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21 minutes ago, timschochet said:

13. The Caine Mutiny (1954)

Directed by: Edward Dmytryk

Starring: Humphrey Bogart, Fred MacMurray, Van Johnson, Jose Ferrer

Columbia Pictures told Stanley Kramer, the producer of this film, that they were afraid that Herman Wouk's story might be perceived as "anti-military" (this was during the Red Scare), so Kramer puts in lots of scenes glorifying the Navy, along with a message at the beginning of the film about how wonderful US servicemen are. Actually, I found that these inclusions add to the film's likability. 

Most people remember Bogart, of course, because Queeg is at once one of the greatest Hollywood villains ever, but what's really ironic is that he's not the villain of the movie at all- indeed, he's a hero, as the film eventually demonstrates. The true villain is Keefer, played by MacMurray, who was simply a spectacular noir actor before he gave that up to become the fatherly star of My Three Sons. Van Johnson was also terrific as the hero Maryk (Johnson was a gay movie star who tragically had to live in the closet, even to the point of marrying). Robert Francis as Keith had a promising movie career ahead of him, but died only a year later in a plane crash. Jose Ferrer had perhaps the greatest voice in movie history.

Anyhow, this is my favorite of the great old fashioned Hollywood war movies. It's riveting all throughout. And it's also my favorite Bogart role. 

Up next: Six years from now, I'll be back here with my wife and two kids. And I'll see you, and one of my kids will say, "Daddy, who is that?" And I'll say it's not nice to point at single fat women.

 

you are so woke. great picture -

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25 minutes ago, timschochet said:

13. The Caine Mutiny (1954)

Directed by: Edward Dmytryk

Starring: Humphrey Bogart, Fred MacMurray, Van Johnson, Jose Ferrer

 

The post-WWII era was tough on Hollywood.  The studio system was much weaker than the 30s and the industry faced challenges from television and the red scare.  But there were some great war movies that came out in the immediate aftermath.  They struck a more realistic and reflective tone than the jingoism of the war years.  Other great ones included Twelve O'Clock High, Stalag 17, They Were Expendable and Battleground.  I don't think modern viewers can appreciate them same way that contemporary audiences did.

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9 minutes ago, timschochet said:

Yep. It's even in the title. "Favorite".

 

 

 

I'm just wondering why you're getting hammered, then. I'd watch Glory 20 times on rerun before I'd watch any of the Godfather films if I had a choice. I grew up in the 60s/70s, and those New Hollywood movies like The Godfather have not aged well. Hopefully, enough of us older folks will retire and there will be a reassessment of those films by younger critics. I don't think GF1 is even a particularly good movie and GF2 is WAY too long (plus, Pacino is an awful actor and failed miserably having to carry the "modern" portion)

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24 minutes ago, Uruk-Hai said:

I'm just wondering why you're getting hammered, then. I'd watch Glory 20 times on rerun before I'd watch any of the Godfather films if I had a choice. I grew up in the 60s/70s, and those New Hollywood movies like The Godfather have not aged well. Hopefully, enough of us older folks will retire and there will be a reassessment of those films by younger critics. I don't think GF1 is even a particularly good movie and GF2 is WAY too long (plus, Pacino is an awful actor and failed miserably having to carry the "modern" portion)

You're going too far for me. I simply can't agree with you. Both are, IMO, incredibly entertaining films- the first significantly more than the second. 

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4 minutes ago, Uruk-Hai said:

I'm just wondering why you're getting hammered, then. I'd watch Glory 20 times on rerun before I'd watch any of the Godfather films if I had a choice. I grew up in the 60s/70s, and those New Hollywood movies like The Godfather have not aged well. Hopefully, enough of us older folks will retire and there will be a reassessment of those films by younger critics. I don't think GF1 is even a particularly good movie and GF2 is WAY too long (plus, Pacino is an awful actor and failed miserably having to carry the "modern" portion)

The Godfather films have aged better than Pacino has.

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1 minute ago, timschochet said:

You're going too far for me. I simply can't agree with you. Both are, IMO, incredibly entertaining films- the first significantly more than the second. 

:shrug:

I don't think they suck, and I can appreciate the craft.

No one will ever convince me that Pacino was a good actor in those films, though. 

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55 minutes ago, Mr. Mojo said:

I have yet to see a Humphrey Bogart film that wasn't good.

He was a one of a kind.

Agree, he might have the highest hit rate ever. (As great movies go)

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3 hours ago, Eephus said:

The post-WWII era was tough on Hollywood.  The studio system was much weaker than the 30s and the industry faced challenges from television and the red scare.  But there were some great war movies that came out in the immediate aftermath.  They struck a more realistic and reflective tone than the jingoism of the war years.  Other great ones included Twelve O'Clock High, Stalag 17, They Were Expendable and Battleground.  I don't think modern viewers can appreciate them same way that contemporary audiences did.

Post WW2 was great, one of best in film history 

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23 hours ago, John Maddens Lunchbox said:

I think he was miscast, but acquitted himself well. Coming off Ferris Bueller it was hard to get that role out of your head. The more I've watched this movie, the better Broderick gets. If you think about the age the guy Broderick was playing would have been, the fresh face isnt that out of place. A more assured officer wouldnt have got that job and Broderick conveys naivete well.

I found him to be distractingly stiff and awkward in this movie. I realize he was probably going for stiff in the role, assuming that was how a person of that class/station would comport themselves in that era, but it just didn't come off convincingly. It was particularly glaring to me because there were so many other actors knocking it out of the park in the same film. And I've got nothing against Broderick in general (I think he was perfect in Election).

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17 hours ago, BobbyLayne said:

You're fine calling them the 54th Massachusetts, but their historical is 54th Massachusetts (Colored) Volunteer Infantry. Commonly referred to that in numerous books & websites. Though you have to wonder where the parenthetical reference came from? The 175 federal regiments were called USCT, but the state regiments didn't seem to use the C word in their title (think there was like 6 state regiments.) pretty minor point.

Hey don't go around spreading the truth, they won't like it.

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14 hours ago, Mr. Mojo said:

I have yet to see a Humphrey Bogart film that wasn't good.

He was a one of a kind.

 

13 hours ago, timschochet said:

Greatest movie star of all time IMO.

No one said lines like they just came into his head like Bogie. And you can have your Waynes & Schwarzeneggers & Rocks - Bogie's ordinary men doing extraordinary things are 100x more heroic than any of em without an ounce of leaping, riding, running, strafing or sweating because they have the fear, doubt, corruption, honor and purpose of a real person within em.

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7 minutes ago, wikkidpissah said:

 

No one said lines like they just came into his head like Bogie. And you can have your Waynes & Schwarzeneggers & Rocks - Bogie's ordinary men doing extraordinary things are 100x more heroic than any of em without an ounce of leaping, riding, running, strafing or sweating because they have the fear, doubt, corruption, honor and purpose of a real person within em.

Agreed. I think Harrison Ford has some of that quality as well. 

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But Bogart had another dimension to him that Ford and others like the ones WP mentioned did not: all thoroughout his career, he often played the villain as well as the hero. As I pointed out The Caine Mutiny is somewhat complicated: Queeg is paranoid and small-minded but not truly a villain. But in another film I love from a year earlier, The Desperate Hours, Bogie plays an escaped convict and killer who is pure evil. 

Most Hollywood stars back then, and some to this day, are typecast: if moviegoers perceive them as good guys, they don't play bad guys. When's the last time Tom Cruise played the villain? Bogart was one of the great exceptions to this rule. Jack Nicholson is another. 

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Bogart's best performance,  IMO, is in In A Lonely Place.

It's so nuanced and he shows what acting is ALL about in the last 15 minutes. An absolute clinic. I can't think of many times (any?) where I shared the character's emotions as much.

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I most intensely remember my first Bogie experience. I knew who he was cuz he was big when i was a kid and my uncle & dad's college buds were always imitating him but i hadn't really seen him til a sick day when the Dialing-for-Dollars movie had this stoopit thing of Bette Davis & a gay guy arguing about poetry outside a gas station in the desert. I had a fever & was waiting for soup so i didnt get up and change the channel. Then a gangster car pulled up and this sweaty, unshaven guy gets out and looks at everybody like he's deciding whether to shoot em or bite their nose off. And he's scared and he's mad and obnoxious and cool at the same time and he's making everybody be scared and mad and sweaty too cuz he's gotta hole up and wait for dis dame, see?! And it was just the bossest ####in thing i ever saw. I can still feel Bogie's Duke Mantee inside me in turbulent times.

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On 12/7/2015 at 10:20 PM, timschochet said:

HISS: May I say for the record at this point, that I would like to invite Mr. Whittaker Chambers to make these same statements out of the presence of this committee without their being privileged for suit and libel. I challenge you to do it, and I hope you will do it damned quickly...

Yaknow, I can't help but think Trump forcing Comey to appear to unfurl the FISA warrant to disprove Trump's claims isn't going to end well.

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12. Broadcast News (1987)

Directed by: James L. Brooks

Starring: Holly Hunter, William Hurt, Albert Brooks

In a way, this movie is a companion piece to Network, in that, filmed a decade later, it continues to show the deterioration of the news media into entertainment. But although its not as creative or as sharply written as that previous film, I find it more entertaining because it's three main characters are so well defined. Broadcast News is, above all else, a romantic comedy, and it works because we believe in and empathize with its stars.

Holly Hunter gives IMO the best performance of her career as the modern American executive woman, brilliant and obsessive-compulsive, yet insecure. Her character would have been impossible ten years earlier (Faye Dunaway's Diane Christensen is a caricature by comparison). Albert Brooks plays, well, Albert Brooks, as he does in the previous two movies I have placed on my list (Lost in America and Defending Your Life). But he's very good at this role, and he's given a lot of great snarky lines to work with. But between the 3 of them, perhaps the guy with the hardest acting job is William Hurt, because he has to come off as well-meaning, very good at what he does (network anchorman), but somewhat stupid, yet real. The last two words are what makes it so difficult- Hurt could have easily played this like Ted Knight from The Mary Tyler Moore Show, but he's going for a deeper pathos than that, and he achieves it.

The movie also features some great supporting characters (particularly Joan Cusack and Jack Nicholson), and like all James L. Brooks movies is expertly written in a witty style that Aaron Sorkin would come to imitate.

Up Next: I've done my share of bootlegging. Up 'ere, if you engage in what the federal government calls 'illegal activity,' but what we call 'just a man tryin' to make a livin' for his family sellin' moonshine liquor,' it behooves oneself to keep his wits. Long story short, we hear a story too good to be true... it ain't.

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On 3/18/2017 at 10:50 AM, Andy Dufresne said:

Bogart's best performance,  IMO, is in In A Lonely Place.

It's so nuanced and he shows what acting is ALL about in the last 15 minutes. An absolute clinic. I can't think of many times (any?) where I shared the character's emotions as much.

Just grabbed this one at the library yesterday. 

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11. Inglorious Basterds (2009)

Directed by: Quentin Tarantino

Starring: Brad Pitt, Christoph Waltz, Melanie Laurent

Just a fantastic, entertaining film in so many ways. There are a number of great Hollywood WWII movies that I love but was forced to leave off my list, including, in no particular order, The Great Escape, The Dirty Dozen, The Guns of Navarone, The Eagle Has Landed, Where Eagles Dare, Stalag 17. Tarantino borrows from all of these and from numerous other sources as well in order to tell his fantasy story about killing Hitler. And that's awesome, because everything works in this movie: the tension, suspense, humor, acting, directing, is all top notch. 

Christoph Waltz has the role of a lifetime here, for which he'll no doubt always be remembered. Brad Pitt is fine in a caricature role. Michael Fassbinder is only on screen for a few minutes but is extremely memorable, as is Eli Roth. And then there's Til Schweiger, so ####### awesome. I'm going to have to watch this movie again. So great. 

Up next: I'm going to be a great film star! That is, if booze and sex don't get me first.

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8 minutes ago, timschochet said:

11. Inglorious Basterds (2009)

Directed by: Quentin Tarantino

Starring: Brad Pitt, Christoph Waltz, Melanie Laurent

Just a fantastic, entertaining film in so many ways. There are a number of great Hollywood WWII movies that I love but was forced to leave off my list, including, in no particular order, The Great Escape, The Dirty Dozen, The Guns of Navarone, The Eagle Has Landed, Where Eagles Dare, Stalag 17. Tarantino borrows from all of these and from numerous other sources as well in order to tell his fantasy story about killing Hitler. And that's awesome, because everything works in this movie: the tension, suspense, humor, acting, directing, is all top notch. 

Christoph Waltz has the role of a lifetime here, for which he'll no doubt always be remembered. Brad Pitt is fine in a caricature role. Michael Fassbinder is only on screen for a few minutes but is extremely memorable, as is Eli Roth. And then there's Til Schweiger, so ####### awesome. I'm going to have to watch this movie again. So great. 

Up next: I'm going to be a great film star! That is, if booze and sex don't get me first.

Huh.  Number 11?  It barely cracks the Tarantino top 11 for me.  

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On 3/17/2017 at 5:29 PM, timschochet said:

Yep. It's even in the title. "Favorite".

If I were ranking the BEST films of all time (which I am not at all qualified to do,) I would probably end up including some movies in my top 10 that aren't anywhere on this list: such as:  

Citizen Kane

8 1/2

2001: A Space Odyssey

Other movies that are not on this list but would have to be on that one, in no particular order:

Sunset Boulevard

The Seventh Seal

Gone With the Wind

The Wizard of Oz

Casablanca

To Kill A Mockingbird

Psycho

Vertigo

Rear Window

Persona

The Grand Illusion

City Lights

The Graduate

 

 

 

:wub:

 

I don't know why you won't admit to loving this one.

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10. Cabaret (1972)

Directed by: Bob Fosse

Starring: Liza Minelli, Michael York, Joel Grey

My top ten films are going to involve longer write-ups.

Although I am a huge fan of the Broadway musical, I don't generally like their adaptions to the big screen. Something usually is missing- even films that a lot of Broadway fans love, like Chicago or My Fair Lady, I only like. Obviously, Cabaret is an exception to that rule. There are several reasons why:

First off is that, with only one exceptions, all of the songs in this musical are onstage, part of the Cabaret show, and are not directly incidental to the plot. They are, in a sense, intermissions to the story of Christopher Isherwood's life in Weimar Germany. (Michael York plays Brian Roberts, heavily based on the gay, Communist Isherwood.) The exception is of course "Tomorrow Belongs to Me", which has got to be one of the most chilling scenes ever produced on film, in which Hitler Youth sing beautifully about the rise of the Nazi Party. In this one scene, Fosse captures brilliantly the lure of fascism as a return to old values, just as he brilliantly captures the growing anti-Semitism in the ballad "If You Could See Her" (in which the MC is comically in love with a gorilla, only to reveal that the gorilla is Jewish at the end of the song.) 

There is more. The Weimar era featured German Expressionism, one of the most pivotal art movements of the 20th century, featuring painters such as George Grosz and Otto Dix (later banned by Joseph Goebbels as "Decadent Art") films such as Metropolis, and architecture like the Bauhaus movement. Bob Fosse takes all these and imitates them in his camera work and costumes, particularly in the nightclub: his camera shots are direct copies of Grosz paintings from the era (and no, I'm no art expert; but my wife was an art major at UCLA and she exposed me to "Decadent Art" along with an exhibit several years back at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.) As a result, I can watch this movie dozens of times (I have) and see something new each time. 

The music, by Kander and Ebb, is marvelous, and both Joel Gray and Liza Minelli give fantastic singing performances. Minelli in particular reaches her peak in this film, and she's largely been a caricature of herself ever since, becoming victim to the pills and liquor that she bemoans in the film (and which also plagued her mother of course.) But in the movie, particularly in the songs "Maybe This Time" and "Cabaret", she matches her mom in soulfulness and rises to the level of greatest vocalist in a movie ever. 

Despite several of the songs being of a playful nature (actually all of them have deadly serious themes) this is a dark, depressing movie about the rise of Nazi Germany on the one hand and the loss of a decadent soul (Minelli as Sally Bowles) on the other. Sally flirts with a normal life all throughout the film, if only she can find stable love from York, or a stable financial existence (from a debauched millionaire who abandons her and York). In the end she can't have either and returns to her inner destruction as the outer world collapses around her. But it's OK, she sings, because "Life is a cabaret", and she has no regrets. Fosse would expand on this theme a few years later in All That Jazz, an autobiographical film that deals with cancer, which is just as brilliant but, for my money, far less enjoyable. THIS movie, however, is both art for art's sake and fun to watch. 

Up next: I feel that life is divided into the horrible and the miserable. That's the two categories. The horrible are like, I don't know, terminal cases, you know, and blind people, crippled. I don't know how they get through life. It's amazing to me. And the miserable is everyone else. So you should be thankful that you're miserable, because that's very lucky, to be miserable.

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6 minutes ago, timschochet said:

10. Cabaret (1972)

Directed by: Bob Fosse

Starring: Liza Minelli, Michael York, Joel Grey

My top ten films are going to involve longer write-ups.

Although I am a huge fan of the Broadway musical, I don't generally like their adaptions to the big screen. Something usually is missing- even films that a lot of Broadway fans love, like Chicago or My Fair Lady, I only like. Obviously, Cabaret is an exception to that rule. There are several reasons why:

First off is that, with only one exceptions, all of the songs in this musical are onstage, part of the Cabaret show, and are not directly incidental to the plot. They are, in a sense, intermissions to the story of Christopher Isherwood's life in Weimar Germany. (Michael York plays Brian Roberts, heavily based on the gay, Communist Isherwood.) The exception is of course "Tomorrow Belongs to Me", which has got to be one of the most chilling scenes ever produced on film, in which Hitler Youth sing beautifully about the rise of the Nazi Party. In this one scene, Fosse captures brilliantly the lure of fascism as a return to old values, just as he brilliantly captures the growing anti-Semitism in the ballad "If You Could See Her" (in which the MC is comically in love with a gorilla, only to reveal that the gorilla is Jewish at the end of the song.) 

There is more. The Weimar era featured German Expressionism, one of the most pivotal art movements of the 20th century, featuring painters such as George Grosz and Otto Dix (later banned by Joseph Goebbels as "Decadent Art") films such as Metropolis, and architecture like the Bauhaus movement. Bob Fosse takes all these and imitates them in his camera work and costumes, particularly in the nightclub: his camera shots are direct copies of Grosz paintings from the era (and no, I'm no art expert; but my wife was an art major at UCLA and she exposed me to "Decadent Art" along with an exhibit several years back at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.) As a result, I can watch this movie dozens of times (I have) and see something new each time. 

The music, by Kander and Ebb, is marvelous, and both Joel Gray and Liza Minelli give fantastic singing performances. Minelli in particular reaches her peak in this film, and she's largely been a caricature of herself ever since, becoming victim to the pills and liquor that she bemoans in the film (and which also plagued her mother of course.) But in the movie, particularly in the songs "Maybe This Time" and "Cabaret", she matches her mom in soulfulness and rises to the level of greatest vocalist in a movie ever. 

Despite several of the songs being of a playful nature (actually all of them have deadly serious themes) this is a dark, depressing movie about the rise of Nazi Germany on the one hand and the loss of a decadent soul (Minelli as Sally Bowles) on the other. Sally flirts with a normal life all throughout the film, if only she can find stable love from York, or a stable financial existence (from a debauched millionaire who abandons her and York). In the end she can't have either and returns to her inner destruction as the outer world collapses around her. But it's OK, she sings, because "Life is a cabaret", and she has no regrets. Fosse would expand on this theme a few years later in All That Jazz, an autobiographical film that deals with cancer, which is just as brilliant but, for my money, far less enjoyable. THIS movie, however, is both art for art's sake and fun to watch. 

Up next: I feel that life is divided into the horrible and the miserable. That's the two categories. The horrible are like, I don't know, terminal cases, you know, and blind people, crippled. I don't know how they get through life. It's amazing to me. And the miserable is everyone else. So you should be thankful that you're miserable, because that's very lucky, to be miserable.

If this movie didn't show me that a movie musical can actually tell stories BETTER than dramas when done right, i never would have devoted the last 6 yrs to writing one of my own, so i thank Kander, Ebb & Fosse for sending me on the greatest journey of my life. That said, the 2nd act drags until the payoff, especially if Liza Minelli is an acquired taste for one. I'd actually like to see Sam Mendes try filming the version he and my cousin staged @ Studio54 so successfully in the late 90s - less heft but more snap.

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6 minutes ago, wikkidpissah said:

If this movie didn't show me that a movie musical can actually tell stories BETTER than dramas when done right, i never would have devoted the last 6 yrs to writing one of my own, so i thank Kander, Ebb & Fosse for sending me on the greatest journey of my life. That said, the 2nd act drags until the payoff, especially if Liza Minelli is an acquired taste for one. I'd actually like to see Sam Mendes try filming the version he and my cousin staged @ Studio54 so successfully in the late 90s - less heft but more snap.

I saw that version- or at least I think I did. The Los Angeles tour in the late 90s featured Teri Hatcher as Sally, and Michael C. Hall as the emcee (though at the time I had no idea who he was.) But your cousin was involved in that? Pretty awesome. :thumbup: 

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I loved that late 90s stage version but it was very different from the film and takes nothing away from the film- except for the end. At the very end of that show, the cast came out all wearing concentration camp outfits- the striped uniforms of Auschwitz victims. The message was obvious- a bit over obvious and over the top. I thought that it was an unnecessary attempt to bludgeon the audience. But other than that, excellent. 

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Cabaret is a wonderful film that seems to get overlooked a bit today.  It was made at a transition point for Hollywood musicals.  The 60s had lots of big budget, prestige musicals ranging from the ridiculous (Finnian's Rainbow, Paint Your Wagon) to the sublime (West Side Story, The Sound of Music) that had their origins on Broadway.  The 70s brought rock-influenced music into musicals with adapted rock operas and Andrew Lloyd Webber.  Cabaret was a period piece so it was able to avoid the trends of its era.  Along with the influences Tim noted, there are strains of Kurt Weill and Bertolt Brecht in the mix as well.  Cabaret was either the last musical from one era or the first of a new set of more serious musicals.  I would probably argue the latter because of the way the songs are integrated into the script.  The musical numbers are edited into the story rather than the actors suddenly breaking into song in the middle of a scene.  In either event, it was the last musical to be nominated for a Best Picture Oscar for nearly three decades.   The 1960s had averaged almost one nominated musical per year.

Cabaret is perfectly cast and strikingly choreographed.  As Tim mentioned, the production design borrows heavily from Neue Sachlichkeit art and has in turn shaped viewers perspectives of what Weimar Germany must have been like.  It's hard to believe it's been longer from the release of Cabaret to the present than it was between the rise of Hitler and the making of the film.

 

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Just now, timschochet said:

I loved that late 90s stage version but it was very different from the film and takes nothing away from the film- except for the end. At the very end of that show, the cast came out all wearing concentration camp outfits- the striped uniforms of Auschwitz victims. The message was obvious- a bit over obvious and over the top. I thought that it was an unnecessary attempt to bludgeon the audience. But other than that, excellent. 

The Fosse film was different from the stage play.  The characters from the rooming house featured more in the original production.

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15 minutes ago, timschochet said:

I saw that version- or at least I think I did. The Los Angeles tour in the late 90s featured Teri Hatcher as Sally, and Michael C. Hall as the emcee (though at the time I had no idea who he was.) But your cousin was involved in that? Pretty awesome. :thumbup: 

Yeah - same one who directed the movie of Chicago. Sam Mendes had staged Cabaret in London a few years before but was having trouble getting Broadway to do it until Hal Prince, who directed the original, helped him - at the cost of co-directing it w my cousin, who'd just choreographed Kiss of the Spider Woman for Prince. Within a couple of years, both Cabaret revival co-directors directed Best Picture movies in each their first attempts.

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8 minutes ago, wikkidpissah said:

Judi Dench was the first Sally Bowles

I'm sure Dame Dench and Liza with a Zed get mistaken for each other all the time.

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1 hour ago, timschochet said:

10. Cabaret (1972)

Directed by: Bob Fosse

Starring: Liza Minelli, Michael York, Joel Grey

My top ten films are going to involve longer write-ups.

Although I am a huge fan of the Broadway musical, I don't generally like their adaptions to the big screen. Something usually is missing- even films that a lot of Broadway fans love, like Chicago or My Fair Lady, I only like. Obviously, Cabaret is an exception to that rule. There are several reasons why:

First off is that, with only one exceptions, all of the songs in this musical are onstage, part of the Cabaret show, and are not directly incidental to the plot. They are, in a sense, intermissions to the story of Christopher Isherwood's life in Weimar Germany. (Michael York plays Brian Roberts, heavily based on the gay, Communist Isherwood.) The exception is of course "Tomorrow Belongs to Me", which has got to be one of the most chilling scenes ever produced on film, in which Hitler Youth sing beautifully about the rise of the Nazi Party. In this one scene, Fosse captures brilliantly the lure of fascism as a return to old values, just as he brilliantly captures the growing anti-Semitism in the ballad "If You Could See Her" (in which the MC is comically in love with a gorilla, only to reveal that the gorilla is Jewish at the end of the song.) 

There is more. The Weimar era featured German Expressionism, one of the most pivotal art movements of the 20th century, featuring painters such as George Grosz and Otto Dix (later banned by Joseph Goebbels as "Decadent Art") films such as Metropolis, and architecture like the Bauhaus movement. Bob Fosse takes all these and imitates them in his camera work and costumes, particularly in the nightclub: his camera shots are direct copies of Grosz paintings from the era (and no, I'm no art expert; but my wife was an art major at UCLA and she exposed me to "Decadent Art" along with an exhibit several years back at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.) As a result, I can watch this movie dozens of times (I have) and see something new each time. 

The music, by Kander and Ebb, is marvelous, and both Joel Gray and Liza Minelli give fantastic singing performances. Minelli in particular reaches her peak in this film, and she's largely been a caricature of herself ever since, becoming victim to the pills and liquor that she bemoans in the film (and which also plagued her mother of course.) But in the movie, particularly in the songs "Maybe This Time" and "Cabaret", she matches her mom in soulfulness and rises to the level of greatest vocalist in a movie ever. 

Despite several of the songs being of a playful nature (actually all of them have deadly serious themes) this is a dark, depressing movie about the rise of Nazi Germany on the one hand and the loss of a decadent soul (Minelli as Sally Bowles) on the other. Sally flirts with a normal life all throughout the film, if only she can find stable love from York, or a stable financial existence (from a debauched millionaire who abandons her and York). In the end she can't have either and returns to her inner destruction as the outer world collapses around her. But it's OK, she sings, because "Life is a cabaret", and she has no regrets. Fosse would expand on this theme a few years later in All That Jazz, an autobiographical film that deals with cancer, which is just as brilliant but, for my money, far less enjoyable. THIS movie, however, is both art for art's sake and fun to watch. 

Up next: I feel that life is divided into the horrible and the miserable. That's the two categories. The horrible are like, I don't know, terminal cases, you know, and blind people, crippled. I don't know how they get through life. It's amazing to me. And the miserable is everyone else. So you should be thankful that you're miserable, because that's very lucky, to be miserable.

We did this show my junior year in high school.  Talk about controversial.  We did the whole shebang, including If you Could See Her and Two Ladies.  I played Ernst Ludwig and led Tomorrow Belongs to Me which ended with nearly the entire cast frozen giving the Nazi salute in front of huge Swastika flags as the lights died to end the Act.  Not the lightest of fair for the local high schoolers to tackle.  Add to that the fact that we had girls as young as 14 in garters and fishnets dancing provocatively on stage as Kit Kat girls, and it was a bit of a controversial dust up in our town (Irvine, by the way, Tim).

Probably the greatest show I've ever been a part of.  The two cast members who played Sally and the Emcee (both of whom were Jewish) were phenomenally talented.  They won all sorts of state wide awards.

Apologies for the "look at me" diversion.

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On 3/18/2017 at 0:12 PM, wikkidpissah said:

I most intensely remember my first Bogie experience. I knew who he was cuz he was big when i was a kid and my uncle & dad's college buds were always imitating him but i hadn't really seen him til a sick day when the Dialing-for-Dollars movie had this stoopit thing of Bette Davis & a gay guy arguing about poetry outside a gas station in the desert. I had a fever & was waiting for soup so i didnt get up and change the channel. Then a gangster car pulled up and this sweaty, unshaven guy gets out and looks at everybody like he's deciding whether to shoot em or bite their nose off. And he's scared and he's mad and obnoxious and cool at the same time and he's making everybody be scared and mad and sweaty too cuz he's gotta hole up and wait for dis dame, see?! And it was just the bossest ####in thing i ever saw. I can still feel Bogie's Duke Mantee inside me in turbulent times.

Petrified Forest is really good. Bogey and young Bette!

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4 minutes ago, Ilov80s said:

Petrified Forest is really good. Bogey and young Bette!

It's very stagey and hasn't aged well IMO.  Bogart is very good though.

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13 minutes ago, Eephus said:

It's very stagey and hasn't aged well IMO.  Bogart is very good though.

It's definitely a clear adaptation but I've only seen it once (about a year ago) and I thought it was real good. 

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9. Annie Hall (1977)

Directed by: Woody Allen

Starring: Woody Allen, Diane Keaton, Tony Roberts

Can a movie be both dated and timeless at the same time?

Annie Hall is certainly dated; it is solely focused on the very specific culture of 1970s New York Jewish liberal intellectual elites, and the types of restaurants and movies they visited, books they read, associations they made, etc. At the same time, this movie is a masterful study of human relationships that extend far beyond that decade. The love affair between Alvy and Annie is timeless and extremely relevant to modern society, in the same way that great art like Romeo and Juliet remains relevant.

Allen is a huge fan of the European filmmakers Bergman and Fellini, and he "borrows" (the appropriate word might be "steals") several things that they originated in this movie: the cinematography at times is pure Fellini, such as the conversations in the car or the two guys walking down the street (which the camera only sees at a distance.) The scenes in which the subtitles show what Alvy and Annie are thinking, when they magically get to visit Annie's old boyfriends, when Alvy is confronted by his childhood classmates, and particularly the brilliant scene in which Annie steps outside of herself while having sex in order to read a book, are all Bergman. But as innovative as those two directors are, I find their films boring and difficult to watch, frankly. Annie Hall is not, mainly because of Allen and Marshall Brickman's sharp writing and Allen's irreverent, hilarious humor which carries the film. Of course there are so many classic funny scenes, with the Marshall McLuhan movie line leading the way.

Another reason this movie is so great and timeless is Diane Keaton's superb acting in her greatest role. She begins the film as insecure, but her relationship with Alvy makes her far more confident (and this is symbolized in the film by her two nightclub performances, in which the viewer is able to see a completely different woman.) Carol Kane, Shelly Duval, Paul Simon and ESPECIALLY Christopher Walken (as Annie's creepy brother) all shine in small but memorable roles. Although I love several Woody Allen movies (all listed here) this one is easily his best for me, even if it's message is a bit more depressing than Hannah and Her Sisters. Is love really doomed? Should we truly be thankful that we're only miserable and not worse?

One final note- my daughter who is a huge Broadway fan made me watch The Last Five Years recently, which I enjoyed. The music was very good. But I realized afterwards that the storyline is simply a more modern version of Annie Hall.

Up next: We'd better get back, 'cause it'll be dark soon, and they mostly come at night... mostly.

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Never mind - you contradicted yourself a million times in your first paragraph. I had a bunch of stuff written out but have since deleted it.

Looking forward to your next choice and the text!

 

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1 hour ago, timschochet said:

9. Annie Hall (1977)

Directed by: Woody Allen

Starring: Woody Allen, Diane Keaton, Tony Roberts

Can a movie be both dated and timeless at the same time?

Annie Hall is certainly dated; it is solely focused on the very specific culture of 1970s New York Jewish liberal intellectual elites, and the types of restaurants and movies they visited, books they read, associations they made, etc. At the same time, this movie is a masterful study of human relationships that extend far beyond that decade. The love affair between Alvy and Annie is timeless and extremely relevant to modern society, in the same way that great art like Romeo and Juliet remains relevant.

Allen is a huge fan of the European filmmakers Bergman and Fellini, and he "borrows" (the appropriate word might be "steals") several things that they originated in this movie: the cinematography at times is pure Fellini, such as the conversations in the car or the two guys walking down the street (which the camera only sees at a distance.) The scenes in which the subtitles show what Alvy and Annie are thinking, when they magically get to visit Annie's old boyfriends, when Alvy is confronted by his childhood classmates, and particularly the brilliant scene in which Annie steps outside of herself while having sex in order to read a book, are all Bergman. But as innovative as those two directors are, I find their films boring and difficult to watch, frankly. Annie Hall is not, mainly because of Allen and Marshall Brickman's sharp writing and Allen's irreverent, hilarious humor which carries the film. Of course there are so many classic funny scenes, with the Marshall McLuhan movie line leading the way.

Another reason this movie is so great and timeless is Diane Keaton's superb acting in her greatest role. She begins the film as insecure, but her relationship with Alvy makes her far more confident (and this is symbolized in the film by her two nightclub performances, in which the viewer is able to see a completely different woman.) Carol Kane, Shelly Duval, Paul Simon and ESPECIALLY Christopher Walken (as Annie's creepy brother) all shine in small but memorable roles. Although I love several Woody Allen movies (all listed here) this one is easily his best for me, even if it's message is a bit more depressing than Hannah and Her Sisters. Is love really doomed? Should we truly be thankful that we're only miserable and not worse?

One final note- my daughter who is a huge Broadway fan made me watch The Last Five Years recently, which I enjoyed. The music was very good. But I realized afterwards that the storyline is simply a more modern version of Annie Hall.

Up next: We'd better get back, 'cause it'll be dark soon, and they mostly come at night... mostly.

Easily the most important Boomer movie - as big as Star Wars to GenX. The counterculture largely improvised its tearing down of old mores and really hadnt given much thought to how to live as long as it was new. Allen gave us the look at ourselves which really helped many of us decide which way to go. 

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