Jump to content
Fantasy Football - Footballguys Forums

WR Allen Robinson, CHI


Recommended Posts

Wideout Allen Robinson makes first-round statement at Penn State

By Jeff Reynolds | NFLDraftScout.com

Quote

Penn State wide receiver Allen Robinson put on a show the Nittany Lions pro day Tuesday.

Robinson, the No. 34 overall prospect in the NFLDraftScout.com rankings and seventh-ranked receiver, showed Tuesday much-improved burst and the kind of explosiveness some scouts expected at what proved to be a marginal workout at the Scouting Combine.

With a 4.47 time in the 40, 42-inch vertical and 6.53 three-cone at State College, Robinson vastly improved his athletic results from Indy: 4.60, 39-inch vertical, 7.00 three-cone. He also added four inches to his broad jump (131 inches Tuesday).

The effort to show more suddenness was evident in Robinson's frame. He weighed 220 in Indianapolis and was 208 at pro day.

Robinson left Penn State with one season of eligibility remaining as one of the most productive in conference history with a combined 174 receptions and 2,445 receiving yards.

On tape, the record-setting receiver doesn't consistently show top-end acceleration or quick-twitch explosion. He does flash in those areas with deceptive acceleration and sharp cuts to be a dangerous catch-and-go receiver. He is physical and will be viewed as an excellent consolation prize from picks 20-40 for teams that miss on the upper-tier prospects.

Among those present from NFL teams were Eagles head coach Chip Kelly and Steelers head coach Mike Tomlin. Beyond the common state ties, they also have a need at the wide receiver position. Robinson would fill an immediate need outside, particularly for the Steelers. The Eagles would seemingly be in the market for more of a vertical home-run threat or slot receiver type following the release of DeSean Jackson.

Edited by Faust
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Brandt: Allen Robinson's draft stock on rise after big pro day

By Mike Huguenin

College Football 24/7 writer

In a draft that's deep on wide receivers, one receiver who often is overlooked is Penn State's Allen Robinson. Perhaps his pro day Tuesday will change that.

Gil Brandt @Gil_Brandt

WR Allen Robinson having big day at #PennState pro day. 42 VJ, 11 BJ, sub-4.5 40. Stock will be up after today. #NFLDraft

One interested observer surely would have been Philadelphia Eagles coach Chip Kelly, whose team is likely to draft a wide receiver or two this year. Robinson is seen by most analysts as a second-rounder, though he isn't expected to be around when the Eagles pick 22nd in the second round. His pro day might spark enough interest to put him in the discussion as a possible late first-rounder.

The big question about Robinson (6-foot-3, 220 pounds) is his speed, but his 40 time at his pro day was a noticeable improvement over his 4.60 time at February's NFL Scouting Combine. Robinson's vertical jump was measured at 39 inches at the combine, when he also turned in a 10-foot, 7-inch broad jump. That he improved from good numbers in both categories Tuesday also had to intrigue scouts.

Robinson led the Big Ten in receptions and receiving yardage in each of the past two seasons. He had 174 receptions and 2,445 receiving yards in that span under since-departed coach Bill O'Brien.

With the Nittany Lions, Robinson proved to be effective as a deep threat and also on wide-receiver screens. According to cfbstats.com, he had 10 receptions of at least 40 yards in 2013, a figure that tied for the national lead with Utah's Dres Anderson and was two more than Oregon State's Brandin Cooks, Texas A&M's Mike Evans and Clemson's Sammy Watkins.

Teams that own top-10 picks in the second round who could be interested in a receiver include Buffalo, Cleveland, Jacksonville, Oakland and Tampa Bay.

Mike Huguenin can be reached at mike.huguenin@nfl.com. You also can follow him on Twitter @MikeHuguenin.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

MILKMAN:

It makes you wonder why he came to the combine so heavy? 6'2+ 210 with 4.49 speed would have looked a lot better than 220 4.6 speed. Still on tape I think he shows some decent fast twitch/explosiveness, good power, and elite vison. Plus that size and vert are pretty tasty.

He def could pop at the next level.

Oh yeah. I'm a huge fan and had him as my #1 just a few weeks ago. I find myself changing my mind on my WR rankings frequently and it probably won't slow up until the NFL draft. But yeah, I love A-Rob. First thing I noticed on tape, was that elite vision you mentioned. This guy is a Demaryius/B-Marsh/Boldin hybrid and I think he will be one of the best from this class. There are soooo many potentially studly WRs from this class. My count is 5-6 that all have equal chance of being best in class. My goal is to nab 3/5.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2014 NFL Draft: WRs Brandin Cooks, Allen Robinson headed for NFL

Excerpt:

Robinson was named to NFLDraftScout.com analyst Dane Brugler's First-team Offense among draft prospects. He finished with school records with 97 catches for 1,432 receiving yards in 2013 and was the main playmaker for the Penn State offense. Robinson was a third-team All-American selection.

"He isn't the biggest (6-2, 210) or fastest (estimated 4.55 speed), but he's able to be effective because he pays attention to detail and is extremely aggressive when the ball is thrown in his area," Brugler wrote.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Rotoworld:

NFL Network's Daniel Jeremiah praised Penn State WR Allen Robinson for his yards after catch ability.
"Wish (Robinson) had more juice but I love the way he fights for every inch after the catch. Very physical," Jeremiah tweeted. According to Rotoworld contributor Greg Peshek, Robinson's yards after the catch averaged out to 7.56, a very solid number. He also has nice vision and block anticipation as a ball carrier.
Mar 11 - 9:53 AM
Penn State WR Allen Robinson ran an official 4.60 forty time and leaped to a 39-inch vertical.
The 6-foot-3, 220-pound receiver's unofficial times were announced at 4.56 and 4.60, about as expected. Robinson displays good body control, run after the catch skill and foot speed to separate from defenders. He might not be a first-round pick, but the productive former Nittany Lions' star will likely be selected in the top-50.
Feb 23 - 5:13 PM
Draft insider Tony Pauline ranked three wide receivers as sure-fire first round picks.
Clemson's Sammy Watkins, Texas A&M's Mike Evans, and USC's Marqise Lee all took home first-round grades from the evaluator. Penn State's Allen Robinson and Oregon State's Brandin Cooks landed on the 1-2 round bubble, while Florida State's Kelvin Benjamin and LSU's Odell Beckham Jr. received second-round grades.
Jan 30 - 5:58 PM
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Allen Robinson bolsters NFL draft stock with Penn State pro-day workout

By Audrey Snyder

STATE COLLEGE – With one month until the 2014 NFL Draft, former Penn State wide receiver Allen Robinson compiled one more public workout for scouts. This time the Nittany Lions’ All-America receiver had the luxury of doing so on the same practice field where he spent the last three years training for this moment.

“It’s everyone’s dream to go in the first round, but I can’t control that so wherever I end up going, God has blessed me with being picked by a team,” Robinson said following his workout. “All I can do is stay prepared and ready and once my name is called, show those guys what I can do and earn my spot on the field.”

There were 26 teams on hand inside Holuba Hall watching Penn State’s 11 NFL hopefuls participate in combine-type drills as part of pro day. Robinson was one of a record-high 85 underclassmen who participated in the NFL Scouting Combine in February, giving him two workouts to try and bolster his stock.

Projected as a late first to early second-round pick, Robinson improved his 40-yard dash time on Tuesday, running what he said was clocked from “4.42 to 4.47 and some 4.5s.” Robinson ran a 4.60 second 40-yard dash at the combine, a number that continued to raise questions about his breakaway speed.

“This season I was caught a couple times on some long runs,” Robinson said. “But at the same time the two guys who caught me could come out next year and run two 4.2 40s, so then what does that mean? Know what I’m saying? I still think I separated a lot from guys on routes on go routes and different deep routes. Obviously, I got behind defenses a lot. So it’s just what teams feel, so I wanted to come out here and run my best 40.”

Robinson caught passes from his cousin who the receiver said is in his 14th season in the Canadian Football League. The two trained together when Robinson was home in Michigan. Robinson trained for the combine in Tampa and then worked at home for a little bit and will return to Michigan later this week.

Robinson’s athleticism continues to help him increase his stock and at pro day he improved his vertical from 39 inches to 42. At this point in the evaluation process every little detail about Robinson has been measured, leaving the receiver at ease with his numbers.

“I wouldn’t be disappointed,” Robinson said when asked about slipping out of the first or second rounds in a draft that is loaded with wide receivers. “I wasn’t highly recruited out of high school, so I’m not too worried about not getting drafted. All I can do is work; my whole life has been sitting around waiting so whatever round I go in, it is what it is. But at the same time when I get to my team, I’m going to grind and earn my spot.”

Robinson won’t be on hand for the Blue-White Game this weekend, rather returning home that way he can make the necessary trips to other teams who could call him and bring him in for additional workouts leading up to the draft. The next month will be filled with a lot of waiting around until draft day, a time where Robinson plans to gather with his family and friends at home.

“I can’t control anything that I can’t control,” he said. “I just continue to go out there, work out and catch balls. Whatever happens happens.”

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Philadelphia Eagles’ 2014 NFL Draft Prospect – WR Allen Robinson

April 1st, 2014 at 9:37 PM
By Scott Erik Anderson

It's that time of the offseason again. Every team is looking at their roster and figuring out which holes need to be filled in the draft or are building for the future. For the Philadelphia Eagles, its a little bit of both. With the outright release of wide receiver DeSean Jackson last week, it only makes sense that the Philadelphia Eagles need to address the void that was created. With that in mind, let's take a look at 2014 NFL Draft prospect, wide receiver Allen Robinson.

Robinson declared for the NFL Draft after his junior season at Penn State. After only having three receptions in his freshman year for only 29 yards, Robinson moved up to become the starter for his sophomore and junior seasons, becoming the leading wide receiver in the Big Ten Conference those years. In 2012, he came away with 77 receptions for 1,018 yards and 11 touchdowns. With 97 receptions for 1,432 yards and six touchdowns, it was evident that Robinson was the go-to guy for the Penn State offense.

At 6-foot-3 and 220 pounds, Robinson has great size for a wide receiver. Compared to former Eagle DeSean Jackson, Robinson is five inches taller and 40 pounds heavier. That is a huge plus because he can jump higher than Jackson when going up against a defensive back. Jackson has Robinson beat at the 40-yard-dash as he ran it in 4.35 seconds compared to Robinson's 4.60 second time.

Beside's his slower speed, Robinson's timing is sometimes off when jumping for the ball. However, when his timing is perfect, he can contort his body mid-air to make the big catch while staying in control. With his height and ability, he would be a huge addition to the Eagles' red-zone offense. His double-moves and line release make up for his lack of a top-end speed for his vertical routes as he can create nice separation. Robinson is a playmaker and will turn short-yard passes into long-yard pickups.

The biggest upside to Robinson is the fact that he has already been in a pro-style offense. Former Penn State head coach and current Houston Texans head coach Bill O'Brien implemented a pro-style offense when Penn State hired him before the 2012 season. Playing in that offense during the 2012 and 2013 seasons, Robinson rose to the top of the charts in the Big Ten. Knowing routes in a pro-style offense definitely helps his draft stock.

With him playing for a university that is just four hours away from Philadelphia, there is no doubt that Chip Kelly and the Eagles have been watching him. If the Eagles do draft Robinson, he would be a solid number three receiver behind Jeremy Maclin and Riley Cooper now that Jackson is out of the picture.

Robinson is ranked seventh among wide receivers in the upcoming draft and is projected to go in the first or second round. Sure, there are wide receivers ahead of him that the Eagles may want to go after, but the Eagles can't go wrong with picking Robinson.

Edited by Faust
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4.6 at the combine is not a good sign.

It's not going to matter for Robinson. Have you watched his vision when he's running after the catch? He's elusive as hell and he appears strong with the ball. Aside from his 40 time, his other metrics are elite. When you combine his metrics and his on field productivity, he's nearly a can't miss prospect, imo. I think the only reason I don't have him ranked #1 is because I know I can get him for the price of a 3rd, worst case scenario.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4.6 at the combine is not a good sign.

It's not going to matter for Robinson. Have you watched his vision when he's running after the catch? He's elusive as hell and he appears strong with the ball. Aside from his 40 time, his other metrics are elite. When you combine his metrics and his on field productivity, he's nearly a can't miss prospect, imo. I think the only reason I don't have him ranked #1 is because I know I can get him for the price of a 3rd, worst case scenario.

thanks. I will check him out.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The SI 64, Nos. 39-35: Lamarcus Joyner, Derek Carr, Allen Robinson and more

Chris Burke

Excerpt:

No. 36: Allen Robinson, WR, Penn State

Bio: While the Big Ten may not be as pass-happy as some other conferences, Robinson still deserves plenty of kudos for leading the conference in receptions and yards two straight years. In 2012, he set the pace with 77 grabs for 1,018 yards and 11 TDs; last year, he went for 97-1,432-6. The latter performance earned him a first-team All-America spot. The 6-3 receiver recently turned in a stellar pro day (following a somewhat-disappointing combine): 42-inch vertical, 11-foot broad jump and a 40 time under 4.5. He also dropped 12 pounds between February and this week, from 220 down to 208.

Strengths: Really uses his body well — almost single-handedly saved Penn State versus Michigan last year by making two difficult, contested deep catches by high-pointing the football over top of defensive backs. Does not hesitate to play a physical style, either after making catches or aiding in the run game. His time with Penn State’s pro-style system gave him plenty of opportunities to do the latter. Better speed/elusiveness than he is given credit for, hence the Nittany Lions’ frequent use of him on screens and hitch routes. One of those receivers who simply finds a way to make the plays his team needs him to make.

Weaknesses: The catch-and-run quickness may be there, but the deep speed has not been. Better improvising on the fly than actually pulling off sharp routes, an issue that could leave him covered often in the NFL. Every so often, will fail to watch the ball into his hands, instead turning his eyes upfield prematurely. Not enough here at the moment to consider Robinson a No. 1 receiver, so his draft ceiling may be limited to Round 2.

Conclusion: One of the more consistent offensive players in the entire draft (and a personal favorite), Robinson should make for a steady target as an NFL receiver. The team that drafts him may have to assist him in getting open early on, while he develops his routes. Robinson will not shy away from press coverage and he is extremely adept carving up zones. Taller, more physical cornerbacks may give him problems if he cannot create a free release. Even taking into account what may be lacking here, Robinson falling beyond Round 2 would be stunning.

NFL player comparison: Rueben Randle, Giants (2nd round, 2012, LSU)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4.6 at the combine is not a good sign.

It's not going to matter for Robinson. Have you watched his vision when he's running after the catch? He's elusive as hell and he appears strong with the ball. Aside from his 40 time, his other metrics are elite. When you combine his metrics and his on field productivity, he's nearly a can't miss prospect, imo. I think the only reason I don't have him ranked #1 is because I know I can get him for the price of a 3rd, worst case scenario.

No doubt he's extremely athletic and great after the catch, but he looks very raw as a route runner and I wasn't very impressed with his hands. He could develop but right now he's not a finished product. I see a lot of Keenan Allen in his game but Keenan was much more polished.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

but he looks very raw as a route runner

We must not be watching the same player.

I watched 6 or 7 games and it appeared that he was primarily targeted on screens. I wasn't impressed by his route running and ability to catch in traffic. To his credit he's amazing on screens.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I watched 6 or 7 games and it appeared that he was primarily targeted on screens.

You're correct; Robinson caught a high percentage behind the LOS, still less than Matthews and Watkins. But this has more to do with the coach calling plays than with the receiver. For what it's worth, Robinson did quite well turning screen passes into first downs.

he looks very raw as a route runner

As for his route running, again I disagree. He is at least ahead of the game.

Syracuse: 1:13

Wisconsin: 1:25, 2:49, 4:25, 5:02

Minnesota: 0:39, 3:31

Indiana 0:33, 2:50, 3:16, 5:11

Like any first year player, he has some room to improve. But he isn't behind the curve.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4.6 at the combine is not a good sign.

It's not going to matter for Robinson. Have you watched his vision when he's running after the catch? He's elusive as hell and he appears strong with the ball. Aside from his 40 time, his other metrics are elite. When you combine his metrics and his on field productivity, he's nearly a can't miss prospect, imo. I think the only reason I don't have him ranked #1 is because I know I can get him for the price of a 3rd, worst case scenario.

I took simply one game here vs Virginia and he looked anything but a "nearly can't miss prospect" What did I miss from that game?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kj8yn8EVneQ

:05 - Body catch, should've come back to the football as it would've created more separation from the DB

1:08 - Way too many steps to run a slant route...gave the route away and the DBs jumped it.

1:46 - Key route, tried to make the defender miss...didn't work.

1:53 - WR screen, tried to make the defender miss...didn't work

2:08 - Slant route, too many steps...DB jumped it, but took a bad angle. Fell down after the catch by himself

2:21 - Hitch, doesn't come back to the football and DB breaks it up.

2:40 - Robinson loses on a jump ball in the endzone, he dropped it.

3:02 - Robinson catches a 5 yard out and falls down...it was a 3rd and 10.

3:19 - He takes too many steps getting out of the break and I believe a yard too deep in his route. Which makes the timing/distance off and an incomplete pass.

3:40 - Robinson runs poor dig route...he doesn't run very hard and is very high in his break. Then he flat out drops the football.

4:01 - Robinson makes a great diving catch on a double move(poor decision by the safety).

5:15 - Catches a shallow cross behind the LOS, makes #53 miss with a good move back to the middle of the field

5:26 - Catches a deep out vs prevent coverage and gets out of bounds

5:35 - Robinson runs a slant that he body catches and tries to turn away to make a play....but he gets tackled by the DB.

My breakdown pre-combine:

17) Allen Robinson 6-3 210 Penn State

2013- 97 for 1432 6

2012- 77 for 1018 11

2011- 3 for 29 0

Comparison: Less athletic Michael Crabtree

I was left wanting more after watching film on Robinson, underwhelming and inconsistent. Robinson reminds me of a less athletic Michael Crabtree(which I think is the lowest athletically a WR1 can be in FF). Robinson is a notch below Crabtree and I question his ability to ever be a WR1 on an NFL team, much less on FF team. I would peg Robinson as a 4.55 type of player, which isnt good for a player that doesnt use his size. Robinson isnt quick enough in and out of his breaks, which make him a below average route runner. For a player with his frame, he can get eaten up by smaller DBs because he doesnt use his hands well during his routes. Robinson also gets very high before he breaks off in a route, which is a big tip off for a DB. He isnt consistent on using his 6-3 frame to his advantage in high pointing the football or boxing out defenders. At times, Robinson can make defenders miss, however hes not consistent in this area. For those that want to point out his two good plays versus Ohio State, please note that the score was 56-7/63-7 and Im sure 2nd or 3rd string defenders were in the game.

FF wise: WR3 to worse

Edited by tdmills
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4.6 at the combine is not a good sign.

It's not going to matter for Robinson. Have you watched his vision when he's running after the catch? He's elusive as hell and he appears strong with the ball. Aside from his 40 time, his other metrics are elite. When you combine his metrics and his on field productivity, he's nearly a can't miss prospect, imo. I think the only reason I don't have him ranked #1 is because I know I can get him for the price of a 3rd, worst case scenario.

I took simply one game here vs Virginia and he looked another but a "nearly can't miss prospect" What did I miss from that game?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kj8yn8EVneQ

:05 - Body catch, should've come back to the football as it would've created more separation from the DB

1:08 - Way too many steps to run a slant route...gave the route away and the DBs jumped it.

1:46 - Key route, tried to make the defender miss...didn't work.

1:53 - WR screen, tried to make the defender miss...didn't work

2:08 - Slant route, too many steps...DB jumped it, but took a bad angle. Fell down after the catch by himself

2:21 - Hitch, doesn't come back to the football and DB breaks it up.

2:40 - Robinson loses on a jump ball in the endzone, he dropped it.

3:02 - Robinson catches a 5 yard out and falls down...it was a 3rd and 10.

3:19 - He takes too many steps getting out of the break and I believe a yard too deep in his route. Which makes the timing/distance off and an incomplete pass.

3:40 - Robinson runs poor dig route...he doesn't run very hard and is very high in his break. Then he flat out drops the football.

4:01 - Robinson makes a great diving catch on a double move(poor decision by the safety).

5:15 - Catches a shallow cross behind the LOS, makes #53 miss with a good move back to the middle of the field

5:26 - Catches a deep out vs prevent coverage and gets out of bounds

5:35 - Robinson runs a slant that he body catches and tries to turn away to make a play....but he gets tackled by the DB.

My breakdown pre-combine:

17) Allen Robinson 6-3 210 Penn State

2013- 97 for 1432 6

2012- 77 for 1018 11

2011- 3 for 29 0

Comparison: Less athletic Michael Crabtree

I was left wanting more after watching film on Robinson, underwhelming and inconsistent. Robinson reminds me of a less athletic Michael Crabtree(which I think is the lowest athletically a WR1 can be in FF). Robinson is a notch below Crabtree and I question his ability to ever be a WR1 on an NFL team, much less on FF team. I would peg Robinson as a 4.55 type of player, which isnt good for a player that doesnt use his size. Robinson isnt quick enough in and out of his breaks, which make him a below average route runner. For a player with his frame, he can get eaten up by smaller DBs because he doesnt use his hands well during his routes. Robinson also gets very high before he breaks off in a route, which is a big tip off for a DB. He isnt consistent on using his 6-3 frame to his advantage in high pointing the football or boxing out defenders. At times, Robinson can make defenders miss, however hes not consistent in this area. For those that want to point out his two good plays versus Ohio State, please note that the score was 56-7/63-7 and Im sure 2nd or 3rd string defenders were in the game.

FF wise: WR3 to worse

For a lot of the route running-type issues from that 2012 Virginia game, it should be noted that he had just turned 19 years old entering that season. He will just be turning 21 as he enters the 2014 NFL preseason. Not saying that he will assuredly fix these issues, but I am more apt to excuse them from a younger player with time to develop and get pro coaching.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For a lot of the route running-type issues from that 2012 Virginia game, it should be noted that he had just turned 19 years old entering that season. He will just be turning 21 as he enters the 2014 NFL preseason. Not saying that he will assuredly fix these issues, but I am more apt to excuse them from a younger player with time to develop and get pro coaching.

It seems like many tdmills's criticisms of Robinson consist of technique issues, which could certainly improve.

IMO, Robinson has many of the unteachable traits necessary for good route running, like hip flexibility and agility. I'll take the chance he improves his technique.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Reading the various draft message boards on the Internet, I've definitely noticed that some evaluators tend to hone in on technique issues while others emphasize athletic traits more. I certainly fall into the latter category. When Demaryius Thomas and Percy Harvin were draft prospects, there were a lot of questions about their route running ability and technique. I thought those were pretty misguided. Both guys clearly had exceptional movement skills (i.e. economical/sudden/explosive), so from my perspective there was no doubt that they would be able to run effective routes in the NFL.

I don't really think of athleticism and route running as being two separate categories. I think the latter is simply a reflection of the former. If somebody is a fluid and explosive mover, he'll probably be a good route runner because those are the qualities that influence route running effectiveness. Robinson is not as explosive as Harvin or as big as Thomas, but you can see that he moves extremely well for his height. He's sudden, fluid, and elastic. Greg Cosell has talked about how he becomes like a RB with the ball in his hands. It's certainly something that you notice when you watch his game clips and see him breaking guys down in the open field. That is not a teachable skill. It's an innate thing and he's got it.

I think his route running is fine. The only legit knock against him in my book is a lack of top end speed to threaten vertically.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Eric Galko @OptimumScouting

Personally, I'd rather Allen Robinson than Mike Evans, unless you're desperate for a big-body on the edge. I think he's very under-valued.

Very good breakdown here comparing Evans and Robinson. 70% of Robinson's catches were within 10 yards of the LOS and only 12.7% were over 20 yards.

This stat stood out considering Robinson is 6-2,220:

Allen Robinson is unusually lacking in red zone receptions. Only 4.8% of his receptions and 2.5% of his yardage have come in the red zone throughout the season. Despite his big frame, suited for red zone work – Evans is simply average near the goal line. 12.7% of his receptions have come inside the 20.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I guess I don't really know if that's a negative or a positive. Was it something he was deficient in (doubt it) or just that the coach's game plan didn't call his number (more likely I think). It's almost like they used him to move the chains instead of to punch it in. Might speak to his elusiveness a little bit.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What does Keenan Allen do that Allen Robinson doesn't? It seems to me they are both pretty explosive with a knack for getting DB's off balance. I'd give Robinson the edge in the open field.

I do think he could be this year's Keenan Allen if he ends up in the right place.

Here's the metrics on Allen from last year.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What does Keenan Allen do that Allen Robinson doesn't? It seems to me they are both pretty explosive with a knack for getting DB's off balance. I'd give Robinson the edge in the open field.

I do think he could be this year's Keenan Allen if he ends up in the right place.

Here's the metrics on Allen from last year.

Eagles perhaps? They do like their screens and stacker receiver plays.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What does Keenan Allen do that Allen Robinson doesn't? It seems to me they are both pretty explosive with a knack for getting DB's off balance. I'd give Robinson the edge in the open field.

I do think he could be this year's Keenan Allen if he ends up in the right place.

Here's the metrics on Allen from last year.

Eagles perhaps? They do like their screens and stacker receiver plays.

Chip Kelly was at his Pro Day.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Rotoworld:

Former NFL scout Russ Lande believes Penn State WR Allen Robinson is going to be a first-round pick.

"I think teams that had concerns about speed are at least saying, ‘You know what, we have no doubt he’s at least average.’ If he’s average in speed, all the other attributes are outstanding. He’s going to be a first-round pick," Lande said on the Big Ten Network last month. The 6-foot-2, 220-pound Robinson has seen his stock rise over the last month, due to a strong combine and the ability to showcase his speed (4.42 to 4.47 forty). Evaluators have been impressed with his ball skills and his ability to dominate smaller defenders with his size. The Penn State prospect could be a target at the end of the first-round. There could be a WR-needy team that wants to trade up from their second round selection, if they know another team is planning to take him off the board. It's safe to say, that Robinson could go in the first two rounds of the draft.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Rotoworld:

Yahoo Sports' Rand Getlin reports that the panthers are traveling to meet Penn State WR Allen Robinson.

"The Panthers are traveling for a last minute meeting with former Penn State WR Allen Robinson, per a source," Getlin tweeted. With Robinson's stock on the rise, the Panthers are in range to select the Nittany Lions prospect. It might take pick No.28 to select Robinson, with no guarantee that he'll be around by their No.60 pick in the draft. If the Panthers brass is making a last minute road trip to meet with Robinson, it's quite possible Carolina is thinking of him as a first round prospect.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Penn State's Allen Robinson fits the Bill at WR

By:

Karen Guregian

The Patriots made their splash in the rookie receiver pool last year and subsequently dealt with the residual growing pains.

It took some time for Aaron Dobson, Josh Boyce and Kenbrell Thompkins to learn the offense, and get on the same page with Tom Brady.

Having endured that process, you might think the Patriots would avoid drafting more inexperienced receivers for Brady. One kid that might make them once again take the plunge?

Allen Robinson.

The Pats still have a need for a playmaker, and Robinson not only fits the bill, but already has a pretty good grasp of the system.

Robinson spent the past two seasons playing for former Patriots offensive coordinator Bill O’Brien at Penn State in a pro style offense with a lot of similarities to the one Brady runs in Foxboro.

O’Brien even gave Robinson tapes of some former Pats receivers to study. One of the players Robinson studied was Brandon Lloyd, who caught 74 passes during his one season in Foxboro.

“That really helped me become versatile as a receiver. Learning things that different receivers do to help them gain an advantage throughout the course of a game,’’ Robinson told the Herald Friday when asked about his Patriot film study. “That was the biggest thing. And coach O’Brien had clips of a lot of Patriot guys.”

Assuming O’Brien doesn’t snag him first for Houston, Robinson is at least someone the Pats might consider, especially since Patriots director of personnel Nick Caserio hasn’t ruled out the possibility of drafting another receiver if the right one came along.

At 6-foot-2, 220 pounds, Robinson just might be the guy.

‘‘With him, you like the size, you like his ability to go down the field in traffic. When he’s one-on-one with the corner, he’s going to outduel that cornerback. He did that time and again this year,” ESPN draft analyst Mel Kiper said of Robinson in a recent conference call. “His speed and separation, he’s going to have to continue to work on, (and) his explosiveness out of the break.”

Kiper suggested that had he stayed for his senior year, Robinson would have been a first- or second-round pick next year.

“If you get him in the third round,” Kiper said, “I think you get some value there.”

With Dobson recovering from surgery to repair a stress fracture, it might make sense to add another outside threat.

The Big Ten’s leading receiver the past two seasons, Robinson caught 174 passes for 2,445 yards with 17 touchdowns in that span.

While not considered in the upper echelon in a deep receiver class, he did have a memorable showing at his pro day. He posted a 4.47 time in the 40, a 42-inch vertical leap and a 6.53 three-cone drill, vastly improving his marks from the combine.

“I think I do a good job of separating from guys,” Robinson said. “I was first in the country in plus-40-yard receiving plays. I think that showed my ability to get behind a defense.”

The Pats offense is based on receivers running precise routes and knowing where to be depending on what the defense shows. Dobson, Thompkins and Boyce are heading into just their second year with the system, while Robinson has already been operating in it for two years.

With that in mind, he might be on the Pats radar. They met with him before his pro day. Robinson believes he’d have a leg up if selected by them or the Texans.

“It would be a much smaller learning curve offensively, knowing what they do with coach O’Brien, and even with the Patriots,” Robinson said. “It’s a very versatile offense. You have a quick pass game, an intermediate pass game, and a deep pass game. Those were the concepts. You attack every level of the field. I’m definitely comfortable playing in that offense.”

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Rotoworld:

Former NFL scout Russ Lande believes Penn State WR Allen Robinson is going to be a first-round pick.

"I think teams that had concerns about speed are at least saying, ‘You know what, we have no doubt he’s at least average.’ If he’s average in speed, all the other attributes are outstanding. He’s going to be a first-round pick," Lande said on the Big Ten Network last month. The 6-foot-2, 220-pound Robinson has seen his stock rise over the last month, due to a strong combine and the ability to showcase his speed (4.42 to 4.47 forty). Evaluators have been impressed with his ball skills and his ability to dominate smaller defenders with his size. The Penn State prospect could be a target at the end of the first-round. There could be a WR-needy team that wants to trade up from their second round selection, if they know another team is planning to take him off the board. It's safe to say, that Robinson could go in the first two rounds of the draft.
NFL draft 2014: Penn State's Allen Robinson compared to Houston Texans star Andre Johnson

By Dustin Hockensmith

It's safe to say that NFL scouting expert Russ Lande is higher on Penn State’s Allen Robinson than most others in his position. Where ESPN’s Mel Kiper and NFL Network’s Mike Mayock both have Robinson pegged as a third-round pick in the 2014 NFL draft, Lande sees a likely first-rounder who has done enough to downplay concerns about his speed.

Lande gave Robinson an 85 percent chance to hear his name called in the first round, particularly with a number of playoff contenders having needs for wide receivers late in the round. That list includes the New Orleans Saints (No. 27), Carolina Panthers (No. 28), San Francisco 49ers (No. 30), Denver Broncos (No. 31) and Seattle Seahawks (No. 32).

“Scouts, when they watched the film of Robinson, they loved what they saw,” Lande said on Big Ten Network last month. “They saw a kid who had natural hands, could win the jump balls, was dynamic in terms of getting up the field after the catch, breaking tackles and making big plays. But they even question, does he have elite speed or is he just an average guy?”

Robinson was clocked at 4.61 in the 40-yard dash at the NFL combine, which knocked him out of the first round in most pundits’ mock drafts. The drop in his draft stock, whether real or perceived, was a combination of speed concerns and outstanding depth at the position. Robinson bounced back at Penn State’s pro day by running between a “4.42 to 4.47 and some 4.5s” in the 40 while recording a 42-inch vertical jump.

“I think teams that had concerns about speed are at least saying, ‘You know what, we have no doubt he’s at least average.’ If he’s average in speed, all the other attributes are outstanding. He’s going to be a first-round pick.”

Lande took the praise for Robinson a step further today on BTN.com as he compared 10 of the Big Ten’s top prospects to current NFL players. Robinson was compared to Andre Johnson of the Houston Texans, a first-round pick (No. 3 overall) in 2003 who has made seven Pro Bowls in his 11 professional seasons.

Physically, the comparison is a bit of a reach as Johnson is both bigger — he weighed 230 pounds at the NFL combine — and faster than Robinson. But in terms of style and substance, both Johnson and Robinson play a physical brand of football that made them reliable, explosive targets in their respective college offenses.

Robinson certainly played the part at Penn State and left as one of the most productive players in school history.

A two-year starter under former coach Bill O’Brien, the 6-3, 208-pounder was twice named the Big Ten’s receiver of the year while ranking among PSU’s all-time leaders in catches (2nd, 177), yardage (3rd, 2,474 yards) and touchdown receptions (5th, 17). He also owns the two highest single-season reception totals in school history.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Physically, the comparison is a bit of a reach as Johnson is both bigger — he weighed 230 pounds at the NFL combine — and faster than Robinson. But in terms of style and substance, both Johnson and Robinson play a physical brand of football that made them reliable, explosive targets in their respective college offenses.

I think Lande is usually pretty good, but I think he's off mark with this one. Andre is a much stronger and more vertically explosive player.

I would not say Robinson plays a "physical brand of football." If anything, he is a pure finesse player. I can't recall ever seeing him power through a tackle or truck a defender. It's all elusiveness with him. And while I don't pay much attention to blocking, I think he's regarded as a pretty terrible blocker.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Rotoworld:

The Philadelphia Daily News says not to be surprised if Penn State WR Allen Robinson sneaks into the first round.

Per NFL reporter Paul Domowitch, at least one team picking late on Thursday night is considering Robinson. It's not too far-fetched. Robinson goes 6'3/220 and is the best leaper of all wideout prospects available, a major asset in today's "win at the catch point" kind of passing game. He also went off for a 97/1432/6 line while playing in Bill O'Brien's pro-style offense last year. Robinson would make some sense for wideout-needy teams like the Saints at No. 26, Panthers at 28 and Seahawks at 32.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Rotoworld:

The Philadelphia Daily News says not to be surprised if Penn State WR Allen Robinson sneaks into the first round.

Per NFL reporter Paul Domowitch, at least one team picking late on Thursday night is considering Robinson. It's not too far-fetched. Robinson goes 6'3/220 and is the best leaper of all wideout prospects available, a major asset in today's "win at the catch point" kind of passing game. He also went off for a 97/1432/6 line while playing in Bill O'Brien's pro-style offense last year. Robinson would make some sense for wideout-needy teams like the Saints at No. 26, Panthers at 28 and Seahawks at 32.

If he does end up on any of those teams listed at the end - I'm guessing he shoots up to the 1.05 rookie pick range.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Rotoworld:

Jaguars traded up with the 49ers to select Penn State WR Allen Robinson with the No. 61 overall pick in the 2014 NFL draft.

Robinson (6-foot-2 5/8, 220) was the featured player in Bill O'Brien's offense as a sophomore and junior, finishing his three-year career with 177 catches for 2,479 yards (14.0 YPR) and 17 scores. Robinson led the Big Ten in receptions and receiving yards in each of his final two years. Although Robinson lacks vertical speed (4.60), he combines leaping ability (39-inch vertical, 10-foot-7 broad jump) with ideal size and fluidity, and can both out-jump and overpower defensive backs. He was also dynamic after the catch in college, and has some poor man's Demaryius Thomas to his game. Long term, Robinson projects as a high-end No. 2 to lower-end No. 1 receiver in the NFL. He'll immediately compete for significant snaps opposite Cecil Shorts in Jacksonville along with fellow second-round rookie Marqise Lee.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Very curious to see where Robinson, Mathews, and Lee get picked today. All are 1st round talents.

Two of them by the Jags. Looks like this is Shorts' last year in Jax.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Was reading up on the Jags picks and noticed that their WR coach Jerry Sullivan was the same guy who had Boldin in Arizona as a rookie. Interesting in part because Robinson has been compared to Boldin by some. Very different physique. Not as stocky or strong. Similar quickness and RAC skills though. It will be interesting to see how they deploy him. He's the only WR in their group who brings any size. I imagine Shorts will work primarily on the outside with Lee and Robinson moving around a lot.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Faust changed the title to WR Allen Robinson, CHI

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
  • Create New...