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Home-owners...What are your current projects?


wilked

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On a scale of 1 = A five year old could do it up to 10 = There's no way I would even attempt it regardless of skill level, where does installing an irrigation system fall?

My lot is relatively small so the amount of irrigation/sprinklers would be limited and the fact that this is a want more than a need, I figured I should at least look into doing on my own.

Am I kidding myself here? 

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28 minutes ago, Senor Schmutzig said:

On a scale of 1 = A five year old could do it up to 10 = There's no way I would even attempt it regardless of skill level, where does installing an irrigation system fall?

My lot is relatively small so the amount of irrigation/sprinklers would be limited and the fact that this is a want more than a need, I figured I should at least look into doing on my own.

Am I kidding myself here? 

Never have attempted myself, but without any research my thoughts go to...

- need to have someone come check and mark where can't dig in your yard

- plan out where you want pipes to go with a long extension cord as your guide

- Research and purchase all needed supplies (pipes, plumbing connectors/angles)

- Hooking up to a water source

If it was me, I would do all the prep work and placing the pipe myself.  Then have a plumber come in and check all connections and properly tap into a water source.  Then I would finish off by covering up all pipes in lawn with topsoil and reseed grass.

I would give it a 6.5 (cute job, but not as hard as it is for an ugly chick to get into a club)

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2 hours ago, Senor Schmutzig said:

On a scale of 1 = A five year old could do it up to 10 = There's no way I would even attempt it regardless of skill level, where does installing an irrigation system fall?

My lot is relatively small so the amount of irrigation/sprinklers would be limited and the fact that this is a want more than a need, I figured I should at least look into doing on my own.

Am I kidding myself here? 

Watch enough youtubes to be able to describe to a layman the entire design, and to sketch is on a blank piece of paper with no assistance.  Once you get there, I'd say give it a shot

 

Key things  - 

 

-You don't want to pay sewer costs on irrigation.  You might need a new meter as a result

-I'd get a 'smart' meter on this.  The new meters know the weather, so they don't water on rainy days, can detect leaks, etc.  It will pay for itself in water saved

-Make a GOOD drawing, and print / post on the wall near utilities

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On 4/24/2020 at 7:00 PM, The General said:

Just spread 65 bags of mulch over 2 days. That was a huge ##### and am glad it's done but was a good time killer.

Been doing a ton of this stuff....have about 1200 sq of "playground" area for our kids.  So far, it's been 8 yards of mulch by itself.  Still want to put down probably 4-5 more yards to get the thickness we want.  The rest of the yard has been about 10 yards between all the beds at the front and sides.  I love the smell of fresh mulch, but man I am sore each morning I wake up from doing it.

I've moved on to replacing all the bath fixtures in my kids' bathrooms including replacing the drains with "toe touch pop up" drain stoppers.  Turns out, plumbing isn't all that complicated.  For some reason I had it in my head that it was a complicated thing to deal with.  The right tools make all the difference.

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4 hours ago, Senor Schmutzig said:

On a scale of 1 = A five year old could do it up to 10 = There's no way I would even attempt it regardless of skill level, where does installing an irrigation system fall?

My lot is relatively small so the amount of irrigation/sprinklers would be limited and the fact that this is a want more than a need, I figured I should at least look into doing on my own.

Am I kidding myself here? 

I had a lot that was about 3/10 of an acre and I did mine all myself.  It's not hard at all (maybe a 3).  Just have to take the time to do the pipe layout.  If the lot is as small as you suggest, you don't even need to spend much time on calculating the number of heads in each zone.  You won't hit capacity.  The only thing you'd need outside intervention with is an irrigation meter installed on the water line (if your municipality even provides that).  For me it was $500 to have the meter installed by the city.

ETA:  If you decide to do it DO NOT forget to call and have your property marked for electric, gas, water lines.  It's free.  Do it.

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On 4/28/2020 at 5:31 PM, Wingnut said:

Haven't done much other than yardwork...was out the other day and this guy showed up,.killed and ate a lizard, and let me get close for a couple pics. Pretty cool.

https://i.imgur.com/YYrzMKU.jpg

https://i.imgur.com/DpIyxjo.jpg

Great pictures - wow.

About 7 years ago I was driving to work and had a huge red tailed hawk like this dive out of a tree and spread his wings to glide away about 15 feet off of my windshield.  Stunning creature.

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On 4/24/2020 at 8:21 PM, Binky The Doormat said:

belljr - hey, for me anyway ...when the bags go on sale for $2 for 2 CF - it's actually cheaper

and we want the black and most of the bulk mulch is brown

ETA:  my son does it now  :)

Dang...how much is a yard of mulch for you and where are you at?  It's $25 a yard here, colored is $26...Cyprus is $29.  Even at $2 a bag, that's double what I pay.

ETA:  No it's not :bag: It's closer to same than I thought :lol: 

Edited by The Commish
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5 hours ago, The Commish said:
On 4/24/2020 at 7:21 PM, Binky The Doormat said:

belljr - hey, for me anyway ...when the bags go on sale for $2 for 2 CF - it's actually cheaper

and we want the black and most of the bulk mulch is brown

ETA:  my son does it now  :)

Dang...how much is a yard of mulch for you and where are you at?  It's $25 a yard here, colored is $26...Cyprus is $29.  Even at $2 a bag, that's double what I pay.

ETA:  No it's not :bag: It's closer to same than I thought :lol: 

It's typically around $35 a yard delivered for us

my son picks up the bags for no charge because we supply him food and shelter

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14 minutes ago, Binky The Doormat said:

It's typically around $35 a yard delivered for us

my son picks up the bags for no charge because we supply him food and shelter

I need in on this approach because feeding and sheltering my kid (12 years old) is freakin' expensive  :lmao: 

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On 4/29/2020 at 10:32 AM, Senor Schmutzig said:

On a scale of 1 = A five year old could do it up to 10 = There's no way I would even attempt it regardless of skill level, where does installing an irrigation system fall?

My lot is relatively small so the amount of irrigation/sprinklers would be limited and the fact that this is a want more than a need, I figured I should at least look into doing on my own.

Am I kidding myself here? 

Most places it's a 3 or 4.  In FL it's a 1.  That's because you have no need to trench it in deep or make it drainable for freeze protection.  You can literally slit the sod and snake the pipe under the sod and it will be buried in 30 days. Good advice above to use a smart controller. Rachio is probably the best. And map the location of every single head.  You'll be very happy when they break and you need to locate them for repairs.  And they will.  One or two every year. Rather than a separate meter in FL try to hook up to municipal gray water supply if you have it where you live or put in an irrigation well.  You can also do that yourself but it may require a permit. This will be an irrigation only super shallow (like 20 foot) well. make sure the heads aren't spraying on your house or anywhere you don't want rust.  Or be prepared to clean with oxalic acid once a year or put in a sequestrant tank.

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Dudes, caulk your f'ing doors and windows.  

I repainted my front door and the frame around it last fall, and noticed that the caulk had eroded pretty badly, so recaulked after I painted.  This is not something I had necessarily paid a lot of attention to.  

Well, a few weeks ago we started getting termite swarmers coming in around the bottom of the door.  Had Terminix come out, and yep, found mud tubes down on the sill plate in the basement right below the front door.  Paid $1500 to have 22 ugly ####ing bait traps put all around the perimeter of the house.  Not only does it ruin the aesthetics, but just seeing these things I'm sure makes my home value plummet when it comes time to sell.

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Today is my first day of a 90 day furlough. I have a decent sized list of home repair work going.

One of the bigger projects involves reducing the bounce of the floor in the dining room. If you step strongly or quickly, it makes the dishes rattle in the cabinet.

I have access to the floor from underneath, as there's a decent height crawl space (hands and knees, can sit cross legged underneath the joists). I've been researching ways to stiffen the joists and I think I'll be adding a 2x4 "flange" to the bottom of the joists with the most bounce. Glue and screw with a brace in the center until the adhesive cures. I've read this is more effective than sistering the joist with another 2x10.

Anyone done anything like this?

Edited by The Z Machine
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On 2/19/2020 at 8:02 PM, -fish- said:

Needed to modernize a house that was built in the mid 70s that had a partial remodel in 2011.   Just finished repainting the entire interior of my house.  Added a grid wall like this in the dining room.   Installing a steel plate over the front of my fireplace, sort of like this.   New bannister like this.   New light fixtures throughout.   

Whole place looks brighter and more modern.

REALLY like the grid wall and bannister, not jazzed with the steel plate over the front of the fireplace. 

Would you mind sharing the plans with how you did the grid wall?

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On 3/10/2020 at 10:49 AM, offdee said:

Looks really good. I give it an “8” on the Offdee Fireplace Scale. 

One thing I question - you used regular non-treated 2x4s in framing it. Is that a concern?

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On 3/23/2020 at 9:27 AM, jb1020 said:

Has anyone ever painted their garage floor?   I've always liked that clean epoxy look.   We have so many dusty footprints in the house from the garage floor.  

Curious on if you did it, was it worth it?  I fear it will be one of those things that looks great for a month of two, but then it will peel and crack and look bad and possibly not even help the dust issue.  

Seems like a nice, smallish, project to knock out now.  

I did it to our cellar floor when we moved in and it was definitely the right decision. 

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On 4/24/2020 at 7:00 PM, The General said:

Just spread 65 bags of mulch over 2 days. That was a huge ##### and am glad it's done but was a good time killer.

If you got that many bags, might it have been less expensive to order ‘x’ number of yards of mulch from a local landscape company?

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Question for anyone with experience on tillers.

Last summer, we had our pool taken out.  I laid black sod over the top, and laid down some grass seed before it snowed.  After it snowed, I discovered I didn't lay near enough seed (I put down the recommended amount for a normal fall re-seed, not enough to seed a blank canvas of black dirt).  So now I have just sparse bits of grass coming through.  I now want to get sod and lay it down so I can finally once and for all have a decent lawn.

So here's my question.  I appears I should till the soil and mix in some fertilized to prepare for the sod.  The equipment rental places around here are all closed, so I can't rent a decent piece of equipment.  Is a $100-$150 tiller worth it?  It looks like they are designed for gardens, but I have at least 1600+ sq of yard to prepare.  I'll only use this thing once most likely, but I don't want to spend that much and have it not be able to do the job.  Thoughts?

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1 hour ago, The Z Machine said:

Today is my first day of a 90 day furlough. I have a decent sized list of home repair work going.

One of the bigger projects involves reducing the bounce of the floor in the dining room. If you step strongly or quickly, it makes the dishes rattle in the cabinet.

I have access to the floor from underneath, as there's a decent height crawl space (hands and knees, can sit cross legged underneath the joists). I've been researching ways to stiffen the joists and I think I'll be adding a 2x4 "flange" to the bottom of the joists with the most bounce. Glue and screw with a brace in the center until the adhesive cures. I've read this is more effective than sistering the joist with another 2x10.

Anyone done anything like this?

Bridging should help with that. 2x10 blocks put between the joists (perpendicular to the joists).

Or you can buy precut metal bridging if your joists are on normal centers (16" is most common). Two pieces per location - they cross like an "X".

I'd try either every 10' or so and see how that performs. 

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2 hours ago, The Z Machine said:

Today is my first day of a 90 day furlough. I have a decent sized list of home repair work going.

One of the bigger projects involves reducing the bounce of the floor in the dining room. If you step strongly or quickly, it makes the dishes rattle in the cabinet.

I have access to the floor from underneath, as there's a decent height crawl space (hands and knees, can sit cross legged underneath the joists). I've been researching ways to stiffen the joists and I think I'll be adding a 2x4 "flange" to the bottom of the joists with the most bounce. Glue and screw with a brace in the center until the adhesive cures. I've read this is more effective than sistering the joist with another 2x10.

Anyone done anything like this?

I had this problem in my first house and added a jack post where the floor needed additional support.  Quick easy and effective 

https://www.homedepot.com/s/jack%20post?searchtype=suggest&NCNI-5

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18 minutes ago, berndog said:

I had this problem in my first house and added a jack post where the floor needed additional support.  Quick easy and effective 

https://www.homedepot.com/s/jack%20post?searchtype=suggest&NCNI-5

Are you allowed to leave the jack post permanently installed?

I saw this article and thought that the 2x4 on the bottom might be the best: https://www.thisoldhouse.com/flooring/21015298/bye-bye-bounce

For solid blocking between joists, should I use construction adhesive and structural wood screws to lock in the blocks?


FYI, the span is about 15' and there is already metal cross straps at mid-span.

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19 minutes ago, The Z Machine said:

Are you allowed to leave the jack post permanently installed?

I saw this article and thought that the 2x4 on the bottom might be the best: https://www.thisoldhouse.com/flooring/21015298/bye-bye-bounce

For solid blocking between joists, should I use construction adhesive and structural wood screws to lock in the blocks?


FYI, the span is about 15' and there is already metal cross straps at mid-span.

I left mine in place and had no problem when I sold my house. 

I would suggest trying a simple approach first and see if that fixes the problem.  
Something along the lines of 2 or 3 jack posts and a 12 Foot 2x6.  Use the jack posts to support the 2x6 under the squeaking joists.  Make sure the posts are on secure footing. 

If that doesn’t work you can move on to bracing etc.  and return the posts if you want. 

There are lots of folks on the board who know more than me so it will be interesting to see what they suggest. 
 

 

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1 hour ago, berndog said:

I left mine in place and had no problem when I sold my house. 

I would suggest trying a simple approach first and see if that fixes the problem.  
Something along the lines of 2 or 3 jack posts and a 12 Foot 2x6.  Use the jack posts to support the 2x6 under the squeaking joists.  Make sure the posts are on secure footing. 

If that doesn’t work you can move on to bracing etc.  and return the posts if you want. 

There are lots of folks on the board who know more than me so it will be interesting to see what they suggest. 
 

 

Ok, got it.  It's not squeaking, it's bounce / vibration.  I also have some sag in one area of my kitchen, as there's 2 refrigerators that sit very close to each orther, one mid-span on the joists.

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2 hours ago, The Z Machine said:

Are you allowed to leave the jack post permanently installed?

I saw this article and thought that the 2x4 on the bottom might be the best: https://www.thisoldhouse.com/flooring/21015298/bye-bye-bounce

For solid blocking between joists, should I use construction adhesive and structural wood screws to lock in the blocks?


FYI, the span is about 15' and there is already metal cross straps at mid-span.

I dont see why it would be an issue? It's not like its supporting your whole house or even being used as a structural support? Just fixing an annoyance

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6 minutes ago, glvsav37 said:

I dont see why it would be an issue? It's not like its supporting your whole house or even being used as a structural support? Just fixing an annoyance

I dunno. If I was doing a home inspection I'd ask why the jack post was there and it would give me pause about the structure of the floor

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49 minutes ago, The Z Machine said:

Ok, got it.  It's not squeaking, it's bounce / vibration.  I also have some sag in one area of my kitchen, as there's 2 refrigerators that sit very close to each orther, one mid-span on the joists.

Do you know how far your joists span?

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Picking up a automated water system at home depot this weekend with six separate lines. The following 1-2 months I will be redoing our front yard and backyard entirely. Both currently have no water system, so we will be laying the PVC and everything involved including digging. Also removing about 10 large shrubs, 4 large trees, currently killing the entire backyard and non good grass in front, and then nicely landscaping everything. A decade plus of almost no management has left the yards needing lots of love. Also need to do a few french drains and down spout work.

The previous owner of our new place was a bum and didn't do anything unless if it was janky, but that allows the wife and I to put in tons of hours in and make it our own amazing place while costing 30% less of what it could have been. 

As for this weekend, I am going to skim coat(over butt ugly texture), sand, level 4 smooth wall, sand, prime, and finally paint our spare bedroom, which is my new office. Almost done with the house, so far as the wife and I have done 1300 of the 1700 sqft. Oh I forgot, also need to remove a closet that still has popcorn ceiling (non asbestos) as well.

I'm debating if I want to do the curb side beer delivery at really good local brewery here to fuel the weekend.

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13 hours ago, The Z Machine said:

Today is my first day of a 90 day furlough. I have a decent sized list of home repair work going.

One of the bigger projects involves reducing the bounce of the floor in the dining room. If you step strongly or quickly, it makes the dishes rattle in the cabinet.

I have access to the floor from underneath, as there's a decent height crawl space (hands and knees, can sit cross legged underneath the joists). I've been researching ways to stiffen the joists and I think I'll be adding a 2x4 "flange" to the bottom of the joists with the most bounce. Glue and screw with a brace in the center until the adhesive cures. I've read this is more effective than sistering the joist with another 2x10.

Anyone done anything like this?

I am a structural engineer, the calculation for deflection takes into account the "modulus of elasticity" which is basically takes into account how much "stuff" is as far from the center of the member as possible.  This is why an "I beam" is so strong, the horizontal portion is further from the middle of the beam compared to the vertical portion.  So when you just sister a 2x10 vertical next to a 2x10 you aren't really increasing that variable very much.  When you add a 2x4 that is flat along the bottom of the 2x10 you are doing more to increase the modulus, however the connection between the vertical 2x10 and the flat 2x4 needs to be strong enough to transfer the stresses into the flat 2x4.

 

Depending on your crawl space slab/height, it would be easier to add a vertical double 2x8 that runs below the midspan of the floor joists with some  blocking and screw jacks to support it.  This would reduce the span of the floor joists in half, and therefore do more than adding a flat 2x4 to the bottom of the floor joists.  Adding the flat 2x4 would work better if you had a full basement where you don't want to add anymore posts, or adding some depth would interfere with headheight.

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1 hour ago, The Commish said:

Anyone here do insulation...blown or otherwise?  I am wondering what a decent price would be to do about 1300 square feet....getting some estimates in the next few days.

Our attic is approx 25X60 and we got quotes ranging from $3k - $10k in an expensive area in MN. Obviously a big spread between companies pretending they are sooo much better than everybody else and the cheap dude that does tons of jobs and makes it up in volume. 

 

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1 minute ago, FBG26 said:

Our attic is approx 25X60 and we got quotes ranging from $3k - $10k in an expensive area in MN. Obviously a big spread between companies pretending they are sooo much better than everybody else and the cheap dude that does tons of jobs and makes it up in volume. 

 

wow...ok....I was thinking it might be like $1 a square foot.  You're saying $3 plus roughly?  There is NO WAY an insulation job should have that sort of spread is there?  :lol: 

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You'd think they'd all be close, but that wasn't our experience. I was expecting $3-4k and got a crazy big spread. We do live in an expensive zipcode so I think people definitely charge too much assuming they'll win some jobs where people don't get multiple bids. The cheaper bid came from a company that only does insulation whereas the other guys were general remodeling and construction companies. We didn't actually go with the lowest bid but went with a slightly higher quote from somebody that seemed more reliable than the cheapest bid, with the thought that we might use them for siding the house in the future if we like them. 

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8 hours ago, FBG26 said:

You'd think they'd all be close, but that wasn't our experience. I was expecting $3-4k and got a crazy big spread. We do live in an expensive zipcode so I think people definitely charge too much assuming they'll win some jobs where people don't get multiple bids. The cheaper bid came from a company that only does insulation whereas the other guys were general remodeling and construction companies. We didn't actually go with the lowest bid but went with a slightly higher quote from somebody that seemed more reliable than the cheapest bid, with the thought that we might use them for siding the house in the future if we like them. 

Thanks :thumbup: 

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On 5/1/2020 at 10:22 PM, UOFI_316 said:

I am a structural engineer, the calculation for deflection takes into account the "modulus of elasticity" which is basically takes into account how much "stuff" is as far from the center of the member as possible.  This is why an "I beam" is so strong, the horizontal portion is further from the middle of the beam compared to the vertical portion.  So when you just sister a 2x10 vertical next to a 2x10 you aren't really increasing that variable very much.  When you add a 2x4 that is flat along the bottom of the 2x10 you are doing more to increase the modulus, however the connection between the vertical 2x10 and the flat 2x4 needs to be strong enough to transfer the stresses into the flat 2x4.

 

Depending on your crawl space slab/height, it would be easier to add a vertical double 2x8 that runs below the midspan of the floor joists with some  blocking and screw jacks to support it.  This would reduce the span of the floor joists in half, and therefore do more than adding a flat 2x4 to the bottom of the floor joists.  Adding the flat 2x4 would work better if you had a full basement where you don't want to add anymore posts, or adding some depth would interfere with headheight.

And don't forget to use a Johnson Rod.  "Modulus of Elasticity"?  Are you kidding me?  Indecently, that's the name of my punk rock string quartet band... we were not very successful.   

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On 4/29/2020 at 8:32 AM, Senor Schmutzig said:

On a scale of 1 = A five year old could do it up to 10 = There's no way I would even attempt it regardless of skill level, where does installing an irrigation system fall?

My lot is relatively small so the amount of irrigation/sprinklers would be limited and the fact that this is a want more than a need, I figured I should at least look into doing on my own.

Am I kidding myself here? 

I have done it. I would say it is about a three.

You can do it. Sounds like a smaller yard so that is good. I did a full acre and it was very physically demanding as I had a lot of trenching to do through hard ground and rock. Guys in the irrigation stores are very helpful as well.

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On 4/28/2020 at 3:31 PM, Wingnut said:

Haven't done much other than yardwork...was out the other day and this guy showed up,.killed and ate a lizard, and let me get close for a couple pics. Pretty cool.

https://i.imgur.com/YYrzMKU.jpg

https://i.imgur.com/DpIyxjo.jpg

 

Obligatory backyard pic:

https://i.imgur.com/bFX1fh6.jpg

When we bought the place a year and a half ago, the backyard was 100% grass - no plants, trees, or mulch beds, nothing. Can't wait to have a deck and pergola built, get the patio screened in, and add some killer ambiance lighting:

 

Nice pics. We have a family of Harris Hawks here that are a lot of fun. They terrorize the neighborhood like a gang but it's cool. 

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I have decided to tackle re roofing my shed. I have the old plywood from my deck that I redid a few months ago. I am cutting the plywood to size. It will be four pieces instead of the two that are there now. This is so I can use wood I have on hand instead of buying new and I assume the seams are not that big a deal, correct?

Looking at you tube I need roofing paper and shingles. I am not really sure what I am doing but it's just a shed so .............

Any recommendations? 

Pricing out the materials and I think if I buy one bundle of shingles I will be just short so I was thinking I could use a few of the old ones. Am I correct in this thinking? 

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11 minutes ago, prosopis said:

I have decided to tackle re roofing my shed. I have the old plywood from my deck that I redid a few months ago. I am cutting the plywood to size. It will be four pieces instead of the two that are there now. This is so I can use wood I have on hand instead of buying new and I assume the seams are not that big a deal, correct?

Looking at you tube I need roofing paper and shingles. I am not really sure what I am doing but it's just a shed so .............

Any recommendations? 

Pricing out the materials and I think if I buy one bundle of shingles I will be just short so I was thinking I could use a few of the old ones. Am I correct in this thinking? 

I wouldn't use the plywood that's been laying flat, exposed to elements for years for my roof deck. It's already deteriorated.

Nor would I use a few old shingles mixed in with new. They probably won't match and the old shingles are also probably deteriorated. I'd also use drip edge along the eaves.

But.... I recall your OP on this and you want to go frugal. So:

You want your seams between sheets of plywood to meet on a rafter. Use construction adhesive along every rafter where the sheathing meets it. Then nail (or screw) the sheathing to the rafters.

Lay your felt paper, then your shingles - using black jack (roofing tar) to seal it. 

 

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6 hours ago, Uruk-Hai said:

I wouldn't use the plywood that's been laying flat, exposed to elements for years for my roof deck. It's already deteriorated.

Nor would I use a few old shingles mixed in with new. They probably won't match and the old shingles are also probably deteriorated. I'd also use drip edge along the eaves.

But.... I recall your OP on this and you want to go frugal. So:

You want your seams between sheets of plywood to meet on a rafter. Use construction adhesive along every rafter where the sheathing meets it. Then nail (or screw) the sheathing to the rafters.

Lay your felt paper, then your shingles - using black jack (roofing tar) to seal it. 

 

Is the felt paper really necessary? Why?

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On 5/5/2020 at 3:37 PM, D-Day said:

And don't forget to use a Johnson Rod.  "Modulus of Elasticity"?  Are you kidding me?  Indecently, that's the name of my punk rock string quartet band... we were not very successful.   

“Indecently”?

😂

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On 5/12/2020 at 2:51 PM, prosopis said:

I have decided to tackle re roofing my shed. I have the old plywood from my deck that I redid a few months ago. I am cutting the plywood to size. It will be four pieces instead of the two that are there now. This is so I can use wood I have on hand instead of buying new and I assume the seams are not that big a deal, correct?

Looking at you tube I need roofing paper and shingles. I am not really sure what I am doing but it's just a shed so .............

Any recommendations? 

Pricing out the materials and I think if I buy one bundle of shingles I will be just short so I was thinking I could use a few of the old ones. Am I correct in this thinking? 

Unless you will be in the house for a year, I would advise not “cheaping out”. 

Definitely use tar paper and stick with the same bundles of shingles. You will need extra for the ridge too. I would suggest drip edge at the bottom row as well  

Just do it right the first time so you do not have to redo it in a few years. Plus, you will see it every day. 

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53 minutes ago, Spike said:

Unless you will be in the house for a year, I would advise not “cheaping out”. 

Definitely use tar paper and stick with the same bundles of shingles. You will need extra for the ridge too. I would suggest drip edge at the bottom row as well  

Just do it right the first time so you do not have to redo it in a few years. Plus, you will see it every day. 

I replaced 1/2 of the roof. The other half does not have the same damage and in my opinion is fine. As was mentioned above I am using old deck wood so there is a little warping. I f this was my house or anything more than a tool shed I would not continue. The warping is causing some lifting but not horrible I am hoping the shingles will hide this. I bought the felt paper and two bundles of shingles. I am hoping to attempt this tomorrow. I have been looking at you tube videos.

Wish me luck!!!

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Solenoid and/or leak/ and/or bad controller for irrigation system. One of my zones had little to no flow and the solenoid in question is making a loud buzzing sound. Solenoid popped off like a champagne cork today while I was trying to manually open the valve. Naturally the water cutoff on the backflow preventer jammed so I absorbed a great deal of water. Finally got the water off and the solenoid back in, but I think it’s toast. Having someone come out next week. The idiots who set it up the controller and the rest of the system did a pretty bad job including the wiring so it all needs to be replaced. 

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