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***Official Grilling and Smoking Thread***


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29 minutes ago, Leeroy Jenkins said:

My friend is getting some new grill/smoker and said I can have his current grill for free. It is a Weber Genesis, with 3 burners, Sear station, and side burner thing. It is 6 years old. Should I grab it?  It looks like it has never been cleaned, but he still uses it so I assume it works. 

If it's in good shape but just dirty, yeah. Clean it up good and maybe put some new burners in there and you probably have a nice grill that will serve you well for years. Should be easy to get Weber parts if you need any. 

FWIW, the equivalent grill is around $1100 new I think.

Edited by whiskey7
ETA: I think I was low on my estimate at first
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33 minutes ago, whiskey7 said:

If it's in good shape but just dirty, yeah. Clean it up good and maybe put some new burners in there and you probably have a nice grill that will serve you well for years. Should be easy to get Weber parts if you need any. 

FWIW, the equivalent grill is around $1100 new I think.

Word. 

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20 hours ago, Mr. Ected said:

Any way to do portobellos without that much cheese? Wife is trying to reduce intake of things like cheese, so any suggestions for healthier fillings?

Maybe first smoke some other veggies like green onions or sweet pepper and chop them fine also? You would still want some cheese to keep things together.

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On 7/30/2017 at 8:16 AM, Brony said:

pulled my brisket off smoker at internal temp of 202.  3 hour rest and then we sliced that bad boy.  It was great.  Best one I've done yet in terms of tenderness of the flat.  Only flaws were that there wasn't much of a smoke ring and bark was a little underdeveloped.  Minor issues and everyone enjoyed it, no bbq sauce necessary.  

Now that I have 150' feet of butcher paper still left, I guess I have to do this more often now! 

One trick for better smoke ring is to make sure the meat is wet when you put it on. A spritz of apple juice as you put it on the cooker goes a long way. 

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3 hours ago, TheFanatic said:

One trick for better smoke ring is to make sure the meat is wet when you put it on. A spritz of apple juice as you put it on the cooker goes a long way. 

Damn, I will definitely try this on my next brisket.

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3 minutes ago, In The Zone said:

 

3 hours ago, TheFanatic said:

One trick for better smoke ring is to make sure the meat is wet when you put it on. A spritz of apple juice as you put it on the cooker goes a long way. 

Damn, I will definitely try this on my next brisket.

 

This^ I actually spray every 30-45 minutes for the first 4 hours or so. Plus, I think the sugar in the juice helps the bark formation and gives it more flavor.

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On 7/30/2017 at 10:32 AM, In The Zone said:

I'll get some :pics:

I pretty much watched this video and went from there.

Malcom Reed Smoked Ham

He has a few smoked ham videos. 

It shouldn't be a long cook. 2 or 3 hours maybe? 

I like Malcom's recipe. I've also made @TheFanatic's apricot glazed ham recipe probably a half dozen times and it always goes over very well.

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17 minutes ago, Hawks64 said:

This^ I actually spray every 30-45 minutes for the first 4 hours or so. Plus, I think the sugar in the juice helps the bark formation and gives it more flavor.

Yeah, I normally spritz throughout the cook just never at the beginning.

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6 minutes ago, Softballguy said:

Doing my first whole hog this Saturday for my wife's grandmother's 100th birthday party. I'm about 90% excited, 10% nervous.

The key is to put an apple in it's mouth

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16 hours ago, Cowboysfan8 said:
On 7/30/2017 at 0:47 PM, Mr. Ected said:

Any way to do portobellos without that much cheese? Wife is trying to reduce intake of things like cheese, so any suggestions for healthier fillings?

Crab

Eta: I can't find the recipe I found  online that I used a month or two ago, but it didn't call for much cheese. A lil parm mixed with the bread crumb topping iirc

That sounds delicious. Breadcrumbs are a good idea even for below.

 

3 hours ago, JaxBill said:
On 7/30/2017 at 0:47 PM, Mr. Ected said:

Any way to do portobellos without that much cheese? Wife is trying to reduce intake of things like cheese, so any suggestions for healthier fillings?

Maybe first smoke some other veggies like green onions or sweet pepper and chop them fine also? You would still want some cheese to keep things together.

Don't really have a smoker, but caramelizing onions then adding some peppers might work too. I know you need the cheese, she just doesn't want something where there is cheese with toppings, like a pizza. Having a small amount of cheese be a topping is better.

Like the ideas!!

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1 hour ago, Softballguy said:

Doing my first whole hog this Saturday for my wife's grandmother's 100th birthday party. I'm about 90% excited, 10% nervous.

You shouldn't be even that nervous. I was the same way with my first one. Very easy to do. Very forgiving.

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6 hours ago, TheFanatic said:

One trick for better smoke ring is to make sure the meat is wet when you put it on. A spritz of apple juice as you put it on the cooker goes a long way. 

The other thing I have heard is that putting the meat on cold helps (ie don't let it rest on the counter at all).

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Did my first rotisserie pineapple this past Saturday.  Was doing a pork loin and decided to throw a whole pineapple on there.  Rubbed it periodically with brown sugar.  Turned out really good.

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1 minute ago, bryhamm said:

Did my first rotisserie pineapple this past Saturday.  Was doing a pork loin and decided to throw a whole pineapple on there.  Rubbed it periodically with brown sugar.  Turned out really good.

I love rubbing loins

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TL:DR

Newbie thinking about giving smoking a whirl. Looking for advice on where to start- education, supplies, techniques, etc. I am starting from essentially nothing. Not looking for anything fancy, just something for the backyard family setting with the ability to make enough for a neighborhood party on occasion. Not sure what specs or info would be helpful so here goes:

- Live in Cincinnati so semi-nasty winters, with more than our share of rain throughout the year and don't have a covered patio or anything to set up under (I'm assuming that's the ideal area). Given that, guessing electric is out.

- Would like the ability to do year round so the super thin walled stuff is likely out.

- Open to all forms (electric, gas, charcoal) but I'm leaning away from Charcoal as I'd like the ability to walk away form it.

- would probably want the ability to throw pretty much anything on there.

- a model safe to put up on a deck would be nice, but not required (I have a few concrete/paver patio options)

Let me know what else you need, and TIA

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10 minutes ago, odin33 said:

TL:DR

Newbie thinking about giving smoking a whirl. Looking for advice on where to start- education, supplies, techniques, etc. I am starting from essentially nothing. Not looking for anything fancy, just something for the backyard family setting with the ability to make enough for a neighborhood party on occasion. Not sure what specs or info would be helpful so here goes:

- Live in Cincinnati so semi-nasty winters, with more than our share of rain throughout the year and don't have a covered patio or anything to set up under (I'm assuming that's the ideal area). Given that, guessing electric is out.

- Would like the ability to do year round so the super thin walled stuff is likely out.

- Open to all forms (electric, gas, charcoal) but I'm leaning away from Charcoal as I'd like the ability to walk away form it.

- would probably want the ability to throw pretty much anything on there.

- a model safe to put up on a deck would be nice, but not required (I have a few concrete/paver patio options)

Let me know what else you need, and TIA

You sound like a future pellet grill owner to me.

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3 hours ago, odin33 said:

TL:DR

Newbie thinking about giving smoking a whirl. Looking for advice on where to start- education, supplies, techniques, etc. I am starting from essentially nothing. Not looking for anything fancy, just something for the backyard family setting with the ability to make enough for a neighborhood party on occasion. Not sure what specs or info would be helpful so here goes:

- Live in Cincinnati so semi-nasty winters, with more than our share of rain throughout the year and don't have a covered patio or anything to set up under (I'm assuming that's the ideal area). Given that, guessing electric is out.

- Would like the ability to do year round so the super thin walled stuff is likely out.

- Open to all forms (electric, gas, charcoal) but I'm leaning away from Charcoal as I'd like the ability to walk away form it.

- would probably want the ability to throw pretty much anything on there.

- a model safe to put up on a deck would be nice, but not required (I have a few concrete/paver patio options)

Let me know what else you need, and TIA

I live in minny and use my smoker year round. Have a weber smokey mountain. I built a folding wind break with plywood and hinges but rarely use it. The weber holds heat well and once the temp is dialed in, i go run errands and leave it be. It also has a relatively small footprint so you can tuck it into a corner when not using it.  When smoking in the winter I watch it a little more closely due to the cold temp but have never had any probs.  

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I grilled some nice fillets this weekend and topped it with a gorganzola - tarragon (from the garden) - irish butter concoction. Nice med rare. I cooked a piece a little more rare for rehearing and am housing it even as we speak. My wife dislikes leftover steak which is fine by me. 

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23 minutes ago, snore said:

I live in minny and use my smoker year round. Have a weber smokey mountain. I built a folding wind break with plywood and hinges but rarely use it. The weber holds heat well and once the temp is dialed in, i go run errands and leave it be. It also has a relatively small footprint so you can tuck it into a corner when not using it.  When smoking in the winter I watch it a little more closely due to the cold temp but have never had any probs.  

Yea i smoke in the snow with my WSM.  it is a little more difficult  but definitely doable. 

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17 minutes ago, snore said:

I live in minny and use my smoker year round. Have a weber smokey mountain. I built a folding wind break with plywood and hinges but rarely use it. The weber holds heat well and once the temp is dialed in, i go run errands and leave it be. It also has a relatively small footprint so you can tuck it into a corner when not using it.  When smoking in the winter I watch it a little more closely due to the cold temp but have never had any probs.  

This. I don't have cold to worry about but with the FL afternoon T-Storms, I often start Boston butts at midnight on my WSM. I'll stay up until 1 to check temp then snooze a few hours. No problem holding temp steady for 6+ hours.

I have both a WSM and a kettle on my wood deck. They sell fire proof mats to rest them on.

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6 minutes ago, Beef Ravioli said:

Anyone ever "smoke" their ingredients for chili? Thinking about trying this later this week. Any tips?

I've smoked the stew meat I've used in the Judges chili.  Since they are small pieces of meat, you shouldn't smoke them too long(only about 20-25 minutes).  Just enough to impart the smokiness.  Then throw them in the pot with the already sauteed onions and sausage.  The timing will be the tricky part.  You have to be able to take the meat out of the smoker and immediately run them into the house and throw them in the pot or they will get rubbery.  When you do that, the onions and sausage will have to be done and ready for the stew meat.

 

Good luck.  

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17 hours ago, odin33 said:

TL:DR

Newbie thinking about giving smoking a whirl. Looking for advice on where to start- education, supplies, techniques, etc. I am starting from essentially nothing. Not looking for anything fancy, just something for the backyard family setting with the ability to make enough for a neighborhood party on occasion. Not sure what specs or info would be helpful so here goes:

- Live in Cincinnati so semi-nasty winters, with more than our share of rain throughout the year and don't have a covered patio or anything to set up under (I'm assuming that's the ideal area). Given that, guessing electric is out.

- Would like the ability to do year round so the super thin walled stuff is likely out.

- Open to all forms (electric, gas, charcoal) but I'm leaning away from Charcoal as I'd like the ability to walk away form it.

- would probably want the ability to throw pretty much anything on there.

- a model safe to put up on a deck would be nice, but not required (I have a few concrete/paver patio options)

Let me know what else you need, and TIA

Couple questions:

How many do you plan on cooking for generally? We talking you +1 or regularly cook for 10 or more?

Do you want a dedicated smoker (low and slow), grill (hot and fast), or something that will do both?

What's your budget?

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1 hour ago, TheFanatic said:

Couple questions:

How many do you plan on cooking for generally? We talking you +1 or regularly cook for 10 or more?

Do you want a dedicated smoker (low and slow), grill (hot and fast), or something that will do both?

What's your budget?

Number would probably max out at about 20-25 for a party (and I wouldn't be looking to cover everyone with the smoker), but it's just the wife and 2 kids usually. I'd target about 10 usually with a little extra room maybe. I've heard to get some sort of economics on it you might as well load up the smoker. I have a deep freeze and a spare fridge so marinading/brine time and storage isn't an issue. I don;t envision this being an every weekend thing. Maybe once a month, but that depends on total cook time. 

Dedicated smoker. I have a Weber Genesis for normal grilling. I'm thinking more ribs, brisket, holiday ham, maybe a turkey after I get the other stuff down. 

Budget- At this point I'm not sure. I don't really have a baseline to say budget non-P.O.S. smoker is X, middle of road is Y, and deluxe is Z. If a $300 grill is just meh, but a $500 is substantially better, I'd rather wait and get the right one. Friend mentioned Traeger and I checked out there site. That felt steep to me, but if it's a high quality product that will last and meets my needs then maybe. Sorrry to be so undecided. I guess the best answer is I'll wait for the right smoker if it's not currently within budget.

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13 minutes ago, odin33 said:

Number would probably max out at about 20-25 for a party (and I wouldn't be looking to cover everyone with the smoker), but it's just the wife and 2 kids usually. I'd target about 10 usually with a little extra room maybe. I've heard to get some sort of economics on it you might as well load up the smoker. I have a deep freeze and a spare fridge so marinading/brine time and storage isn't an issue. I don;t envision this being an every weekend thing. Maybe once a month, but that depends on total cook time. 

Dedicated smoker. I have a Weber Genesis for normal grilling. I'm thinking more ribs, brisket, holiday ham, maybe a turkey after I get the other stuff down. 

Budget- At this point I'm not sure. I don't really have a baseline to say budget non-P.O.S. smoker is X, middle of road is Y, and deluxe is Z. If a $300 grill is just meh, but a $500 is substantially better, I'd rather wait and get the right one. Friend mentioned Traeger and I checked out there site. That felt steep to me, but if it's a high quality product that will last and meets my needs then maybe. Sorrry to be so undecided. I guess the best answer is I'll wait for the right smoker if it's not currently within budget.

That's a tough one. Big fan of the Traeger, but you don't want to leave it out in the elements. A Weber Smoky Mountain might be your best choice. 

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I'm guessing this information is somewhere in this thread, but I've tried to search and follow along but can't seem to locate what I'm looking for. 

What I am looking for is some kind of timetable for brisket. I've done brisket before, so I know what rubs I like to use and wood and such. Just seeking a general idea of what you guys are doing to make these good briskets. I've seen butcher paper mentioned before, but I just need to know when you are using it. I'm assuming its during the resting phase.

So if someone has a link or some good advice on how to do a good brisket, any and all info is appreciated. It's the one cut of meat I haven't done enough of but need to perfect at some point. 

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24 minutes ago, ChiefD said:

I'm guessing this information is somewhere in this thread, but I've tried to search and follow along but can't seem to locate what I'm looking for. 

What I am looking for is some kind of timetable for brisket. I've done brisket before, so I know what rubs I like to use and wood and such. Just seeking a general idea of what you guys are doing to make these good briskets. I've seen butcher paper mentioned before, but I just need to know when you are using it. I'm assuming its during the resting phase.

So if someone has a link or some good advice on how to do a good brisket, any and all info is appreciated. It's the one cut of meat I haven't done enough of but need to perfect at some point. 

Oooh

Temperature, not time....

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24 minutes ago, TheFanatic said:

That's a tough one. Big fan of the Traeger, but you don't want to leave it out in the elements. A Weber Smoky Mountain might be your best choice. 

Would a traeger be safe to do in a garage?

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Just now, msommer said:

Oooh

Temperature, not time....

Yes, I know this. But I'm looking for a general guide ( and timetable is probably the wrong word), but at what temps to pull the brisket. What temps you guys are cooking at. How long should I allot to do, say, a 10lb brisket.

Stuff like that.

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Just now, odin33 said:

Would a traeger be safe to do in a garage?

No. My friend burned down his deck when his traeger failed. And the traeger was on the ground 3 feet from the deck when this happened.

Edited by ChiefD
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14 minutes ago, ChiefD said:

No. My friend burned down his deck when his traeger failed. And the traeger was on the ground 3 feet from the deck when this happened.

Whoa.

Thanks, I strongly suspected it was a big no-no, but figured I'd ask. 

BTW tried your fries a few weeks back. Lights out. Tried a variety of seasonings (Butt Rub, Rudy's, Lemon Pepper), but the Seasoned Salt won out.

Edited by odin33
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38 minutes ago, ChiefD said:

Yes, I know this. But I'm looking for a general guide ( and timetable is probably the wrong word), but at what temps to pull the brisket. What temps you guys are cooking at. How long should I allot to do, say, a 10lb brisket.

Stuff like that.

my TL;DR:

1.  Smoke it until you have a nice bark on it.  Temp of the smoker can be anywhere from 225(low and slow) to upwards of 325-350(hot and fast).  Low and slow usually gives you more room for error but obviously takes much longer.  Franklin smokes at 275 FYI. 

2.  If you like the bark and want to speed up the cook then wrap in either foil or butcher paper.  If not, proceed to 3.

3.  Smoke it until probes like butter in the thick part of the flat (this could be when the brisket has an internal temp anywhere from 195 to 210 from what i have heard and seen.  every brisket is different.)

4.  Wrap in foil or butcher paper and let it rest for a while(at least an hour). 

5.  eat brisket. 

*ill defer to the experts to tweak this as im no brisket expert.  But this is basically how you do it.

**how long will it take?  Assume it will take about  an hour or two longer than the estimates you read.  Brisket takes a while and its done when its tender.  So plan accordingly. 

Edited by PinkydaPimp
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28 minutes ago, ChiefD said:

No. My friend burned down his deck when his traeger failed. And the traeger was on the ground 3 feet from the deck when this happened.

wow.  i thought i was paranoid keeping my smoker on my driveway away from my house but i glad i do reading things like this. 

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28 minutes ago, ChiefD said:

Yes, I know this. But I'm looking for a general guide ( and timetable is probably the wrong word), but at what temps to pull the brisket. What temps you guys are cooking at. How long should I allot to do, say, a 10lb brisket.

Stuff like that.

At 275 guestimate around 1 hour per LB, as far as butcher wrap/foil, typically  around internal of 170-180, smoke wrapped till 200, remove and rest at least one hour in a cooler, remove and let rest before slicing

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17 minutes ago, Megla said:

At 275 guestimate around 1 hour per LB, as far as butcher wrap/foil, typically  around internal of 170-180, smoke wrapped till 200, remove and rest at least one hour in a cooler, remove and let rest before slicing

Why put it back on the smoker after wrapping? Would it not give an equal result to put it in the oven then (and thusn free up the smoker space/time for something else)?

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1 minute ago, msommer said:

Why put it back on the smoker after wrapping? Would it not give an equal result to put it in the oven then (and thusn free up the smoker space/time for something else)?

I want to be outside, smoking/drinking, space is not an issue for me but sure, you can finish in the oven. 

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34 minutes ago, PinkydaPimp said:

 

3.  Smoke it until probes like butter in the thick part of the flat (this could be when the brisket has an internal temp anywhere from 195 to 210 from what i have heard and seen.  every brisket is different.)

To me this is the most important step.

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3 minutes ago, Megla said:

I want to be outside, smoking/drinking, space is not an issue for me but sure, you can finish in the oven. 

Space is most definitely a concern for me, so I'll go that route next time I have a long cook and want to do multiple things

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Alrighty looks like we're got two 12lb USDA Prime Briskets ready for the weekend (Costco 3.99/lb) but my buddy who was going to cook them can't now. 

What with draft day being a big/long day, I'd rather not be up all night watching a pit. With dinner service around 5, I'm kinda thinking I'd like to have them resting by 3ish. Standard cook time would involve having it on the smoker by 12a-2a and letting it run all night.

Not sure about messing with that... so I'm considering doing a hot and fast-ish cook at 275 or 300. @TheFanatic & OThers: Thoughts on outcome? Timeline for a 12#er? I'm well aware it's a "cook to 205ish" temp thing, but having a ballpark timeline for a packer that size at that temp would be a handy reference. I'm seeing numbers around 5-6 hours for 12lb packers in that temp range... but wanted to ask you guys. 

Going basic salt/pepper/garlic rub.... butcher paper at the stall... pull at 205ish, wrap in towels and place in cooler to rest. 

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1 hour ago, Megla said:

At 275 guestimate around 1 hour per LB, as far as butcher wrap/foil, typically  around internal of 170-180, smoke wrapped till 200, remove and rest at least one hour in a cooler, remove and let rest before slicing

Are you wrapping in butcher paper, then putting it in the foil? Or just butcher paper?

I'm assuming you are wrapping them completely then in the butcher paper. 

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17 minutes ago, [icon] said:

Alrighty looks like we're got two 12lb USDA Prime Briskets ready for the weekend (Costco 3.99/lb) but my buddy who was going to cook them can't now. 

What with draft day being a big/long day, I'd rather not be up all night watching a pit. With dinner service around 5, I'm kinda thinking I'd like to have them resting by 3ish. Standard cook time would involve having it on the smoker by 12a-2a and letting it run all night.

Not sure about messing with that... so I'm considering doing a hot and fast-ish cook at 275 or 300. @TheFanatic & OThers: Thoughts on outcome? Timeline for a 12#er? I'm well aware it's a "cook to 205ish" temp thing, but having a ballpark timeline for a packer that size at that temp would be a handy reference. I'm seeing numbers around 5-6 hours for 12lb packers in that temp range... but wanted to ask you guys. 

Going basic salt/pepper/garlic rub.... butcher paper at the stall... pull at 205ish, wrap in towels and place in cooler to rest. 

I would probably go lower on the heat to make the cook longer. If you go at 275-300, and you want it done by 3 in the afternoon, then you're putting it on around 3 in the morning. I'd maybe drop down to 250 or less and put it on at say 10-11 pm the night before. 

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5 minutes ago, ChiefD said:

Are you wrapping in butcher paper, then putting it in the foil? Or just butcher paper?

I'm assuming you are wrapping them completely then in the butcher paper. 

Butcher paper if I have it, if not then double foil.  The only difference is that the butcher paper is a bit porous so it doesn't braise your meat to the same affect that foil does.  This is particularly important when it comes to your bark as braising will soften up/limit your bark

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Just now, Megla said:

Butcher paper if I have it, if not then double foil.  The only difference is that the butcher paper is a bit porous so it doesn't braise your meat to the same affect that foil does.  This is particularly important when it comes to your bark as braising will soften up/limit your bark

:thumbup:

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My go to method for brisket.

1) slather with good mustard and marinate for at least 2 days

2) wipe off most of the mustard leaving a slight glaze on the outside for the rub to adhere to. This makes for fantastic bark but in no way tastes like mustard (the mustard melts away)

3) place the meat fat cap down on the smoker at 275-300

4) after an hour, mop with beer/vinegar sauce (If you mop earlier than that, the rub will wash off and you will have to re-apply. After an hour, the rub has attached itself to the meat)

5) keep mopping every 45 minutes until it hits 160 degrees internal

6) wrap in butcher paper or foil

7) if using foil, once through the stall remove from the foil and place back on the cooker to firm up the bark (if paper, just take it all the way to 203)

8) at 203, remove from the heat and put in an empty cooler or an unlit oven to rest for at least an hour. 2 hours is better

9) Slice against the grain and serve

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