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6 hours ago, badmojo1006 said:

I was ageism profiled last week. Was at a meeting, new person showed up. New person (Millennial) was introducing himself. One guys name is Carl so the Millennial said do you relate to  Carl on "Aqua Teen Hunger Force"?

Carl had no clue. I chimed in, "Is Carl the one in the wife beaters, bald and an jerk?"

Millennial said sure but was surprised I watched it.

"Why"? I asked 

"Cause you are old" :rant::boxing:

So I hit him with my walker and told him to get off my lawn

I deal with this all the time.  It used to be just with my students. “You’re shocked that I know who My Chemical Romance is? Like I live in a cave?”

Now it’s my coworkers.   A few months ago we had some BS training thing.  The presenter showed some dumb video clip using Rap to teach kids some math crap (like it’s 1991).  But the vocalist was pretty smooth.  I said something, just loud enough for my table to hear, like “That guy’s trying to sound like Anderson Paak.”  

One guy (very hipstersy  but cool) at my table who is probably all of 26 said “Oh wow...yeah...totally”.  When he realized who had said it, he looked at my old, fat, grey ### like I had just I just invented an avocado flavored stout.  

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5 minutes ago, mr. furley said:

“This Earl of Bridgewater style stout from Dootchbeard Brewery (Skagit County) is transcendent.  It contains just the slightest hints of guac and paprika.  There is a careless whisper of a dirty, twill ‘Keep Portland Weird’ ballcap at the finish”

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10 hours ago, OrtonToOlsen said:

“This Earl of Bridgewater style stout from Dootchbeard Brewery (Skagit County) is transcendent.  It contains just the slightest hints of guac and paprika.  There is a careless whisper of a dirty, twill ‘Keep Portland Weird’ ballcap at the finish”:X

 

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20 minutes ago, General Malaise said:

Hey....where were you yesterday?  

recovering from the last 2.5 weeks.

 

p.s. - sorry I didn't make it and thank you for the invite.

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Can I ask a question in here that just might be a little insensitive?

Am I supposed to feel sorry for all the people that are dying on Mt. Everest?  Because I'll be honest.  I feel about as much sorrow for them as I do the guy who died kissing a rattlesnake.  I'm sorry if that makes me a giant assssshat, but that's just the way I feel. 

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11 minutes ago, General Malaise said:

Can I ask a question in here that just might be a little insensitive?

Am I supposed to feel sorry for all the people that are dying on Mt. Everest?  Because I'll be honest.  I feel about as much sorrow for them as I do the guy who died kissing a rattlesnake.  I'm sorry if that makes me a giant assssshat, but that's just the way I feel. 

same. and I don't feel bad for the parkour guys who die falling off buildings. not going to go-fund-them for hospital bills or whatnot. :shrug: 

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3 minutes ago, El Floppo said:

same. and I don't feel bad for the parkour guys who die falling off buildings. not going to go-fund-them for hospital bills or whatnot. :shrug: 

Yup, no sorrow for that either.  And the dude who died coming back from North Korea?  No soup for you either.  

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34 minutes ago, General Malaise said:

Yup, no sorrow for that either.  And the dude who died coming back from North Korea?  No soup for you either.  

The guy who stole the poster and got brain killed? Dumb move, but he still gets soup from me.

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12 minutes ago, El Floppo said:

The guy who stole the poster and got brain killed? Dumb move, but he still gets soup from me.

I don't know what he did, but how about staying out of North Korea for starters?  World's a big place.; that's not where we are wanted.  Avoid, imo.

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1 hour ago, General Malaise said:

I don't know what he did, but how about staying out of North Korea for starters?  World's a big place.; that's not where we are wanted.  Avoid, imo.

I went into North Korea, but under very limited and safe conditions - I mean, for less than an hour.

I would also climb Everest, if I were maybe 10 years younger.  I don't know the backgrounds of the others, but the two Americans who died in the past week had both just completed the last of the Seven Summits, meaning they climbed the highest mountain on each of the seven continents.  To do that, they were dedicated mountaineers with training and abilities.  The fact that they got caught in a mass of people many of whom shouldn't have been there is not their fault or necessarily predictable.  They were doing something they loved, which if you haven't done it, even in a smaller stage, you wouldn't understand.  So yeah, it seems heartless and small-minded to me.  :shrug: 

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3 hours ago, krista4 said:

I went into North Korea, but under very limited and safe conditions - I mean, for less than an hour.

I would also climb Everest, if I were maybe 10 years younger.  I don't know the backgrounds of the others, but the two Americans who died in the past week had both just completed the last of the Seven Summits, meaning they climbed the highest mountain on each of the seven continents.  To do that, they were dedicated mountaineers with training and abilities.  The fact that they got caught in a mass of people many of whom shouldn't have been there is not their fault or necessarily predictable.  They were doing something they loved, which if you haven't done it, even in a smaller stage, you wouldn't understand.  So yeah, it seems heartless and small-minded to me.  :shrug: 

I guess we'll just have to let you die on that hill.

 

 

 

 

EVERY ONE A MASERATI!

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5 hours ago, krista4 said:

I went into North Korea, but under very limited and safe conditions - I mean, for less than an hour.

I would also climb Everest, if I were maybe 10 years younger.  I don't know the backgrounds of the others, but the two Americans who died in the past week had both just completed the last of the Seven Summits, meaning they climbed the highest mountain on each of the seven continents.  To do that, they were dedicated mountaineers with training and abilities.  The fact that they got caught in a mass of people many of whom shouldn't have been there is not their fault or necessarily predictable.  They were doing something they loved, which if you haven't done it, even in a smaller stage, you wouldn't understand.  So yeah, it seems heartless and small-minded to me.  :shrug: 

I mean I get it but then again I kind of don’t.  

There’s a reason why people don’t live at the top of Mt. Everest.  It’s inhospitable and dangerous. I’m not going to dance on the graves of people that die trying to climb it but part of me says “you decided to defy death and, unfortunately, death won.”  :shrug:

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4 minutes ago, OrtonToOlsen said:

I mean I get it but then again I kind of don’t.  

There’s a reason why people don’t live at the top of Mt. Everest.  It’s inhospitable and dangerous. I’m not going to dance on the graves of people that die trying to climb it but part of me says “you decided to defy death and, unfortunately, death won.”  :shrug:

This is about where I'm at.   Climbing a mountain that's got a good likelihood of killing you (and even if it doesn't, decent chance of lifelong health problems including brain damage) is a pretty selfish act.  It may be your thing, but it seems like you're putting your ego and need for accomplishment ahead of family and friends.  

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6 hours ago, krista4 said:

I went into North Korea, but under very limited and safe conditions - I mean, for less than an hour.

I would also climb Everest, if I were maybe 10 years younger.  I don't know the backgrounds of the others, but the two Americans who died in the past week had both just completed the last of the Seven Summits, meaning they climbed the highest mountain on each of the seven continents.  To do that, they were dedicated mountaineers with training and abilities.  The fact that they got caught in a mass of people many of whom shouldn't have been there is not their fault or necessarily predictable.  They were doing something they loved, which if you haven't done it, even in a smaller stage, you wouldn't understand.  So yeah, it seems heartless and small-minded to me.  :shrug: 

The point to me is that climbing Everest or any of those others are inherently life-threatening in a luxurious non-necessary way. They're not fire-fighters, soldiers or cops in bad situations paying the ultimate price, they're thrill seekers. When people actually do die doing it.. :shrug:  I don't feel sorry for them. Yes. Look at me....I'm a monster.

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5 minutes ago, El Floppo said:

The point to me is that climbing Everest or any of those others are inherently life-threatening in a luxurious non-necessary way. They're not fire-fighters, soldiers or cops in bad situations paying the ultimate price, they're thrill seekers. When people actually do die doing it.. :shrug:  I don't feel sorry for them. Yes. Look at me....I'm a monster.

flop

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11 hours ago, General Malaise said:

Can I ask a question in here that just might be a little insensitive?

Am I supposed to feel sorry for all the people that are dying on Mt. Everest?  Because I'll be honest.  I feel about as much sorrow for them as I do the guy who died kissing a rattlesnake.  I'm sorry if that makes me a giant assssshat, but that's just the way I feel. 

If it was 20 years ago, when there were a fraction of the climbers that went up and somebody died, would feel sorry for him.

Not know. Too many inexperienced climbers are mucking it up.

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3 hours ago, El Floppo said:

The point to me is that climbing Everest or any of those others are inherently life-threatening in a luxurious non-necessary way. They're not fire-fighters, soldiers or cops in bad situations paying the ultimate price, they're thrill seekers. When people actually do die doing it.. :shrug:  I don't feel sorry for them. Yes. Look at me....I'm a monster.

We all do things that are life-threatening and unnecessary.  Have you ever sped?  Driven when maybe you shouldn’t have due to booze?  Hell, our own GM posted pics of himself pretty beat up from a drunken fall at the Kentucky Oaks.  If he’d fallen in a slightly different way he might have died from it, and then it appears some would say that he was selfish and they don’t feel sorry for a dad of five* having lost his life, because he shouldn’t have done something risky.

In addition, calling people who climb Everest “thrill seekers” isn’t accurate for a large number of the true mountaineers there.

You’re not alone.  I see this stuff a lot on the hiking and climbing community.  Not regarding Everest, but when someone dies on a trail.  A young (28?) woman disappeared on a tough trail last year, certainly having died in a fall, and people were scrutinizing her Instagram to criticize her for her attire and backpack size (to allege lack of preparation), her summit selfies (to allege lack of care), or even the mere fact she would hike alone.  I just thought it was sad to lose a young and by all accounts jubilant life. 

I don’t care to change anyone’s viewpoint, but given the question originally posed then I’m going to say yes, I find that attitude heartless.  I’m less and less surprised these days at people’s lack of empathy or concern for people they don’t know, though.

*Accurate as of May 29, 2019

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I told this story once before in a thread about college hazing. I am now going to try and tell it again from a slightly different perspective.

One night I was the designated driver for a group of my fraternity brothers. At the time, that meant that I was only allowed alcohol and weed. Everyone else was doing mushrooms too. We drove from Lexington, KY to Red River Gorge. All went well - so far.

Once we reached our destination, we parked and began a hike to the top of Half Moon Arch (on right in photo). At the top, we stopped and sat down on the path to pass a joint and a bottle of bourbon. After a shot from the bottle, my head began to spin so I leaned back to rest on my elbow. Unfortunately, there was nothing there for my elbow to rest upon. I was already sitting on the edge of the cliff.

I fell a total of about 80 feet, but it was interrupted by mid sized tree branches that were big enough to slow me down a little, but small and supple enough to not damage me. Also, I was lucky and landed on a slope - like a landing ramp - that brought me to a gentle halt. I think that I may have passed out for a while, but I am not sure. 

This all occurred in the deep night and early morning, so I did not know where I had actually stopped. However, I could tell that I was still on a ledge. How high from the valley floor it was, I had no clue. So, I called up to my brothers. Their first reply was, "Are you alive?" They were on mushrooms - as noted. It is funny to look back upon now, but at the time, it did not strike me as odd at all. I felt the same in a lot of ways.

After a bit of yelling (and echoing) back and forth, they eventually hiked to the floor and found me. I was on a ledge about 8 -10 feet off of the ground. I tried to carefully slide down, but fell and bruised my hip. That was my only injury.

I did go to a doctor though, just to be safe. He speculated that the whisky saved me. Being so drunk, I did not tense up, rather I rag-dolled my way through the trees and down the ramp. I dunno; it was all too fast for me to remember. However, I told the doc that if it weren't for the whisky, I never would have fell in the first place.

 

Now, I don't know if I would have deserved any sorrow for my own stupidity and recklessness if I had died. But, I do know that I have sorrow for those who do - even the reckless and stupid ones. I have to. I would be a hypocrite otherwise, imo.

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After posting that, I do want to add something.

I understand why people can't feel sorrow for everyone and everything all of the time. 

It can be exhausting and emotionally taxing - especially when dealing with your own life.

I think the human mind just can't handle a full load of feeling EVERYTHING all the time.

We have to pick and choose I believe. And do the best we can.

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15 hours ago, General Malaise said:

Can I ask a question in here that just might be a little insensitive?

Am I supposed to feel sorry for all the people that are dying on Mt. Everest?  Because I'll be honest.  I feel about as much sorrow for them as I do the guy who died kissing a rattlesnake.  I'm sorry if that makes me a giant assssshat, but that's just the way I feel. 

 

15 hours ago, El Floppo said:

same. and I don't feel bad for the parkour guys who die falling off buildings. not going to go-fund-them for hospital bills or whatnot. :shrug: 

 

6 hours ago, El Floppo said:

The point to me is that climbing Everest or any of those others are inherently life-threatening in a luxurious non-necessary way. They're not fire-fighters, soldiers or cops in bad situations paying the ultimate price, they're thrill seekers. When people actually do die doing it.. :shrug:  I don't feel sorry for them. Yes. Look at me....I'm a monster.

i fall into this camp, as well - any "luxuriant" risk of life falls flat for me.  dunno, i was surrounded by a ton of misery and untimely deaths when growing up, mostly drug/alcohol related.  so many people succumbed from our 'hood, great majority under the age of 21(4 family members included up in that).  makes a person value the life they were given, and to be witness to such senseless and heartbreaking loss at an impressionable age turns one sour on thrill seeking sorts - suffice to say that it took awhile for me to fully grasp this concept - i was a notorious drunk driver for a good 3/4 years backnaday (my brand of thrillseeking? sure. give it a name) ... and i paid the price with 4 arrests, some lengthy mandatory incarceration, loss of license for 12+ years, and upwards to $20k in fines and surcharges. B-O-O, H-O-O!!!! for me. 

i deserved every last ####### punishment hurled at me ... of course, at the time, i was furious, 'cuz, ya know, my hot rod was impounded for well over a year (mandatory fines needed to be settled, and every day in the pound accrued more vig from those mofos).

but ya know what i took away the most from all of that? the fact that i was the luckiest mutha ###### on the face of the earth because, not only did i survive all those days driving whilst ossified, but ... BECAUSE BY THE GRACE OF ALL THAT IS HOLY I NEVER HURT AN INNOCENT BYSTANDER- NO COLLATERAL DAMAGE. 

not to say it makes one go through life like a pvssy, far from it ... it makes one immune to throwing ##### to give at folks who poke the bear of mortality unnecessarily. 

... which segues into another facet of this convo - those who venture out to live amongst the wildlife - most notably that guy who was mauled to death by the grizzlies in Alaska - saw the doc, and was blown away by how long he actually lasted ... now, i get that this was his passion and reason for waking up in the morning, got it.  but, man, the inherent risks of that kinda ticking time bomb are eventually gonna come to fruition ... same with the chimp/gorilla curator, and anyone who bites it thinking they can somehow fudge mother nature. like playing God and ####.

as i alluded to in the Everest thread, when my ex told me of it all i was numb to her excitement and sense of wonder. #### is just not in my wheelhouse, and never will be. 

saw a bit from some black comedian (maybe Patrice O'Neal?) weighing in on this, basically stating that it's always white folk doing all this daredevil and wilderness #### - that black folk don't need to seek cheap thrills and danger because every day in the 'hood is enough for them ... now, yeah, that's a bit of a broad brush he painted with - but i get the sentiment, and would allow that it is as much socio-economic as it is based on race.  no one i grew up with became an outdoorsman/rock scaler/parkour foo'/sky diver/bungee jumper/free faller/repeller, etc ... just not in our DNA :shrug:

look, to each their own ... and i begrudge not one humanoid on the planet their right to git their ya-yas out ... but to hear of such senseless consequences stirs very little emotion outta me - and i'd also allow that the whole shebang is a most selfish act, tons of loved ones left behind in the wake of these tragedies. i just don't get it. 

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12 hours ago, OrtonToOlsen said:

I mean I get it but then again I kind of don’t.  

There’s a reason why people don’t live at the top of Mt. Everest.  It’s inhospitable and dangerous. I’m not going to dance on the graves of people that die trying to climb it but part of me says “you decided to defy death and, unfortunately, death won.”  :shrug:

Isn't there a difference between what you are saying and people dying because there was a long line?

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2 hours ago, Leeroy Jenkins said:

Isn't there a difference between what you are saying and people dying because there was a long line?

There was a long line in the "Death Zone."   Should be the first clue right there.   It's not like they were waiting in line for customer service at Best Buy and suddenly keeled over.   

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I had lunch with a gal last week that used to be my neighbor many moons ago.  Her mom died climbing* Mt. Hood when my friend was a little girl.  When she told me this way back when, I expressed a great deal of sympathy and my buddy said matter of factly "She died doing what she loved.  Not a bad way to go".  Always stuck with me.  Very pragmatic.  So if I can muster up feelings for the loss of a human based on the fact that I know their surviving family I should be able to do the same for people I don't know.  Never too old to reevaluate things.

 

*I don't know the difference between climbing, summiting, scaling, hiking or whatever other verbs are used in mountaineering.  

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10 hours ago, krista4 said:

We all do things that are life-threatening and unnecessary.  Have you ever sped?  Driven when maybe you shouldn’t have due to booze?  Hell, our own GM posted pics of himself pretty beat up from a drunken fall at the Kentucky Oaks.  If he’d fallen in a slightly different way he might have died from it, and then it appears some would say that he was selfish and they don’t feel sorry for a dad of five* having lost his life, because he shouldn’t have done something risky.

In addition, calling people who climb Everest “thrill seekers” isn’t accurate for a large number of the true mountaineers there.

You’re not alone.  I see this stuff a lot on the hiking and climbing community.  Not regarding Everest, but when someone dies on a trail.  A young (28?) woman disappeared on a tough trail last year, certainly having died in a fall, and people were scrutinizing her Instagram to criticize her for her attire and backpack size (to allege lack of preparation), her summit selfies (to allege lack of care), or even the mere fact she would hike alone.  I just thought it was sad to lose a young and by all accounts jubilant life. 

I don’t care to change anyone’s viewpoint, but given the question originally posed then I’m going to say yes, I find that attitude heartless.  I’m less and less surprised these days at people’s lack of empathy or concern for people they don’t know, though.

*Accurate as of May 29, 2019

Many different degrees of risk.  Comparing climbing Mt. Everest to say....going 10 mph over the speed limit isn't even remotely close in terms of risk.  Or even driving home with a buzz (full on drunk is a different story.....you're an idiot then and putting others at risk).

Put it another way...

If your thing was keeping a pet tiger and one day your pet tiger decides to eat you, I won't celebrate your death but it's hard for me to feel sorry for you.  That's a very dangerous activity you chose to partake in.....similar to climbing Mt. Everest.

 

 

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19 hours ago, OrtonToOlsen said:

I mean I get it but then again I kind of don’t.  

There’s a reason why people don’t live at the top of Mt. Everest.  It’s inhospitable and dangerous. 

There's a reason people don't live in Disneyland.  It's inhospitable and dangerous.  

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7 hours ago, -fish- said:

There was a long line in the "Death Zone."   Should be the first clue right there.   It's not like they were waiting in line for customer service at Best Buy and suddenly keeled over.   

LOL seriously.

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Speaking of doing life threatening things, driving my 1st car was life threatening.  It had a ride like being in a shopping cart being pushed down a cobblestone street.  It could go up hills, but not without a fight.  It didn’t actually have an engine.  What it had was a small field mouse named Roger and if he ran in his wheel fast enough, I could go from 0-60 in about 21 seconds.

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On 5/28/2019 at 10:11 AM, General Malaise said:

Can I ask a question in here that just might be a little insensitive?

Am I supposed to feel sorry for all the people that are dying on Mt. Everest?  Because I'll be honest.  I feel about as much sorrow for them as I do the guy who died kissing a rattlesnake.  I'm sorry if that makes me a giant assssshat, but that's just the way I feel. 

As someone who has caused himself a lot of pain and heartache due to his own knuckleheadedness and terrible decisions, I do manage to find some sympathy for those who find themselves in terrible situations that are of their own doing. 

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16 hours ago, General Malaise said:

I had lunch with a gal last week that used to be my neighbor many moons ago.  Her mom died climbing* Mt. Hood when my friend was a little girl.  When she told me this way back when, I expressed a great deal of sympathy and my buddy said matter of factly "She died doing what she loved.  Not a bad way to go".  Always stuck with me.  Very pragmatic.  So if I can muster up feelings for the loss of a human based on the fact that I know their surviving family I should be able to do the same for people I don't know.  Never too old to reevaluate things.

 

*I don't know the difference between climbing, summiting, scaling, hiking or whatever other verbs are used in mountaineering.  

:heart:  I read similar thoughts to your friend’s with respect to the first US guy who died on Everest this year.  His family members all expressed happiness that he had achieved his goal and died in the midst of the mountains he loved.  

In case I haven’t mentioned it lately, you’re a wonderful human.

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Just boarded my flight back from Paris.  Ten days in France and Spain with my mom, stepfather, and Mr krista...ten days in which I planned and was in charge of EVERY detail.  I’m exhausted.  But last night at dinner, when we got our champagne, my mom insisted on a toast.  Then she started crying, then was upset because she said she had been practicing her speech all day and was messing it up, then managed to eke out something about “trip of a lifetime” and ended with “Merci beaucoup.”  Then cried more.  It was very sweet.

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On 5/29/2019 at 11:52 AM, General Malaise said:

I had lunch with a gal last week that used to be my neighbor many moons ago.  Her mom died climbing* Mt. Hood when my friend was a little girl.  When she told me this way back when, I expressed a great deal of sympathy and my buddy said matter of factly "She died doing what she loved.  Not a bad way to go".  Always stuck with me.  Very pragmatic.  So if I can muster up feelings for the loss of a human based on the fact that I know their surviving family I should be able to do the same for people I don't know.  Never too old to reevaluate things.

This is really good. 👍

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6 minutes ago, RC94 said:

At how boring it is to watch?

I see someone never watched Spellbound.  One of my favorite documentaries.

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