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***Official Grilling and Smoking Thread***


bryhamm

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22 minutes ago, [icon] said:

Alrighty looks like we're got two 12lb USDA Prime Briskets ready for the weekend (Costco 3.99/lb) but my buddy who was going to cook them can't now. 

What with draft day being a big/long day, I'd rather not be up all night watching a pit. With dinner service around 5, I'm kinda thinking I'd like to have them resting by 3ish. Standard cook time would involve having it on the smoker by 12a-2a and letting it run all night.

Not sure about messing with that... so I'm considering doing a hot and fast-ish cook at 275 or 300. @TheFanatic & OThers: Thoughts on outcome? Timeline for a 12#er? I'm well aware it's a "cook to 205ish" temp thing, but having a ballpark timeline for a packer that size at that temp would be a handy reference. I'm seeing numbers around 5-6 hours for 12lb packers in that temp range... but wanted to ask you guys. 

Going basic salt/pepper/garlic rub.... butcher paper at the stall... pull at 205ish, wrap in towels and place in cooler to rest. 

I doubt you are going to get a 1/2 hour per LB cook time at 275

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2 minutes ago, TheFanatic said:

My go to method for brisket.

1) slather with good mustard and marinate for at least 2 days

2) wipe off most of the mustard leaving a slight glaze on the outside for the rub to adhere to. This makes for fantastic bark but in no way tastes like mustard (the mustard melts away)

3) place the meat fat cap down on the smoker at 275-300

4) after an hour, mop with beer/vinegar sauce (If you mop earlier than that, the rub will wash off and you will have to re-apply. After an hour, the rub has attached itself to the meat)

5) keep mopping every 45 minutes until it hits 160 degrees internal

6) wrap in butcher paper or foil

7) if using foil, once through the stall remove from the foil and place back on the cooker to firm up the bark (if paper, just take it all the way to 203)

8) at 203, remove from the heat and put in an empty cooler or an unlit oven to rest for at least an hour. 2 hours is better

9) Slice against the grain and serve

Why wash off the mustard, it makes for a wonderful bark?

I wont touch mine for the first 3 hours, other than that this is pretty spot on

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1 minute ago, TheFanatic said:

My go to method for brisket.

1) slather with good mustard and marinate for at least 2 days

2) wipe off most of the mustard leaving a slight glaze on the outside for the rub to adhere to. This makes for fantastic bark but in no way tastes like mustard (the mustard melts away)

3) place the meat fat cap down on the smoker at 275-300

4) after an hour, mop with beer/vinegar sauce (If you mop earlier than that, the rub will wash off and you will have to re-apply. After an hour, the rub has attached itself to the meat)

5) keep mopping every 45 minutes until it hits 160 degrees internal

6) wrap in butcher paper or foil

7) if using foil, once through the stall remove from the foil and place back on the cooker to firm up the bark (if paper, just take it all the way to 203)

8) at 203, remove from the heat and put in an empty cooler or an unlit oven to rest for at least an hour. 2 hours is better

9) Slice against the grain and serve

Do you take off the point for burnt ends? 

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1 minute ago, ChiefD said:

Do you take off the point for burnt ends? 

Depends on the day. My dad has this neat trick where he partially removes the point when trimming (basically, edges in along the fat seam) but leaves it on. So when it's time to pull the flat, removing the point is a breeze. 

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3 hours ago, TheFanatic said:

 

3 hours ago, odin33 said:

Number would probably max out at about 20-25 for a party (and I wouldn't be looking to cover everyone with the smoker), but it's just the wife and 2 kids usually. I'd target about 10 usually with a little extra room maybe. I've heard to get some sort of economics on it you might as well load up the smoker. I have a deep freeze and a spare fridge so marinading/brine time and storage isn't an issue. I don;t envision this being an every weekend thing. Maybe once a month, but that depends on total cook time. 

Dedicated smoker. I have a Weber Genesis for normal grilling. I'm thinking more ribs, brisket, holiday ham, maybe a turkey after I get the other stuff down. 

Budget- At this point I'm not sure. I don't really have a baseline to say budget non-P.O.S. smoker is X, middle of road is Y, and deluxe is Z. If a $300 grill is just meh, but a $500 is substantially better, I'd rather wait and get the right one. Friend mentioned Traeger and I checked out there site. That felt steep to me, but if it's a high quality product that will last and meets my needs then maybe. Sorrry to be so undecided. I guess the best answer is I'll wait for the right smoker if it's not currently within budget.

That's a tough one. Big fan of the Traeger, but you don't want to leave it out in the elements. A Weber Smoky Mountain might be your best choice.

 

Totally agree, WSM is fairly inexpensive but built very well. You can mod the crap out of it to make it pretty automatic outside of feeding it fuel, pretty much turn it into a set it and forget it smoker. I am biased though since I have one and can do a pretty good job on it.

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3 hours ago, ChiefD said:

I'm guessing this information is somewhere in this thread, but I've tried to search and follow along but can't seem to locate what I'm looking for. 

What I am looking for is some kind of timetable for brisket. I've done brisket before, so I know what rubs I like to use and wood and such. Just seeking a general idea of what you guys are doing to make these good briskets. I've seen butcher paper mentioned before, but I just need to know when you are using it. I'm assuming its during the resting phase.

So if someone has a link or some good advice on how to do a good brisket, any and all info is appreciated. It's the one cut of meat I haven't done enough of but need to perfect at some point. 

What made it easier for me was separating the point and flat. That allows for a faster cook and you can turn the point into burnt ends if you'd like or just keep it on for slicing. Once it reaches temp you need to let it rest (wrap in something like butcher paper, saran wrap or foil) and then towels in a cooler for a bit. Time table is hard to say but I usually can have mine done in 8-9 hours and then letting it rest for a few hours...so 12-13 hours total or so?

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1 hour ago, TheFanatic said:

My go to method for brisket.

1) slather with good mustard and marinate for at least 2 days

2) wipe off most of the mustard leaving a slight glaze on the outside for the rub to adhere to. This makes for fantastic bark but in no way tastes like mustard (the mustard melts away)

3) place the meat fat cap down on the smoker at 275-300

4) after an hour, mop with beer/vinegar sauce (If you mop earlier than that, the rub will wash off and you will have to re-apply. After an hour, the rub has attached itself to the meat)

5) keep mopping every 45 minutes until it hits 160 degrees internal

6) wrap in butcher paper or foil

7) if using foil, once through the stall remove from the foil and place back on the cooker to firm up the bark (if paper, just take it all the way to 203)

8) at 203, remove from the heat and put in an empty cooler or an unlit oven to rest for at least an hour. 2 hours is better

9) Slice against the grain and serve

Thanks and I got ya... but at 275-300 how many hours are you seeing, on average, for a standard packer (10-12lbs)? 
 

Edited by [icon]
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1 hour ago, TheFanatic said:

My go to method for brisket.

1) slather with good mustard and marinate for at least 2 days

2) wipe off most of the mustard leaving a slight glaze on the outside for the rub to adhere to. This makes for fantastic bark but in no way tastes like mustard (the mustard melts away)

3) place the meat fat cap down on the smoker at 275-300

4) after an hour, mop with beer/vinegar sauce (If you mop earlier than that, the rub will wash off and you will have to re-apply. After an hour, the rub has attached itself to the meat)

5) keep mopping every 45 minutes until it hits 160 degrees internal

6) wrap in butcher paper or foil

7) if using foil, once through the stall remove from the foil and place back on the cooker to firm up the bark (if paper, just take it all the way to 203)

8) at 203, remove from the heat and put in an empty cooler or an unlit oven to rest for at least an hour. 2 hours is better

9) Slice against the grain and serve

I always go with the fat cap on top allowing the fat to liquefy and baste the meat.  Perhaps I should try otherwise.  I also try to keep my temp under 275 but over 250.   At those temps I go an hour per pound as a guideline. I try to time the rest with the smoker running out of fuel and instead of wrapping it I let it rest in the cooling diminishing smoke.  Since you seem like you know what you are doing I am going to give your suggestions a whirl. 

Edited by Ditkaless Wonders
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3 minutes ago, Ditkaless Wonders said:

I always go with the fat cap on top allowing the fat to liquefy and baste the meat.  Perhaps I should try otherwise.  I also try to keep my temp under 275 but over 250.    I try to time the rest with the smoker running out of fuel and instead of wrapping it I let it rest in the cooling diminishing smoke.  Since you seem like you know what you are doing I am going to give your suggestions a whirl. 

IIRC Aaron Franklin runs fat cap (trimmed to 1/4") on top, and with the point facing the heat source (if smoker is asymmetrical). Not to say that is the right way... or that either way makes a ton of difference. Just throwing out as he's become somewhat of the poster child for brisket. YMMV. 

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2 minutes ago, proninja said:

FYI, the usual logic here is that since rendered fat doesn't penetrate meat at all, you're going to derive no benefit from the fat running down the side. If you put it on the bottom, it acts as insulation from the heat source, making it easier to get your meat cooked more evenly. 

This.

It really only renders down the sides of the meat anyway, not all along it. Also, I use a mop sauce that I want basting the meat, not an impenetrable fat cap. 

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1 minute ago, proninja said:

FYI, the usual logic here is that since rendered fat doesn't penetrate meat at all, you're going to derive no benefit from the fat running down the side. If you put it on the bottom, it acts as insulation from the heat source, making it easier to get your meat cooked more evenly. 

I do see the logic.  I have also been told I am shielding the meat and bark from smoke penetration by my method,  My belief is that is helps the bark and it also washes some of the greasy smoke reside away and given the length of my cooks I still get very deep smoke penetration.  Still, how can I improve if I don't experiment.  I trust you and the Fanatic enough to dedicate a cook or two to your suggestions to see if I can improve.

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4 minutes ago, TheFanatic said:

This.

It really only renders down the sides of the meat anyway, not all along it. Also, I use a mop sauce that I want basting the meat, not an impenetrable fat cap. 

I load my fat cap with ridiculous amounts of rub.  That seems to help reduce it, and I like to think it carries the rub down onto the meat during the cook.  Regardless, I do not advocate what I do, though I like the results.  I am going to explore your method.  Could just be that this old dog can still learn a new trick or two if I am just open to it.

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http://amazingribs.com/recipes/beef/texas_brisket.html

Quote

Fat cap up or down, on or off? The argument is as old as Texas. I asked my beef consultant, Dr. Antonio Mata, a meat scientist and a former Consulting Technical Coordinator to the National Cattlemen's Beef Association, if fat will melt and penetrate the muscle fibers. His reply was simple and unequivocal. "No way." I asked him to elaborate. "The fibers are packed too close for large fat molecules to squeeze in. Since about 75% of the muscle is made of water, and oil and water don't mix, it is just going to melt and run off." Click here for more on the subject of fat caps.

This melting is called rendering. We know that rendered fat can run over bare muscle, basting it, but little will go to the underside of the meat. Most of it will just run down the sides and drip off. So the only basting is on the sides.

  • We know that all the fat does not render during cooking.
  • We know that rub applied to a thick fat cap will not contact the meat because the fat is a barrier. If the fat cap is very thin some might get through.
  • We know that warm fat with spice rub is yummy.
  • We know that the fat can inhibit moisture loss from evaporation and since the stall is caused by evaporation, a fat cap can slow the onset of the stall and help you speed through it.
  • We know that bark will not form on fat because bark is mostly dried surface meat.
  • We know that when cooking with heat directly below, as with a Weber Smokey Mountain or Kamado, the fat can absorb heat and protect meat from drying out.
  • We know that diet conscious diners will trim thick layers of fat if the meat is served on a plate and not on a sandwich. That means the rub will be removed. They may leave a thin layer on.
  • We know that when cooking two meats, one above the other, the fat can drip down and baste the meat below. We know that beans that sit below melting fat are magical.
  • We know that a small fat cap will run down over the meat as it is cut adding flavor.

So what's the right thing to do? I say, trim most of the fat but leave a thin layer, less than 1/4", so that diners will not remove it and the rub, and I put it between the heat and the meat, often with beans underneath. Sometimes I even flip the meat midway through the cook just so nobody can win the argument.

 

:shrug:

 

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1 hour ago, proninja said:

I trim the fat cap on a brisket to thin enough that it doesn't matter either way, just FYI. I don't want to cut fat off at the table and take bark with it. 

I too trim it as I generally find the store or butcher leaves a little more on than I am comfortable with.  I do want the smoke and the heat to be able to penetrate that area so I get an even cook.  A little is fine, a lot seems to be a literal barrier to a good cook.

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@[icon] You could consider doing a two-part brisket cook if it works with your timing better.  I experimented with it on my last cook and it worked out great.  I use Franklin's method for my briskets so to make it a two part I wrapped in paper right after the stall and then immediately double bagged the brisket in food safe plastic bags and plunge cooled it in a cooler full of ice water (to get it out of the danger zone quickly) and kept refrigerated overnight.  At my leisure the next day I cooked it the remaining 3-4 hours and rested it for the normal 1 hour.  It made it much easier to hit my late afternoon/early evening serve time without doing an all night cook. The brisket turned out as just as good if not a little better than the standard cook. 

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8 minutes ago, Ditkaless Wonders said:

I am going to brisket one up this weekend with cap on bottom and trying the mustard thing.  I am a bit apprehensive because 12 pounds of meat is a lot to have around if I find the mustard is not to my liking, but one has to get out of their comfort zone from time to time.

I have been inspired.

 

you will not taste the mustard.  Its just to help make the rub stick.  Also helps with the bark.

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37 minutes ago, PinkydaPimp said:

 

46 minutes ago, Ditkaless Wonders said:

I am going to brisket one up this weekend with cap on bottom and trying the mustard thing.  I am a bit apprehensive because 12 pounds of meat is a lot to have around if I find the mustard is not to my liking, but one has to get out of their comfort zone from time to time.

I have been inspired.

 

you will not taste the mustard.  Its just to help make the rub stick.  Also helps with the bark.

 

You can also use Beef Better Than Bouillon. I use that with salt, garlic, pepper and ancho chile powder.

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Quote

 

A culinary heist: Chef’s BBQ smoker hauled off

Did you happen to see a 1,700-pound barbecue pit atop a two-wheel trailer traveling down Albuquerque streets “ashes and smoke billowing out of the back” early Sunday morning? Daniel Morgan, proprietor of Pepper’s Ole Fashion BBQ, wants to know.

Morgan said a thief took the black and red 200-gallon smoker from his restaurant’s parking lot on San Pedro and Copper between midnight and 5 a.m. Sunday. The smoker was cooking up a batch of brisket when it was taken.

“What on God’s earth do you think they would want with it?” Morgan asked Sunday evening, later wondering if the person or people responsible got a whiff of the “meat smell.”

“You know what, I wouldn’t be surprised,” he said.

Morgan said most of the meat the restaurant serves is prepared in an indoor barbecue pit and he uses the custom built apparatus for catering gigs. Replacing the $5,800 smoker and the trailer it was sitting on when it was stolen will be a stretch, he said.

Pepper’s was featured in May on the Cooking Channel show “Big Bad BBQ Brawl.” He said that he saw an uptick in business as a result of that appearance, but that saving enough to buy a replacement smoker will be a challenge.

“It’s gonna throw a big blow to the little consistent income we do have,” he said.

Morgan said he considered launching a crowdfunding page to help cover the costs of a replacement, but he’s holding off on that for now.

“We’re just gonna let people know that we will take prayers before money,” he said. “That’s what we need most of all.”

His own security footage didn’t capture the theft, but he’s hoping cameras on nearby businesses caught a glimpse of the vehicle pulling the smoker away.

“I felt like someone had stolen my bike when I was 10 years old,” he said. When that happened, Morgan said, he cried to his mother and threw a hissy fit. “I was mad at the world.”

Now his mother is gone, and he again finds himself disgusted that someone took something that “wasn’t theirs to take.”

“Here it is 40 years later,” he said, “and I have no one to cry to, and I’m too tired to throw a hissy fit.”

 

https://www.abqjournal.com/1040679/brisket-bandit-makes-off-with-bbq-joints-smoker.html

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17 hours ago, PinkydaPimp said:

you will not taste the mustard.  Its just to help make the rub stick.  Also helps with the bark.

I was worried the first time I tried the mustard slather. It was on a pork butt and in the end had absolutely no taste at all. I use that method often now.

Along the lines of putting odd things on bbq during the cook... I mentioned I'm doing my first whole hog on Saturday. The person we're getting the pit from recommends stuffing the pig with sauerkraut. I can't imagine that's not going to affect the flavor, and it's a flavor I don't want even a hint of in my bbq. I'll eat it on a hot dog, but gtfo if you're putting in on my que.

His reasoning is that it keeps the pig moist, but I'm thinking that there's plenty of fat in there to keep it from drying out. Any of you guys who have done this ever try kraut? @TheFanatic @Megla @[icon]

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7 minutes ago, Softballguy said:

I was worried the first time I tried the mustard slather. It was on a pork butt and in the end had absolutely no taste at all. I use that method often now.

Along the lines of putting odd things on bbq during the cook... I mentioned I'm doing my first whole hog on Saturday. The person we're getting the pit from recommends stuffing the pig with sauerkraut. I can't imagine that's not going to affect the flavor, and it's a flavor I don't want even a hint of in my bbq. I'll eat it on a hot dog, but gtfo if you're putting in on my que.

His reasoning is that it keeps the pig moist, but I'm thinking that there's plenty of fat in there to keep it from drying out. Any of you guys who have done this ever try kraut? @TheFanatic @Megla @[icon]

LOL, never.

How are you cooking the pig?  Butter flied or race style

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Just now, Megla said:

LOL, never.

How are you cooking the pig?  Butter flied or race style

Man, it would make for one hell of a presentation if I did race style, but no chance on my first cook. Plan is to go skin side up for a while, then skin side down. At least that's my plan, as long as I can talk my partner out of kraut.

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14 minutes ago, Softballguy said:

I was worried the first time I tried the mustard slather. It was on a pork butt and in the end had absolutely no taste at all. I use that method often now.

Along the lines of putting odd things on bbq during the cook... I mentioned I'm doing my first whole hog on Saturday. The person we're getting the pit from recommends stuffing the pig with sauerkraut. I can't imagine that's not going to affect the flavor, and it's a flavor I don't want even a hint of in my bbq. I'll eat it on a hot dog, but gtfo if you're putting in on my que.

His reasoning is that it keeps the pig moist, but I'm thinking that there's plenty of fat in there to keep it from drying out. Any of you guys who have done this ever try kraut? @TheFanatic @Megla @[icon]

Don't worry about it drying out at all. But if you go racer style, I do recommend stuffing the cavity or the back bone will break and the back will cave in. I put an empty #10 can of beans in the cavity. 

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4 minutes ago, Softballguy said:

Man, it would make for one hell of a presentation if I did race style, but no chance on my first cook. Plan is to go skin side up for a while, then skin side down. At least that's my plan, as long as I can talk my partner out of kraut.

Racer style is easy. And I will say this. I don't know how big of a pig you are doing, but flipping over a cooking pig is no simple feat. It's hot, it's greasy and it's HEAVY!

Are you skinning the pig?

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Just now, TheFanatic said:

Racer style is easy. And I will say this. I don't know how big of a pig you are doing, but flipping over a cooking pig is no simple feat. It's hot, it's greasy and it's HEAVY!

Are you skinning the pig?

It's about 125lbs. Going to try Meathead's method of applying lots of water to the skin and salting it heavily. Apparently it won't have that mahogany color that looks real pretty, but it crisps up and can be chopped up and mixed in with the pork.

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27 minutes ago, Softballguy said:

Along the lines of putting odd things on bbq during the cook... I mentioned I'm doing my first whole hog on Saturday. The person we're getting the pit from recommends stuffing the pig with sauerkraut. I can't imagine that's not going to affect the flavor, and it's a flavor I don't want even a hint of in my bbq. I'll eat it on a hot dog, but gtfo if you're putting in on my que.

His reasoning is that it keeps the pig moist, but I'm thinking that there's plenty of fat in there to keep it from drying out. Any of you guys who have done this ever try kraut? @TheFanatic @Megla @[icon]

I've been to a pig roast where it was stuffed with kraut. Not a fan at all (and I do like pork&kraut - just not on the smoker). It definitely affects the flavor.

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17 minutes ago, Softballguy said:

It's about 125lbs. Going to try Meathead's method of applying lots of water to the skin and salting it heavily. Apparently it won't have that mahogany color that looks real pretty, but it crisps up and can be chopped up and mixed in with the pork.

flipping a 125 pounder is not easy, even with a cold pig before the fire is lit.

The problem with unskinned pig is there isn't a ton of smoke penetration. 

Next year I plan on butterflying out that bad boy and leaving the skin on as a buffer between the meat and the fire. 

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3 minutes ago, E-Z Glider said:

I've been to a pig roast where it was stuffed with kraut. Not a fan at all (and I do like pork&kraut - just not on the smoker). It definitely affects the flavor.

Perfect - exactly what I was looking for. I've never seen it before so I couldn't be sure, but it just seemed like that flavor will linger around everywhere.

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Just now, TheFanatic said:

flipping a 125 pounder is not easy, even with a cold pig before the fire is lit.

The problem with unskinned pig is there isn't a ton of smoke penetration. 

Next year I plan on butterflying out that bad boy and leaving the skin on as a buffer between the meat and the fire. 

Meathead recommends leaving skin on, butterflying it, but then cooking it with the exposed portion down (skin side up) for about 60 or 70% of the cook, then flipping it and doing skin side down until the hams are at 145. I think the thought is that the shoulder and belly will be closer to 185 (though less than what you'd want them to be at) being that they have less meat.

Oh, and I'm definitely concerned with flipping this thing. It will be just two of us for the initial 8 hours or so. Just the weight will be an issue, but if that thing starts sliding around we may be in trouble. That is, of course, if I wasn't a big burly FBG like all of us.

Edited by Softballguy
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2 minutes ago, Softballguy said:

Meathead recommends leaving skin on, butterflying it, but then cooking it with the exposed portion down (skin side up) for about 60 or 70% of the cook, then flipping it and doing skin side down until the hams are at 145. I think the thought is that the shoulder and belly will be closer to 185 (though less than what you'd want them to be at) being that they have less meat.

So yeah, every year I do this, the shoulders are done before the hams. I pull the meat from the shoulder (to make pulled pork) and have to chop the hams. 

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Just now, TheFanatic said:

So yeah, every year I do this, the shoulders are done before the hams. I pull the meat from the shoulder (to make pulled pork) and have to chop the hams. 

Great tip. I was thinking it all gets pulled at once, but when sections are done they're done.

Do you cut up the ribs like ribs then? I wasn't sure if it all gets pulled or if I should do what I'd normally do with each section of meat.

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21 minutes ago, Softballguy said:

Great tip. I was thinking it all gets pulled at once, but when sections are done they're done.

Do you cut up the ribs like ribs then? I wasn't sure if it all gets pulled or if I should do what I'd normally do with each section of meat.

By the time the shoulders are done the bones of the ribs pull out clean as a whistle. It's actually pretty cool the first time you pull a pig and you grab four rib bones in your hands and they slide right out. 

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1 hour ago, TheFanatic said:

Speaking of whole hog. Anyone use a La Caja China roasting box? I've had some discussions with them sponsoring my Pig Roast next year. 

They work very well, but you won't be getting any smoke on the pig.  You're gonna have to be creative, but you can make a really good pig with it.  Make sure you clean the ashes out periodically.

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45 minutes ago, Megla said:

What are you cooking the hog on?

To be honest, I haven't seen the pit yet. But the person we're renting it from does quite a few catering jobs a year so I'm fairly confident it will do the job. But I'm not exactly sure what kind of pit it is.

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2 minutes ago, Softballguy said:

To be honest, I haven't seen the pit yet. But the person we're renting it from does quite a few catering jobs a year so I'm fairly confident it will do the job. But I'm not exactly sure what kind of pit it is.

If he does whole hog often I wouldn't worry about the flip, I'm sure he has chicken wire to encase the hog to make for easy turning

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2 hours ago, TheFanatic said:

Speaking of whole hog. Anyone use a La Caja China roasting box? I've had some discussions with them sponsoring my Pig Roast next year. 

I have not tried it but I have had a lot of super succulent pork cooked that way in Peru. A buddy of mine had one, never used it, gave it to another buddy, wh didn't use it either and then he sold it. You need to make a lot of pork and it was apparently not that easy to clean

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4 minutes ago, greedygoat said:

The charcoal is burned on a tray above the pig in a La Caja China box.  It's more liking baking than smoking. 

Most Cubans here in S FL inject the pig with Mojo for flavor.

Hmmmmm. I hadn't thought about that. I wonder how I can get some smoke into it? Metal trashcan, dryer vent and cold smoke it while it cooks?

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3 minutes ago, TheFanatic said:

Hmmmmm. I hadn't thought about that. I wonder how I can get some smoke into it? Metal trashcan, dryer vent and cold smoke it while it cooks?

:shrug:  You going to drill holes in the box and all of that?  Seems like you'd be kind of redesigning their product, but maybe that's an idea that they'd like to see implemented.  They could sell a smoke box attachment, which would make them more marketable to the BBQ crowd.  I'd like to see it.   

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33 minutes ago, psychobillies said:

:shrug:  You going to drill holes in the box and all of that?  Seems like you'd be kind of redesigning their product, but maybe that's an idea that they'd like to see implemented.  They could sell a smoke box attachment, which would make them more marketable to the BBQ crowd.  I'd like to see it.   

I would like to see it too. 

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