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Ran a 10k - Official Thread


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6 hours ago, SayWhat? said:

 

I’m just a total fraud as it relates to running.  So I’m trying to figure out what I need to alter in terms of habits, mental approach, etc to change that.  I’d like to become a runner.

Oh, come on man. You are one of the top runners here and it’s not even close. There is no if’s, shovels, or buts about it.

Look - you and I are similar I think. In terms of family stuff, job stuff - just life stuff. But the difference is you have talent. If you are a fraud then my shovels can’t scoop things. 

Look man - if anyone can relate to the things you are going through its this guy. But I don’t ever want to hear you ever again say you are a fraud at running - you are WAY better than that and you know it.

Fight through the hard parts and just get out there.  We can all find 30 minutes a day - and I need to do this as well.

But you know - one foot in front of the other.  Do it man.

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14 hours ago, El Floppo said:

Thanks. Where are you again? Anywhere near new paltz? Used to do tri training up there occasionally- gorgeous area.

The shells I have aren't terribly waterproof...better for wind or light rain, and waterlogged in real downpours like this. The arm warmers seem to work best of the gear I own in the rain.

I've got a busy day starting at 9, so there's no waiting unfortunately. Tomorrow looks nice at least. Im running our slow 7+ m pickle with my pals tomorrow.. I'll switch it up go shorter today and add faster miles at the end tomorrow.

Notice that I'm writing instead of running....

 

 

Ok dammit. I'm off.

I live north of New Paltz.  I’m in Red Hook (just north of Rhinebeck and across the river from Kingston.  And not the Brooklyn Red Hook!)

 

i work in Poughkeepsie. 
 

once life gets back to normal, I’m in Manhattan several times a year for work.

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Just now, SteelCurtain said:

I live north of New Paltz.  I’m in Red Hook (just north of Rhinebeck and across the river from Kingston.  And not the Brooklyn Red Hook!)

 

i work in Poughkeepsie. 
 

once life gets back to normal, I’m in Manhattan several times a year for work.

Thanks! 

Lol...yes...we've had exactly this conversation at least once.

Is the Excalibur hotel/bar still around in Poughkeepsie? ...and now I'm thinking we've probably already had that exact conversation too!

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7 hours ago, SayWhat? said:

I’d love to hear any tips, tricks, lifecycle changes, etc that may aid in making better habits stick. 
 

I’ll echo what others said. I run generally in the AM.  5-7 am is my time when no one in my house is up.  Admittedly, it’s tough in the winter being dark.  
 

i find trying to do it after work is tough due to exhaustion and family obligations.  So the morning it is.

 

the other thing I’ve realized is I’m not doing anything productive after 9 pm.  I’m just watching TV or playing on the internet.  Over time, that’s been my time when i start to head to bed.  I’m usually not sleeping until 10, but that gives me a fighting chance to do the morning workouts.
 

Another thing I do to push myself is I lay out all my workout clothes the night before so that’s one less thing.  And if i don’t workout then i need to put all that stuff away.  Sometimes that’s all I need to get out there.  
 

Finally, I will sometimes make a weekly goal for strava.  It could be a mileage number or something as easy as “i want to run more miles than last week”.  That’s enough for me to sometimes want to bank some miles early in the week or when the weather is favorable so my weekends are easier.  If you look at my strava, I decided i wanted to do 50 miles per week and I’ve been steady on that the last few weeks (and hopefully again this week.)

 

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16 hours ago, El Floppo said:

Thanks! 

Lol...yes...we've had exactly this conversation at least once.

Is the Excalibur hotel/bar still around in Poughkeepsie? ...and now I'm thinking we've probably already had that exact conversation too!

Hmmmm.  I’m not familiar with an Excalibur hotel in Poughkeepsie.  What year was the last time you knew it was open?

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Yesterday's wet and windy (apparently a nor-easter) run went a little faster than I planned, so I could get out of the elements and also get home for a full day I'm chores.

Today was clear, but colder and windier. I had planned on going longer by combining my prospect park loop into my bklyn waterfront usual run, but realized part way into the combine that I had to get home to take floppinho to tennis...and get yelled at for not getting him a bagel sandwich at our local spot first. Fun.

Tried to push in the 4m park loop. Also saw they were having a small race in the park, so I talked to one of the runners in bibs for a sec....50m! Cheered every person I ran by with a bib- pretty hilly course, and cold/windy...inspirimg stuff from the all ages crew I saw racing it.

So windy out there, especially on the manhattan bridge back. A long 14+. Legs were tired, but felt good and wanted to do more miles.

Edited by El Floppo
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6 minutes ago, SteelCurtain said:

Hmmmm.  I’m not familiar with an Excalibur hotel in Poughkeepsie.  What year was the last time you knew it was open?

:oldunsure: ....counting fingers, crosschecking ages of kids... It may have been this millennium. Maybe.

The excalibur had a big knight statue on top. And a killer karaoke bar.

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Got the first four weeks of my Milwaukee Marathon training plan tonight.  Race is 18 weeks away, so my plan was to ease into things (especially with the baby due this month) and then hit it hard starting in mid-January.  Looking at the plan, mileage is fine, but the workouts/paces are quite a bit more aggressive than I expected, and I told my coach this.  Maybe I'm just being a big ol' poosay, and I need this push to get me back outside my comfort zone (where improvement occurs).  Or maybe it really is too aggressive.  I guess we'll find out.

Link to the plan for anyone who's interested.  Note that I definitely do not weigh 199 pounds or anywhere near that right now:  https://docs.google.com/document/d/1e_IdWDD4Iu3eY3nr-XiOxyJSNGYBx-i6lIWatvlKoG8/edit?usp=sharing

Edited by gruecd
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11 minutes ago, gruecd said:

Got the first four weeks of my Milwaukee Marathon training plan tonight.  Race is 18 weeks away, so my plan was to ease into things (especially with the baby due this month) and then hit it hard starting in mid-January.  Looking at the plan, mileage is fine, but the workouts/paces are quite a bit more aggressive than I expected, and I told my coach this.  Maybe I'm just being a big ol' poosay, and I need this push to get me back outside my comfort zone (where improvement occurs).  Or maybe it really is too aggressive.  I guess we'll find out.

Link to the plan for anyone who's interested.  Note that I definitely do not weigh 199 pounds or anywhere near that right now:  https://docs.google.com/document/d/1e_IdWDD4Iu3eY3nr-XiOxyJSNGYBx-i6lIWatvlKoG8/edit?usp=sharing

That plan is extremely detailed. Excited to see what you can do. I’m still sore from my 15 on Saturday and have a tempo run tomorrow. 9 with 5 at 10K pace. 

Edited by JShare87
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23 minutes ago, JShare87 said:

That plan is extremely detailed. Excited to see what you can do. I’m still sore from my 15 on Saturday and have a tempo run tomorrow. 9 with 5 at 10K pace. 

This doesn't make sense. It's essentially racing a 10K (which is only a mile more than you're expected to run) plus another 4 miles? That kind of effort is hard to recover from.

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11 minutes ago, gianmarco said:

This doesn't make sense. It's essentially racing a 10K (which is only a mile more than you're expected to run) plus another 4 miles? That kind of effort is hard to recover from.

Yeah I'm sure it's subjective, but I've always thought that tempo runs should be closer to 15K pace (the pace you can run for an hour).

Edited by gruecd
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Did have a couple of nice runs this weekend though.  Did 12 yesterday on my favorite out (uphill) and back (down) bike path.  Averaged 7:27, but knocked out the last three miles in 6:58/6:46/6:37.  Heart rate was up into the 160s by the end, but the feel was just "comfortably uncomfortable."

Back out today for an easy 8.  Legs felt heavy AF for the first little bit but then woke up nicely.  Finish not nearly as fast as yesterday, but I wasn't really pushing either.  Went 7:28/7:21/7:16 for miles 6-8 and averaged 7:38 overall.  AHR only 140.

No idea where these runs came from, but I'll take it.

ETA:  I hit my 2,500-mile goal this week.  Currently at 2,522.

Edited by gruecd
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From my coach:

Quote

I do know that over this training period there will be times where you run a workout or LR with certain paces in there & those paces will be worth way more than the numbers show-- (with MORE effort too probably just because you are busy).....and that will be a factor. but there is NO WAY you cant run the goal paces in the next couple of weeks-total faith.

 

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1 hour ago, gruecd said:

Got the first four weeks of my Milwaukee Marathon training plan tonight.  Race is 18 weeks away, so my plan was to ease into things (especially with the baby due this month) and then hit it hard starting in mid-January.  Looking at the plan, mileage is fine, but the workouts/paces are quite a bit more aggressive than I expected, and I told my coach this.  Maybe I'm just being a big ol' poosay, and I need this push to get me back outside my comfort zone (where improvement occurs).  Or maybe it really is too aggressive.  I guess we'll find out.

Link to the plan for anyone who's interested.  Note that I definitely do not weigh 199 pounds or anywhere near that right now:  https://docs.google.com/document/d/1e_IdWDD4Iu3eY3nr-XiOxyJSNGYBx-i6lIWatvlKoG8/edit?usp=sharing

I'll defer to other more experienced folk in here, but I thought the long run paces seemed on the quick side.  I also thought the 18 x 400 workout seemed like a big ask, although that did have walking rests, which I've never really done, so maybe they make you a lot fresher than jogging rests?

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I'm legit terrified to look at grue's google doc.

Speaking of...

I have a colonoscopy on Tuesday. The wife and Google say it'll be a week or so before I should be up and at em. That can't be right though...right?

I'll listen to my doc, but anybody have first hand knowledge with this? I had one in my 20s and I don't recall any slowdown at all afterwards (no biopsies though).

Eta... Also debating running the morning of the procedure, but that's after a day/night of "prepping". 

I could head out tomorrow I suppose, but had planned on a day off after a couple longer runs (for me).

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6 minutes ago, El Floppo said:

I'm legit terrified to look at grue's google doc.

Speaking of...

I have a colonoscopy on Tuesday. The wife and Google say it'll be a week or so before I should be up and at em. That can't be right though...right?

I'll listen to my doc, but anybody have first hand knowledge with this? I had one in my 20s and I don't recall any slowdown at all afterwards (no biopsies though).

Eta... Also debating running the morning of the procedure, but that's after a day/night of "prepping". 

I could head out tomorrow I suppose, but had planned on a day off after a couple longer runs (for me).

Good lord, you'll be fine by that afternoon.

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On 12/5/2020 at 8:19 PM, ChiefD said:

Oh, come on man. You are one of the top runners here and it’s not even close. There is no if’s, shovels, or buts about it.

Look - you and I are similar I think. In terms of family stuff, job stuff - just life stuff. But the difference is you have talent. If you are a fraud then my shovels can’t scoop things. 

Look man - if anyone can relate to the things you are going through its this guy. But I don’t ever want to hear you ever again say you are a fraud at running - you are WAY better than that and you know it.

Fight through the hard parts and just get out there.  We can all find 30 minutes a day - and I need to do this as well.

But you know - one foot in front of the other.  Do it man.

Well I appreciate the kind words Chief, but I'll try to elaborate.  Yeah, I suppose I have finished some 100's, but that's really not indicative about much other than being about to commit to 24+ hours of misery.   And I really think that's the root problem for me.  Because I can and have been able to, I do.  But not even remotely the right way.  And that's not healthy (mentally nor physically), nor what I want.  And being able to complete a 100 doesn't make one anything close to a "top runner" in here (except for that bad ### mfer @SFBayDuck). 

I've gotten through so many aspects of life by simply outworking people.   Professionally?  I'm not the smartest guy, but I will put in more time in the office than the other guy will.  Athletics?  I'm not the most athletic guy, but I will out hustle and outwork anyone you put in front of me.  Running 100's?  I'm not the fastest nor most talented, but I will push consistently through to the finish while others start to question why they're out there (well unless my balls feel like sandpaper, then I will #### out :bye:).

Any honestly, the running piece is just entirely depressing because I do the.  Same.  Dang. Thing. Every. Single. Year.  And then I do that year after year. And here's how it goes. I start with an incredible base of mediocre and inconsistent training for 9 months.  Then when the race is 3 months away, I start to consistent train (30-40mpw) but not to the level that someone looking to run a 100 should (probably more like 40-80+mpw).  Then I enter race day in really good shape, but not good "100" shape.  So then I complete the race and tell myself that this time will be different.  This is the race where I will carry my training through into normal, everyday life beyond the race and make it a life habit.  And then I don't. And then I eat crappy.  My running consistency and volume falls off.  And that continues until...you got it, three months before the next race.  Like clockwork.  And that's unbelievably depressing.  The guy that would put his work ethic up against anyone can't do something as simple as you said in bold above.  Find 30 minutes per day.  Put one foot in front of the other and just get out there.  It's really not that hard, right?

So I'm trying to figure out how to change that, keep it simple, start small, and find consistency.  Just wish there was some flip I could switch where I'd actually do it, stick to it, and be so confident about it that I'd actually tell people that I was a runner and actually enjoy talking about it like you guys do without feeling like a total fraud, which is 100% how I feel about it.  Why do you think I never wanted to join Strava?  So that others wouldn't actually see this.  

But it's time to just get it done.  The pity party of doing this same #### year after year has to end.  I'm going to start holding myself accountable and getting it done.  Not for one week.  Not for a month.  And not for a race.  For a lifestyle.  To be fit and healthy.   Find 30 minutes per day.  One foot in front of the other.  :thumbup:   

 

 

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14 minutes ago, El Floppo said:

I'm legit terrified to look at grue's google doc.

Speaking of...

I have a colonoscopy on Tuesday. The wife and Google say it'll be a week or so before I should be up and at em. That can't be right though...right?

I'll listen to my doc, but anybody have first hand knowledge with this? I had one in my 20s and I don't recall any slowdown at all afterwards (no biopsies though).

Eta... Also debating running the morning of the procedure, but that's after a day/night of "prepping". 

I could head out tomorrow I suppose, but had planned on a day off after a couple longer runs (for me).

 

7 minutes ago, krista4 said:

Good lord, you'll be fine by that afternoon.

Yeah, I would be pretty floored if you had much if anything in the way of restrictions after the day of the procedure. 

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13 minutes ago, El Floppo said:

How about running the morning of, after (and potentially during) the super colon blow? I'm used to Brooklyn bears, but I don't think I can handle this particular sub-species.

I don't think the morning of would work very well.  You'll be totally cleaned out and a bit weak, I think, plus still...pooping.  Really I'd just take that day off.

Btw, I don't blow this off as easy just to be a tough guy/gal, but it really is nothing.  I've had to do it three times (TMI?) due to family history, and it's just not an issue after at all.  Even the prep isn't that bad now compared to when I first had to do it 12 or so years ago, but again I wouldn't recommend any big exertion until after the procedure.

Edited by krista4
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16 minutes ago, El Floppo said:

How about running the morning of, after (and potentially during) the super colon blow? I'm used to Brooklyn bears, but I don't think I can handle this particular sub-species.

You're not going to be in any condition to run after doing the prep, nor will you want to.

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7 hours ago, SayWhat? said:

I've gotten through so many aspects of life by simply outworking people.   Professionally?  I'm not the smartest guy, but I will put in more time in the office than the other guy will.  

I found your 30 minutes per day.

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7 hours ago, SayWhat? said:

Well I appreciate the kind words Chief, but I'll try to elaborate.  Yeah, I suppose I have finished some 100's, but that's really not indicative about much other than being about to commit to 24+ hours of misery.   And I really think that's the root problem for me.  Because I can and have been able to, I do.  But not even remotely the right way.  And that's not healthy (mentally nor physically), nor what I want.  And being able to complete a 100 doesn't make one anything close to a "top runner" in here (except for that bad ### mfer @SFBayDuck). 

I've gotten through so many aspects of life by simply outworking people.   Professionally?  I'm not the smartest guy, but I will put in more time in the office than the other guy will.  Athletics?  I'm not the most athletic guy, but I will out hustle and outwork anyone you put in front of me.  Running 100's?  I'm not the fastest nor most talented, but I will push consistently through to the finish while others start to question why they're out there (well unless my balls feel like sandpaper, then I will #### out :bye:).

Any honestly, the running piece is just entirely depressing because I do the.  Same.  Dang. Thing. Every. Single. Year.  And then I do that year after year. And here's how it goes. I start with an incredible base of mediocre and inconsistent training for 9 months.  Then when the race is 3 months away, I start to consistent train (30-40mpw) but not to the level that someone looking to run a 100 should (probably more like 40-80+mpw).  Then I enter race day in really good shape, but not good "100" shape.  So then I complete the race and tell myself that this time will be different.  This is the race where I will carry my training through into normal, everyday life beyond the race and make it a life habit.  And then I don't. And then I eat crappy.  My running consistency and volume falls off.  And that continues until...you got it, three months before the next race.  Like clockwork.  And that's unbelievably depressing.  The guy that would put his work ethic up against anyone can't do something as simple as you said in bold above.  Find 30 minutes per day.  Put one foot in front of the other and just get out there.  It's really not that hard, right?

So I'm trying to figure out how to change that, keep it simple, start small, and find consistency.  Just wish there was some flip I could switch where I'd actually do it, stick to it, and be so confident about it that I'd actually tell people that I was a runner and actually enjoy talking about it like you guys do without feeling like a total fraud, which is 100% how I feel about it.  Why do you think I never wanted to join Strava?  So that others wouldn't actually see this.  

But it's time to just get it done.  The pity party of doing this same #### year after year has to end.  I'm going to start holding myself accountable and getting it done.  Not for one week.  Not for a month.  And not for a race.  For a lifestyle.  To be fit and healthy.   Find 30 minutes per day.  One foot in front of the other.  :thumbup:   

 

 

Here is the thing.  Strava helps keep me accountable.

 

You want accountability?  Here's what you do.  You join Strava....tell everyone here....we will all follow you.....then each week, post your upcoming week running plan. 

WE will keep you accountable.  If you ask us, we will help you on this journey. 

 

I'm obsessed over my stupid graph and I love seeing the 50 miles per week for the last 4 weeks.  Its stupid, but its getting my fat a$$ out there when I just want to stay in bed some days.

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10 hours ago, gruecd said:

Yeah I'm sure it's subjective, but I've always thought that tempo runs should be closer to 15K pace (the pace you can run for an hour).

Got it. I’ll shoot for somewhere around 7:00 flat. Had some things go on last night and wasn’t able to get out. Will move the schedule back a day and get out there in the morning. 

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10 hours ago, gruecd said:

Got the first four weeks of my Milwaukee Marathon training plan tonight.  Race is 18 weeks away, so my plan was to ease into things (especially with the baby due this month) and then hit it hard starting in mid-January.  Looking at the plan, mileage is fine, but the workouts/paces are quite a bit more aggressive than I expected, and I told my coach this.  Maybe I'm just being a big ol' poosay, and I need this push to get me back outside my comfort zone (where improvement occurs).  Or maybe it really is too aggressive.  I guess we'll find out.

Link to the plan for anyone who's interested.  Note that I definitely do not weigh 199 pounds or anywhere near that right now:  https://docs.google.com/document/d/1e_IdWDD4Iu3eY3nr-XiOxyJSNGYBx-i6lIWatvlKoG8/edit?usp=sharing

This was my favorite part

“nothing like a dumb HS runner would do with sprinting them all on the first day you do them.”

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48 minutes ago, SteelCurtain said:

I'm obsessed over my stupid graph and I love seeing the 50 miles per week for the last 4 weeks.  Its stupid, but its getting my fat a$$ out there when I just want to stay in bed some days.

This is me.  Strava has been huge at keeping me pushing for numbers.

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Thanks for the butt replies, guys.

I had one done in my 20s (no anesthesia, enema cleanse, not this luxurious drink and poo modern contrap) and as mentioned wasn't that bad. Being awake for the procedure wasn't...nice...but other than that, no concerns for me. Not eating solids for a day and a half? I've done a few 10+ day master cleanses, so not an issue. 

I got into a nice running rhythm last week (40+) with the stated intent of continuing it, but didn't really consider his procedure and what it might do to the schedule.

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10 hours ago, gruecd said:

From my coach:

I do know that over this training period there will be times where you run a workout or LR with certain paces in there & those paces will be worth way more than the numbers show-- (with MORE effort too probably just because you are busy).....and that will be a factor. but there is NO WAY you cant run the goal paces in the next couple of weeks-total faith.

I don't care about your silly plan or goals. What I am impressed with is the copious amounts of CAPTILIZATIONS throughout the ENTIRE document :chefskiss:

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9 hours ago, Dr_Zaius said:

I'll defer to other more experienced folk in here, but I thought the long run paces seemed on the quick side.  I also thought the 18 x 400 workout seemed like a big ask, although that did have walking rests, which I've never really done, so maybe they make you a lot fresher than jogging rests?

I don't understand the purpose behind 18x400, but am curious to learn the logic behind it.

I'm less adverse to more rigorous long run paces early in a marathon cycle. Running on fumes with 5+ miles to go is counter productive, but I think you should be nearing 'uncle' towards the end. There's the increase injury risk line to navigate, but if successful those more vigorous paces require less effort as you're in the back half of the training plan. Certainly not all of them, but more than you'd think until actually experiencing it. I think a well run plan has three stages:

*The training before the training

*The grind that is the first part of the schedule

*Zen

Not every plan results in zen, but the best ones do. 

Edited by MAC_32
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9 hours ago, SayWhat? said:

Any honestly, the running piece is just entirely depressing because I do the.  Same.  Dang. Thing. Every. Single. Year.  And then I do that year after year. And here's how it goes. I start with an incredible base of mediocre and inconsistent training for 9 months.  Then when the race is 3 months away, I start to consistent train (30-40mpw) but not to the level that someone looking to run a 100 should (probably more like 40-80+mpw).  Then I enter race day in really good shape, but not good "100" shape.  So then I complete the race and tell myself that this time will be different.  This is the race where I will carry my training through into normal, everyday life beyond the race and make it a life habit.  And then I don't. And then I eat crappy.  My running consistency and volume falls off.  And that continues until...you got it, three months before the next race.  Like clockwork.  And that's unbelievably depressing.  The guy that would put his work ethic up against anyone can't do something as simple as you said in bold above.  Find 30 minutes per day.  Put one foot in front of the other and just get out there.  It's really not that hard, right?

So I'm trying to figure out how to change that, keep it simple, start small, and find consistency.  Just wish there was some flip I could switch where I'd actually do it, stick to it, and be so confident about it that I'd actually tell people that I was a runner and actually enjoy talking about it like you guys do without feeling like a total fraud, which is 100% how I feel about it. 

Man, you just described me as well.  :lol:

One thing I have learned is I'm just not wired like a lot of the folks here.  I don't love running -  as a matter of fact I really hate it. I love the benefits of running though. But right now I'm on the precipice of falling down into a deep, dark hole.

The ONE THING that I KNOW can keep me falling over that edge is running.  The downside is I need a race as a carrot - because I LOVE race day. I need those workouts sitting on my calendar every day pointing toward a goal.

Someone told me years ago as a piece of advice - sign up for more 5k's and 10k's to provide that race day energy boost that you need between major races.  So that is something I will explore in 2021 if they are available. 

But I'm with you - I'm mentally tired of being in this rut the last few months, and I need to do something about it. 

 

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10 hours ago, SayWhat? said:

Any honestly, the running piece is just entirely depressing because I do the.  Same.  Dang. Thing. Every. Single. Year.  And then I do that year after year. And here's how it goes. I start with an incredible base of mediocre and inconsistent training for 9 months.  Then when the race is 3 months away, I start to consistent train (30-40mpw) but not to the level that someone looking to run a 100 should (probably more like 40-80+mpw).  Then I enter race day in really good shape, but not good "100" shape.  So then I complete the race and tell myself that this time will be different.  This is the race where I will carry my training through into normal, everyday life beyond the race and make it a life habit.  And then I don't. And then I eat crappy.  My running consistency and volume falls off.  And that continues until...you got it, three months before the next race.  Like clockwork.  And that's unbelievably depressing.  The guy that would put his work ethic up against anyone can't do something as simple as you said in bold above.  Find 30 minutes per day.  Put one foot in front of the other and just get out there.  It's really not that hard, right?

It may seem like a bit of a crutch (and easier said than done during covid times), but if having a race coming up gets you out in the months prior, could you start by staggering races (not necessarily 100 milers) throughout the year?  That's what made me sign up for a spring half marathon a few years back - I wanted to force myself to run regularly through the winter.  Now that I've gotten used to training in the bad weather, I don't seem to need the carrot in front of me anymore, but I'm not sure I would have gotten to that point if I hadn't had the fear of failing a race to ingrain the habit.

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1 hour ago, ChiefD said:

One thing I have learned is I'm just not wired like a lot of the folks here.  I don't love running -  as a matter of fact I really hate it. I love the benefits of running though.

Just a hunch, but I bet it's actually a majority of us who feel this way.

Personally, I don't hate running, but I certainly don't love it nearly as much as I love the benefits.

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42 minutes ago, gruecd said:

Just a hunch, but I bet it's actually a majority of us who feel this way.

Personally, I don't hate running, but I certainly don't love it nearly as much as I love the benefits.

I was thinking about this yesterday during my long run. Since I don't listen to music anymore when I run, I have plenty of time for thoughts and they are almost always related to running the entire time for whatever reason. 

Anyway, I was wondering if any of you guys get a runner's high when you run? If so, how long into your run and how long does it last? What does it feel like?

I don't think I ever have. I mean, the only thing perhaps is that my run will feel easier after about 4-5 miles in but it's more that I just feel like I get into a groove and not some euphoric feeling.

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15 minutes ago, gianmarco said:

I was thinking about this yesterday during my long run. Since I don't listen to music anymore when I run, I have plenty of time for thoughts and they are almost always related to running the entire time for whatever reason. 

Anyway, I was wondering if any of you guys get a runner's high when you run? If so, how long into your run and how long does it last? What does it feel like?

I don't think I ever have. I mean, the only thing perhaps is that my run will feel easier after about 4-5 miles in but it's more that I just feel like I get into a groove and not some euphoric feeling.

This is when I feel it:

Quote

The Trigger: Endorphins

Nature’s home-brewed opiates, endorphins are chemicals that act a lot like their medically engineered counterpart, morphine. Runners have credited them for their feel-good effects for decades, but it wasn’t until 2008 that German researchers used brain scans on runners and were able to identify exactly where they originated. The scientists found that during two-hour-long runs, subjects’ prefrontal and limbic regions (which light up in response to emotions like love) spewed out endorphins. The greater the endorphin surge in these brain areas, the more euphoric the runners reported feeling.

Get It: Push yourself hard, but not too hard. Endorphins are painkillers produced in response to physical discomfort, says Matthew Hill, Ph.D., an associate professor at the University of Calgary’s Hotchkiss Brain Institute. But that doesn’t mean your runs should be excruciating; you need to find a sweet spot where they are comfortably challenging (think tempo run).

In the German study, for example, the subjects were experienced runners for whom a two-hour run at a six-to seven-mile-an-hour pace wasn’t easy nor was it gut-busting. “Most runners I have worked with experience endorphins when they are pushing their bodies, but not usually at max effort,” says Cindra S. Kamphoff, Ph.D., director of the Center for Sport and Performance Psychology at Minnesota State University. A short, casual run likely won’t produce enough discomfort to trigger a rush. Attempt a pace or distance that’s too aggressive, and you’ll possibly be too overwhelmed by the effort to feel good. As powerful as they are, endorphins can’t override an injury or lack of training (which is why newbies aren’t likely to feel elated when they are just starting out).

https://www.runnersworld.com/training/a20851505/how-to-achieve-a-runners-high/

The feeling for me is one of increased happiness and a sense of calm. 

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1 hour ago, gianmarco said:

I was thinking about this yesterday during my long run. Since I don't listen to music anymore when I run, I have plenty of time for thoughts and they are almost always related to running the entire time for whatever reason. 

Anyway, I was wondering if any of you guys get a runner's high when you run? If so, how long into your run and how long does it last? What does it feel like?

I don't think I ever have. I mean, the only thing perhaps is that my run will feel easier after about 4-5 miles in but it's more that I just feel like I get into a groove and not some euphoric feeling.

I get it once in a while. Usually towards the end or after a run or race of purpose. I’ve never slogged through a 5 mile recovery and been all giddy about it. Towards the end and after my 2nd marathon was one of the highest highs I’ve ever experienced in my life. Been chasing that feeling for years. 

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1 hour ago, gianmarco said:

I was thinking about this yesterday during my long run. Since I don't listen to music anymore when I run, I have plenty of time for thoughts and they are almost always related to running the entire time for whatever reason. 

Anyway, I was wondering if any of you guys get a runner's high when you run? If so, how long into your run and how long does it last? What does it feel like?

I don't think I ever have. I mean, the only thing perhaps is that my run will feel easier after about 4-5 miles in but it's more that I just feel like I get into a groove and not some euphoric feeling.

Yes

It varies wildly depending on many factors that are unique to each run

And, that word I used this morning - zen.

---

I've gotten away from responding to motivational inquiries lately because I realize I'm not wired like most. Chef was right when he said it sometime last year - I'm driven by the process. I don't overtly apply energy into thinking about how my decisions I make today will impact future me; it's just my instincts. And over the years I've realized those instincts are...not common. i.e. I had no plan for this morning's run, I was out at a park after appointments and knew I was pressed for time on the other side and just went. After a few minutes I happened to be heading towards a hill then both rewound over the last few days and fast forwarded through the next few and said to myself - hill repeats sounds good. I then put my focus on it and shut everything else out and just did them. How does one get to that point? And is it even a desirable spot? Beats me.

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13 hours ago, SayWhat? said:

But it's time to just get it done.  The pity party of doing this same #### year after year has to end.  I'm going to start holding myself accountable and getting it done.  Not for one week.  Not for a month.  And not for a race.  For a lifestyle.  To be fit and healthy.   Find 30 minutes per day.  One foot in front of the other.  :thumbup:   

Confident you will get there.  I think smaller bites like you mention are the key.  I would not be able to execute at the extremes of ultra racing from both the distance and the toll and recovery needs. I need smaller bites to keep going and for the mental health lift I get from accountability and routine. 

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2 minutes ago, MAC_32 said:

Yes

It varies wildly depending on many factors that are unique to each run

And, that word I used this morning - zen.

---

I've gotten away from responding to motivational inquiries lately because I realize I'm not wired like most. Chef was right when he said it sometime last year - I'm driven by the process. I don't overtly apply energy into thinking about how my decisions I make today will impact future me; it's just my instincts. And over the years I've realized those instincts are...not common. i.e. I had no plan for this morning's run, I was out at a park after appointments and knew I was pressed for time on the other side and just went. After a few minutes I happened to be heading towards a hill then both rewound over the last few days and fast forwarded through the next few and said to myself - hill repeats sounds good. I then put my focus on it and shut everything else out and just did them. How does one get to that point? And is it even a desirable spot? Beats me.

I think I'm more wired this way too.  I actually don't like training for a specific race.  There's a schedule, a time crunch, a feeling of "don't want to miss out on this run" that I'm not a big fan of.

The 2 times I've been the happiest while running in general:

1)  MAF training July/August 2019.  First, it was a fun process to see how it would go and a new way to run/train.  Secondly, the "easy running" was appealing.  It really helped me just slow down, enjoy the run itself, and in the end, I felt better after almost every run than I did going into it.  Plus, it was a huge help with weight loss. 

2)  My winter base training last Dec/Jan/Feb.  I had no plan other than just get out.  Every day, much like above, was a "so what do I feel like doing today".  It was combination of running long some days, doing hills some days, pushing at the end some days, and bottom line of just getting out and not worrying about any specific race or goal.  I came out of that happier and fitter than I'd ever been.  Even though I had a 5K and a HM I raced after those 3 months, they were not what were guiding me at all.

Prior to those, there was always training for "something" and since then much the same.  Even now, I've got this marathon scheduled for mid February that I'd like to get ready for but if I don't, I don't really care.  I'm loosely doing Hanson's (if that's even possible), but I'm not really stressing if I miss a run or change it around a bit.  I'm mostly using it as a template to get out and do something and use each workout as a goal for that day.  I'm starting to get into that base building groove again which is good for me.  I'm not thinking or worrying about the marathon at all. 

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1 hour ago, gianmarco said:

I was thinking about this yesterday during my long run. Since I don't listen to music anymore when I run, I have plenty of time for thoughts and they are almost always related to running the entire time for whatever reason. 

Anyway, I was wondering if any of you guys get a runner's high when you run? If so, how long into your run and how long does it last? What does it feel like?

I don't think I ever have. I mean, the only thing perhaps is that my run will feel easier after about 4-5 miles in but it's more that I just feel like I get into a groove and not some euphoric feeling.

Not sure I’ve really felt it, I think it’s incumbent to be fit in order to really have a high long enough to ride.  I normally am feeling something other than zen when running. Either fatigue or thinking about something or that it’s dark or cold or hot or think ‘#### I need to get home’.

Closest I can think of to a high is when I cross over to the faster side of an out slow/back faster or during a progression run when I turn on a ‘go’ playlist. That is fun & good feeling. 

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4 hours ago, gianmarco said:

Anyway, I was wondering if any of you guys get a runner's high when you run? If so, how long into your run and how long does it last? What does it feel like?

I remember one run vividly on Good Friday where I went for about 7 miles in the afternoon (which was near if not the longest I had ever run at that point) where I just felt bliss the last few miles, and I felt like I could have run another 30 minutes or more.  That's the only time I've really felt it at an intense level.

In general I would say the closest to a high I get are on cold runs I will typically get a very happy feeling shortly after I get into the house.  I'm not sure if it's a combination of endorphins from the run and the sudden burst of warm air (I really hate being cold), but I get this on a fairly frequent basis.  Almost makes me not hate winter runs.

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On 12/7/2020 at 6:01 AM, MAC_32 said:

I found your 30 minutes per day.

Yep, the amount of time committed to my job is a detriment.  The problem is, I kind of need to commit that amount of time in order to meet the requirements of my position.  So tough to say "I'm going to work 30 minutes less per day in order to exercise 30 minutes or 30 minutes more."  That time likely has to come from somewhere else (family time, sleep, or FBG posting!). 

On 12/7/2020 at 6:29 AM, SteelCurtain said:

Here is the thing.  Strava helps keep me accountable.

 

You want accountability?  Here's what you do.  You join Strava....tell everyone here....we will all follow you.....then each week, post your upcoming week running plan. 

WE will keep you accountable.  If you ask us, we will help you on this journey. 

 

I'm obsessed over my stupid graph and I love seeing the 50 miles per week for the last 4 weeks.  Its stupid, but its getting my fat a$$ out there when I just want to stay in bed some days.

Yeah, that should do the trick.  Problem is, I begrudgingly joined Strava back during the FBG 1M/5K/10K challenge this summer and I haven't really felt a sense of accountability to it.  But that may just be because I don't really use it.  But maybe I should?  I'll give this a shot. 

On 12/7/2020 at 8:18 AM, ChiefD said:

Man, you just described me as well.  :lol:

One thing I have learned is I'm just not wired like a lot of the folks here.  I don't love running -  as a matter of fact I really hate it. I love the benefits of running though. But right now I'm on the precipice of falling down into a deep, dark hole.

The ONE THING that I KNOW can keep me falling over that edge is running.  The downside is I need a race as a carrot - because I LOVE race day. I need those workouts sitting on my calendar every day pointing toward a goal.

Someone told me years ago as a piece of advice - sign up for more 5k's and 10k's to provide that race day energy boost that you need between major races.  So that is something I will explore in 2021 if they are available. 

But I'm with you - I'm mentally tired of being in this rut the last few months, and I need to do something about it. 

 

Hmmm...I've never been one to sign up for 5K's or 10K's, but that may be a great strategy.  Here's why.  Sure, I could get to race day for a 5K or 10K with poor training and still finish the race, but damn it if that FBG 5K I ran this summer in less than ideal shape didn't burn my lungs for weeks after.  That was probably the worst "race" experience I've had, outside of rhabdo last year.  

Let's do this Chief.  You and me.  Time to shake these anchors and get after it.  :hifive:

On 12/7/2020 at 9:37 AM, Dr_Zaius said:

It may seem like a bit of a crutch (and easier said than done during covid times), but if having a race coming up gets you out in the months prior, could you start by staggering races (not necessarily 100 milers) throughout the year?  That's what made me sign up for a spring half marathon a few years back - I wanted to force myself to run regularly through the winter.  Now that I've gotten used to training in the bad weather, I don't seem to need the carrot in front of me anymore, but I'm not sure I would have gotten to that point if I hadn't had the fear of failing a race to ingrain the habit.

Yep, definitely going to sprinkle in more/shorter races throughout the year when things get back to normal.  I like that idea, as that will definitely commit me more.  Maybe that helps establish the consistency I need and will end up like you, where you then establish the training as routine in your life and then no longer need the race carrots. 

On 12/7/2020 at 12:32 PM, bushdocda said:

Confident you will get there.  I think smaller bites like you mention are the key.  I would not be able to execute at the extremes of ultra racing from both the distance and the toll and recovery needs. I need smaller bites to keep going and for the mental health lift I get from accountability and routine. 

Appreciate that bushdocda.  Yep, definitely need to lock in the consistency of daily exercise/fitness and then build from there. 

 

I think the key is going to be getting to bed a bit earlier and trying to incorporate 5am exercise on the daily.  Tough to do, but hopefully once the habit forms it locks in for life.  Thanks all for the words of wisdom and encouragement.  Keep kicking ###.  :thumbup:

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