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22 hours ago, Don Quixote said:

Bump for the conjunction of Jupiter and Saturn tonight. It has been too cloudy to see them the past couple of nights by me — hoping for clearer weather tonight.

I checked it out last night. Pretty cool stuff.

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Juno mission is extended for another 3 years.  More splendid photos!!  The shot here is from only 9600 miles above the "surface"

Am I the only one who gets way too excited when this thread gets bumped? I love hearing about new discoveries in astronomy specifically and science in general. 

Yes, they showed the picture.   link

Fun night last night.  Set the telescope up on the sidewalk and ended up having 20-30 people walk by.  We have a marina in the neighborhood everyone walked too for a good view, they all stopped by on the way home.  

I really don't think a lot of people knew what they were looking at at the beginning of the night.   Some of the kids had their mind blown when they looked in the scope.  They had no idea you could see Jupiter and Saturn like that. 

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5 minutes ago, jb1020 said:

Fun night last night.  Set the telescope up on the sidewalk and ended up having 20-30 people walk by.  We have a marina in the neighborhood everyone walked too for a good view, they all stopped by on the way home.  

I really don't think a lot of people knew what they were looking at at the beginning of the night.   Some of the kids had their mind blown when they looked in the scope.  They had no idea you could see Jupiter and Saturn like that. 

Very cool to share like that. Not to be a Debbie downer, but were you worried about covid transmission?

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Just now, The Z Machine said:

Very cool to share like that. Not to be a Debbie downer, but were you worried about covid transmission?

No one was touching the scope at all.  and they all came by in groups of 5-6.    So not really.

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11 hours ago, jb1020 said:

Fun night last night.  Set the telescope up on the sidewalk and ended up having 20-30 people walk by.  We have a marina in the neighborhood everyone walked too for a good view, they all stopped by on the way home.  

I really don't think a lot of people knew what they were looking at at the beginning of the night.   Some of the kids had their mind blown when they looked in the scope.  They had no idea you could see Jupiter and Saturn like that. 

Had an old scope and brought it out for this.  Was able to see both planets and Jupiter's four moons.  

Really cool. 

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  • 4 weeks later...
On 7/29/2020 at 9:00 PM, El Floppo said:
On 7/29/2020 at 8:05 PM, The Man With No Name said:

Been looking forward to this since they first announced it...hope I wake up in time :bag:

Should arrive Feb 18.

UAE orbiter will arrive Feb 9 and drop off its payload of bangladeshi workers who are happy to be anywhere else other than slaving in the UAE.

China arrives a few days later and will orbit for a month or two looking for a good spot to drop their first rover. Probably on top of the bangladeshi workers.

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Artemis 1 is supposed to head to the moon to orbit and set up the planned 2024 manned trip back to the moon. All of conditional at this point on budget vis a vis the pandemic and new administration.

Just saw in my college alum magazine that an alum is one of the main dudes in Space Force. The armed service, not the show 

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First of three Mars missions arrives today...

"The United Arab Emirates' first mission to Mars arrives at the red planet on Tuesday and will attempt a tricky maneuver to place it in orbit. The Emirates Mars Mission is known as the Hope Probe, and it is expected to arrive at Mars and send back a signal at 10:42 a.m. ET."

Needs to do a hard burn to make it into orbit...fingers crossed.

ETA...they'll be doing the most complete study of the martian atmosphere if successful.

Edited by El Floppo
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36 minutes ago, El Floppo said:

First of three Mars missions arrives today...

"The United Arab Emirates' first mission to Mars arrives at the red planet on Tuesday and will attempt a tricky maneuver to place it in orbit. The Emirates Mars Mission is known as the Hope Probe, and it is expected to arrive at Mars and send back a signal at 10:42 a.m. ET."

Needs to do a hard burn to make it into orbit...fingers crossed.

ETA...they'll be doing the most complete study of the martian atmosphere if successful.

GLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLL

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3 hours ago, El Floppo said:

First of three Mars missions arrives today...

"The United Arab Emirates' first mission to Mars arrives at the red planet on Tuesday and will attempt a tricky maneuver to place it in orbit. The Emirates Mars Mission is known as the Hope Probe, and it is expected to arrive at Mars and send back a signal at 10:42 a.m. ET."

Needs to do a hard burn to make it into orbit...fingers crossed.

ETA...they'll be doing the most complete study of the martian atmosphere if successful.

Success!

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It seems like these missions to the moon, Mars, etc. are improving their probability of success.  For every Indian smash into the surface, it seems there are 5 successful landings / orbital insertions.  I wonder if it's learning from experience (although the UAE had none) or if technology and simulations are helping out here.

Making reliable rockets still seems the most daunting part. 

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China's Tianwen-1 is thought to be arriving today to attempt the same maneuver (they're being more secretive about exact time/day). Apparently 50% of these missions have failed.

This will be an orbiter, lander and golfcart sized rover. The landimg is expected to be attempted in a couple months.

"As detailed by the article in Nature, there are five core science objectives first laid out in 2018:

Create a geological map of Mars

Explore the characteristics of the Martian soil and potentially locate water-ice deposits

Analyze the surface material composition

Investigate the Martian atmosphere and climate at the surface

Understand the electromagnetic and gravitational fields of the planet

The orbiter is equipped with seven instruments. It contains two cameras, a subsurface penetrating radar, a spectrometer to reveal the mineral composition of the surface and instruments to analyze charged particles in the Martian atmosphere. 

The rover, which is about twice the mass of China's lunar Yutu-2 rover at around 240 kilograms (530 pounds), contains six instruments and also includes two cameras, as well as radar and three detectors which can be used to understand the soil composition and magnetic fields of Mars."

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6 hours ago, El Floppo said:

China's Tianwen-1 is thought to be arriving today to attempt the same maneuver (they're being more secretive about exact time/day). Apparently 50% of these missions have failed.

This will be an orbiter, lander and golfcart sized rover. The landimg is expected to be attempted in a couple months.

"As detailed by the article in Nature, there are five core science objectives first laid out in 2018:

Create a geological map of Mars

Explore the characteristics of the Martian soil and potentially locate water-ice deposits

Analyze the surface material composition

Investigate the Martian atmosphere and climate at the surface

Understand the electromagnetic and gravitational fields of the planet

The orbiter is equipped with seven instruments. It contains two cameras, a subsurface penetrating radar, a spectrometer to reveal the mineral composition of the surface and instruments to analyze charged particles in the Martian atmosphere. 

The rover, which is about twice the mass of China's lunar Yutu-2 rover at around 240 kilograms (530 pounds), contains six instruments and also includes two cameras, as well as radar and three detectors which can be used to understand the soil composition and magnetic fields of Mars."

Success!

 

 

Things not looking good for NASA on the 18th if that 50% stat holds....

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41 minutes ago, Sand said:

Possible signal received from the habitable zone of Alpha Centauri.

So, Liu Cixin might be a non-fiction author?  :scared:

I hate the clickbait title... they didn't receive a signal from a planet, they saw a measurement that could indicate that there is a planet. To them, that's a "signal" there could be a planet there. 

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37 minutes ago, shades said:

I hate the clickbait title... they didn't receive a signal from a planet, they saw a measurement that could indicate that there is a planet. To them, that's a "signal" there could be a planet there. 

I fell for it and didn't figure it out until the end. What should be and is exciting news was made to be a disappointment.

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15 hours ago, Desert_Power said:

Very cool. A bit surprised we haven't found the ninth planet yet

Have you looked near Uranus?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Once again, I'll see myself out. :bag:

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On 2/15/2021 at 3:22 PM, RC94 said:

 

On 2/15/2021 at 3:44 PM, El Floppo said:

7 minutes of TERROR!!!

 

 

Coming on the 18th

Supposed to arrive sometime before 4pm today.

Fingers crossed.

 

"You can watch the Mars landing live here and on Space.com's homepage, courtesy of NASA, beginning at 2:15 p.m. EST (1915 GMT). The landing is expected at 3:55 p.m. EST (2055 GMT). "

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Star Talk Radio podcast has NASA Chief Scientist Jim Green talking Perseverance. Pretty cool to hear what’s new on it compared to other rovers. Like this one will be the first time a rover will get audio from Mars. Quick 45min listen 

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38 minutes ago, The Gator said:

Star Talk Radio podcast has NASA Chief Scientist Jim Green talking Perseverance. Pretty cool to hear what’s new on it compared to other rovers. Like this one will be the first time a rover will get audio from Mars. Quick 45min listen 

I watched a ton of youtube that covered the last rover. 

 

Looking forward to more videos where some dude in his basement points out rocks and says he sees straight lines which can only mean there must have been a sprawling city at one time. 

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1 hour ago, The Gator said:

Star Talk Radio podcast has NASA Chief Scientist Jim Green talking Perseverance. Pretty cool to hear what’s new on it compared to other rovers. Like this one will be the first time a rover will get audio from Mars. Quick 45min listen 

They've also sent an oxygen generator prototype. Sounds like it's far from a primary mission, and also uses up the rover's entire daily battery power to function (heats up)...might get trotted out every few months. But still with obviously big ramifications if successful.

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17 minutes ago, The Z Machine said:

How nervous are the peeps at NASA right now?  Squeaky bum time...

Really hoping for success today. I posted that only 50% of Mars missions have historically reached their goals. with two successful mission already this month, that percentage seems against nasa. But hopefully we're just collectively better at this stuff and the odds reflect more naive missions.

:scared:

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I grew up with that Adam Steltzner guy. I've told his story here before...pretty sure he dropped out of HS. Still kinda smart in spite of that.

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1 hour ago, El Floppo said:

They've also sent an oxygen generator prototype. Sounds like it's far from a primary mission, and also uses up the rover's entire daily battery power to function (heats up)...might get trotted out every few months. But still with obviously big ramifications if successful.

It was cool to hear that the samples this rover  will take are just left in canisters on Mars to be picked up by a later mission.  #pickupsticks 

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4 minutes ago, Leeroy Jenkins said:

How is Elon talking about manned missions to Mars by 2026?  We are making great progress, but that seems super aggressive when NASA is talking about these samples not coming back to Earth until 2031.

Cuz he doesn't have to answer to Congress for funding.  He can take tons of risk and explode a bunch of rockets if he wants.

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