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I want to murder the person who invented the 20 paragraph bull#### about a recipe that I have to scroll down for 5 minutes before finally getting to the recipe itself

Discovered a killer Asian market just down the road a couple weeks ago. I've been there about 5 times since. I decided to try my hand at home made pork dumplings last week, they turned out great. I pa

Weather got cool (low 60s) so I decided to knock out a batch of seafood gumbo, and man did it turn out KILLER. Before After I skimped on using the best quality sausage and crab meat, an

2 hours ago, Nigel said:

Love those. Also have a tube of this chipotle paste in the fridge if I want a small dose but don't want to open a can of the whole peppers. 

I'll have to keep my eye out for something like that when I next go to the store - have been thinking of using adobo in a chicken or beef marinade - haven't really looked too deep into it, but this talk of adobo has got me thinking it sounds good with some rice, beans and tortillas

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8 minutes ago, acarey50 said:

I'll have to keep my eye out for something like that when I next go to the store - have been thinking of using adobo in a chicken or beef marinade - haven't really looked too deep into it, but this talk of adobo has got me thinking it sounds good with some rice, beans and tortillas

Also good with simple pico , salsas, and guacamole

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1 hour ago, acarey50 said:

I'll have to keep my eye out for something like that when I next go to the store - have been thinking of using adobo in a chicken or beef marinade - haven't really looked too deep into it, but this talk of adobo has got me thinking it sounds good with some rice, beans and tortillas

maybe this - pretty straight forward

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 2 months later...

It's a chilly grey November day and I am enjoying ramen so good I don't think I could stand up. Pretty close to orgasmic.

Instant Ramen Hack

Usually I prefer all day slow cooking chilis, soups and stews. So happy I went against my usual routine and tried this.

Super easy regardless of your skillset / confidence level in the kitchen.

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  • 1 month later...

Made something today I haven't in a bit as it was just something I forgot. Super easy to make, just takes a little prep time and picking up ingredients. But final product is tasty and looks nice too.  Adjust amounts as needed, change proteins, etc. Concept is still simple, takes maybe 20 minutes.

 

Pork tenderloin (~ 1lb). Sliced into stir fry size pieces. 

Shrimp (~ 1 lb)

Baby bok choy (6-7 bunches)

Yu choy (6-7 bunches)

Garlic (4-5, chopped)

Ginger (about same amount as garlic, chopped)

Onion (1, chopped)

Green onion (2-3, chopped)

Cream of mushroom (1 can)

 

Clean vegetables, cut off lower stem so all pieces are separated. Saute in a little oil for a few minutes until stems soften just a little. Salt and pepper to taste. Remove from pan. Saute onions and green onion for a few minutes same as above. Add garlic and ginger and cook another minute or two. Add pork and mix, cook until no more pink (but don't overcook). Add cream of mushroom soup and a little water. Stir and cook on med high heat for a couple minutes. Toss in shrimp, another minute, then add green vegetables and mix together and cook for final minute or two. 

Serve with rice.

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39 minutes ago, gianmarco said:

Made something today I haven't in a bit as it was just something I forgot. Super easy to make, just takes a little prep time and picking up ingredients. But final product is tasty and looks nice too.  Adjust amounts as needed, change proteins, etc. Concept is still simple, takes maybe 20 minutes.

 

Pork tenderloin (~ 1lb). Sliced into stir fry size pieces. 

Shrimp (~ 1 lb)

Baby bok choy (6-7 bunches)

Yu choy (6-7 bunches)

Garlic (4-5, chopped)

Ginger (about same amount as garlic, chopped)

Onion (1, chopped)

Green onion (2-3, chopped)

Cream of mushroom (1 can)

 

Clean vegetables, cut off lower stem so all pieces are separated. Saute in a little oil for a few minutes until stems soften just a little. Salt and pepper to taste. Remove from pan. Saute onions and green onion for a few minutes same as above. Add garlic and ginger and cook another minute or two. Add pork and mix, cook until no more pink (but don't overcook). Add cream of mushroom soup and a little water. Stir and cook on med high heat for a couple minutes. Toss in shrimp, another minute, then add green vegetables and mix together and cook for final minute or two. 

Serve with rice.

Sounds good

What exactly is yu choy?

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49 minutes ago, Cowboysfan8 said:

Sounds good

What exactly is yu choy?

Yu choy

But you can substitute any green vegetable.  You could do spinach.  Or just the baby bok choy.  Or regular bok choy.  Doesn't really matter. 

If you have access, go to a local Asian market and see what they have.  I got 3x as much as what I needed above for like $2 total.  Other than the shrimp, this whole thing could be made for like $5-6. 

Here you go

Edited by gianmarco
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How crazy is this:

Put in lamb bones and veggies in the bottom of a crock pit, put my lamb roast on top, add about an inch of water and a few tablespoons of red wine,  and cook for 7 hours.  The liquid in the bottom is to be used to make the gravy.

Tell me I'm crazy.

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On 12/18/2020 at 4:47 PM, Cowboysfan8 said:

10 mins start to finish 

I used bagged rice in microwave and doubled the lemon juice. Really good 

https://damndelicious.net/2019/02/04/garlic-butter-shrimp-scampi/#comments

eta: I finished it with a decent handful of grated parmigiano reggiano

So, for me, there's something so delicious about well-made shrimp scampi.  But, for some reason, I always struggled getting it right for a long time.  I would search various recipes, watch videos, and there was always something slightly different but enough that I never could find one I liked.  Then, one day, I found one video and combined a few of the ideas with others and have finally come up with an excellent version that is incredibly simple.  The key, I found, was actually the order of doing certain steps.  Also, many recipes call for wine and/or lemon and/or shallots (and also parsley).  I've found that I actually prefer it without those (although parsley is fine and I'll add if I have some at home).  And you can still add lemon to this if you wanted.  Wine would be difficult as there's not enough time for it to reduce.

I prefer 16-20 count shrimp for this and use anywhere from 1 - 1.5 pounds when I make it.  I'll do 21-25 count shrimp, but anything smaller and it's hard to turn the shrimp in time without overcooking.

Shrimp (dried, laid out on a plate, and seasoned generously with sea salt and pepper, tails/shell off)
4-5 pieces of garlic, chopped well
3/4 stick of butter, cut into a several pats (up to a full stick if I have 1.5 pounds of shrimp)
Red pepper flakes (only a few, it's not to make it "spicy")
Grated cheese (pecorino romano is what I use)  -- small handful

I start cooking my pasta (spaghetti, linguini, whatever you prefer).  In the meantime I get all of the above ready.  When there's 5 minutes left for the pasta to be ready, I turn up my pan on high.  Generous amount of olive oil and wait a couple minutes for it to get pretty hot (just not smoking).  Add the shrimp first and get a "sear" on the first side in about one minute and then turn over.  They should start to get a brownish crust but without overcooking them.  After about 30 seconds of flipping them over, toss in the butter, toss in the garlic, and the red pepper flakes.  Stir well as butter melts.  Should take about 1 minute.  At this point, the pasta should just be about ready.  Toss in a bit of grated cheese (just helps "thicken" the mixture) and then add the pasta.  If you add the cheese too early it will melt and stick to the bottom so add it just before putting in the pasta.  Mix it all together for 30 seconds or so and then take it out of the pan.

It's the opposite of most recipes where they cook the garlic first in oil/butter and then add the shrimp.  But I absolutely love the way this comes out and it's so fast and easy to make.

ETA -- I think one of the reasons I prefer it this way is that it doesn't have an overly greasy feel/taste with the pasta or shrimp just swimming in butter. While it seems like a lot of butter, because of the shorter cook time for it, it is more of a "sauce"than just melted butter. 

Edited by gianmarco
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I need a good au jus recipe for prime rib. Something easy and light. Not a gravy like consistency. 

Any help is appreciated. First prime rib. Also, making a softened garlic/ herb butter. When do you slather? Beginning? End? I have a foolproof cook process and rub.

Edited by Tony Jabroni
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1 hour ago, Tony Jabroni said:

I need a good au jus recipe for prime rib. Something easy and light. Not a gravy like consistency. 

Any help is appreciated. First prime rib. Also, making a softened garlic/ herb butter. When do you slather? Beginning? End? I have a foolproof cook process and rub.

I cheat with my au jus and just use packaged au jus mix, but I will add in some of the drippings, however, I am definitely interested in any replies you get on making it from scratch. I've got a 15 pound prime rib I'm doing for Christmas Eve dinner.

Au Jus and gravies are definitely something I have struggled with making from scratch. Slightly different, but I would love to master making from scratch country sausage gravy so I can work on home made biscuits and gravy (my lord I will get even fatter if I start working on this)

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2 hours ago, gianmarco said:

So, for me, there's something so delicious about well-made shrimp scampi.  But, for some reason, I always struggled getting it right for a long time.  I would search various recipes, watch videos, and there was always something slightly different but enough that I never could find one I liked.  Then, one day, I found one video and combined a few of the ideas with others and have finally come up with an excellent version that is incredibly simple.  The key, I found, was actually the order of doing certain steps.  Also, many recipes call for wine and/or lemon and/or shallots (and also parsley).  I've found that I actually prefer it without those (although parsley is fine and I'll add if I have some at home).  And you can still add lemon to this if you wanted.  Wine would be difficult as there's not enough time for it to reduce.

I prefer 16-20 count shrimp for this and use anywhere from 1 - 1.5 pounds when I make it.  I'll do 21-25 count shrimp, but anything smaller and it's hard to turn the shrimp in time without overcooking.

Shrimp (dried, laid out on a plate, and seasoned generously with sea salt and pepper, tails/shell off)
4-5 pieces of garlic, chopped well
3/4 stick of butter, cut into a several pats (up to a full stick if I have 1.5 pounds of shrimp)
Red pepper flakes (only a few, it's not to make it "spicy")
Grated cheese (pecorino romano is what I use)  -- small handful

I start cooking my pasta (spaghetti, linguini, whatever you prefer).  In the meantime I get all of the above ready.  When there's 5 minutes left for the pasta to be ready, I turn up my pan on high.  Generous amount of olive oil and wait a couple minutes for it to get pretty hot (just not smoking).  Add the shrimp first and get a "sear" on the first side in about one minute and then turn over.  They should start to get a brownish crust but without overcooking them.  After about 30 seconds of flipping them over, toss in the butter, toss in the garlic, and the red pepper flakes.  Stir well as butter melts.  Should take about 1 minute.  At this point, the pasta should just be about ready.  Toss in a bit of grated cheese (just helps "thicken" the mixture) and then add the pasta.  If you add the cheese too early it will melt and stick to the bottom so add it just before putting in the pasta.  Mix it all together for 30 seconds or so and then take it out of the pan.

It's the opposite of most recipes where they cook the garlic first in oil/butter and then add the shrimp.  But I absolutely love the way this comes out and it's so fast and easy to make.

Got a craving for it and just made some for lunch.  I actually only had smaller shrimp which isn't ideal, but still good.  Can't get a brown crust on them because they cook so fast.  So I forego that when they are small to make sure they aren't overcooked as I hate rubbery, overcooked shrimp.  Done in less than 15 minutes total.

Prep
Shrimp
Final cook
Lunch

Edited by gianmarco
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2 hours ago, Tony Jabroni said:

I need a good au jus recipe for prime rib. Something easy and light. Not a gravy like consistency. 

Any help is appreciated. First prime rib. Also, making a softened garlic/ herb butter. When do you slather? Beginning? End? I have a foolproof cook process and rub.

So simple, it just might work....

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4 hours ago, Hastur said:

How crazy is this:

Put in lamb bones and veggies in the bottom of a crock pit, put my lamb roast on top, add about an inch of water and a few tablespoons of red wine,  and cook for 7 hours.  The liquid in the bottom is to be used to make the gravy.

Tell me I'm crazy.

Crazy like a ####### fox IMO.  Any fresh herbage? Couple sprigs of rosemary maybe?

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To me, scampi is one of the easiest and quickest "gourmet" dishes.

My method:

Heat about a tablespoon of clarified butter or a mix of unsalted butter and olive oil, let it get hot, add 6 to 8 large shrimp (16/20s are perfect), let them cook undisturbed for 30 seconds, flip, add a pinch of sea salt and a clove or 2 of chopped garlic to pan, toss with shrimp for about 15 seconds or so.

Add a generous splash of white wine and about a tablespoon of fresh lemon juice, let it come to a boil and remove pan from heat. Toss in 2 or 3 pats of room temp softened unsalted butter and gently stir until butter is fully melted and incorporated into sauce. Transfer to a boat style plate with the sauce, sprinkle some fresh chopped parsley on top. Enjoy.

If you're serving over pasta, double the amount of wine, lemon, and softened butter at the end.

Edited by Wingnut
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Hosted people and made sea scallops a la nage. Received rave reviews. Not the least time consuming thing I've ever cooked, but was also really easy.

 

1. Julienne carrots, leeks, onion (keep all your peels and roots and stuff) and make sure you've got scallops fresh, or thaw them

2. Pot of ~50/50 water and an acidic white wine. Add in some whole peppercorns, a couple whole garlic cloves, and an herb bouquet (thyme, rosemary - avoid strong stuff like oregano) plus tear up and dump in a decent amount of parsley. Add your veggies and bring the whole thing to a simmer, simmer 15 minutes. Salt to taste also. 

3. Take out the veggies and herbs and lay them on a rack to dry and cool so they don't overcook. Take your liquid remaining and let it cool, covered, to intensify. 

4. OPTIONAL: use your veggie skins and extra pieces and stuff and simmer a pot of water as vegetable stock for however long you want all day. You can later add this to your other liquid (I'm not having you simmer the original liquid because I don't want to reduce the wine too much. 

5. Later on, when you're about ready for dinner, bring your liquid back to a strong simmer. Bring like 2 sticks of butter to room temp (You're probably fine with one but butter gooooood).

6. Poach your scallops in the simmering liquid for ~3 minutes each. You can do a lot and just turn up the heat a little bit to keep your simmer.

7. Place your scallops in the bottom of a big soup plate or a large wide bowl (one per person you're serving) and keep warm while you do this last part.

8. cut your butter into manageable chunks, turn up the heat on the liquid you poached your scallops in, and start whisking in the butter. It's nice to have a helper to add the butter while you whisk really rapidly. Chunking it makes it melt into the mixture easier. You could probably dumb the whole thing in a vitamix and dump the butter in the top and blend it somewhat if you want (make sure you leave the top open or the steam will pressurize and blow the top off).

9. Pour your sauce (the "nage") over the scallops in every bowl, about halfway up each scallops.

10. Place your pretty julienned vegetables all around the scallops, and garnish with a fresh parsley sprig and a slice of lemon. 

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13 hours ago, Hastur said:

How crazy is this:

Put in lamb bones and veggies in the bottom of a crock pit, put my lamb roast on top, add about an inch of water and a few tablespoons of red wine,  and cook for 7 hours.  The liquid in the bottom is to be used to make the gravy.

Tell me I'm crazy.

do it and post the pics

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I went to Nashville for the draft in 2019 and had both Hattie B's and Prince's.  Now I know it's not a fair fight, but for the life of me I cannot find anything anywhere to approximate this.  I've had tons of buffalo wings not in the city of Buffalo and 20% of them are actually awesome, so how can no one do Nashville Hot properly?

Someone solve this for me - recipe, recommend a pre-fab, something.

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  • 4 weeks later...

Made chicken and dumplings a few days ago. I followed this except I used closer to 3 cups of chicken (rotisserie) and used dried parsley instead of thyme which I didn’t have 

https://www.bowlofdelicious.com/easy-chicken-and-dumplings-from-scratch/
 

I barely stirred the dumpling mix together, they turned out very light and fluffy. 
 

Really good

 

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24 minutes ago, Cowboysfan8 said:

Made chicken and dumplings a few days ago. I followed this except I used closer to 3 cups of chicken (rotisserie) and used dried parsley instead of thyme which I didn’t have 

https://www.bowlofdelicious.com/easy-chicken-and-dumplings-from-scratch/
 

I barely stirred the dumpling mix together, they turned out very light and fluffy. 
 

Really good

 

That looks really good - I made a chicken and vegetable soup last week that was a hit with the family, will have to try this one out as well.

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26 minutes ago, acarey50 said:

That looks really good - I made a chicken and vegetable soup last week that was a hit with the family, will have to try this one out as well.

It was delicious 

I planned to add some frozen peas also but forgot

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This has been my go to for the little cold snap we've been having lately:

 

Pozole Verde

2 pounds boneless chicken thighs, skin removed

1.25 pound tomatillos (husked and washed)

1 large white onion, quartered

1 small white onion (chopped for serving)

3 jalapenos (stemmed, halved, seeded)

3 poblano peppers (stemmed, seeded, quartered)

2 large cloves garlic (peeled)

8 cups chicken broth

3 15 ounce can of white hominy (drained and rinsed) 

2 teaspoons kosher salt

2 tablespoons vegetable oil

1 large handful of cilantro (stems and leaves)

1 + tablespoon dried mexican oregano

1 + tablespoon cumin

2 teaspoons white pepper or to taste.

 

Sliced radishes

Crumbled queso fresco

Thick corn tortillas (homemade best)

 

In a large dutch oven, sear chicken in oil over medium heat until brown develops. Deglaze with chicken broth.  

Add remaining broth, garlic, tomatillos, large onion quarters, jalapenos, oregano, cumin, and salt. 

Bring to boil over high heat.

Reduce heat, cover partially and simmer on low for 40 minutes or until chicken is falling apart.

Transfer chicken to bowl or cutting board with slotted spon and shred.

Using slotted spoon, place tomatillos, onions, and jalapenos in blender. Add large handful of fresh cilantro and a cup of cooking liquid and puree until completely smooth. A good blender like a Vitamix or Blendtec is helpful here.

Add shredded chicken, puree, and hominy into dutch oven. Stir and cook uncovered over medium heat for 15 minutes.

Taste and salt as needed.

Serve with lime wedges, sliced radishes, chopped cilantro, crumbled queso fresco, chopped white onions, and thick corn tortillas for dipping. 

Edited by Ron Swanson
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32 minutes ago, Ron Swanson said:

This has been my go to for the little cold snap we've been having lately:

 

Pozole Verde

2 pounds boneless chicken thighs, skin removed

1.25 pound tomatillos (husked and washed)

1 large white onion, quartered

1 small white onion (chopped for serving)

3 jalapenos (stemmed, halved, seeded)

3 poblano peppers (stemmed, seeded, quartered)

2 large cloves garlic (peeled)

8 cups chicken broth

3 15 ounce can of white hominy (drained and rinsed) 

2 teaspoons kosher salt

2 tablespoons vegetable oil

1 large handful of cilantro (stems and leaves)

1 + tablespoon dried mexican oregano

1 + tablespoon cumin

2 teaspoons white pepper or to taste.

 

Sliced radishes

Crumbled queso fresco

Thick corn tortillas (homemade best)

 

In a large dutch oven, sear chicken in oil over medium heat until brown develops. Deglaze with chicken broth.  

Add remaining broth, garlic, tomatillos, large onion quarters, jalapenos, oregano, cumin, and salt. 

Bring to boil over high heat.

Reduce heat, cover partially and simmer on low for 40 minutes or until chicken is falling apart.

Transfer chicken to bowl or cutting board with slotted spon and shred.

Using slotted spoon, place tomatillos, onions, and jalapenos in blender. Add large handful of fresh cilantro and a cup of cooking liquid and puree until completely smooth. A good blender like a Vitamix or Blendtec is helpful here.

Add shredded chicken, puree, and hominy into dutch oven. Stir and cook uncovered over medium heat for 15 minutes.

Taste and salt as needed.

Serve with lime wedges, sliced radishes, chopped cilantro, crumbled queso fresco, chopped white onions, and thick corn tortillas for dipping. 

This sounds delicious, I may make some next cold front.

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Discovered a killer Asian market just down the road a couple weeks ago. I've been there about 5 times since. I decided to try my hand at home made pork dumplings last week, they turned out great. I pan fried some for potstickers, and the next night steamed some and had them with grilled shrimp and sauteed asparagus.

Yesiree

for the dumplings I used frozen wrappers and:

2lbs ground pork

About 1/2 cup of a mixture of minced cabbage, carrot, & green onions

2 cloves garlic, minced

2 TBS soy (not light soy)

2 TBS fish sauce

1 TBSP rice vinegar

TBSP grated ginger

1-2 TBSP sesame oil

Tsp black pepper

Small chunk of shrimp paste dissolved in a tsp of water

Mix everything in a bowl, cover refrigerate overnight. 

Lightly wet the outer edge of dumpling wrapper with your finger. Put a spoonful of filling in the center and pinch edges closed all around (make fancy shapes if you know how).

Then you can freeze or cook them. Steam em for about 9 minutes and serve, or pan fry in a little bit of oil for about 4 minutes, then add some water, cover, and let steam for about 6 minutes, then serve.

Dipping sauce was soy, rice vinegar, and red pepper flakes.

 

 

Edited by Wingnut
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Made the Pozole Verde last night...wow, its really friggin good. I garnished with shredded cabbage, sliced radishes, diced avocado, cilantro, and a dollop of sour cream. So good.

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On 1/19/2021 at 3:42 PM, Wingnut said:

Discovered a killer Asian market just down the road a couple weeks ago.

Have you noticed their pricing on fresh ginger there? 

It's normally $4.00 - $5.00/lb at Kroger or Walmart ...$1.39/lb at our main one.  Same for all the fresh stuff - and can't even find fresh bean sprouts at Kroger/Walmart - .99 cents/lb at our local market.  

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  • 2 weeks later...

Just discovered a great little recipe for ice cream.  For you chocolate lovers, especially Nutella lovers.

Nutella ice cream:

2 cups (480ml) heavy cream
½ tsp (2.5ml) vanilla extract
½ tsp (2.5ml) salt
1 can-14 oz (397g) of sweetened condensed milk
¾ cup (180ml) Nutella

Place the heavy cream, vanilla and salt in the bowl of an electric mixer. Whip on high until stiff peaks form. Add the sweetened condensed milk. Whip until just combined. Add Nutella. Whip until just combined. Remove bowl from mixer and then gently fold the mixture to assure all ingredients are well combined. Transfer to a freezer-safe container and freeze overnight.

 

Just tried this last night.  Ridiculously easy to do, very little time needed.  Just tried it this morning and I'll just say we'll be making this regularly.  Cost for the above is roughly $4 total and it made a decent amount.

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On 1/19/2021 at 3:54 PM, Ron Swanson said:

This has been my go to for the little cold snap we've been having lately:

 

Pozole Verde

2 pounds boneless chicken thighs, skin removed

1.25 pound tomatillos (husked and washed)

1 large white onion, quartered

1 small white onion (chopped for serving)

3 jalapenos (stemmed, halved, seeded)

3 poblano peppers (stemmed, seeded, quartered)

2 large cloves garlic (peeled)

8 cups chicken broth

3 15 ounce can of white hominy (drained and rinsed) 

2 teaspoons kosher salt

2 tablespoons vegetable oil

1 large handful of cilantro (stems and leaves)

1 + tablespoon dried mexican oregano

1 + tablespoon cumin

2 teaspoons white pepper or to taste.

 

Sliced radishes

Crumbled queso fresco

Thick corn tortillas (homemade best)

 

In a large dutch oven, sear chicken in oil over medium heat until brown develops. Deglaze with chicken broth.  

Add remaining broth, garlic, tomatillos, large onion quarters, jalapenos, oregano, cumin, and salt. 

Bring to boil over high heat.

Reduce heat, cover partially and simmer on low for 40 minutes or until chicken is falling apart.

Transfer chicken to bowl or cutting board with slotted spon and shred.

Using slotted spoon, place tomatillos, onions, and jalapenos in blender. Add large handful of fresh cilantro and a cup of cooking liquid and puree until completely smooth. A good blender like a Vitamix or Blendtec is helpful here.

Add shredded chicken, puree, and hominy into dutch oven. Stir and cook uncovered over medium heat for 15 minutes.

Taste and salt as needed.

Serve with lime wedges, sliced radishes, chopped cilantro, crumbled queso fresco, chopped white onions, and thick corn tortillas for dipping. 

Quick question, Ron.  After I pull and blend the veggies and cooking liquid, do I discard the rest of the cooking liquid or keep it in the pot?  

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1 hour ago, Ron Popeil said:

Quick question, Ron.  After I pull and blend the veggies and cooking liquid, do I discard the rest of the cooking liquid or keep it in the pot?  

Keep it in the pot.  Just try and get any particles of veggies into the blender so the soup will be smooth. I use a spider to pull the veggies out. Getting ready to whip up a batch of this here in about 30 minutes myself!

Edited by Ron Swanson
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I usually have food/snacks on Super Bowl sunday related to the two cities representing the game.  So, KC isn't too hard.  Beef BBQ. I've done this for years, so I'm good there.

For Tampa, I'm excited to try my hand at Cuban sandwiches.  Easy enough to get the basic idea down with youtube videos, etc.  Any first hand experience/tips?

TIA

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1 hour ago, Hastur said:

For Tampa, I'm excited to try my hand at Cuban sandwiches.  Easy enough to get the basic idea down with youtube videos, etc.  Any first hand experience/tips?

TIA

Smoke the pork. And really good pickles.

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On 2/4/2021 at 12:26 PM, Hastur said:

I usually have food/snacks on Super Bowl sunday related to the two cities representing the game.  So, KC isn't too hard.  Beef BBQ. I've done this for years, so I'm good there.

For Tampa, I'm excited to try my hand at Cuban sandwiches.  Easy enough to get the basic idea down with youtube videos, etc.  Any first hand experience/tips?

TIA

A mojo or sour orange marinade adds some authenticity to the pork. If you don't have a sandwich press, a 10" cast iron skillet nestled in a 12" cast iron skillet (both heated in the oven) works great.  Some add a brick.

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12 minutes ago, Ron Swanson said:

A mojo or sour orange marinade adds some authenticity to the pork. If you don't have a sandwich press, a 10" cast iron skillet nestled in a 12" cast iron skillet (both heated in the oven) works great.  Some add a brick.

I like mine a bit chewier so I'll pass.

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20 hours ago, Ron Swanson said:

A mojo or sour orange marinade adds some authenticity to the pork. If you don't have a sandwich press, a 10" cast iron skillet nestled in a 12" cast iron skillet (both heated in the oven) works great.  Some add a brick.

I'm going to marinate the pork in this tonight, then tomorrow I will slather the pork in oregano, garlic, and lime juice before putting it in my smoker.

Unfortunately, I do not have a sandwich press.  I will be using the two cast iron pans method. A brick is a nice touch.  I was just going to stand there and press down on it lol.

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good cubano elements:

- make sure your ham, good ham, is as prominent as your pulled pork

- adding lime juice to orange juice is a good substitute for sour orange in marinades

- pickled shallots. thank me later

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On 1/19/2021 at 3:54 PM, Ron Swanson said:

This has been my go to for the little cold snap we've been having lately:

 

Pozole Verde

2 pounds boneless chicken thighs, skin removed

1.25 pound tomatillos (husked and washed)

1 large white onion, quartered

1 small white onion (chopped for serving)

3 jalapenos (stemmed, halved, seeded)

3 poblano peppers (stemmed, seeded, quartered)

2 large cloves garlic (peeled)

8 cups chicken broth

3 15 ounce can of white hominy (drained and rinsed) 

2 teaspoons kosher salt

2 tablespoons vegetable oil

1 large handful of cilantro (stems and leaves)

1 + tablespoon dried mexican oregano

1 + tablespoon cumin

2 teaspoons white pepper or to taste.

 

Sliced radishes

Crumbled queso fresco

Thick corn tortillas (homemade best)

 

In a large dutch oven, sear chicken in oil over medium heat until brown develops. Deglaze with chicken broth.  

Add remaining broth, garlic, tomatillos, large onion quarters, jalapenos, oregano, cumin, and salt. 

Bring to boil over high heat.

Reduce heat, cover partially and simmer on low for 40 minutes or until chicken is falling apart.

Transfer chicken to bowl or cutting board with slotted spon and shred.

Using slotted spoon, place tomatillos, onions, and jalapenos in blender. Add large handful of fresh cilantro and a cup of cooking liquid and puree until completely smooth. A good blender like a Vitamix or Blendtec is helpful here.

Add shredded chicken, puree, and hominy into dutch oven. Stir and cook uncovered over medium heat for 15 minutes.

Taste and salt as needed.

Serve with lime wedges, sliced radishes, chopped cilantro, crumbled queso fresco, chopped white onions, and thick corn tortillas for dipping. 

Made this yesterday for SB. It was REALLY good. :thumbup:  Used pork instead of chicken and pickled radicchio instead of radishes since they were out. Even better today for lunch!

Ingredients

Peppers

Pozole

Toppings

Served

 

 

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On 12/27/2020 at 7:31 PM, Hankmoody said:

I went to Nashville for the draft in 2019 and had both Hattie B's and Prince's.  Now I know it's not a fair fight, but for the life of me I cannot find anything anywhere to approximate this.  I've had tons of buffalo wings not in the city of Buffalo and 20% of them are actually awesome, so how can no one do Nashville Hot properly?

Someone solve this for me - recipe, recommend a pre-fab, something.

This stuff is the secret of how Nashville hot can stay crispy with the sauce.

https://modernistpantry.com/products/crisp-coat-uc.html

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On 2/13/2021 at 9:34 PM, Ron Swanson said:

This stuff is the secret of how Nashville hot can stay crispy with the sauce.

https://modernistpantry.com/products/crisp-coat-uc.html

wow - that stuff is expensive!  $25/14 oz.

the only info I have found so far is using a 50/50 flour mix ...any idea if you can get away with less of this stuff and still get good results??

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