still end up with a pan of greasy water to dispose of.  I usually find a flat spot in my deep freeze and then toss the frozen disk in the trash right before taking the can out for pickup.

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1 hour ago, PlayaHata said:

I saw someone mentioned the Weber SmokeFire series a bit ago and I just got an email from Weber last night that their SmokeFire series is on sale for $200 off now through July 13.

That makes the EX4 $799 and the EX6 $999.

The lack of Weber ever discounting their other products should give pause here. I have no idea if they have fixed all of the issues with it or not but that product has not been received well by the market. 2.5-3 stars on Amazon and only 3 stars on their own site.

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On 5/28/2020 at 9:32 AM, Capella said:

Anybody ever use a Blackstone? Some type of flat top grill. My buddy swears by it and I wouldn’t mind making some breakfast meals on it. 

These are great pizza ovens. 

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20 hours ago, Wingnut said:

Reverse seared a 24oz ribeye and 8oz filet today on the Akorn. Cooked them indirect at 240° until internal temp hit 115°, then seared em over hot coals, topped with butter, and let em rest for about 5 min. Had sauteed asparagus and crock pot cowboy beans on the side. Killer meal.

We have the meats!

pulled at 115°

Seared and resting

Ribeye on left, filet on right

Ribeye plated

For each side, how long do you sear?

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On 5/28/2020 at 9:32 AM, Capella said:

Anybody ever use a Blackstone? Some type of flat top grill. My buddy swears by it and I wouldn’t mind making some breakfast meals on it. 

I have done eggs, bacon, sausage, pancakes, french toast, breakfast burritos...on and on. Other than camping, nothing beats drinking coffee in the morning and grilling breakfast on your deck.

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1 hour ago, Spike said:

For each side, how long do you sear?

With an IT of 115° and the steaks pretty thick, I did 2 min per side (about a minute with the lid closed and a minute open). I didnt check the temp after searing, but next time I will.

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First brisket turned out great today.  Had to cut part of flat off to fit in smoker.  Smoked for 5 hrs then wrapped and did an additional 2.5hr.  I let it rest 1.5hrs.  Only had foil for wrap.  Next time will try butcher paper. Here is a pic of it finished and some of the leftovers. 

Brisket

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Daughter requested smoked stuffed meatballs this weekend, sans sauce. We used cubed cheddar cheese (and provolone in a few) this time instead of mozzarella. Turned out good. A few were a little leaky, but really good flavor and had the right amount of smoke. Still perfecting the size of balls and amount of cheese.

Halfway done

Done

Inside

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22 minutes ago, lardonastick said:

Daughter requested smoked stuffed meatballs this weekend, sans sauce. We used cubed cheddar cheese (and provolone in a few) this time instead of mozzarella. Turned out good. A few were a little leaky, but really good flavor and had the right amount of smoke. Still perfecting the size of balls and amount of cheese.

Halfway done

Done

Inside

They look great

What temp and how long?

eta: sorry, just saw 90 mins on pic

Edited by Cowboysfan8
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40 minutes ago, lardonastick said:

Daughter requested smoked stuffed meatballs this weekend, sans sauce. We used cubed cheddar cheese (and provolone in a few) this time instead of mozzarella. Turned out good. A few were a little leaky, but really good flavor and had the right amount of smoke. Still perfecting the size of balls and amount of cheese.

Halfway done

Done

Inside

Looks great! What was the meat mix?  Last time I did them they came out about golf ball size and I decided next time to make them a bit smaller so they could be easy to eat in one bite. When they are golf ball size or larger they tend to get eaten in pieces and I think they should just be a pop in the mouth kind of snack.

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Just now, Ron Swanson said:

Looks great! What was the meat mix?  Last time I did them they came out about golf ball size and I decided next time to make them a bit smaller so they could be easy to eat in one bite. When they are golf ball size or larger they tend to get eaten in pieces and I think they should just be a pop in the mouth kind of snack.

2 lbs 80/20 ground beef, 1 lb ground pork

I agree with you about the size. 1st time we made them, wife and daughter molded the balls. Started with the same amount of meat (pork sausage instead of ground pork though). Ended up with 23 meatballs. This time, I asked for smaller balls, and the wife ended up making 33. When I asked her to make them smaller, she whined that it was too hard to stuff the smaller balls :rolleyes: . I think next time, I'll make the meatballs myself, and will shoot for 40.

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Question, doing pulled pork and could only find small butts, so doing two 6 lb butts
 

I usually plan for 1.5 hr per lb, but in this case do I plan for 9-10 hrs or do I need to go by total meat weight and plan for like 18 hours?

i know the meat will tell me when it’s done, but just trying to determine if I should do an overnight cook or just get up early

i know I can rest it for a few hours but trying to avoid putting it on at 9 tonight and having it done at breakfast time when we are having it for dinner

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15 minutes ago, Dan Lambskin said:

Question, doing pulled pork and could only find small butts, so doing two 6 lb butts
 

I usually plan for 1.5 hr per lb, but in this case do I plan for 9-10 hrs or do I need to go by total meat weight and plan for like 18 hours?

i know the meat will tell me when it’s done, but just trying to determine if I should do an overnight cook or just get up early

i know I can rest it for a few hours but trying to avoid putting it on at 9 tonight and having it done at breakfast time when we are having it for dinner

Smaller pieces of meat will cook faster. I would budget 10-12 hours to be safe and be happy if it finishes early.

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Smoking some ribs and a chicken on the 4th with my home made pork and chicken rubs for each. Also doing a batch of my BBQ sauce. Should be fun and fattening. 
 

Everyone have a good Holiday weekend. 

Edited by Redwes25
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Also I noticed the meat store had some pork shoulders, (I know butt and shoulder get used interchangeably but this was the shoulder aka picnic ham).  Had a nice thick skin on it, anyone ever make one of these?  What’s the best way?  Thinking maybe some carnitas style tacos but open to other suggestions 

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1 hour ago, Ron Swanson said:

Smaller pieces of meat will cook faster. I would budget 10-12 hours to be safe and be happy if it finishes early.

One nice thing about smaller pieces (aside from shorter cook time) is more bark

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32 minutes ago, heckmanm said:

One nice thing about smaller pieces (aside from shorter cook time) is more bark

It's actually on my experiment list to try and cube up a pork butt into say 3" cubes like making cochinita pibil and smoke it with the goal of creating a higher bark ratio and a faster smoke. 

Edited by Ron Swanson
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I've only done corn a couple of times, but we have a bunch from our produce boxes. Anyone have particular instructions that work well for you? I typically just wing it. Going to be firing up the Kamado Joe for steaks tonight.

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6 minutes ago, Slapdash said:

I've only done corn a couple of times, but we have a bunch from our produce boxes. Anyone have particular instructions that work well for you? I typically just wing it. Going to be firing up the Kamado Joe for steaks tonight.

My favorite way to grill corn is by wrapping it with bacon. Don’t shuck it and use the leaves to protect the bacon. Should be especially nice on a KJ since it shouldn’t flame up too much. 

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Doing steak-frites tonight.

Grilling 10oz filet mingnons indirect at 220° to an IT of 115°, then seared and served with a side of french fried taters.

Stay tuned for pics, and have a safe and fun holiday weekend, you magnificent bastards!

:banned:

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6 hours ago, Slapdash said:

I've only done corn a couple of times, but we have a bunch from our produce boxes. Anyone have particular instructions that work well for you? I typically just wing it. Going to be firing up the Kamado Joe for steaks tonight.

Keep it simple.  Most people overthink corn.  It doesn't really need much cooking.  These days I just shuck and de-silk mine and grill it directly on the gas burner of my stove set to medium. Char it up just a bit on all sides.  Maybe 2-3 minutes total. Hit it with a little butter or coconut oil and your favorite BBQ rub or chili lime salt and it's perfect. Elotes Americana.

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11 hours ago, Ron Swanson said:

Keep it simple.  Most people overthink corn.  It doesn't really need much cooking.  These days I just shuck and de-silk mine and grill it directly on the gas burner of my stove set to medium. Char it up just a bit on all sides.  Maybe 2-3 minutes total. Hit it with a little butter or coconut oil and your favorite BBQ rub or chili lime salt and it's perfect. Elotes Americana.

Yeah I grill my corn naked with spread butter and chili powder on it beforehand.  I grill mine indirect for about 10 minutes and then put it over direct heat for a minute or so with lid closed until you hear "popcorn". Give it a turn, repeat and pull.

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On 6/25/2020 at 6:51 PM, Wingnut said:

Reverse seared a 24oz ribeye and 8oz filet today on the Akorn. Cooked them indirect at 240° until internal temp hit 115°, then seared em over hot coals, topped with butter, and let em rest for about 5 min. Had sauteed asparagus and crock pot cowboy beans on the side. Killer meal.

We have the meats!

pulled at 115°

Seared and resting

Ribeye on left, filet on right

Ribeye plated

Stupid rookie question: I thought you were always supposed to do the searing part first to seal in the moisture, and then do the slow internal cook?

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4 minutes ago, Otis said:

Stupid rookie question: I thought you were always supposed to do the searing part first to seal in the moisture, and then do the slow internal cook?

The myth is the sealing in moisture or juices...searing is really just for the texture m/crust in the outside.

A proper rest after cooking does more for “sealing in moisture”.

 

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Not sure if this is the right thread, but I just encountered a terrible tragedy in my house.  I lost my hard copy of Mr. Ham's BBQ Sauce recipe.  I got it from these boards probably over a decade ago, and stored it on my work computer.  I got a new computer at work, and it looks like the folder I had saved it in is gone.  My hard copy is gone.

I did a search on the boards, but nothing came up.  Anyone have this recipe, or know the link to the original?

It is amazing sauce.  I had a full 8x10 piece of paper with small font listing the ingredients.  Making ribs today and was hoping to use it, but now I'm dealing with anxiety over the loss of the classic.

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For those of you guys smoking for 10-12 hours, you may want to look into higher smoke temps. A lot of guys on the local BBQ contests have gone to this technique - and winning.

Cuts cook times dramatically and still produces quality product. I’m talking 300 - 350 degrees.  

I’m a purist as much as anyone, but I have experimented with it and it works.

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8 minutes ago, ChiefD said:

For those of you guys smoking for 10-12 hours, you may want to look into higher smoke temps. A lot of guys on the local BBQ contests have gone to this technique - and winning.

Cuts cook times dramatically and still produces quality product. I’m talking 300 - 350 degrees.  

I’m a purist as much as anyone, but I have experimented with it and it works.

Can you give me an example with say two racks of spares?

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18 minutes ago, ChiefD said:

For those of you guys smoking for 10-12 hours, you may want to look into higher smoke temps. A lot of guys on the local BBQ contests have gone to this technique - and winning.

Cuts cook times dramatically and still produces quality product. I’m talking 300 - 350 degrees.  

I’m a purist as much as anyone, but I have experimented with it and it works.

I do briskets and pulled pork hot and fast.  Works well.  Small window for error with brisket but still comes out juicy.  Just note the finishing temps can be higher.  Otherwise there isn’t really a downside and i don’t miss waking up super early to get started.

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15 minutes ago, Cowboysfan8 said:

Can you give me an example with say two racks of spares?

https://amazingribs.com/tested-recipes/pork-ribs-recipes/rendezvous-ribs-recipe-ribs-hurry
 

Though don’t really have to go that high and fast.  Ive done 300-350 before and notice no real difference in taste.  I dont foil or sauce will mop or spray/spritz a little.  Not sure on timing as its all just sort of based on how they look and when the meat is pulling back from the bone. Plan for 3-4 hours then wrap them in foil of they are done early to keep warm and throw em in a cooler.

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28 minutes ago, ChiefD said:

For those of you guys smoking for 10-12 hours, you may want to look into higher smoke temps. A lot of guys on the local BBQ contests have gone to this technique - and winning.

Cuts cook times dramatically and still produces quality product. I’m talking 300 - 350 degrees.  

I’m a purist as much as anyone, but I have experimented with it and it works.

I know Myron Mixon is big on it, I tired it last year with a brisket and I thought it was a little dry, but my smoker wasn’t great either

i may give it a try again

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3 hours ago, Otis said:

Stupid rookie question: I thought you were always supposed to do the searing part first to seal in the moisture, and then do the slow internal cook?

The whole point of the reverse sear is to sear last. You cook it low and slow til you hit your target internal temp, then give it a quick sear for char. This gives you the wall to wall color you see in the steaks without the gray outer band.

Plus, going slow with the steaks allows them to get good smoke flavor from the lump charcoal. They actually taste like they're smoked and then grilled. Fantastic. 

Edited by Wingnut
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