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Dynasty & Redraft: WR Breshad Perriman, Lions


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No way I could put OBJ in my championship line up after the turd he’s been all year. I actually cut him two weeks ago to avoid this decision. I hope he works out for you if you start him, but Perriman

Where the heck was all this for the past 5 years when I drafted you in the 1st round of my rookie draft.  Do nothing for 4 and 3/4 years and then explode.

Yeesh. Who do you like in this draft at WR? 

Rotoworld:

NFL Films' Greg Cosell believes UCF WR Breshad Perriman is in the top tier of wide receivers in this year's draft.

Cosell believes Perriman is in the same tier as Alabama WR Amari Cooper and West Virginia WR Kevin White, and can even "see ranking Perriman even with or ahead of White." Perriman has been shooting up draft boards since running in the low 4.2s at his Pro Day. He could be selected in the first half of Day 1.
Source: Yahoo!
Apr 25 - 2:00 PM
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Rotoworld:

Breshad Perriman - WR - Knights

UCF WR Breshad Perriman "will go in the first round of this year's draft, but his route running and hands are issues right now," according to NFL Media draft analyst Lance Zierlein.

The UCF prospect hauled in 50 of 99 targets thrown his way, with some of the incompletions blamed on his poor route running. Perriman dropped eight balls with a drop percentage of 13.8 percent. Zierlein notes that Perriman's drop rate was "far and away the worst of any of the top receivers in this year's draft."

Source: NFL.com

Apr 27 - 2:17 PM

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From ESPNs reporter draft:

I don’t think the Eagles will take Perriman because I really don’t expect him to be on the board when they pick at No. 20. But when the 6-foot-2, 212-pound Perriman -- who has run sub-4.3 times in the 40-yard dash -- slipped past Houston and Cleveland, there was no hesitation here. I was leaning toward UConn cornerback/freakish athlete Byron Jones, but a receiver with Perriman’s size and speed would be irresistible to Chip Kelly. Put it this way: Perriman represents an upgrade from the departed Jeremy Maclin. -- Phil Sheridan

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Rotoworld:

Breshad Perriman - WR - Knights

NFL Media analyst Daniel Jeremiah would feel "much more comfortable" selecting UCF WR Breshad Perriman "at the top of the second round than the top half of the first."

"That's way too high for a player who drops a ton of balls, has hip tightness and doesn't play nearly as fast as he was timed. Perriman has value as a developmental deep threat, but I'd feel much more comfortable selecting him at the top of the second round than the top half of the first," Jeremiah wrote. While Perriman put evaluators on notice with his 4.25 forty at his pro day, some still have questions on his overall game. The UCF prospect has the natural traits to be a dominant player at the next level, but will have to show he can be a consistent playmaker.

Source: NFL.com

Apr 29 - 3:16 PM

Breshad Perriman - WR - Knights

An NFL scout said that though he likes UCF WR Breshad Perriman, it's "a little surprising given the dad that he's not a better route runner."

"Totally different from his dad," another scout agreed. "His dad was really quick. This guy is bigger. You don't see the speed he ran. This guy doesn't run routes. He has a rough time against press because he's not quick and he's tight. I see a straight-line speed guy." Brett Perriman, the father, was a 5-foot-9, 180-pounder who caught 525 passes across a 10-year NFL career. "Hands were very iffy this year," said another scout. "He has a big up side but obviously a lower floor because he has inconsistencies catching. He really just hasn't put it all together yet."

Source: Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

Apr 29 - 3:10 PM

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pickibg 6th I think it's probably coming down to we forme. Can't wait for tonight :popcorn:

Perriman, White, Parker, and DGB are virtually tied pending landing spots and draft position for me. Thinking of actually trying to slide back to 1.07 today before the draft and rolling the dice.

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Rotoworld:

ESPN NFL Insider Jon Gruden says UCF's Breshad Perriman and Auburn's Sammie Coates are not first rounders in his book because they drop too many passes and run poor routes.

The analyst expressed surprise that Mel Kiper previously mocked Perriman to the Rams at No. 10. "The one thing I can't understand with Perriman is you have all this talent, and I have plenty of tape where he is making circus catches, but there are way too many drops," he said. "These balls are easy catches." Gruden loves the 4.25-4.3s speed, of course, but questions Perriman's ability to be a "bad-ball receiver." He documented 14 drops on tape, including a sure touchdown which just clanked off his hands. "No one is perfect, but if people are going to talk about you as a potential top-10 pick, the catching has to be more consistent," Gruden said.
Apr 30 - 4:57 PM
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Looks like another Torrey Smith.

Any reason to expect better numbers?

Tracks the deep ball way better than Smith. Highpoints better. Plays bigger. Better movement skills to translate to routes.

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Looks like another Torrey Smith.

Any reason to expect better numbers?

Tracks the deep ball way better than Smith. Highpoints better. Plays bigger. Better movement skills to translate to routes.

As a Ravens fan, I've watched TS drop way too many balls to get too excited about another guy doing the same thing. That said, if he does the above better than TS I have hope he can be an upgrade.

I still can't believe how much money SanFran paid TS. Crazy.

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Looks like another Torrey Smith.

Any reason to expect better numbers?

Tracks the deep ball way better than Smith. Highpoints better. Plays bigger. Better movement skills to translate to routes.

As a Ravens fan, I've watched TS drop way too many balls to get too excited about another guy doing the same thing. That said, if he does the above better than TS I have hope he can be an upgrade.

I still can't believe how much money SanFran paid TS. Crazy.

Torry Smith career catch rate is 49.1% the big plays are great and he scored double digit TD for the first time last season but I can understand why they let him walk.

Despite some concern about drops with Perriman I doubt he will be worse in this regard than Smith.

I have been skeptical of Perriman, but Ozzie changes my mind about that a bit. Not that Newsome has a very good track record with drafting WR. Brandon Stokely and Travis Taylor have the most career approximate value. Torry Smith may end up having a better career than those two did.

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He makes DHB look like Jerry Rice when it comes to catcing the ball. :P

This kid has worse hands that Torrey Smith. Saw a highlight film of him dropping pass and pass that was right in his hands. Long, intermediate, or short pass it didn't matter.

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I don't see Perriman that much different from Torrey Smith in Baltimore's offense. His situation for competition is great but I don't see him producing great numbers. I see him getting 60/800/5 type numbers with Flacco.

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Rotoworld:

Breshad Perriman - WR - Ravens

First-round Ravens WR Breshad Perriman believes most of his college drops were the result of "lapses in concentration.

As in, he believes it's something he can fix. Perriman muffed eight passes for UCF in 2014. "It's something I have a chip on my shoulder about," Perriman said. "At the end of the day, I know what I have to do and I know that I can catch." We're not overly concerned about Perriman's hands, though Kelvin Benjamin was a reminder last season that college-drop issues don't get better overnight.

Source: Baltimore Sun

May 3 - 5:26 PM

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Rotoworld:

ESPN's Mel Kiper gave the Ravens an "A-" draft grade.

"Breshad Perriman could have been off the board by No. 14, and I wouldn't have blinked," Kiper wrote. "To get a big (218 pounds), fast (sub-4.3 speed) big-play threat such as this at No. 26 is a great get." The analyst sees some Dez Bryant in Perriman. "Maxx Williams was a player the Ravens coveted, and to get him at No. 55 overall was good value," Kiper wrote. "Both he and Perriman could be impact players from the rookie class, which is rare on a good team." Kiper also liked Baltimore's later picks, which included DT Carl Davis, edge rusher Za'Darius Smith, CB Tray Walker, RB Buck Allen and TE Nick Boyle.
Source: ESPN.com
May 4 - 12:34 AM
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Looks like another Torrey Smith.

Any reason to expect better numbers?

Tracks the deep ball way better than Smith. Highpoints better. Plays bigger. Better movement skills to translate to routes.

As I watch TS I am continually amazed just how awful his hand-eye is. He's always reaching for the ball at the wrong time, never gets it high, and never wins a contest. It's truly stunning to me this is an NFL-caliber player, and a WR to boot.

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cant wait to watch him catch a deep bomb every week with that speed and flaccos arm.

before all the naysayer say it, yes it is well documented that people thinks he has catching issues.

he can drop a ball a game does that mean he wont have good numbers still?

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he can drop a ball a game does that mean he wont have good numbers still?

It means he likely won't have a job

Long term BroadwayG is right on. I don't know a lot about Perriman but it sounds a lot like DHB. You won't have a long productive career if you can't catch.

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he can drop a ball a game does that mean he wont have good numbers still?

It means he likely won't have a job

Long term BroadwayG is right on. I don't know a lot about Perriman but it sounds a lot like DHB. You won't have a long productive career if you can't catch.

DHB had other issues than not being able to catch.

If you can make big plays teams will live with a few drops. Go look at drop percentage and every year you will see plenty of stud WR's at the bottom of these rankings. Terrell Owen was a WR who spent most of his career near the bottom of drop percentage rankings and he had a long productive career.

The guy he is replacing ranked 45 out of top 46 qualifiers per PFF for drop percentage last season. At no point was Torrey Smith in danger of getting benched.

With Perriman I'd be more concerned that he can become a complete WR and run a full route tree and not just be a one trick pony deep threat like Torrey Smith more than I'd be concerned with his hands.

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I'm intrigued by the other guy they drafted, Darren Waller. Guy has some really impressive size/measurables. As a GT WR he's got some refinement issues, but he has big payoff potential if he works out, and it's looking like you can take a chance late in rookie drafts

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that was supergood --- didn't know he had those vids on his site

I liked that guest he had on there, too

edit: who was the transcendent talent that torched hargreaves -- amari cooper?

Cooper beat Hargreaves pretty bad last year but it's worth noting that Hargreaves played with an injury so he wasn't full speed. I think ankle?
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Waldman shreds Perriman in his review.

Cosell loves Perriman.

I do too. The guys in the industry describe him as having rare size/speed/suddenness traits. People have overused the word elite to the point it means very little anymore but you don't often find multiple analysts describing a guy as "rare". When you do, it often leads to good things. Beckham, Moss, Josh Gordon, Dez, Peterson, Calvin, Gronk, All guys that multiple people described as RARE.

I don't care one iota about how the only thing people want to talk about is drops. Harbaugh and Trestman can fix that as well as anyone. I put a lot of fantasy bread on my table over the years with Terrell Owens who dropped a lot of balls but at the end of the day, the result was "Man, that 21 point day coulda been 30 had he caught that one ball." I'm not crying over a 1st world problem.

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Background article.

Jeff Zrebiec, The Baltimore Sun

Updated May 9, 2015

http://touch.baltimoresun.com/#section/-1/article/p2p-83502859/

Breshad Perriman already had posed for dozens of photos, conducted countless interviews and uncomfortably learned his NFL fate in front of television cameras.

He maintained his patience and poise throughout, but the whirlwind 24 hours was finally starting to take its toll. Sitting in an office at the Ravens' training facility the afternoon before the second round of the NFL draft, Perriman fidgeted with his phone and shifted anxiously in his chair. Stealing an occasional glance at the football fields outside, Perriman couldn't wait to move on to the next phase of his rookie season.

"I'm very anxious just to be here, focus on football and leave everything else behind," Perriman said.

If only it had ever been that easy for the team's first-round draft pick, who was on the field the past two days for the Ravens' rookie minicamp. For all their draft success, the Ravens have struggled to develop an elite wide receiver and the 6-foot-2, 212-pound speedster out of Central Florida is their latest hope.

It's a lot to put on a 21-year-old, though Perriman has been dealing with high expectations his whole life. His father, Brett, played 10 seasons in the NFL and had more than 500 receptions. He is only 5-9, but he cast a large shadow that his youngest son has never really escaped.

Even during the telecast of the draft's first round, a highlight package of the soon-to-be Raven started with a clip of his father, who was drafted by the New Orleans Saints 27 years earlier.

"That pressure will never exit," said Brett Perriman Jr., the oldest of Brett and Laundria Perriman's four kids. "I think the time he's going to experience that the most will be now. This is the height of it all. There's nothing else to reach for. He's made it. The great thing about Breshad is he's very linear in his thinking and he's able to block things out when he needs to. It's definitely one of those pressure points for us. We can't erase our father's history. Breshad's the baby boy, but he's the one who handles pressure the best."

There was a time when Brett Perriman wondered how serious his youngest son was about playing football. Now, he marvels at all Breshad has overcome.

Breshad had a painful knee condition throughout his adolescence. He attended three Georgia high schools in as many years. He broke his ankle in his senior season and got just two college scholarship offers. A variety of nagging injuries cropped up in college.

"He's had everything known to man — a lot of setbacks," said Brett Perriman Sr. "But he worked hard and he was rewarded."

Pain and perseverance

Perriman had a strong final season at Central Florida, catching 50 passes for 1,044 yards and nine touchdowns. But his transformation from an intriguing prospect into a first-round pick essentially was made in 4.22 seconds, the amount of time it took Perriman to run the 40-yard dash at his pro day in March. When he crossed the line, several NFL scouts glanced at their stopwatches in disbelief.

His arms pumping in rhythm, his long strides chewing up turf, Perriman distanced himself from past knee problems with every step. Until his late teens, he struggled with Osgood-Schlatter disease, a form of knee inflammation that primarily affects children. Brett Perriman and all three of his sons dealt with the symptoms before outgrowing the disease.

"There's nothing you can do, so you have to deal with it," Brett said. "Some people can, some can't. But for a young kid, it becomes unbearable."

Breshad was in the junior Olympic track program and there were times he'd cross the finish line and double over in pain. He wore special insoles, but they only helped so much.

That wasn't the only thing that Breshad saw as an impediment to a potential football scholarship. His first high school, Heritage High in Conyers, Ga., never threw the ball. A frustrated wide receiver, he transferred to Martin Luther King High in Lithonia. That wasn't a good fit either, so he enrolled at nearby and nascent Arabia Mountain High in time for his senior year.

"Nobody actually knew Breshad coming in, but you would have thought that he was deeply invested in Arabia Mountain instead of being there for just one year," said Terrone Owens, the team's offensive coordinator at the time. "He wasn't a 'me, me' kid. He was very humble. As a player, he was pretty advanced. There wasn't a lot of coaching I had for him."

Perriman began to hear from more and more schools early in his senior season, but after he broke his ankle, many of the calls stopped. As he prepared to make his college decision, Perriman had just two formal scholarship offers: Central Florida and Florida International.

"I knew he was a good player, but he just couldn't develop through all the problems that he had along the way," Brett said.

Similar goals, different demeanors

Central Florida wide receivers coach Sean Beckton had no idea whether Perriman was enjoying his campus visit. Perriman said very little to coaches or even the Knights' players. But during the ride back to the airport, the wide receiver interrupted the silence.

"He said, 'Coach, I want to be one of the best receivers that ever played here,'" recalled Beckton who had previously worked with future NFL wideouts Brandon Marshall and Mike Sims-Walker. "Looking back on it, he lived up to that billing."

As Beckton got to know Perriman, he learned that the player was shy and uncomfortable in the spotlight. That's where Breshad and his father differed most.

"I think I've started to open up a little more as I get older, but I'm the type just to sit back and kind of observe," Breshad said. "My dad is the complete opposite. He's real talkative. He's outspoken and outgoing. But that has never been me."

Brett said Breshad takes after his mother.

"I'm way more aggressive, way more outgoing. I had to be because I had the short man's syndrome," Brett said. "He's laid-back, calm, quiet and very, very humble. We had to do a lot to get him to talk to the media and everything else."

Breshad was about 5 years old when his father played his final NFL game in 1997. His memories of Brett's NFL career were shaped by watching tape. Beckton said that Breshad would come back to campus after breaks with a notebook, detailing all the things he wanted to work on after watching film with his father.

It wasn't always easy for Breshad, hearing the constant comparisons, having his father dissect his play. But he knew that it came from a good place and his game was shaped by those film study sessions and on-field workouts with his dad.

"He's loosened up a little bit, but at the same time, he kind of kept pressure on me," Breshad said. "After every game, even if I had a good game, he'd always tell me what's something I could do better. But he never tried to get in the way of what the coaches did. He wanted to give them their space. At the same time, it's not like he fully let go. When I'm back home, we still hit the field. But he knows that there's a time and place for everything."

Brett readily concedes that finding the balance between being a father and a coach has been challenging. But Brett, who survived a tough childhood in the Miami housing projects to earn a scholarship to the University of Miami, is not going to apologize for wanting the best from his son.

"One thing I had to learn was it's not my system, so I can't overrule them. If I do something that might be good but it's bad for him as far as not being in the coach's program, ... he's going to suffer," Brett Sr. said. "Ultimately, I paid the price for doing it too much. So what I told him was, 'Whatever the coaches say, you do what the coaches say.' I'm very adamant about my kids. I want to make sure they do their best at whatever. If it's truck driver, you're going to be the best truck driver."

Coming full circle

The Perriman family was in Chicago for the NFL draft, but if Breshad had gotten his way, he would have been anyplace else. He wanted to watch the first round from home, surrounded by family and friends, and not by television cameras, red carpets and unfamiliar faces. Breshad's parents worked on him for two weeks before he consented to go.

There were certainly perks to being there, such as the lavish food spread for guests. Breshad put a piece of chicken and some fruit on his plate, grabbed two Gatorades and that was that. He has always been a picky eater. Growing up, he insisted on having brown sugar and maple oatmeal nearly every meal.

Brett Jr., though, could sense his brother's anxiety level rise with each passing minute. The last thing anybody wanted was for Breshad to be that guy who fell in the draft, cameras chronicling his facial expressions after each selection.

When commissioner Roger Goodell announced that the Ravens had taken Perriman with the 26th overall pick, the wide receiver stood up and smiled broadly. He hugged his father and other family members, later calling the night a "dream come true."

"At first, it started off as a player-coach kind of deal. My dad pretty much taught Breshad everything he needed to know," Brett Jr. said. "But Breshad became a true student of the game. He dedicated himself. By the time college came around, it was more of a player-agent thing. It was more collaborative. Breshad has learned enough to know his own body, to know what works for him and what doesn't. What may work for my father, who is 5-9, may not work for Breshad at 6-2. But it's fun to watch my dad live vicariously through Breshad and be a proud father."

Less than 24 hours later, Breshad was rattling off all the roles that his dad played in his life: father, best friend, teacher, agent. He had one more to add to the list: motivator.

Breshad Perriman had always wanted to follow in his father's footsteps and make it to the NFL. Now that he had, he set a new goal.

"I want to make my own name," he said. "You want to be successful so you won't be labeled as Brett Perriman's son. They'll just know you as Breshad Perriman."

jeff.zrebiec@baltsun.com

twitter.com/jeffzrebiecsun

Name: Breshad Perriman

Age: 21

Height/weight: 6 feet 2, 212 pounds

Hometown: Lithonia, Georgia

College: Central Florida

Personal: Perriman has three older siblings; two brothers (Brett Jr. and Breon) and one sister (Brittney). His father, Brett, played for 10 seasons in the NFL.

Honors: Perriman is the first wide receiver that the Ravens have drafted in the first round since 2005. He was an All-American Athletic Conference first-team selection last year. In 2013, he was a member of the MAAC All-Academic team.

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  • Faust changed the title to Dynasty & Redraft: WR Breshad Perriman, Lions

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