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I don't understand Art - Now the ***Official Art Thread***


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I remember being 5 years old and my Mom taking me to the art museum. They were hosting a contemporary sculpture exhibit. I wanted to be outside on the breakwater. It was a perfect early fall day. We trudged from room to room. I stopped in front of a sculpture. It was the same canister vacuum cleaner my Grandmother owned. Instead of one suction hose it had many, all with suction cups affixed to the underside. It was entitled "Octopus". The asking price was $50,000, a substantial sum at the time. I remember asking why the Octopus had only 7 arms. My mother hushed me. The museum guide winked and said few people noticed the anomaly. He said that was what made it art. I just wanted to get outside to the breakwater.

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I remember being 5 years old and my Mom taking me to the art museum. They were hosting a contemporary sculpture exhibit. I wanted to be outside on the breakwater. It was a perfect early fall day. We trudged from room to room. I stopped in front of a sculpture. It was the same canister vacuum cleaner my Grandmother owned. Instead of one suction hose it had many, all with suction cups affixed to the underside. It was entitled "Octopus". The asking price was $50,000, a substantial sum at the time. I remember asking why the Octopus had only 7 arms. My mother hushed me. The museum guide winked and said few people noticed the anomaly. He said that was what made it art. I just wanted to get outside to the breakwater.

I would have told you to go play outside too.

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I am a big fan of John Atkinson Grimshaw. He's no Picasso, but I really like the look, feeling and texture he captured.

https://www.google.com/search?q=john+atkinson+grimshaw&client=safari&hl=en&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=s4JuVK-zJoz_yQT784GoCA&ved=0CAcQ_AUoAQ&biw=320&bih=460

I like these

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Been teaching high school for a long time. Would throw up some random posters from year to year, but eventually must looked at my walls and knew I could do a lot better. After we built a new school (previous building was exactly 100 years old) I figured it was time to take the leap and put up some stuff on my walls that I liked.

So far I've got three pieces on the walls that I'm good with. Found them all cheap on Amazon/Ebay for about $10 each. They're all 24x36 in frames that look much classier that just stapling or taping them up. Went with Kandinksy, Pollock, and Dali. Go figure, I teach math. Its the sort of art that just speaks to me. Got some more space that I plan to fill in soon, but not sure where to go. These three all represent stuff that I like. Much happier with my workspace as I get to see these every day. Have gotten lots of positive comments from students, parents, and colleagues. Lots of conversations started by the prints.

I'm in the market for some similar stuff and I have pretty limited art knowledge. Suggestions?

EDIT: Was considering this one. Just the sort of stuff I like, and its seems like its a more famous one. That said, "nude descending stairs #2" might cause problems for the average teenage boy.

Edited by Hooper31
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M. C. Escher is well known for his use of mathematics in his art.

Appreciate the suggestion. But been inundated with Escher stuff my all of my career. Have taught students how to create Escher-like art, and have had some kids with talent create some very cool stuff when I've taught Geometry. I have this one on the wall behind my desk at school that a student of mine created a few years ago. Kind of burned out on Escher.

Edited by Hooper31
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For something that combines recognized artists, fine art, mathematics, and something different than you have already, I'd definitely go for one of the big cubists. Picasso, George Braque, Franz Marc (a personal fave), the one you already posted, etc. To get to the more fractal stuff, Google the artist's name plus the phrase "synthetic cubism," and image search.

A lot of people who like that era of Picasso, but want something a little different (but still easy to find in a print), gravitate toward the Portrait of Ambroise Vollard. Also worth a Google image search.

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For something that combines recognized artists, fine art, mathematics, and something different than you have already, I'd definitely go for one of the big cubists. Picasso, George Braque, Franz Marc (a personal fave), the one you already posted, etc. To get to the more fractal stuff, Google the artist's name plus the phrase "synthetic cubism," and image search.

A lot of people who like that era of Picasso, but want something a little different (but still easy to find in a print), gravitate toward the Portrait of Ambroise Vollard. Also worth a Google image search.

Great suggestions. Saw a few in a cubism search that really addressed what I'm looking for. Could see the attraction to Marc right away. I don't know how to properly describe it, but his big patches of reds, yellows, and oranges would be a good contrast to the stuff I already have. Is that "bold" use of color?

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love the Duchamp posted (and in general)... I find Escher hokey at best.

similar vibe to Nude descending are a lot of the Futurist paintings... check out Boccioni's dynamism of a soccer player- won't create the "nude" problem for teenage boys.

Nice. Did a search of Boccioni and saw quite a few that I would consider as strong candidates. Sort of dig this one, but again its might be a big too much of what I already have.

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I dont get art, but I like watching the Banksy docs. The one on hbo was good about doing a new piece all month in NYC.

Would have loved to but 5 or 6 pieces for $60 each. But I didnt like how they made the doc appear as if banksy had nothing to do with it, yet, they knew about the art sale in central park the day before he announced it

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  • 2 weeks later...

Controversial Illustrations By Spanish Artist Mirror The Ugly Side Of Society (Mostly NSFW despite what it says below)

While these images are safe for work, they’ll still make you feel dirty – and that’s because they reflect some of the dirtiest things about our society. Spanish artist Luis Quiles’ images are so powerful because they evoke deep visceral responses – be they arousal, terror or disgust.

Quiles gets down and dirty with topics like sexism, homophobia, exploitation and violence. He’s got more powerful works spread across his various profiles, but not all of it is safe for work (NSFW) or suitable for minors, so be warned!

Edited by Fennis
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How on earth can this painting be worth 36.5 million?

This Rothko painting (Untitled) just sold at auction for 36.5 million?

Rothko's explanations of his works:

In response to a negative review by the New York Times, Rothko and Gottlieb issued a manifesto (written mainly by Rothko) which stated, in response to the Times critic's self-professed "befuddlement" over the new work,

We favor the simple expression of the complex thought. We are for the large shape because it has the impact of the unequivocal. We wish to reassert the picture plane. We are for flat forms because they destroy illusion and reveal truth." On a more strident note, they took a potshot at those who wanted to live surrounded by less challenging art, noting that their work necessarily "must insult anyone who is spiritually attuned to interior decoration.

Rothko painted in oil only on large canvases with vertical formats. Very large-scale designs were used in order to overwhelm the viewer, or, in Rothko's words, to make the viewer feel "enveloped within" the painting. For some critics, the large size was an attempt to make up for a lack of substance. In retaliation, Rothko stated:

I realize that historically the function of painting large pictures is painting something very grandiose and pompous. The reason I paint them, however . . . is precisely because I want to be very intimate and human. To paint a small picture is to place yourself outside your experience, to look upon an experience as a stereopticon view or with a reducing glass. However you paint the larger picture, you are in it. It isn’t something you command!

He even went so far as to recommend that viewers position themselves as little as eighteen inches away from the canvas so that they might experience a sense of intimacy, as well as awe, a transcendence of the individual, and a sense of the unknown.

Rothko began to insist that he was not an abstractionist and that such a description was as inaccurate as labeling him a great colorist. His interest was:

only in expressing basic human emotions — tragedy, ecstasy, doom, and so on. And the fact that a lot of people break down and cry when confronted with my pictures shows that I can communicate those basic human emotions . . . The people who weep before my pictures are having the same religious experience I had when I painted them. And if you, as you say, are moved only by their color relationship, then you miss the point.

I got married at the Rothko chapel in Houston. Some folks thought it was the most depressing place every for a wedding and we're looking for the paintings. Others thought it was the most spiritual place they had ever been. I am mot a fan of Rothko' s in print.

But, if you see one in person, and just stare at it- not try to decided what it represents, or what it means, or if you could do it- but just stare at it, sometimes your heart might start to race. It happened to me once, and aside from some James Turrell work, I haven't had that experience with art. Sometimes, they open up like a portal, and that rectangle in front of you starts to tremble and vibrate.

It is similar with some Jackson Pollack work. It is one think to stare at the splatters on your tablet. It is another to sit on a bench in the MoMa and just stare at that sucker, or try to follow a line through the composition.

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Rothko and his horizontal color blocks always seemed sort of half-measures and weak attempts at digging into the depths of human aesthetic understanding to me. Now Barnett Newman, on the other hand, there was an artist.

I like the "not to be confused with..." line. http://twentytwowords.com/canvas-painted-blue-with-a-white-line-sells-for-nearly-44-million-4-pictures/

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Rothko and his horizontal color blocks always seemed sort of half-measures and weak attempts at digging into the depths of human aesthetic understanding to me. Now Barnett Newman, on the other hand, there was an artist.

I like the "not to be confused with..." line. http://twentytwowords.com/canvas-painted-blue-with-a-white-line-sells-for-nearly-44-million-4-pictures/

guy paints a whole canavs blue and it's a masterpiece? C'mon man....

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Rothko and his horizontal color blocks always seemed sort of half-measures and weak attempts at digging into the depths of human aesthetic understanding to me. Now Barnett Newman, on the other hand, there was an artist.

I like the "not to be confused with..." line. http://twentytwowords.com/canvas-painted-blue-with-a-white-line-sells-for-nearly-44-million-4-pictures/

guy paints a whole canavs blue and it's a masterpiece? C'mon man....

It is pretty awesome.

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How on earth can this painting be worth 36.5 million?

This Rothko painting (Untitled) just sold at auction for 36.5 million?

Rothko's explanations of his works:

In response to a negative review by the New York Times, Rothko and Gottlieb issued a manifesto (written mainly by Rothko) which stated, in response to the Times critic's self-professed "befuddlement" over the new work,

We favor the simple expression of the complex thought. We are for the large shape because it has the impact of the unequivocal. We wish to reassert the picture plane. We are for flat forms because they destroy illusion and reveal truth." On a more strident note, they took a potshot at those who wanted to live surrounded by less challenging art, noting that their work necessarily "must insult anyone who is spiritually attuned to interior decoration.

Rothko painted in oil only on large canvases with vertical formats. Very large-scale designs were used in order to overwhelm the viewer, or, in Rothko's words, to make the viewer feel "enveloped within" the painting. For some critics, the large size was an attempt to make up for a lack of substance. In retaliation, Rothko stated:

I realize that historically the function of painting large pictures is painting something very grandiose and pompous. The reason I paint them, however . . . is precisely because I want to be very intimate and human. To paint a small picture is to place yourself outside your experience, to look upon an experience as a stereopticon view or with a reducing glass. However you paint the larger picture, you are in it. It isn’t something you command!

He even went so far as to recommend that viewers position themselves as little as eighteen inches away from the canvas so that they might experience a sense of intimacy, as well as awe, a transcendence of the individual, and a sense of the unknown.

Rothko began to insist that he was not an abstractionist and that such a description was as inaccurate as labeling him a great colorist. His interest was:

only in expressing basic human emotions — tragedy, ecstasy, doom, and so on. And the fact that a lot of people break down and cry when confronted with my pictures shows that I can communicate those basic human emotions . . . The people who weep before my pictures are having the same religious experience I had when I painted them. And if you, as you say, are moved only by their color relationship, then you miss the point.

Because some dumb ### will pay that much.

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  • 4 weeks later...

Top 10, maybe Top 5 painting for me on today's Muzei app.

Courbet - The Meeting

Coming out of Romanticism, this was shocking. That's what you're painting? Three guys standing there with a dog?

Critics ridiculed it as "Bonjour, Monsieur Courbet" Big influence on the Impressionists. Light, shadow, outdoors. Love it.

bunch a ####### hipsters

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About 5 or 6 years ago, they had a Courbet exhibit at the Met. If you've never heard of it, one of his most famous paintings is L'Origine du monde ("The Origin of the World")

So at the Met, they have this in a separate, draped area, by itself. Small space like an elevator depth but maybe double wide. Everyone is kinda quiet, looking at that painting. And a mom was there, picks up her daughter and the kid says "Look Mommy, a ######" Everyone just freakin cracked up. It was the perfect viewing.

eta: va-gi-na

See how the edit actually makes you think of different word...lol

Edited by jamny
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I went to the LA County museum of art last night. I didn't enjoy the new modern collection. The photography exhibit was boring as well. The samurai gallery was occupied by a private party :thumbsdown:

Damn, it's probably the same Samurai exhibit that was at the DIA this spring. It was really cool.
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How on earth can this painting be worth 36.5 million?

I wish I could appreciate art sufficiently to get $36.5 million worth of enjoyment out of a painting like that (or even $36.5 worth), but I fear that I'll spend my entire life missing out on that kind of pleasure entirely.

I wish I had the money to buy that. How incredible that must feel.

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