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***Official Grilling and Smoking Thread***


bryhamm

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18 hours ago, proninja said:

Who is going to make fun of you for getting a badass smoker?

 

Hmmm -  Let's just say I am on a BBQ in Memphis with some local guys (ICON) and have cut my teeth with the most famous pit master on this board (typsey).  I still make my ribs in the traditional style, i just don't have space for something bigger living in So Cal.
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4 hours ago, Ron Swanson said:

Well, if that's your thing.

Personally, it's only real BBQ to me if the wood is hand split Oak that was planted by my great-great grandfather, harvested by me,  and open air seasoned for exactly 8 months.  Each split must weigh between 3-5 pounds and be pre-warmed on the firebox to 180-225 degrees before burning.

Anything else is really just lazy.

 

:lmao:  Believe me i have tended many-o-fire in my days.  It is a space thing for me.  Honestly, we cooked a few of the competition items last year at MIM on the barrel smoker and i was very impressed.  I just don't have the setup needed for a true smoker.  

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6 hours ago, [icon] said:

You'll catch no #### from me. My buddy owns a Traeger Pro 34 and enjoys it. Just upgraded to a backwoods and is selling his Traeger now, but it served him well. 
 

hmm..how much to ship :)

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18 minutes ago, sbonomo said:

hmm..how much to ship :)

Sadly it's already sold to one of the pilots in his guard unit (It's Gonzo from Deeez Butts selling to Keith from our team). Sorry GB! 

 

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25 minutes ago, sbonomo said:

hmm..how much to ship :)

 

8 minutes ago, [icon] said:

Sadly it's already sold to one of the pilots in his guard unit (It's Gonzo from Deeez Butts selling to Keith from our team). Sorry GB! 

 

I've got a Traeger 34 I could part with... The Timberline sort of makes it superfluous [/JackSparrowsVoice]

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Recently I've been experimenting with grilling beef short ribs. I don't mean the flanken cut kind like are common at Korean & Hawaiian restaurants and Teriyaki joints, I mean English cut short ribs with the whole bone in them.

Typically these are considered better for braising, but I've had really good success with grilling them. Grilling them is pretty common in Argentina, I guess.

I've done them twice. Once I had very short ones (where the bones have been cut in half) and once I had longer ones (where the bones were full length).

The shorter ones I put in the smoker at low temp (~200 degrees) for about an hour, then I finished them on a charcoal grill. The longer ones I pre-cooked in a sous vide bath at 126 degrees for 3 hours, then put in a low temp smoker for 45 minutes, then finished on the grill.

In both cases they were well seasoned with sea salt and fresh ground pepper. 

They came out great both times.  I sliced the meat off the bone and then cut the resulting slab of meat into slices roughly 1/4" thick. The meat was rare to medium rare, with a nice sear on the outside. I wouldn't call the results exactly tender, but the meat wasn't tough either. It had a pleasant amount of chew and an intensely beefy flavor, a pleasant smokiness and a crisp fat cap along one edge.

Admittedly, it is a bit of a process, but I really like turning a cheap cut of meat into something awesome.

I didn't have any chimichurri sauce either time, but it would be a great with them. Instead I had some gochujang on the side to dip them in.

Edited by RedmondLonghorn
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1 hour ago, TheFanatic said:

 

I've got a Traeger 34 I could part with... The Timberline sort of makes it superfluous [/JackSparrowsVoice]

I would imagine the shipping may not make it cost effective.  PM me if you think we could make it work. 

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1 hour ago, RedmondLonghorn said:

Recently I've been experimenting with grilling beef short ribs. I don't mean the flanken cut kind like are common at Korean & Hawaiian restaurants and Teriyaki joints, I mean English cut short ribs with the whole bone in them.

Typically these are considered better for braising, but I've had really good success with grilling them. Grilling them is pretty common in Argentina, I guess.

I've done them twice. Once I had very short ones (where the bones have been cut in half) and once I had longer ones (where the bones were full length).

The shorter ones I put in the smoker at low temp (~200 degrees) for about an hour, then I finished them on a charcoal grill. The longer ones I pre-cooked in a sous vide bath at 126 degrees for 3 hours, then put in a low temp smoker for 45 minutes, then finished on the grill.

In both cases they were well seasoned with sea salt and fresh ground pepper. 

They came out great both times.  I sliced the meat off the bone and then cut the resulting slab of meat into slices roughly 1/4" thick. The meat was rare to medium rare, with a nice sear on the outside. I wouldn't call the results exactly tender, but the meat wasn't tough either. It had a pleasant amount of chew and an intensely beefy flavor, a pleasant smokiness and a crisp fat cap along one edge.

Admittedly, it is a bit of a process, but I really like turning a cheap cut of meat into something awesome.

I didn't have any chimichurri sauce either time, but it would be a great with them. Instead I had some gochujang on the side to dip them in.

what does something like this cost per lb?  How enough to feed four people?  I really want to try these on the smoker with a much longer cook to try and get that tenderness. 

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1 hour ago, RedmondLonghorn said:

Recently I've been experimenting with grilling beef short ribs. I don't mean the flanken cut kind like are common at Korean & Hawaiian restaurants and Teriyaki joints, I mean English cut short ribs with the whole bone in them.

Typically these are considered better for braising, but I've had really good success with grilling them. Grilling them is pretty common in Argentina, I guess.

I've done them twice. Once I had very short ones (where the bones have been cut in half) and once I had longer ones (where the bones were full length).

The shorter ones I put in the smoker at low temp (~200 degrees) for about an hour, then I finished them on a charcoal grill. The longer ones I pre-cooked in a sous vide bath at 126 degrees for 3 hours, then put in a low temp smoker for 45 minutes, then finished on the grill.

In both cases they were well seasoned with sea salt and fresh ground pepper. 

They came out great both times.  I sliced the meat off the bone and then cut the resulting slab of meat into slices roughly 1/4" thick. The meat was rare to medium rare, with a nice sear on the outside. I wouldn't call the results exactly tender, but the meat wasn't tough either. It had a pleasant amount of chew and an intensely beefy flavor, a pleasant smokiness and a crisp fat cap along one edge.

Admittedly, it is a bit of a process, but I really like turning a cheap cut of meat into something awesome.

I didn't have any chimichurri sauce either time, but it would be a great with them. Instead I had some gochujang on the side to dip them in.

Confirmed. Normally cut into two inch wide strips across many ribs. That to me is overrated, too chewy.

But I've also had fabulous beef ribs in Argentina where I got a whole rib on my plate (so cut between the ribs) with a decent amount of meat on it. To die for.

Brazilians take the one whole slab and go low and slow (12+ hours) over a wood fire (embers only so no smoke). My ex-wife loves that. I think they generally get overcooked and too fatty that way. I'd probably try to make them whole bone and then smoked to medium, to be sure the gristle softens. Just salt on that for max beef flavor.

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23 minutes ago, sbonomo said:

what does something like this cost per lb?  How enough to feed four people?  I really want to try these on the smoker with a much longer cook to try and get that tenderness. 

I got them for $4.99/per pound on special. The butcher cut the long ones specially for me.

The meat on the last go around was acceptably tender, probably because of the sous vide stage. The next time I will probably put them in a slightly hotter water bath for a longer period of time.

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3 minutes ago, msommer said:

Confirmed. Normally cut into two inch wide strips across many ribs. That to me is overrated, too chewy.

But I've also had fabulous beef ribs in Argentina where I got a whole rib on my plate (so cut between the ribs) with a decent amount of meat on it. To die for.

Brazilians take the one whole slab and go low and slow (12+ hours) over a wood fire (embers only so no smoke). My ex-wife loves that. I think they generally get overcooked and too fatty that way. I'd probably try to make them whole bone and then smoked to medium, to be sure the gristle softens. Just salt on that for max beef flavor.

2" wide or 2" thick?

 

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12 minutes ago, RedmondLonghorn said:

I got them for $4.99/per pound on special. The butcher cut the long ones specially for me.

The meat on the last go around was acceptably tender, probably because of the sous vide stage. The next time I will probably put them in a slightly hotter water bath for a longer period of time.

@[icon] - We should try these at MIM next year for chit's and giggles.  Maybe team dinner just in case we mess them up :) 

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4 minutes ago, msommer said:

Wide. It's really weird. Asado de tira it's called IIRC

Yep.

Mine looked more like this. But they were more charred on the outside and rare on the inside. I just removed the meaty slab from the bone, then cut the slab into tidy little slices.

My favorite Brazilian cut is probably the picanha, which is a rump roast-like cut. I recently did a rump roast using a similar technique to what I used on the short ribs and it was spectacular. Pic

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6 minutes ago, RedmondLonghorn said:

Yep.

Mine looked more like this. But they were more charred on the outside and rare on the inside. I just removed the meaty slab from the bone, then cut the slab into tidy little slices.

My favorite Brazilian cut is probably the picanha, which is a rump roast-like cut. I recently did a rump roast using a similar technique to what I used on the short ribs and it was spectacular. Pic

You are not going to hear a bad word about picanha from me....

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1 hour ago, RedmondLonghorn said:

Yep.

Mine looked more like this. But they were more charred on the outside and rare on the inside. I just removed the meaty slab from the bone, then cut the slab into tidy little slices.

My favorite Brazilian cut is probably the picanha, which is a rump roast-like cut. I recently did a rump roast using a similar technique to what I used on the short ribs and it was spectacular. Pic

Those are beef plate ribs.  Louie Mueller's is famous for them.  Low and slow like brisket over post oak fire with just salt and pepper rub. They come out super tender like a pot roast with a very unique melted collagen stickiness.  Spectacular and one of my favorite meals.  Richer than brisket point and just as tender when cooked right. It's not easy to find that cut of rib, most people are scared to cook them.

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10 minutes ago, Ron Swanson said:

 

Those are beef plate ribs.  Louie Mueller's is famous for them.  Low and slow like brisket over post oak fire with just salt and pepper rub. They come out super tender like a pot roast with a very unique melted collagen stickiness.  Spectacular and one of my favorite meals.  Richer than brisket point and just as tender when cooked right. It's not easy to find that cut of rib, most people are scared to cook them.

I am sure those are great. I like cuts like that served medium rare to medium too. Serving them at that degree of done-ness and having them not be overly chewy is the challenge. And the fun.

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5 minutes ago, RedmondLonghorn said:

 

17 minutes ago, Ron Swanson said:

 

Those are beef plate ribs.  Louie Mueller's is famous for them.  Low and slow like brisket over post oak fire with just salt and pepper rub. They come out super tender like a pot roast with a very unique melted collagen stickiness.  Spectacular and one of my favorite meals.  Richer than brisket point and just as tender when cooked right. It's not easy to find that cut of rib, most people are scared to cook them.

I am sure those are great. I like cuts like that served medium rare to medium too. Serving them at that degree of done-ness and having them not be overly chewy is the challenge. And the fun.

 

It's brisket on the bone type of thing, that's what I am trying to get tomorrow at Costco. I was told that they have them but don't really put them out. So I am going to give it a go if I can get them. 8-10 hours @ ~225 with some salt, pepper and garlic and a hint of cayenne.

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16 hours ago, RedmondLonghorn said:

 

They came out great both times.  I sliced the meat off the bone and then cut the resulting slab of meat into slices roughly 1/4" thick. The meat was rare to medium rare, with a nice sear on the outside. I wouldn't call the results exactly tender, but the meat wasn't tough either. It had a pleasant amount of chew and an intensely beefy flavor, a pleasant smokiness and a crisp fat cap along one edge.

 

Beef ribs are not supposed to be cooked like steak. That's why they weren't as tender as they could be. Mr. Swanson knows things:

13 hours ago, Ron Swanson said:

 

Those are beef plate ribs.  Louie Mueller's is famous for them.  Low and slow like brisket over post oak fire with just salt and pepper rub. They come out super tender like a pot roast with a very unique melted collagen stickiness.  Spectacular and one of my favorite meals.  Richer than brisket point and just as tender when cooked right. It's not easy to find that cut of rib, most people are scared to cook them.

 

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15 hours ago, sbonomo said:

I would imagine the shipping may not make it cost effective.  PM me if you think we could make it work. 

Yeah, that would be a bear. I wasn't all that serious. I do in fact have an extra one that is in my garage, but I wasn't planning on selling it outside of the St. Louis area. 

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14 hours ago, sbonomo said:

@[icon] - We should try these at MIM next year for chit's and giggles.  Maybe team dinner just in case we mess them up :) 

I'm down for sure! We have room in the Southern Pride for some big ### beef racks 

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27 minutes ago, TheFanatic said:

Beef ribs are not supposed to be cooked like steak. That's why they weren't as tender as they could be. Mr. Swanson knows things:

 

These are short ribs with a nice chunk of chuck attached. 

There are lots of cuts of beef that aren't naturally amazingly tender that can be enjoyed at medium-rare to medium.

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17 minutes ago, PinkydaPimp said:

ordered a wagyu Tr-tip from lobels because #### it.  Gonna smoke this thing for the fight on saturday!  Curious to see the difference between prime. 

Do a side by side. Cook one you normally cook and see how it comes out next to the prime. 

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Just now, NewlyRetired said:

From your suggestions it sounds like it has to be wrapped in a fatty based thin meat.  Am I correct about that?

Yes. Something fatty to soften the pepper in both hardness and heat. I bet some salami would be outstanding. It would crisp up on the outside. 

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Just now, NewlyRetired said:

From your suggestions it sounds like it has to be wrapped in a fatty based thin meat.  Am I correct about that?

No. You can grill, broil or smoke jalapenos filled with cream cheese or whatever without bacon or any meat. 

I think they might be a shade dull, but there wouldn't be anything wrong with doing that per se.

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Just now, RedmondLonghorn said:

No. You can grill, broil or smoke jalapenos filled with cream cheese or whatever without bacon or any meat. 

I think they might be a shade dull, but there wouldn't be anything wrong with doing that per se.

Part of what makes them so good is the balancing the heat of the pepper with the cream cheese and bacon. You need something fatty there to help keep this a well nuanced app. Without it, dull is not the right word. One sided would be more like it. 

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8 minutes ago, TheFanatic said:

Part of what makes them so good is the balancing the heat of the pepper with the cream cheese and bacon. You need something fatty there to help keep this a well nuanced app. Without it, dull is not the right word. One sided would be more like it. 

I like them better with bacon, but the ones they sell frozen with breading on the outside are delicious imo, no bacon with those

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37 minutes ago, TheFanatic said:

Do a side by side. Cook one you normally cook and see how it comes out next to the prime. 

That is exactly my plan.  Going to get a second one from my local guy and then see how it goes.  :excited:

Im wondering if i should even brine them.   this wagyu is pretty well marbleized. 

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23 minutes ago, PinkydaPimp said:

That is exactly my plan.  Going to get a second one from my local guy and then see how it goes.  :excited:

Im wondering if i should even brine them.   this wagyu is pretty well marbleized. 

We got a Costco flyer in the mail and one of the monthly online specials is $100 off a pack of 4 12-oz imported Wagyu NY strips.  Now only $100 per steak :blink:

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I made some smoked bone-in jerk chicken breasts yesterday that turned out pretty great.  I made a jerk marinade/sauce from jerk seasoning, olive oil, soy sauce, apple cider vinegar, fresh squeezed orange and lime juice, ginger, garlic, honey, and scotch bonnet pepper hot sauce.  I marinated the breasts overnight, smoked them over hickory and peach wood for about an hour and 45 minutes while basting occasionally with jerk sauce, threw them on my gas grill for like 5 minutes to crisp up the skin, and then returned to the smoker for another 15 minutes or so with another slathering of jerk sauce.  The chicken was so tender and juicy with crispy skin and explosive smoky jerk flavors.  I'm definitely going to use the same technique of finishing on the grill for future smoked chicken endeavors.  

Smoked jerk bone-in chicken breasts with cilantro coconut lime rice

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1 hour ago, Cowboysfan8 said:

I like them better with bacon, but the ones they sell frozen with breading on the outside are delicious imo, no bacon with those

I love the breaded ones but I don't think those are smoked.  Most popper recipes with breading seem to be for deep frying or baking.

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1 minute ago, Buckfast 1 said:

I made some smoked bone-in jerk chicken breasts yesterday that turned out pretty great.  I made a jerk marinade/sauce from jerk seasoning, olive oil, soy sauce, apple cider vinegar, fresh squeezed orange and lime juice, ginger, garlic, honey, and scotch bonnet pepper hot sauce.  I marinated the breasts overnight, smoked them over hickory and peach wood for about an hour and 45 minutes while basting occasionally with jerk sauce, threw them on my gas grill for like 5 minutes to crisp up the skin, and then returned to the smoker for another 15 minutes or so with another slathering of jerk sauce.  The chicken was so tender and juicy with crispy skin and explosive smoky jerk flavors.  I'm definitely going to use the same technique of finishing on the grill for future smoked chicken endeavors.  

Smoked jerk bone-in chicken breasts with cilantro coconut lime rice

that look great!  I am not a chicken breast fan though, would this work for legs and or thighs?

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8 minutes ago, NewlyRetired said:

that look great!  I am not a chicken breast fan though, would this work for legs and or thighs?

Thanks!  I'm sure the same technique would work well for legs and thighs -- maybe just a little less time on the smoker.  I'm sure jerk chicken thighs would be great.  

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Sooo... Micklethwait Craft Meats food truck is stopping by my buddy's Brewery today en route to NYC. 

http://craftmeatsaustin.com/

Messaged them about menu on FB and Tom himself replied: 

Quote

"we're offering brisket, beef ribs, pork ribs, venison sausage, and Frito pies. All free- donations accepted.

"Free" got me nervous about small bite/taste plates... asked about the format or if it was to avoid legal food restrictions (brewery doesn't have kitchen) 

Quote

"Not really trying to avoid authorities, just not approaching it as a sales opportunity. I'll hook you up if you come by. - Tom"


Boom... I randomly get legit Texas BBQ and my buddy's craft brew tonight. I am a happy camper. Tom seems like a really nice guy. Excited to chow and talk 'que with him. 

 

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10 minutes ago, Buckfast 1 said:

Thanks!  I'm sure the same technique would work well for legs and thighs -- maybe just a little less time on the smoker.  I'm sure jerk chicken thighs would be great.  

awesome!  

Is Jerk Seasoning something you blend yourself or buy in the store?  I am not sure I have seen that on my spice shelves but I will look closer.

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5 minutes ago, NewlyRetired said:

awesome!  

Is Jerk Seasoning something you blend yourself or buy in the store?  I am not sure I have seen that on my spice shelves but I will look closer.

I use this Jamaican jerk seasoning from my local specialty spice shop, which is the best jerk seasoning that I've found.  They use scotch bonnet peppers in their seasoning, which helps impart the authentic heat and flavor of Jamaican jerk.  

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2 hours ago, Brony said:

Butcher paper and full brisket packer purchased.  I think I'm going to start the cook around midnight tonight. 

 

2 hours ago, Brony said:

I want it 'done' (off smoker and resting to begin) around noon or 1 tomorrow.  You serious Clark? 

How big is it to start? And what grade?  And what are you cooking it on?

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