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Ran a 10k - Official Thread


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Here's the strava data if you're interested in all the splits: https://www.strava.com/activities/432551636

ETA: Oh yeah, BTW this was a 27 minute PR. :bowtie:

For all you talked about ups and downs and hills and such this you wouldn't know it by your splits. Clinical pacing there. Even the mile 16 21% hill (yeah, I doubt that's right!).

------

On my end my kid is finally finished with his state meet - 21:12. Not a PR, but that course wasn't the fastest. He had a good race, though, and was most improved on the team. Did good.

I haven't been able to do a huge amount, fitting things in where I can. This weekend I managed to get my wife to drop me off 30 miles from home and rode in after the meet. Don't know what it is about solo rides like this, but I tend to just punish myself - I hold really high power on the flats. 30 miles at 200watts exactly - that's a pretty good number for just about any weekend warrior guy. Really pleased to see that. Now I just need to see 20lbs off my frame and I can utilize all this power.

Tonight - 70 degrees, 25mph winds. Should be an epic blowaround.

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Here's the strava data if you're interested in all the splits: https://www.strava.com/activities/432551636

ETA: Oh yeah, BTW this was a 27 minute PR. :bowtie:

For all you talked about ups and downs and hills and such this you wouldn't know it by your splits. Clinical pacing there. Even the mile 16 21% hill (yeah, I doubt that's right!).

------

On my end my kid is finally finished with his state meet - 21:12. Not a PR, but that course wasn't the fastest. He had a good race, though, and was most improved on the team. Did good.

I haven't been able to do a huge amount, fitting things in where I can. This weekend I managed to get my wife to drop me off 30 miles from home and rode in after the meet. Don't know what it is about solo rides like this, but I tend to just punish myself - I hold really high power on the flats. 30 miles at 200watts exactly - that's a pretty good number for just about any weekend warrior guy. Really pleased to see that. Now I just need to see 20lbs off my frame and I can utilize all this power.

Tonight - 70 degrees, 25mph winds. Should be an epic blowaround.

Yeah, for some reason that elevation change on GPS doesn't calculate the bridge. The bridge makes that mile slightly easier. :lol:

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2015 USA 12KM Championships - Trip/Race Report

Part 1: Background - How I wormed my way into a world class race

A question that I hear often from people when i tell them I run races is "can you make money being a runner?". Well, there is relatively little running in money compared to the mainstream sports, but for some of the top tier elite runners in the country right now there is a road racing circuit sponsored by the national governing body fittingly named the "USATF Running Circuit". (http://usatfrunningcircuit.runnerspace.com/) Throughout the year, there are 10-12 races across the country, each dubbed the "(Insert Race Distance) National Championships", where the distance ranges anywhere from a mile up to a marathon. While each race provides some prize money on their own to the top finishers, the series is scored grand prix style with the top-15 finishers at each stop invited to the year end "championship" race in Alexandria, VA duking it out for yet more prize money.

At some point during the year, I was fortunate enough to have cherry-picked arguably one of the lesser competitive stops on the circuit (The 25KM championships in Grand Rapids in May) and snagged a top 15 finish. Knowing that only the true elites in the running for some grand prix money would show up for the year end championship, I nonetheless decided it may possibly be a once in a lifetime opportunity for me to run in the year end race. So along with an excuse to visit my sister and friends on the east coast, I entered the championship race this past weekend.

Part 2: An unexpected meeting

Expectations for a fast time coming into the race were fairly low. I had gone for an Olympic Marathon Trials qualifier the weekend before in Indianapolis and fell off pace before even reaching halfway. (although I did hang on for 8K/5M/10K PRs before watching my shot at a half-marathon PR disappear over the last 5K). At the beginning of race week there were 25 entrants in the 12K championship race, but with a few more race week scratches it seems like I may have an outside shot at squeaking out a top-20 finish. (out of 20-22 starters :P ). I flew into Maryland on Thursday and spent a couple of days with sister and her husband just relaxing and enjoying myself before driving down on Saturday to spend the night before the race in the host hotel.

When I checked in, I was informed by the nice lady at the front desk my reservation had been cancelled. Well... shucks, I tracked down the event manager for the race and he informed me he was responsible for cancelling my reservation but because he was giving me one of the free rooms that race had for elite athletes! (I didn't initially qualify for one of these rooms, but I guess they had a surplus with the lower than expected turnout for this year's race). While free, the room would come with a random roommate, and my roommate for the night would be.... (drum roll).... 2012 Olympian Donn Cabral! (http://www.usatf.org/Athlete-Bios/Donn-Cabral.aspx).

Moments after I was told of my room assignment and got my keys from the event manager, we were all ushered into a pre-race technical meeting where they went over the race logistics as well as a quick course preview. We were told to sign a W9 if we want to collect prize money the next day (I didn't waste their time or paper filling one out), and zoned out when they talked about where to go to get interviewed post-race. Right after the meeting, I grabbed my bib and shirt and started heading upstairs when a young skinny kid approached me:

"Hi, are you Steve?"

"Yes"

"Hi I am Donn, I think we are roommates for the night?"
Inside I am thinking to myself "!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!"... "Oh yeah, Matt mentioned that when he gave me the keys before the meeting"

Part 3: You guys want to know what Olympians eat the night before racing for $20,000?

After Donn and I got back upstairs to the room and put our stuff down, he asked me if I had any dinner plans, which I didn't. He then mentioned that one of the girls competing in the women's race tomorrow had invited him to dinner with her friends/teammates at a nearby Italian restaurant (which sounded standard to me) but he doesn't do Italian the night before most races (what?!). After pulling up google map we found Mexican place around the corner, which he seemed pretty enthusiastic about, so Mexican it is! Alas, it was still early so he invited me to go for a shakeout run with him. With little/no expectations for the race the next day and an opportunity to log a few miles with an Olympian, I accepted. There is an urban legend that some of you may have heard that world class runners actually do their shakeouts/warm-ups/easy runs extremely slow, and while I have a small sample size to work with, my 3.5mi/31:30 run (9min/mi pace) sure didn't debunk that theory.

When we got back I took a quick shower and then we were on the way. This guy sure didn't mess around, he got their big burrito with beans / rice / mole sauce, even ordering a soup to go to snack on as we were relaxing in the room before bedtime.

Part 4: The calm before the storm

I slept pretty soundly, and almost past my alarm. Alas, my roommate who was actually there to race and try to make some money didn't, and woke me up. We went upstairs to the hospitality suite to grab some breakfast, some oatmeal and coffee. While I was trying to wake up, some girl started chatting with Donn. I quickly gathered they knew each other quite well, and when we left he casually remarked "sorry about that, that was my ex-teammate Julie Culley, she retired after the 2012 trials" "Julie Culley that won the 2012 Olympic trials? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Julie_Culley?""Yep"

When we got back to the room we quickly grabbed our stuff and headed over to a pre-race area they had set aside for us by the start line. I used the porta potty and headed out for my warmup, coincidentally when Donn was about to start his as well. He looked at me and in an almost apologetic voice said "sorry man, I usually warm up alone", which completely surprised me since I wasn't even expecting to tag along, but for someone of that level to even make that consideration of me caught me off guard. "oh of course dude, do your thing". Surprisingly, I quickly pull away from him on our warmup, yet another example supporting the "elites warmup slow". When I got back, I had the pleasure of waiting behind Molly Huddle in the porta potty line, and the whole time I was just thinking about how jealous one of my good friends is going to be later. (he has a huge crush on her).

Part 5: The Race

This was fairly uneventful. The gun goes off and I am trying to run as comfortably hard as possible. I don't know why I am even surprised at this point, but due to the tactical nature of these type of races I am still fairly close behind the leaders at the mile. Then we crest a second hill and somebody up front started pulling away, or I start fading a bit. Fortunately for me, even though I was completely outclassed by everyone in my race, there is also an open race that runs in conjunction with the championship event, so there's a mass of open runners behind me. 2 miles or so into the race, a couple of the guys from the open race blow by me and I try unsuccessfully to latch on. After seeing my splits for the 3rd and 4th mile (both a few seconds slower than my half-marathon PR pace) I get more and more discouraged, then finally I just decided I would run the last half of the race as hard as I can without looking at my watch again. The downside to this strategy is that there are huge clocks at 8K and 10K marks and when I hit 10K I quickly realized if I don't close the last 2K of this thing somewhat fast I may end up running close to the women's course record and possibly get chicked if Molly Huddle breaks her own CR. Thankfully, with a mile to go one of my friends who live in the area cheer loudly for me and give me just the boost I need. I chase down one of the guys in the open race with half a mile to go and pretty much gun it as hard as I can the last 2 minutes of the race since I didn't want to get passed in the homestretch. Final result - 37:35 (5:02 pace) and 19th out of 20 in the championship race, I did get beat by 5 guys in the open race, then again 2 of the 5 have qualified for next spring's Olympic Marathon trials. I plugged the time into a calculator and it's basically my half-marathon PR pace. Obviously I wasn't super psyched about it, but considering it was at the end of a hard training cycle and I managed to not get chicked I'll take it. Rough splits - 4:54, 5:02, 5:05, 5:07, 5:04, 5:05, 4:58, 2:17/0.49 (4:41/mi)

Part 6: The aftermath

I went for a cooldown after the race and then had a delicious brunch at a nearby cafe with one of my friends from high school who came to watch the race. On my drive back to my sister's house as well as on my flight home I had a lot of time to reflect on the experience. It was definitely a nice unexpected experience to spend a few hours with an Olympian and get a glimpse of a true professional runner's life, and overall while I ran below expectations compared to what my recent training and races indicate I should be able to do, it's definitely a performance I wouldn't have been capable of even a year ago, and light years ahead of where I was 2-3 years ago. I guess sometimes you just have to take a step back to put things in perspective. It's time for a couple of weeks of downtime before I make one last push for my last two shots at a trials qualifier.

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Part 3: You guys want to know what Olympians eat the night before racing for $20,000?

After Donn and I got back upstairs to the room and put our stuff down, he asked me if I had any dinner plans, which I didn't. He then mentioned that one of the girls competing in the women's race tomorrow had invited him to dinner with her friends/teammates at a nearby Italian restaurant (which sounded standard to me) but he doesn't do Italian the night before most races (what?!). After pulling up google map we found Mexican place around the corner, which he seemed pretty enthusiastic about, so Mexican it is! Alas, it was still early so he invited me to go for a shakeout run with him. With little/no expectations for the race the next day and an opportunity to log a few miles with an Olympian, I accepted. There is an urban legend that some of you may have heard that world class runners actually do their shakeouts/warm-ups/easy runs extremely slow, and while I have a small sample size to work with, my 3.5mi/31:30 run (9min/mi pace) sure didn't debunk that theory.

When we got back I took a quick shower and then we were on the way. This guy sure didn't mess around, he got their big burrito with beans / rice / mole sauce, even ordering a soup to go to snack on as we were relaxing in the room before bedtime.

WTF? I eat anything even close to this and I'm tasting it all race long. I eat this exact meal and I'm throwing it back up by mile 2.

:X:

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2015 USA 12KM Championships - Trip/Race Report

Part 6: The aftermath

and overall while I ran below expectations compared to what my recent training and races indicate I should be able to do, it's definitely a performance I wouldn't have been capable of even a year ago, and light years ahead of where I was 2-3 years ago. I guess sometimes you just have to take a step back to put things in perspective.

I love to do this after big races, both successful and unsuccessful. It's a great way to remain grounded amidst getting wrapped up on all these crazy expectations we tend to put on ourselves. :thumbup:

Thanks for posting that RR! As cool as it was for you to get a glimpse into an Olympian's life, I feel the same way when you post an in depth RR. Cool stuff!

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Incredible experience and incredibly well captured Steve. I just shared this with my son over email as I am traveling for work. He was just on an overnight recruiting visit this past weekend and he did great but has a hard time talking about himself (not a bad thing). He and I have been talking about the difference between being boastful and prideful as he has told me how much he hates talking about himself. IMO your write up is a stellar example of how someone can be incredibly prideful while still remaining very very humble. Thanks for the mentoring moments provided!!!

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pbm- How does the forecast look? What's the race strategy?

His dress rehearsal looked awesome. Can't wait to see what he does.

The weather looks good except that it could be windy. I found out that Ned will be running with me the first half of the race, which is awesome and should be a huge help.

The plan is to wear a 2:59:59 pace band, but I think I can do better than that. How much better is really the question. I am hoping that the HRM will be working properly and I will be able to pickup the pace based on HR. So the preliminary plan is to run the first few miles at 6:52 and then take a peak at the HR, if it is in the mid 150s like I am expecting I will pickup the pace so that the HR is 158-160 until the half. For my best paced marathon my avg HR was 163 so I am thinking if I do this it should set me up for a strong 2nd half.

I never thought I'd be shooting for something faster than 2:59:59 this cycle, but my pace/HR numbers the past 1.5 months have me convinced that I am capable of more.

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pbm- How does the forecast look? What's the race strategy?

His dress rehearsal looked awesome. Can't wait to see what he does.

The weather looks good except that it could be windy. I found out that Ned will be running with me the first half of the race, which is awesome and should be a huge help.

The plan is to wear a 2:59:59 pace band, but I think I can do better than that. How much better is really the question. I am hoping that the HRM will be working properly and I will be able to pickup the pace based on HR. So the preliminary plan is to run the first few miles at 6:52 and then take a peak at the HR, if it is in the mid 150s like I am expecting I will pickup the pace so that the HR is 158-160 until the half. For my best paced marathon my avg HR was 163 so I am thinking if I do this it should set me up for a strong 2nd half.

I never thought I'd be shooting for something faster than 2:59:59 this cycle, but my pace/HR numbers the past 1.5 months have me convinced that I am capable of more.

Sounds like a great plan! I agree that you might be able to run several minutes faster if all goes well.

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pbm- How does the forecast look? What's the race strategy?

His dress rehearsal looked awesome. Can't wait to see what he does.

The weather looks good except that it could be windy. I found out that Ned will be running with me the first half of the race, which is awesome and should be a huge help.

The plan is to wear a 2:59:59 pace band, but I think I can do better than that. How much better is really the question. I am hoping that the HRM will be working properly and I will be able to pickup the pace based on HR. So the preliminary plan is to run the first few miles at 6:52 and then take a peak at the HR, if it is in the mid 150s like I am expecting I will pickup the pace so that the HR is 158-160 until the half. For my best paced marathon my avg HR was 163 so I am thinking if I do this it should set me up for a strong 2nd half.

I never thought I'd be shooting for something faster than 2:59:59 this cycle, but my pace/HR numbers the past 1.5 months have me convinced that I am capable of more.

Sounds like a great plan! I agree that you might be able to run several minutes faster if all goes well.

2:55

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pbm- How does the forecast look? What's the race strategy?

His dress rehearsal looked awesome. Can't wait to see what he does.

The weather looks good except that it could be windy. I found out that Ned will be running with me the first half of the race, which is awesome and should be a huge help.

The plan is to wear a 2:59:59 pace band, but I think I can do better than that. How much better is really the question. I am hoping that the HRM will be working properly and I will be able to pickup the pace based on HR. So the preliminary plan is to run the first few miles at 6:52 and then take a peak at the HR, if it is in the mid 150s like I am expecting I will pickup the pace so that the HR is 158-160 until the half. For my best paced marathon my avg HR was 163 so I am thinking if I do this it should set me up for a strong 2nd half.

I never thought I'd be shooting for something faster than 2:59:59 this cycle, but my pace/HR numbers the past 1.5 months have me convinced that I am capable of more.

My running sucks right now, so I just hope I can support you for longer than 5mi before I start sucking wind! I was glad you said yes - otherwise I wasn't really too excited to run Philly. I've been a total slug since my marathon - so I feel like I'd just be going through the motions. Selfishly, running with you gives me a purpose!

The wind looks to be W, so that should bode well once you get turned around at mile 19.5 in Manyunk. Its going to make the hills at 8-9 a little more challenging, but you'll still be fresh there.

Looking forward to seeing you cross the line with a 2 still on the clock!

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Awesome Steve!

Part 3: You guys want to know what Olympians eat the night before racing for $20,000?

After Donn and I got back upstairs to the room and put our stuff down, he asked me if I had any dinner plans, which I didn't. He then mentioned that one of the girls competing in the women's race tomorrow had invited him to dinner with her friends/teammates at a nearby Italian restaurant (which sounded standard to me) but he doesn't do Italian the night before most races (what?!). After pulling up google map we found Mexican place around the corner, which he seemed pretty enthusiastic about, so Mexican it is! Alas, it was still early so he invited me to go for a shakeout run with him. With little/no expectations for the race the next day and an opportunity to log a few miles with an Olympian, I accepted. There is an urban legend that some of you may have heard that world class runners actually do their shakeouts/warm-ups/easy runs extremely slow, and while I have a small sample size to work with, my 3.5mi/31:30 run (9min/mi pace) sure didn't debunk that theory.

When we got back I took a quick shower and then we were on the way. This guy sure didn't mess around, he got their big burrito with beans / rice / mole sauce, even ordering a soup to go to snack on as we were relaxing in the room before bedtime.

WTF? I eat anything even close to this and I'm tasting it all race long. I eat this exact meal and I'm throwing it back up by mile 2.

:X:

Really? While obviously I'm going nowhere near that speed (heart rates might be similar), that meal sounds perfect.

when a young skinny kid approached me

5'9.5", 148 ain't skinny!

Yeah, I'm basically a good dump away from that! :unsure:

:lol: I'm a 30 lb. dump from that. so yeah, that's skinny.

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pbm- How does the forecast look? What's the race strategy?

His dress rehearsal looked awesome. Can't wait to see what he does.

The weather looks good except that it could be windy. I found out that Ned will be running with me the first half of the race, which is awesome and should be a huge help.

The plan is to wear a 2:59:59 pace band, but I think I can do better than that. How much better is really the question. I am hoping that the HRM will be working properly and I will be able to pickup the pace based on HR. So the preliminary plan is to run the first few miles at 6:52 and then take a peak at the HR, if it is in the mid 150s like I am expecting I will pickup the pace so that the HR is 158-160 until the half. For my best paced marathon my avg HR was 163 so I am thinking if I do this it should set me up for a strong 2nd half.

I never thought I'd be shooting for something faster than 2:59:59 this cycle, but my pace/HR numbers the past 1.5 months have me convinced that I am capable of more.

My running sucks right now, so I just hope I can support you for longer than 5mi before I start sucking wind! I was glad you said yes - otherwise I wasn't really too excited to run Philly. I've been a total slug since my marathon - so I feel like I'd just be going through the motions. Selfishly, running with you gives me a purpose!

The wind looks to be W, so that should bode well once you get turned around at mile 19.5 in Manyunk. Its going to make the hills at 8-9 a little more challenging, but you'll still be fresh there.

Looking forward to seeing you cross the line with a 2 still on the clock!

So you're pacing? How does that work? Are you signed up for the full?

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pbm- How does the forecast look? What's the race strategy?

His dress rehearsal looked awesome. Can't wait to see what he does.

The weather looks good except that it could be windy. I found out that Ned will be running with me the first half of the race, which is awesome and should be a huge help.

The plan is to wear a 2:59:59 pace band, but I think I can do better than that. How much better is really the question. I am hoping that the HRM will be working properly and I will be able to pickup the pace based on HR. So the preliminary plan is to run the first few miles at 6:52 and then take a peak at the HR, if it is in the mid 150s like I am expecting I will pickup the pace so that the HR is 158-160 until the half. For my best paced marathon my avg HR was 163 so I am thinking if I do this it should set me up for a strong 2nd half.

I never thought I'd be shooting for something faster than 2:59:59 this cycle, but my pace/HR numbers the past 1.5 months have me convinced that I am capable of more.

My running sucks right now, so I just hope I can support you for longer than 5mi before I start sucking wind! I was glad you said yes - otherwise I wasn't really too excited to run Philly. I've been a total slug since my marathon - so I feel like I'd just be going through the motions. Selfishly, running with you gives me a purpose!

The wind looks to be W, so that should bode well once you get turned around at mile 19.5 in Manyunk. Its going to make the hills at 8-9 a little more challenging, but you'll still be fresh there.

Looking forward to seeing you cross the line with a 2 still on the clock!

So you're pacing? How does that work? Are you signed up for the full?

I've been signed up for the half since April (been running the full or half here since 2010). I originally wanted to PR this race, but I became a self-loathing slacker after my September marathon. I figured since I wasn't running Philly for any real reason, I'd try to run the first half with pbm to help him get the sub 3.

I vividly remember SC hugely helping me in Philly 3 years ago by running the first 19 together. I hope I can do the same for pbm.

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pbm- How does the forecast look? What's the race strategy?

His dress rehearsal looked awesome. Can't wait to see what he does.

The weather looks good except that it could be windy. I found out that Ned will be running with me the first half of the race, which is awesome and should be a huge help.

The plan is to wear a 2:59:59 pace band, but I think I can do better than that. How much better is really the question. I am hoping that the HRM will be working properly and I will be able to pickup the pace based on HR. So the preliminary plan is to run the first few miles at 6:52 and then take a peak at the HR, if it is in the mid 150s like I am expecting I will pickup the pace so that the HR is 158-160 until the half. For my best paced marathon my avg HR was 163 so I am thinking if I do this it should set me up for a strong 2nd half.

I never thought I'd be shooting for something faster than 2:59:59 this cycle, but my pace/HR numbers the past 1.5 months have me convinced that I am capable of more.

My running sucks right now, so I just hope I can support you for longer than 5mi before I start sucking wind! I was glad you said yes - otherwise I wasn't really too excited to run Philly. I've been a total slug since my marathon - so I feel like I'd just be going through the motions. Selfishly, running with you gives me a purpose!

The wind looks to be W, so that should bode well once you get turned around at mile 19.5 in Manyunk. Its going to make the hills at 8-9 a little more challenging, but you'll still be fresh there.

Looking forward to seeing you cross the line with a 2 still on the clock!

So you're pacing? How does that work? Are you signed up for the full?

I've been signed up for the half since April (been running the full or half here since 2010). I originally wanted to PR this race, but I became a self-loathing slacker after my September marathon. I figured since I wasn't running Philly for any real reason, I'd try to run the first half with pbm to help him get the sub 3.

I vividly remember SC hugely helping me in Philly 3 years ago by running the first 19 together. I hope I can do the same for pbm.

Does the half and full run the same course simultaneously? Or do you have to sacrifice your half to stay with him?

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Lots of great motivation the last few pages of this thread. Great job guys! I used to be a very, very serious runner. One hour thirty few minute half, and a three thirty on the nose full PR. It's been about 5 or so years since I was in PR shape, and with a 4 month old at home it will be very difficult to get back to even half of what I was.....but this thread is helping. Maybe sign up for a half next year.

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Same exact course, start times, etc. It sets up perfectly for this. The half/full run the same exact 13mi loop at the start, then split off at 0.1mi from the finish. Marathoners go left for another fun filled 13.1mi while the half marathoners finish up to the right.

http://philadelphiamarathon.com/sites/default/files/Full-Half_CourseSplit_2015.pdf

So no I'm not sacrificing anything. Just figured I'd try to support him while I'm capable since I'd just be lolly-gagging around the course.

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Same exact course, start times, etc. It sets up perfectly for this. The half/full run the same exact 13mi loop at the start, then split off at 0.1mi from the finish. Marathoners go left for another fun filled 13.1mi while the half marathoners finish up to the right.

http://philadelphiamarathon.com/sites/default/files/Full-Half_CourseSplit_2015.pdf

So no I'm not sacrificing anything. Just figured I'd try to support him while I'm capable since I'd just be lolly-gagging around the course.

Wow, that's very cool that it works out that way. I've never seen that before. :thumbup:

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Same exact course, start times, etc. It sets up perfectly for this. The half/full run the same exact 13mi loop at the start, then split off at 0.1mi from the finish. Marathoners go left for another fun filled 13.1mi while the half marathoners finish up to the right.

http://philadelphiamarathon.com/sites/default/files/Full-Half_CourseSplit_2015.pdf

So no I'm not sacrificing anything. Just figured I'd try to support him while I'm capable since I'd just be lolly-gagging around the course.

What's your HM PR?

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Same exact course, start times, etc. It sets up perfectly for this. The half/full run the same exact 13mi loop at the start, then split off at 0.1mi from the finish. Marathoners go left for another fun filled 13.1mi while the half marathoners finish up to the right.

http://philadelphiamarathon.com/sites/default/files/Full-Half_CourseSplit_2015.pdf

So no I'm not sacrificing anything. Just figured I'd try to support him while I'm capable since I'd just be lolly-gagging around the course.

What's your HM PR?

1:27:10

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Same exact course, start times, etc. It sets up perfectly for this. The half/full run the same exact 13mi loop at the start, then split off at 0.1mi from the finish. Marathoners go left for another fun filled 13.1mi while the half marathoners finish up to the right.

http://philadelphiamarathon.com/sites/default/files/Full-Half_CourseSplit_2015.pdf

So no I'm not sacrificing anything. Just figured I'd try to support him while I'm capable since I'd just be lolly-gagging around the course.

What's your HM PR?

1:27:10

OK. I was wondering how close you would be if you were feeling surprisingly good and decided to hang with pbm longer (who might be at the half around 1:28 or less).

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Awesome Steve!

Part 3: You guys want to know what Olympians eat the night before racing for $20,000?

After Donn and I got back upstairs to the room and put our stuff down, he asked me if I had any dinner plans, which I didn't. He then mentioned that one of the girls competing in the women's race tomorrow had invited him to dinner with her friends/teammates at a nearby Italian restaurant (which sounded standard to me) but he doesn't do Italian the night before most races (what?!). After pulling up google map we found Mexican place around the corner, which he seemed pretty enthusiastic about, so Mexican it is! Alas, it was still early so he invited me to go for a shakeout run with him. With little/no expectations for the race the next day and an opportunity to log a few miles with an Olympian, I accepted. There is an urban legend that some of you may have heard that world class runners actually do their shakeouts/warm-ups/easy runs extremely slow, and while I have a small sample size to work with, my 3.5mi/31:30 run (9min/mi pace) sure didn't debunk that theory.

When we got back I took a quick shower and then we were on the way. This guy sure didn't mess around, he got their big burrito with beans / rice / mole sauce, even ordering a soup to go to snack on as we were relaxing in the room before bedtime.

WTF? I eat anything even close to this and I'm tasting it all race long. I eat this exact meal and I'm throwing it back up by mile 2.

:X:

Really? While obviously I'm going nowhere near that speed (heart rates might be similar), that meal sounds perfect.

My understanding is that the food from the night before a race just doesn't digest in time to be beneficial. The meal needs a few to several hours to move through the stomach and then a number of hours for the intestines to break it down and generate the glycogen that is used during the race. Two nights before the race is the ideal time for that big meal. :shrug:

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Very cool, Steve. So how did you boy perform after his monster burrito?

Ah, he had a bad race by his standards. Apparently the margin of error is razor thin at that point, he said somebody basically made a move around 4-5 miles and they went from "cruising at 4:50s" to running a sub-4:40s and he just didn't cover it in time.

Incredible experience and incredibly well captured Steve. I just shared this with my son over email as I am traveling for work. He was just on an overnight recruiting visit this past weekend and he did great but has a hard time talking about himself (not a bad thing). He and I have been talking about the difference between being boastful and prideful as he has told me how much he hates talking about himself. IMO your write up is a stellar example of how someone can be incredibly prideful while still remaining very very humble. Thanks for the mentoring moments provided!!!

It's definitely much harder doing it in his shoes. He definitely needs to sell himself, and it's at a point where most kids/teenagers may lack some confidence in that area. I think the coaches want to hear that you have big goals, but you have to believe them yourself as well.

______________________

Another anecdote from my weekend on confidence, the elites definitely have the mental game down. (in terms of believing in themselves). Right before dinner we were looking at the information packet they gave us and specifically the grand prix prize money information. I pointed out that the grand prix pays prize money to the top 5 point earners in the series. Donn then asked me what he would need to do the next day to get enough points to move into the top 5, and I said his only shot at getting enough points is to win the race the next day. He simply muttered "oh" and nodded his head. If he had any doubts about his chances I surely couldn't see it, and this was a steeplechase/5000m specialist that was about to take on some of the top 10K/half-marathon road racers in the country at a distance more suited for the later.

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Same exact course, start times, etc. It sets up perfectly for this. The half/full run the same exact 13mi loop at the start, then split off at 0.1mi from the finish. Marathoners go left for another fun filled 13.1mi while the half marathoners finish up to the right.

http://philadelphiamarathon.com/sites/default/files/Full-Half_CourseSplit_2015.pdf

So no I'm not sacrificing anything. Just figured I'd try to support him while I'm capable since I'd just be lolly-gagging around the course.

What's your HM PR?

1:27:10

OK. I was wondering how close you would be if you were feeling surprisingly good and decided to hang with pbm longer (who might be at the half around 1:28 or less).

Good luck guys. I'll be tracking.

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Awesome Steve!

Part 3: You guys want to know what Olympians eat the night before racing for $20,000?

After Donn and I got back upstairs to the room and put our stuff down, he asked me if I had any dinner plans, which I didn't. He then mentioned that one of the girls competing in the women's race tomorrow had invited him to dinner with her friends/teammates at a nearby Italian restaurant (which sounded standard to me) but he doesn't do Italian the night before most races (what?!). After pulling up google map we found Mexican place around the corner, which he seemed pretty enthusiastic about, so Mexican it is! Alas, it was still early so he invited me to go for a shakeout run with him. With little/no expectations for the race the next day and an opportunity to log a few miles with an Olympian, I accepted. There is an urban legend that some of you may have heard that world class runners actually do their shakeouts/warm-ups/easy runs extremely slow, and while I have a small sample size to work with, my 3.5mi/31:30 run (9min/mi pace) sure didn't debunk that theory.

When we got back I took a quick shower and then we were on the way. This guy sure didn't mess around, he got their big burrito with beans / rice / mole sauce, even ordering a soup to go to snack on as we were relaxing in the room before bedtime.

WTF? I eat anything even close to this and I'm tasting it all race long. I eat this exact meal and I'm throwing it back up by mile 2.

:X:

Really? While obviously I'm going nowhere near that speed (heart rates might be similar), that meal sounds perfect.

when a young skinny kid approached me

5'9.5", 148 ain't skinny!

Yeah, I'm basically a good dump away from that! :unsure:

:lol: I'm a 30 lb. dump from that. so yeah, that's skinny.

I am a bad chain saw accident away from 5' 9.5"!

Go PBM. I can't wait to hear about it. Is it Saturday or Sunday?

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Still no afib since the ablation but man I'm really laboring on my runs. I felt as spent during and at the end of 4M @ 8:05 yesterday as I dind with my HM @ 7:26 four weeks ago. I feel like I'm back to where I was a year ago fitness wise and dreading my runs. I guess I need to be patient but it's really frustrating.

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Still no afib since the ablation but man I'm really laboring on my runs. I felt as spent during and at the end of 4M @ 8:05 yesterday as I dind with my HM @ 7:26 four weeks ago. I feel like I'm back to where I was a year ago fitness wise and dreading my runs. I guess I need to be patient but it's really frustrating.

Was this expected?

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Still no afib since the ablation but man I'm really laboring on my runs. I felt as spent during and at the end of 4M @ 8:05 yesterday as I dind with my HM @ 7:26 four weeks ago. I feel like I'm back to where I was a year ago fitness wise and dreading my runs. I guess I need to be patient but it's really frustrating.

Was this expected?

Not sure. I've read a lot about people taking more time off than I did afterwards. But my doc said as long as my groin is healed I could resume whatever I was doing before with no risk. Didn't really talk about performance expectations. I guess it makes sense that as my heart is still healing it wouldn't be working optimally but I feel so good otherwise that mentally I was expecting to pick up where I left off. I have a follow up in two weeks and I'll get some clarity then, will keep grinding away and hope for a breakthrough in the meantime.

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IMFL Race Report:

GENERAL INFORMATION

Ironman Florida was an afterthought for me this year – I had originally planned to just race Louisville with my buddies. However, as the wife and I have come up with a goal to race my 12 IM to get into the Kona Legacy lottery, when I saw that IMFL was still open via IM Foundation about 6 months ago, I figured that I might as well use the fitness from the Louisville build. It would mean one less overall build as well, which I secretly think was her motivation, and it also let her plan a trip to Disney. So, I sucked it up, paid the $1400, and off to Florida we went.

The best part about Florida is honestly the accommodations. There are literally thousands of condos within walking distance of the race, and it’s offseason for them, so you can get a nice place to stay really cheaply. We liked staying at Laketown Wharf last time (as it’s on the bike course, but on a corner with an exit on the back side so you can get your car out while the race is going), and I was able to find a 2Br with a bunk bed area condo there for $150 a night all-in (including taxes/fees/maid/etc. – a bargain). Since we had a spare bedroom, the in-laws came along to stay for free and help out with the kids – double bargain.

We drove down to Florida from Atlanta first thing Thursday morning, as checkin concluded Thursday, bike and gear back drop off on Friday, race Saturday, Disney Sunday – Wednesday. Had the family up and out the door by 7:00am, and of course it was raining, which if you’re familiar with Atlanta traffic means that everyone drives like a moron. After a couple of stops for kid potty breaks, we make it down to Panama City about 1:00pm EST. I put the kids/wife down for a nap and I go check in/walk around the expo. One plus about the IM Foundation slot – I got to swing by the Foundation booth to pick up my free gift. Now I’ve got a $700 hat to add to my collection J. Nothing exciting to report either that night or Friday night – went to the beach, played at the pool with the kids, etc.

PRE RACE

Race morning went almost according to plan; I got a solid night of sleep, woke up at around 4:15am and started checking things off the list. Hopped in the shower to wake up, body glided all the nether bits, ankles, underarms, etc., tossed on my De Soto Forza Riviera shorts (love these things) and a De Soto Carrera top. For breakfast was a bagel with peanut butter. Grabbed the Special Needs bags (minimally packed this time, only a spare contact lens/redbull in my bike SN, and only gloves/new socks/spare contact in the run SN, I was hoping to be done before I would need a headlamp) and headed down to transition to drop them off and get body marked.

The water temp had been borderline all week, so when I get down to transition I heard that the race was NOT wetsuit legal –the first time in IMFL history that had happened. They would let you race with a wetsuit, but you’d start 10 minutes after the non-wetsuit wave, and wouldn’t be eligible for awards or Kona slots. Surf was huge as well, probably 6 foot swells (http://imgur.com/1umJNse). Nastiness.

They had changed the IMFL swim start to a self-seeded wave start, which pretty much worked terribly. Everyone crammed into the corral with no actual seeding, but since I’m a pretty average swimmer I figured that no matter where I started, I’d get both swum over and swim over folks. So, I just headed about halfway back into the crowd. The sheer number of athletes starting was amazing – there were pink and green swim caps everywhere. You honestly forget how many people 3,000 is – it’s literally a mass of humanity.


SWIM START

I hit my watch start button about 2 seconds after I run under the arch. I immediately notice that my goggles are a little more foggy than I am used to and that the dark mirror is making it hard to see since we are only a couple of minutes past dawn. I will want the mirror later, so I must deal with it early on.

I tried to start run far to the right of the swim to let the current bring me to the first turn (this is a two loop rectangular swim that goes out south 0.5 miles, east 0.25 miles, north 0.5 miles and then along the beach over the timing mat and do it again.

The contact was pretty rough, I was getting my ### kicked and punched and all beat to hell. Even after getting through the breakers, the rolling waves still felt pretty huge to me, I would try to sight when at the crest of the wave, but it still seemed tough to see from buoy to buoy. This was seriously the worst part of the race – I actually thought that I wouldn’t be able to finish the swim. A few thoughts of getting pulled out of the water by a boat or kayak. I can handle the contact, and I can handle the swells, but dealing with both I seriously thought I might drown a couple times. A few times kicked in the face, a few times dragged by the feet, a few times tangled in the arms, a couple times fixing the goggles after a good kick, a couple of breast strokes to see where the hell I was and I make the first turn buoy. I took it super-wide to avoid the pileup, and after that it was just swimming, thankfully, except for one moron on the back side who I think actually tried to dunk me under water. I found some clean water, and after the turn we were swimming with the current, so it got a ton easier very quickly.

After an uneventful way back because I’m way wide right, I get into shallow water and see people walking in, I am usually the guy that swims until I literally can’t swim anymore, but the small breakers were crashing on me and I was not making the progress that I had hoped, so on my feet and I am running.

Per usual when running after swim, my heart rate spikes and I feel like I am in the last 100 yards of a 5k. I run as far to the west as the crowd and volunteers will allow, which is almost back to the start and I am back in the water (where I instantly settle back in to a groove and no longer feel like I am sprinting a 5k). Second lap was pretty uneventful, but I could tell about halfway through that I was getting tired and my form was slipping, so I slowed down a bit. No real goal time, just hoping to beat my 2012 time, which due to the surf and contact didn’t happen. I’m in significantly better condition and am a much better swimmer now, but like you see above, this was nasty.

No splits on the IM website (funny how they have splits in the live tracker, but not in the results pages), but my overall swim time was 1:26:16. Louisville was 1:10:04 (probably more indicative of my actual swim fitness), Chattanooga 2014 was 55:59, Florida 2012 was 1:23:45.

T1

I ran hard up the beach, skipped the wetsuit strippers because I didn’t have a wetsuit on, but did hit the freshwater showers since I wouldn’t be changing clothes. I didn’t want to have salt chafing, so I lingered longer than I probably should have in the showers. Saw my wife in the chute between the swim and the T1 bag pickup. Grab my bag and head into the men’s changing tent, and the first bare a$$ greets me as I turn the corner into the tent. That didn’t take long, lol.

Despite the madness of the changing tent I manage to find a spot next to the wall pretty quickly, open my bag, and dump it out. Put on socks/shoes, helmet, toss my gels in my pocket, put on the sunglasses, and I’m off. Running toward racks, I have a long circuitous run to my rack, but I can see the volunteers standing by it so I start yelling my number at them. By the time I reach my rack a volunteer has my bike, I bend over put my shoes on, he hands me the bike right in time, I gingerly run the rest of way in cleats and I mount just past the mount line and I am OUT. T1 time 7:06 (9:12 in 2012), so 2+ minutes better than the same race 3 years ago.


BIKE

I was hoping to break 6 hours on the course, but avoid going out too fast and dying the second half. This meant, however, I was going backwards through the field for the first hour or so, as people are flying by me. This is a long race, folks. Huge packs of riders were passing me like I’m standing still. One big hill on the first half of the course, the bridge at about mile 11. I took that opportunity to get up out of the saddle, even though I didn’t need to, and stretch everything out. It would be the last opportunity to do so for 50 miles.

Brief note about nutrition – my plan was to race off of the course offerings, which were Gatorade Endurance, Gu, and Clif Bars. Had a couple spare/emergency gels and bars with me, just in case, but essentially lived off the course. I had pre-filled my aero bottle with water, grabbed a water bottle at every aid station, and filled it up. Drank to thirst, which was about a bottle of water/hr, had a gel or half a bar every 20-30 minutes, and used Gatorade to switch things up when I wanted something other than water. Seemed to work perfectly for me – I didn’t have to carry much, and I never seemed to have an energy issue. Took a couple extra-strength Tylenol at about mile 25, and two more about mile 100, as the back of my neck tends to act up on long aero rides, but that was about it.

This course is pretty crowded, especially since I came out of the swim behind schedule. I give the guys a free pass in the first 20 miles or so, but after that, the packs are obviously intentionally cheating. The course, however, has been changed since 2012 – they eliminated the awful out and back where Special Needs was, and added a different out and back on a freshly paved road that was like butter. Seriously, this is the fastest IM bike course I’ve seen. Super fast. I also thought this was a very fairly refereed course. Tons of martials on motorcycles, and I saw lots of folks in penalty tents.

I’m literally flying along, at somewhere around 21mph, and am thinking I’m going to smash my course goal of 6 hours with something along the lines of a 5:20 bike split, and at mile 107 my entire left leg cramps up. I don’t know why (I’d assume lack of salt, it was hot out there), but I had to pull over and stretch for 4-5 minutes, and honestly thought that I was going to have to walk my bike back into town. After I got everything loosened back up, I was able to resume riding, although I soft pedaled the last 5 miles. Probably cost me a sub 5:20 split, but I still rode a 5:24:58 (20.69mph), which is pretty screaming IMO.


Louisville was 5:54:03, Chattanooga for 116 miles was 5:39:39, 2012 Florida was 6:12:09.

T2

Ran into room where gear bags were and grabbed mine with no issue, bag was open before I got to change tent. The madness, as I’m sure you’d figure, was far less. I actually found a seat, and had a helpful volunteer. Off with the cycling shoes/socks, re-body glided the feet, put back on some fresh socks, and new sunglasses. Grabbed my visor, and I was out. As I ran out of T2, though, I realized I still had my bag in my hand, so I had to run back a couple hundred feet and toss it into the change tent. Probably cost me 30 seconds or so. Hit the sunscreen volunteers this time (because there was a cute girl who offered to lube me up J), and I was out the run exit. T2 time 5:21 (4:59 in 2012, so pretty comparable when controlling for my brain fart).

RUN

I am off to run, I put in some pretty decent run mileage this year, but with Louisville so recent I really was just hoping to not fall apart. I was thinking that mile 90 of the bike course would be when I started to feel it in my legs, but actually felt pretty good starting to run. Temperatures were great – low 80s and overcast, so didn’t have to worry a ton about the heat. This course is a double out and back to the St. Andrews State Park, about 6.5 miles each way. Similar to the bike course, also super flat.

I didn’t really have a run nutrition plan, as I generally go with gels/water/Gatorade for the first 13 miles or so, then switch from gels to coke on the second half. But, I’m pretty lucky in that my stomach can tolerate most things, so I don’t have to worry too much about what I’m taking in.

The first (and last) 1.5 miles of each loop are along Thomas Drive, so there are plenty of spectators cheering, music playing, etc. Tons of crowd support. The next 3.5-4 miles, though, are through residential neighborhoods in PCB that never seem to end. Then, there’s about another mile to 1.5 miles up to the park and into the park for the turnaround. About mile 10 is where I died a quick, painful death on this course. There was just nothing left. I went from 8:30/9:00 minutes/mile to trying not to walk in the span of an instant. I finally suffered through to Special Needs where I stopped to change socks. My feet, although I re-lubed in T2, were feeling blistery on the insides of my arch, so I wanted to lube them up again – unfortunately, there were no chairs in SN this year, so I grabbed my bag and sat down on the ground. Another bad move. I got one sock off, one foot lubed, and a new sock on when my left leg cramped up on me again. I felt it coming and was able to at least stand up before it fully locked up, but couldn’t bend down to tie my shoe and had to have a volunteer do it. After a couple minutes massaging/wincing, I passed on trying to change the other sock and headed out.

I can’t say much about the second lap – like I said, a sufferfest of trying to keep moving forward. As I’m leaving the park, it basically falls into full nightfall. The next 3.5-4 miles, through dark neighborhoods, were the worst part of the run. It was very lonely, I was the only person running (for the most part, some people would run for a few steps and then lapse back into a walk). It’s very true, what you hear, that an Ironman run course is littered with the carnage of people who buggered their bike pacing. That second lap, I’d say 90% of the athletes were walking.

Once you get out of the neighborhoods, though, the crowds pick back up. I’d say that the crowd support, by this time, is getting pretty raucous. Crazy ladies (and dudes) are out in full costume. I make the turn to go past Alvin’s Island and I can hear the finish line announcer, and see the lights. After a long finisher chute, it’s done. I am tired. Run time was 4:18:51, disappointing after going sub-4 (3:58:29 at Louisville), but I’ll take it.

Overall time 11:22:30, so only 5 minutes slower than Louisville overall, but with a much tougher swim (about 15 minutes) and slower (although similar difficulty) run (by 20 minutes), but a much faster (30 minutes) bike. Transition times make up the difference

OVERALL RESULTS

The first number is gender place, the second division (M35-39), and the last is overall. I was 784/100/968 in Florida in 2012, 284/58/336 in Chattanooga in 2014, was 240/61/279 in Louisville, and 230/55/292 in Florida. I’m shocked that I was able to actually place better in Florida than Louisville 4 weeks before, although the results are reasonably similar and could easily be influenced by who showed up to race. Not too shabby for such a quick turnaround. I’m registered for Chattanooga at the end of September 2016, and am going to race Florida again next year also, so hopefully the 6 week differential next year will allow me even more recovery time.

POST RACE

I was met at the finish by the wife and father-in-law, who had brought along the youngest daughter from the condo (she’s 1) while the bigger 2 (the 3 and 4 year olds) stayed at the room with the MIL. Took a couple pictures, and then started the maybe ¼ mile walk back. Hopped in the shower with the chocolate milk while my wife walked over to the local Backyard Burgers to grab some dinner for everyone. I’m usually not hungry for a while after a race, but this was apparently the anomaly. I was starving, consuming my 2 burgers and fries, finished each of the big kids’ burgers and fries (I’d guess I consumed something along the lines of 3.5 burgers and 3 servings fries), and finished a liter of chocolate milk. We also had been keeping the Disney trip a surprise, so we sprung that one on the big kids, who were predictably excited.

After eating, I walked back over to transition to grab the bike and gear bags, then headed to bed. Had tons of trouble sleeping (also an anomaly, usually I sleep like a baby) so was up half the night. The next morning, the in-laws were heading back to Atlanta while we packed everything up and drove to Orlando to go to Disney.

DISNEY

We got to Disney around 2pm on Sunday – part of the sales pitch the wife gave me was that we’d be eligible for their Free Dining, so I (in my predictable day subsequent post race hunger) could gorge myself at Disney’s expense. Obviously trying to maximize our free dining, we selected character dining as much as we reasonably could. Our dining schedule was setup as: Sunday evening – Akershus at Epcot, Monday morning – Be Our Guest, Monday evening – Crystal Palace, Tuesday lunch – Hollywood and Vine, Wednesday breakfast – 1900 Park Fair, while filling in the remaining with QS and snack-credit meals.

We got to Pop Century and checked in, no problem, and then headed over to Epcot. Our first Fastpass was for Soarin’ at 5:00 and we barely made it, with me stumbling as fast as I could through the park (wife was wearing the 1-year old in the Boba and pushing the big ones in a double stroller to try to make it easy on me). Met Mickey/Minnie/Goofy, and rode Spaceship Earth before heading to Akershus, where the appetizer bar took a beating. We got out of there at about 10pm, though, and after stumbling back to Pop I slept like a baby.

Monday was Magic Kingdom first thing, for Be Our Guest at 8:00am. I’d say I’m somewhere around 80% by this time, though, so I’m getting around much better. Trying to get kids up and out the door, though, is like herding cats. Spent the morning there, and had lunch at Columbia House before heading back to Pop for kid naps. Monday evening was back at MK for all of our FP+ rides and Crystal Palace. Unfortunately, though, my wife got really really sick Monday night (a cold, not food poisoning or anything) which meant that I had to sleep with both the 3 year old and the 1 year old in a Queen bed, along with trying to keep all 3 kids away from her as much as possible.

This theme continued the whole rest of the trip – me trying to recover while walking around a Disney park, while trying to keep all 3 kids away from their mother. Hollywood Studios on Tuesday was terrible. The wife felt awful, Hollywood and Vine was a disaster (both the 1 year old and the 4 year old puked at the table), crazy kids running around everywhere, food was mediocre, etc. As a matter of fact, I don’t know that I’d go back to H&V ever again, it was that bad. 1900 Park Fair, though, was fantastic. I’d highly recommend it, although a bit pricey if you paid for it (I think it was $38/adult and $15/kid for breakfast, so after tax/tip it would’ve been $130 for us to eat breakfast), but the food was good, atmosphere fantastic, and characters were great. We left on Wednesday after spending the morning at MK, and drove back to Atlanta.

I’m now in “offseason” mode, I guess. I quit with the pool sessions in the mornings, at least until it warms up a bit after the New Year. I’m still riding, but have yet to run again after IMFL. I’ll try to add back in some morning bike sessions next week and some lunch runs, but won’t ramp up again until I put together a mini-build for the Chattanooga 70.3 in May.

Edited by ThreeThousand
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Still no afib since the ablation but man I'm really laboring on my runs. I felt as spent during and at the end of 4M @ 8:05 yesterday as I dind with my HM @ 7:26 four weeks ago. I feel like I'm back to where I was a year ago fitness wise and dreading my runs. I guess I need to be patient but it's really frustrating.

Was this expected?

Not sure. I've read a lot about people taking more time off than I did afterwards. But my doc said as long as my groin is healed I could resume whatever I was doing before with no risk. Didn't really talk about performance expectations. I guess it makes sense that as my heart is still healing it wouldn't be working optimally but I feel so good otherwise that mentally I was expecting to pick up where I left off. I have a follow up in two weeks and I'll get some clarity then, will keep grinding away and hope for a breakthrough in the meantime.

Took me about 7 weeks or so to feel normal again. Felt like the ablation shaved off all my cardio fitness immediately following the procedure and then one day, it was just back. You gotta be patient but it does suck.

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Wow, ThreeThousand! Great Race Report - and you threw in a Disney Report as well for extra credit.

I can't swim and am not real comfortable in the water (weird for a guy who spent all his summers growing up on a boat commercial fishing), so that swim description gave me anxiety. Brutal.

Congrats on a great race, and enjoy the offseason!

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Per usual when running after swim, my heart rate spikes and I feel like I am in the last 100 yards of a 5k.

First off, spectacular race. Sub 12 really is an incredible result.

Second, mine also does this.

Surf was huge as well, probably 6 foot swells (http://imgur.com/1umJNse). Nastiness.

I can't swim and am not real comfortable in the water (weird for a guy who spent all his summers growing up on a boat commercial fishing), so that swim description gave me anxiety. Brutal.

OK, I just gotta say those swim conditions look awesome. I love swimming in stuff like that.

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This is the downside to registering for a race 7 months in advance...

We're only 45mins from Philly, but it's always a hassle to drive in and park before all of the road closures. We've always kicked around staying the night in Philly, but always decide not to because of the cost. So I go to print out my race confirmation for packet pickup and I open the email to see its a confirmation for a hotel. WTF? I bought a hotel but not the race??? Turns out I did register for the race (whew!) and must've bought the room the same day (4/1). I guess we're staying the night! :bag::lol:

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This is the downside to registering for a race 7 months in advance...

We're only 45mins from Philly, but it's always a hassle to drive in and park before all of the road closures. We've always kicked around staying the night in Philly, but always decide not to because of the cost. So I go to print out my race confirmation for packet pickup and I open the email to see its a confirmation for a hotel. WTF? I bought a hotel but not the race??? Turns out I did register for the race (whew!) and must've bought the room the same day (4/1). I guess we're staying the night! :bag::lol:

That's funny, where are you staying? I guess you are picking up your packet tomorrow then. I will be picking mine up during lunch today.

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This is the downside to registering for a race 7 months in advance...

We're only 45mins from Philly, but it's always a hassle to drive in and park before all of the road closures. We've always kicked around staying the night in Philly, but always decide not to because of the cost. So I go to print out my race confirmation for packet pickup and I open the email to see its a confirmation for a hotel. WTF? I bought a hotel but not the race??? Turns out I did register for the race (whew!) and must've bought the room the same day (4/1). I guess we're staying the night! :bag::lol:

That's funny, where are you staying? I guess you are picking up your packet tomorrow then. I will be picking mine up during lunch today.

Yeah, picking up tomorrow afternoon. We're staying at the Loews Hotel with comfortably numb. We must've coordinated that back in April and just totally forgot!

Assuming you're maroon corral?

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