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______ Passed Away Today, RIP


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  • 3 weeks later...

http://www.tmz.com/2018/05/14/margot-kidder-dead-dies-bipolar-superman-lois-lane/

 

Margot Kidder, the actress who played Lois Lane in "Superman," died Sunday in Montana ... TMZ has learned.

Margot was at her home when she passed away, according to the spokesperson at Franzen-Davis Funeral Home in Livingston, MT. The cause of death is unknown at this point.

Margot starred opposite Christopher Reeve in 1978's "Superman," and also in the 3 sequels. She continued acting right up until this year, taking small roles in TV shows and movies -- but also had stage roles ... including "The ###### Monologues" on Broadway. She reportedly had 2 more roles yet to be released.

 

Margot had a very public battle with bipolar disorder for years. During her struggle she was briefly homeless in 1996. Margot became an advocate for mental health after that incident.

She'd been married 3 times, although she'd been single since the '80s.

Margot is survived by a daughter.

RIP

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2 minutes ago, LAUNCH said:

http://www.tmz.com/2018/05/14/margot-kidder-dead-dies-bipolar-superman-lois-lane/

 

Margot Kidder, the actress who played Lois Lane in "Superman," died Sunday in Montana ... TMZ has learned.

Margot was at her home when she passed away, according to the spokesperson at Franzen-Davis Funeral Home in Livingston, MT. The cause of death is unknown at this point.

Margot starred opposite Christopher Reeve in 1978's "Superman," and also in the 3 sequels. She continued acting right up until this year, taking small roles in TV shows and movies -- but also had stage roles ... including "The ###### Monologues" on Broadway. She reportedly had 2 more roles yet to be released.

 

Margot had a very public battle with bipolar disorder for years. During her struggle she was briefly homeless in 1996. Margot became an advocate for mental health after that incident.

She'd been married 3 times, although she'd been single since the '80s.

Margot is survived by a daughter.

RIP

I met her on the Superman earthquake set in Quemado NM a hundred years ago. Verrrry sexy and only i-might-have-a-shot pretty. Wasn't hooked into that party scene yet, though, so i couldnt try. And, as i rhapsodized when Gene Wilder passed, Quackser Fortune Has A Cousin in the Bronx is one of the most charming flix of all time. RIP -

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37 minutes ago, LAUNCH said:

http://www.tmz.com/2018/05/14/margot-kidder-dead-dies-bipolar-superman-lois-lane/

 

Margot Kidder, the actress who played Lois Lane in "Superman," died Sunday in Montana ... TMZ has learned.

Margot was at her home when she passed away, according to the spokesperson at Franzen-Davis Funeral Home in Livingston, MT. The cause of death is unknown at this point.

Margot starred opposite Christopher Reeve in 1978's "Superman," and also in the 3 sequels. She continued acting right up until this year, taking small roles in TV shows and movies -- but also had stage roles ... including "The ###### Monologues" on Broadway. She reportedly had 2 more roles yet to be released.

 

Margot had a very public battle with bipolar disorder for years. During her struggle she was briefly homeless in 1996. Margot became an advocate for mental health after that incident.

She'd been married 3 times, although she'd been single since the '80s.

Margot is survived by a daughter.

RIP

Holy ####. 

I just heard her, I guess now which would be her last interview, on the Drew and Mike podcast here in Detroit last Friday. She was scheduled for Comic Con here this week. Prior to this podcast, she was kicked off WJR the day before for dropping f-bombs. LIL

Take a listen. Well worth it. She was friggin wild and hilarious on there. She really lets loose with Drew on this. 

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=kDb5kYupSrk

Edited by BroncoFreak_2K3
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3 hours ago, wikkidpissah said:

I met her on the Superman earthquake set in Quemado NM a hundred years ago. Verrrry sexy and only i-might-have-a-shot pretty. Wasn't hooked into that party scene yet, though, so i couldnt try. And, as i rhapsodized when Gene Wilder passed, Quackser Fortune Has A Cousin in the Bronx is one of the most charming flix of all time. RIP -

I've always liked Margot Kidder. The first thing I ever saw her in was Black Christmas. She was great in it. Her spunk and humor in interviews always reminded me of Carrie Fisher. Interestingly they both were bipolar, and candid about it. I'm thinking Superman met her at Heaven's Gate.  RIP Margot 

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4 hours ago, LAUNCH said:

http://www.tmz.com/2018/05/14/margot-kidder-dead-dies-bipolar-superman-lois-lane/

 

Margot Kidder, the actress who played Lois Lane in "Superman," died Sunday in Montana ... TMZ has learned.

Margot was at her home when she passed away, according to the spokesperson at Franzen-Davis Funeral Home in Livingston, MT. The cause of death is unknown at this point.

Margot starred opposite Christopher Reeve in 1978's "Superman," and also in the 3 sequels. She continued acting right up until this year, taking small roles in TV shows and movies -- but also had stage roles ... including "The ###### Monologues" on Broadway. She reportedly had 2 more roles yet to be released.

 

Margot had a very public battle with bipolar disorder for years. During her struggle she was briefly homeless in 1996. Margot became an advocate for mental health after that incident.

She'd been married 3 times, although she'd been single since the '80s.

Margot is survived by a daughter.

RIP

I thought she died awhile back.

RIP

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39 minutes ago, Mr. Ected said:

Tom Wolfe author of 'The Right Stuff' and many other things, dies at 87.

The original Thin White Duke. We surely don't need to lose any more folk who actually understand America. And Bonfire of the Vanities is behind only Catch-22 & Thomas Harris's first 3 works as the most readable book i've ever experienced. RIP -

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47 minutes ago, Mr. Ected said:

Tom Wolfe author of 'The Right Stuff' and many other things, dies at 87.

I loved "The Right Stuff" and he was a terrific author. 

I remember once when I was living in NYC, seeing him on the street by the Bryant Park NYPL. He was in a cream three-piece suit with spats, hat, and walking stick. I hung back a little bit and watched him stroll for a few blocks. It was pretty cool to see him on the streets of midtown Manhattan completely in his element like that.

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15 minutes ago, saintfool said:

I loved "The Right Stuff" and he was a terrific author. 

I remember once when I was living in NYC, seeing him on the street by the Bryant Park NYPL. He was in a cream three-piece suit with spats, hat, and walking stick. I hung back a little bit and watched him stroll for a few blocks. It was pretty cool to see him on the streets of midtown Manhattan completely in his element like that.

Wolfe and Norman Mailer had a great feud back in the 1980s.

 Mailer remarked: "In my mind, there is something silly about a man who wears a white suit all the time, especially in New York." 

Wolfe brushed off the sartorial attack, simply pointing out that "the lead dog is the one they always try to bite in the ###".

To which Mailer quickly responded: "It doesn't mean you're the top dog just because your ### is bleeding."

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yeah... was a fan, and like saint saw him around NYC a few times. wishing now I had followed him too- only just passed by while double-taking the "who's the white suit dandy guy- who's he think he is, Tom Wolfe?" oh... right....

 

I started with Electric Koolaid Acid Test, which my english teacher mom for some reason gave me in the 7th or 8th grade to read. I didn't get a lot, but loved the style. followed that right up with From Bauhaus to Our House to tickle my more scarfy early leanings. I don't think I ever read Bonfire (I'll put it on my list now)... but loved Right Stuff.

I don't know enough about novels or journalism, but seemed like he was able to flow seamlessly between the two in an easy reading way that wikkid touched on. RIP.

eta: crap- forgot about Radical Chic and Mau-Mauing the Flak Catchers... read that one after Koolaid and have zero recollection of it.

Edited by El Floppo
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On May 15, 2018 at 10:07 AM, wikkidpissah said:

The original Thin White Duke. We surely don't need to lose any more folk who actually understand America. And Bonfire of the Vanities is behind only Catch-22 & Thomas Harris's first 3 works as the most readable book i've ever experienced. RIP -

Damn shame what they did to his work in the film version of Bonfire.

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Will Alsop, architect. 

He was a guy who built stuff that we only dreamed of doing while in school.... like one formalist grad-school project after another. as such- pretty hit or miss, especially as urban buildings... subtle, nuanced, contextual they ain't. but so much fun and always inspiring to see what he'd come up with next- color, form, material... constantly pushing the envelope. really influenced a generation of architects and architecture... rip 

art college

train station

cardiff visitor center

no idea... china

 

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27 minutes ago, El Floppo said:

Will Alsop, architect. 

He was a guy who built stuff that we only dreamed of doing while in school.... like one formalist grad-school project after another. as such- pretty hit or miss, especially as urban buildings... subtle, nuanced, contextual they ain't. but so much fun and always inspiring to see what he'd come up with next- color, form, material... constantly pushing the envelope. really influenced a generation of architects and architecture... rip 

art college

train station

cardiff visitor center

no idea... china

 

Never heard his name but a couple of those look familiar.  

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3 minutes ago, Walking Boot said:

When I went to college I studied with the goal of being a movie poster designer. I ended up in writing and production but damn if I don’t think of the poster design before I finish the script. 

Bill Gold was a legend. The Alien poster is perfection. RIP. 

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On 5/21/2018 at 6:30 PM, Eephus said:

Pop artist Robert Indiana died at the age of 89.  He created the iconic

LO
VE

artwork with the diagonally tilted O.

Sports fans know him best as the designer of the Bucks' basketball court at the old Milwaukee Arena.  It's pretty tame by modern standards but was revolutionary for its time.

I remember that! 

Im still not as old as @Eephus though. :D 

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2 hours ago, Don Quixote said:

Philip Roth

One of the great American authors of the 20th century....  Portnoy's Complaint, American Pastoral, Goodbye Columbus, The Plot Against America, and many more.

 

a giant. i'm not so much a fan of him or Salinger (who he reminds me of) because i prefer authors of greater distance and imagination and majesty, but a compelling read when the mood is right. the American Pastoral arc (with I Married a Communist & Human Stain) may be the best an old man has ever written. RIP -

Edited by wikkidpissah
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1 hour ago, Don Quixote said:

Philip Roth

One of the great American authors of the 20th century....  Portnoy's Complaint, American Pastoral, Goodbye Columbus, The Plot Against America, and many more.

 

I read Portnoy's Complaint when I was too young to appreciate it.  I also read his WWII era baseball novel "The Great American Novel" which seemed like Roth had more fun writing than I did reading it.  His obvious love for the game and nostalgia for his youth in the 40s shone through his meandering, alliterative sentences. 

The death of Roth and Wolfe last week symbolically closes the book on a generation of American writers.  It seems like a long time ago when men of letters (and they were all men) like Roth, Mailer, Updike and Vidal were major celebrities.  Their talk show appearances were more than current authors' perfunctory chats to plug their latest book.  Outside of the occasional genre specialist like King or Martin, modern novelists are niche players virtually unknown outside of their small core audience.

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7 minutes ago, Eephus said:

I read Portnoy's Complaint when I was too young to appreciate it.  I also read his WWII era baseball novel "The Great American Novel" which seemed like Roth had more fun writing than I did reading it.  His obvious love for the game and nostalgia for his youth in the 40s shone through his meandering, alliterative sentences. 

The death of Roth and Wolfe last week symbolically closes the book on a generation of American writers.  It seems like a long time ago when men of letters (and they were all men) like Roth, Mailer, Updike and Vidal were major celebrities.  Their talk show appearances were more than current authors' perfunctory chats to plug their latest book.  Outside of the occasional genre specialist like King or Martin, modern novelists are niche players virtually unknown outside of their small core audience.

Yeah, I was trying to think back on who that leaves from that generation of American authors.  Herman Wouk (still kicking at 102) is probably the standard bearer, but he is/was more reclusive and not the celebrity of the others.  

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32 minutes ago, Don Quixote said:

Yeah, I was trying to think back on who that leaves from that generation of American authors.  Herman Wouk (still kicking at 102) is probably the standard bearer, but he is/was more reclusive and not the celebrity of the others.  

Pynchon and Didion are in their 80s but belong more to the 1960s and never had the popularity or celebrity of the others I mentioned.  John Barth and Thomas McGuane come to mind but are even more obscure.

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1 hour ago, Eephus said:

I read Portnoy's Complaint when I was too young to appreciate it.  I also read his WWII era baseball novel "The Great American Novel" which seemed like Roth had more fun writing than I did reading it.  His obvious love for the game and nostalgia for his youth in the 40s shone through his meandering, alliterative sentences. 

The death of Roth and Wolfe last week symbolically closes the book on a generation of American writers.  It seems like a long time ago when men of letters (and they were all men) like Roth, Mailer, Updike and Vidal were major celebrities.  Their talk show appearances were more than current authors' perfunctory chats to plug their latest book.  Outside of the occasional genre specialist like King or Martin, modern novelists are niche players virtually unknown outside of their small core audience.

I think Truman Capote could be added to your Roth, Mailer et al list.

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14 minutes ago, northern exposure said:

I think Truman Capote could be added to your Roth, Mailer et al list.

Yeah.  I've seen clips from Capote being interviewed by Johnny Carson and Dick Cavett.  He was booked because he was an interesting guest, I don't recall him plugging a book.

My list wasn't meant to be exhaustive but just an example of how much "serious" authors have slipped down the celebrity pecking order in the past 50 years.

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On 5/24/2018 at 4:44 PM, hagmania said:

RIP John 'Totalbiscuit' Bain

A beloved content creator, commentator, and personality in the gaming world, John lost his battle with cancer at the age of 33.

I used to run premade AVs with that guy. :(

 

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On ‎5‎/‎22‎/‎2018 at 1:46 PM, Nick Vermeil said:

 

On ‎5‎/‎22‎/‎2018 at 1:40 PM, Walking Boot said:

When I went to college I studied with the goal of being a movie poster designer. I ended up in writing and production but damn if I don’t think of the poster design before I finish the script. 

Bill Gold was a legend. The Alien poster is perfection. RIP. 

 

Wow, that's an interesting career choice. I never knew that was a specialized profession. The guy was clearly a legend. Great work. RIP

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  • 2 weeks later...

He basically defined or redefined the travelogue series.

Somebody was telling me about the ESPN+ series Last Train to Russia (much different host) and accurately  said each episode was "5 minutes of soccer and 20 minutes of Anthony Bourdain"

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20 minutes ago, Osaurus said:

RIP Bourdain.  Followed him for a long time. Kitchen Confidential is a great read.  He will be missed. 

Just read this for the first time last month. The guy certainly seemed to have some demons. 

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His shows were about more than just food.  On overanalysis of food: "It intrudes on my meal. I like to eat like a child, in an emotional way. I don’t like to overanalyze. I don’t like my food explained with tasting notes. I want to sit down, get a couple of beers, get a buzz, and enjoy my meal."

Brian Stelter reports that he hung himself. He seemed to have it all except maybe happiness.

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10 minutes ago, SoBeDad said:

His shows were about more than just food.  On overanalysis of food: "It intrudes on my meal. I like to eat like a child, in an emotional way. I don’t like to overanalyze. I don’t like my food explained with tasting notes. I want to sit down, get a couple of beers, get a buzz, and enjoy my meal."

Brian Stelter reports that he hung himself. He seemed to have it all except maybe happiness.

Depression is a horrible thing

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I saw him live with Eric Ripert. They just sat and BS about cooking, world travel and all kinds of other topics. We got the tickets for free and I was skeptical about watching two chefs just talk, but it was fun and fascinating. Very sad to see him end it. It's hard to understand. 

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