Jump to content
Fantasy Football - Footballguys Forums

College Admissions Questions


Recommended Posts

17 minutes ago, scorchy said:

If only he had seen Scooby/RHE in red wrestling trunks and a yellow Hulkamania shirt...

At dinner in Charlottesville, I was telling the kid about some of your posts in this thread and he said, "Can you just use his real name please?  If you keep saying bigbottom, I'm afraid people might get the wrong idea."

LOL.  That made my day.

  • Like 1
  • Love 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, Binky The Doormat said:

how much are you guys looking at "out-of-state" colleges vs "in-state"?  

the costs are ridiculously high to send a kid out of state ...

My daughter is half in-state (2), half out-of-state (2).  She's been accepted to all four, and we're now comparing the costs.  Out of state tuition is ridiculous!  We haven't seen all of the Financial Aid packages yet.  Tuition is ridiculously over-priced for out-of-state colleges.  I'm trying to impress upon her some financial responsibility.  However, she fell in love with Tennessee.  She doesn't want to go to Cincinnati, only because many of her classmates will be going there and she wants to get away from them.  I tried to get her to go for OSU, but they didn't offer the same courses for her major as the other schools do.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 minutes ago, Binky The Doormat said:

how much are you guys looking at "out-of-state" colleges vs "in-state"?  

the costs are ridiculously high to send a kid out of state ...

Some state schools have programs where they offer in state tuition to students from certain surrounding states, or significant tuition reductions for out of state applicants with certain credentials. It’s worth looking into. 

Here’s an example: https://www.wiche.edu/tuition-savings/wue/

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 minutes ago, Binky The Doormat said:

how much are you guys looking at "out-of-state" colleges vs "in-state"?  

the costs are ridiculously high to send a kid out of state 

My son is only looking OOS. The only two in-state schools that would fit his interests are less than 45 min from home (and one of them is private anyway). I totally understand wanting to get away, as I went to UF despite being from Maryland, so can't really see pushing him towards UMD. But everyone's situation is different, obviously.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

27 minutes ago, Binky The Doormat said:

how much are you guys looking at "out-of-state" colleges vs "in-state"?  

the costs are ridiculously high to send a kid out of state ...

Dumb question, but do private schools also charge less for in-state students?

NY state universities (SUNY) are currently free, under a certain income level...but likely below the level 8th grade floppinho is currently striving for (understood...a looong ways between now and then).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 minutes ago, scorchy said:

My son is only looking OOS. The only two in-state schools that would fit his interests are less than 45 min from home (and one of them is private anyway). I totally understand wanting to get away, as I went to UF despite being from Maryland, so can't really see pushing him towards UMD. But everyone's situation is different, obviously.

we are cool with the possibility of her moving to a more prestigious school and/or more suited to what she wants to major in (when she decides) after the first year or two.  But not just to "get away" ...2- 3 hrs away will do just fine while she remains in-state.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, El Floppo said:

Dumb question, but do private schools also charge less for in-state students?

NY state universities (SUNY) are currently free, under a certain income level...but likely below the level 8th grade floppinho is currently striving for (understood...a looong ways between now and then).

I don't know ...just getting into this.  

we had our fingers crossed that our daughter would get a debate scholarship to a big time place ...she was completely into it and kicking ###.  

but ...she got burned out, and is no longer competing - she won 2 "speaker of the tournament" awards at national events this Fall ... 

we have not pushed her and her happiness is more important - still hate it for her ...and our pocketbook.  

she's only a junior so maybe she'll get re-energized ...but we won't be pushing her.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Has anyone here used a college entrance consultant or some kind of service?

We are really at a loss as to how to get started.  

The other big question we have is - how realistic is it to transfer to a different school after you determine what you really want to major in?  

We would love to have her go in-state and then go somewhere that is known for whatever she ends up majoring in.  

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My daughter fired off applications 8, 9, and 10 yesterday, and is all done now.  She started Zoom school again today for her final semester in high school, and afterward came out and said, "I feel like I should be doing application stuff now," as it's been so consuming at times.

And she got her first admission today!  It's to U of Oregon, which is one of her "safety schools", and the only out of state school she applied to.  They threw in a $40,000 "Summit Scholarship" ($10K per year), which it looks like they give to applicants with over a 3.9 gpa.  So that would cut into that out of state tuition a little, which is >$50K total cost of attendance.  It's probably 8th or 9th in order of preference of the 10 she's applying to, so it's highly unlikely she'll be headed to my alma mater, but I'm really happy for her to get that first one.

  • Like 9
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I’ve been following this thread for years, and now I’m starting to feel the reality of it. Son is a Junior in HS, and trying to figure out what he’d like to pursue as a major in college. Electrical Engineering holds some of his interest, but he loves his biology courses as well- and now has come across biomedical engineering as a possibility. Hoping to start visiting some campuses this spring just to get some ideas of what type of campus he’s interested in. Financially, a state university here in Florida would be a great start as an undergraduate, as he’s on the path to getting a”Bright Futures” scholarship which gives  him a full tuition to any state U. But, i do not want him to narrow his sights.  
Here we go....

 

(and stand by for a million questions from me over the next year or so)

Edited by MindCrime
  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 1/2/2021 at 3:08 PM, Binky The Doormat said:

Has anyone here used a college entrance consultant or some kind of service?

We are really at a loss as to how to get started.  

The other big question we have is - how realistic is it to transfer to a different school after you determine what you really want to major in?  

We would love to have her go in-state and then go somewhere that is known for whatever she ends up majoring in.  

Yes, we used a consultant.  Primarily, she worked with our son to develop a target list of schools and to help him with the essay writing process (there were probably close to 30 essays he had to write). Every kid is different, but it worked great for our family. She had a wealth of knowledge about a whole bunch of schools that weren’t on our radar, but were really good fits for him. And based on her background in admissions, she was able to help him better stratify his safety, target and reach schools. And she helped him hone his essay themes to increase their impact and effectiveness while still ensuring they were authentic and in his own voice. More importantly, she kept him accountable to a writing schedule that ensured he didn’t fall behind and had plenty of time for review and revision before submission. This worked particularly well for our family because his mom and I stepped aside and let him drive the process.  He was the one who researched and chose the schools to which he applied. We didn’t have to nag him about getting his essays done. And most importantly, we were completely uninvolved in what he wrote about. I sort of write for a living, so I had all sorts of ideas about what would be a great personal statement for my son. But me working with him on his essays would have been a disaster, and my involvement at any level would have diluted his voice. Having an independent consultant to help keep him focused and on track was totally worth it for us. 

Edited by bigbottom
  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, SFBayDuck said:

My daughter fired off applications 8, 9, and 10 yesterday, and is all done now.  She started Zoom school again today for her final semester in high school, and afterward came out and said, "I feel like I should be doing application stuff now," as it's been so consuming at times.

And she got her first admission today!  It's to U of Oregon, which is one of her "safety schools", and the only out of state school she applied to.  They threw in a $40,000 "Summit Scholarship" ($10K per year), which it looks like they give to applicants with over a 3.9 gpa.  So that would cut into that out of state tuition a little, which is >$50K total cost of attendance.  It's probably 8th or 9th in order of preference of the 10 she's applying to, so it's highly unlikely she'll be headed to my alma mater, but I'm really happy for her to get that first one.

That is awesome, congrats!  One of my best friend’s son is attending Oregon now and absolutely loves it. 

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 12/31/2020 at 8:57 AM, scorchy said:

My sophomore son and I just finished up a quick road trip to visit a few colleges.  Neither of us had left the immediate Baltimore area for what has felt like eons, and I felt (rightly or wrongly) that empty college campuses were likely as safe as the local grocery store.  Son would have definitely preferred to head north, but those States are mainly shut down to visitors, so drove south instead.  Campuses were great, but the best part was actually getting hours in a car or walking around to hear his thoughts on high school, college, career aspirations, and politics.  I can't tell you how many times I brought up facts, observations, and stories from this thread - such an invaluable resource and those of us starting the process now owe a huge debt of gratitude.  I'll definitely try to pay it forward by posting about my kid's experiences over the next couple of years.

Just a few quick blurbs:

Georgetown:  Based on his interests and goals alone, Georgetown would be a top choice.  His opinion of the campus went down somewhat after seeing some other schools on the trip though - obviously smaller, buildings felt crowded together, and dorms are just far enough away from the main drags of M Street or Wisconsin Ave to be annoying.  Will definitely go back when school is in session to see how he feels about the preppy and hyper-driven vibe.  Also, it's one of the hardest admits of the places we visited, although at least one or two kids from his HS end up there every year so there does seem to be a little bit of a pipeline.

...

We are definitely planning a few more of these trips as things hopefully open up toward late spring and summer.  Even with no students on campus, I think at least he can get a feel of city vs college town, big campus vs small, etc, so even if all of these schools end up being reaches, we can focus in on less selective schools with similar characteristics.  Next up is likely the midwest, with Michigan (where his Mom and both maternal grandparents attended) plus Wisconsin and Indiana (which also have State Dept Russian programs).  Then, once we are allowed to head northeast, he wants to see Tufts, BC, Cornell, and Middlebury.  If he thinks Charlottesville was isolated, can't wait to see what he thinks of the latter two.

Would recommend checking out American if Georgetown is top of list. I found I actually liked the campus, people, professors I met, and general vibe at American. Not nearly the reputation, but also a really high State dept placement (at least as of 2010 LOL). Of course, I can't say more than that because I went to OU ($$$), but I crossed of Georgetown once admits came from both. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, SFBayDuck said:

My daughter fired off applications 8, 9, and 10 yesterday, and is all done now.  She started Zoom school again today for her final semester in high school, and afterward came out and said, "I feel like I should be doing application stuff now," as it's been so consuming at times.

And she got her first admission today!  It's to U of Oregon, which is one of her "safety schools", and the only out of state school she applied to.  They threw in a $40,000 "Summit Scholarship" ($10K per year), which it looks like they give to applicants with over a 3.9 gpa.  So that would cut into that out of state tuition a little, which is >$50K total cost of attendance.  It's probably 8th or 9th in order of preference of the 10 she's applying to, so it's highly unlikely she'll be headed to my alma mater, but I'm really happy for her to get that first one.

Congratulations! Presume she's applied to CA schools for the rest. Mind sharing where? Tough to get into UC Berkeley, UCSD, UC Davis, UCLA these days without a stellar application and a 4.0+ GPA.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

29 minutes ago, DEADHEAD said:

Congratulations! Presume she's applied to CA schools for the rest. Mind sharing where? Tough to get into UC Berkeley, UCSD, UC Davis, UCLA these days without a stellar application and a 4.0+ GPA.

Thanks!  UC Davis is her first choice, and yes that’s a bit of a stretch even with her 4.19 gpa. Also UCI and UCSC, along with St Mary’s, Santa Clara, LMU, Pepperdine, Chapman, and USD.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 hours ago, SFBayDuck said:

Thanks!  UC Davis is her first choice, and yes that’s a bit of a stretch even with her 4.19 gpa. Also UCI and UCSC, along with St Mary’s, Santa Clara, LMU, Pepperdine, Chapman, and USD.  

I'm a Davis grad. Didn't know how good I had it when I was there. I'd give my left arm if you told me both of my kids could go there. Good luck!

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, DEADHEAD said:

I'm a Davis grad. Didn't know how good I had it when I was there. I'd give my left arm if you told me both of my kids could go there. Good luck!

When I graduated U of O in '96 I moved to Sacramento for awhile (I couldn't afford SF yet).  I went out in Davis a lot back then, loved the college town feel.  I still have to hit Woodstock's Pizza if I'm in the area around lunch time.

All the fingers are crossed that she somehow gets in there!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 12/31/2020 at 3:47 PM, Binky The Doormat said:

how much are you guys looking at "out-of-state" colleges vs "in-state"?  

the costs are ridiculously high to send a kid out of state ...

Fortunately we are right next to Wisconsin, who we get reciprocity with.  Their colleges and universities (public anyway) are far more affordable than their equal counterparts in Minnesota for Minnesota residents.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

14 minutes ago, Bull Dozier said:

Fortunately we are right next to Wisconsin, who we get reciprocity with.  

That's a good deal, you know if this is a common thing among neighboring states elsewhere? Didn't know states buddied-up like this. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 12/31/2020 at 9:57 AM, scorchy said:

My sophomore son and I just finished up a quick road trip to visit a few colleges.  Neither of us had left the immediate Baltimore area for what has felt like eons, and I felt (rightly or wrongly) that empty college campuses were likely as safe as the local grocery store.  Son would have definitely preferred to head north, but those States are mainly shut down to visitors, so drove south instead.  Campuses were great, but the best part was actually getting hours in a car or walking around to hear his thoughts on high school, college, career aspirations, and politics.  I can't tell you how many times I brought up facts, observations, and stories from this thread - such an invaluable resource and those of us starting the process now owe a huge debt of gratitude.  I'll definitely try to pay it forward by posting about my kid's experiences over the next couple of years.

 

Duke:  holy cow, West Campus is absolutely gorgeous.  And the area around the student center and dining halls made me want to go back to college.  On the other hand, the campus itself felt kind of isolated from the town.  A girl from his HS golf team goes there and was raving about it to him, but luckily he realizes that even among all of these highly competitive schools, Duke is the longest of long-shots for him.

UNC:  Definitely my kid's overall favorite from the trip.  The campus itself was pretty and open and felt just the right size to him, and he absolutely loved having everything on Franklin Street directly across from the school.  UNC also is one of eight schools that offer the State Department Russian Language Flagship program so that was a huge plus in its favor.  On the other hand, admission from in-state is tough enough, but out-of-state seems like a total crapshoot.

 

We are definitely planning a few more of these trips as things hopefully open up toward late spring and summer.  Even with no students on campus, I think at least he can get a feel of city vs college town, big campus vs small, etc, so even if all of these schools end up being reaches, we can focus in on less selective schools with similar characteristics.  Next up is likely the midwest, with Michigan (where his Mom and both maternal grandparents attended) plus Wisconsin and Indiana (which also have State Dept Russian programs).  Then, once we are allowed to head northeast, he wants to see Tufts, BC, Cornell, and Middlebury.  If he thinks Charlottesville was isolated, can't wait to see what he thinks of the latter two.

We walked through Duke and UNC this fall and loved them both. They are probably 2 of the top 3 campuses we have visited (Stanford is the other, but way too far away). 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 12/31/2020 at 9:57 AM, scorchy said:

 

Duke:  holy cow, West Campus is absolutely gorgeous.  And the area around the student center and dining halls made me want to go back to college.  On the other hand, the campus itself felt kind of isolated from the town.  A girl from his HS golf team goes there and was raving about it to him, but luckily he realizes that even among all of these highly competitive schools, Duke is the longest of long-shots for him.

UNC:  Definitely my kid's overall favorite from the trip.  The campus itself was pretty and open and felt just the right size to him, and he absolutely loved having everything on Franklin Street directly across from the school.  UNC also is one of eight schools that offer the State Department Russian Language Flagship program so that was a huge plus in its favor.  On the other hand, admission from in-state is tough enough, but out-of-state seems like a total crapshoot  

We walked through Duke and UNC this fall and loved them both. They are probably 2 of the top 3 campuses we have visited (Stanford is the other, but way too far away). 

Edited by The Flying Turtle
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Anybody have experience with the CSS Profile for Financial Aid?  We already filled out the FAFSA, but I just came across this and it turns out one of my daughter's choices indicates on their financial aid page that "First-year students should complete the CSS PROFILE in order to be considered for the full range of Santa Clara University scholarships and grants."  Googling isn't giving me much info, other than some indication that it may particularly benefit lower-income applicants. 

Any thoughts?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

18 hours ago, Nigel said:

That's a good deal, you know if this is a common thing among neighboring states elsewhere? Didn't know states buddied-up like this. 

I know we do not get reciprocity with Iowa, so it is certainly not a universal concept. 

Not sure where you are, but here's a summary link.  If you hit one of these categories, it may be worth looking in to.

 

https://www.nasfaa.org/State_Regional_Tuition_Exchanges

Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 hours ago, SFBayDuck said:

Anybody have experience with the CSS Profile for Financial Aid?  We already filled out the FAFSA, but I just came across this and it turns out one of my daughter's choices indicates on their financial aid page that "First-year students should complete the CSS PROFILE in order to be considered for the full range of Santa Clara University scholarships and grants."  Googling isn't giving me much info, other than some indication that it may particularly benefit lower-income applicants. 

Any thoughts?

We were/are counting on significant financial aid for our two kids (college Senior and Freshman now) and were required to fill that out for some of the schools they applied to, including the one they are both at now.  It's a lot more in-depth and time consuming compared to the FAFSA.  I remember finishing the FAFSA the first time and thinking, "Well, that wasn't so bad," and then being hit by the CSS and wondering why everyone seems to complain about the FAFSA.

Another thing to know is that there is a main section with the bulk of questions that you fill out once and that goes to all your schools that request it, but then each school can request their own additional information.  For example, I remember one school asking about credit card debt in their additional required questions, while others didn't seem to take that into their calculations.

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 hours ago, SFBayDuck said:

Anybody have experience with the CSS Profile for Financial Aid?  We already filled out the FAFSA, but I just came across this and it turns out one of my daughter's choices indicates on their financial aid page that "First-year students should complete the CSS PROFILE in order to be considered for the full range of Santa Clara University scholarships and grants."  Googling isn't giving me much info, other than some indication that it may particularly benefit lower-income applicants. 

Any thoughts?

The CSS is more in depth and time consuming than the FAFSA. It goes into deeper detail concerning assets, expenses, etc. It's used to determine eligibility for non-governmental aid, especially the institutions own aid programs. My daughter's school, Duke, required it, as do many others. It was definitely worth our while as she received very generous aid from the school, lending credence to your benefiting lower-income applicants statement, which we most certainly are when compared to the rest of Duke's student body.

As jhib pointed out, each school can ask for additional info on top of the base CSS. Ours did.  

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

16 hours ago, SFBayDuck said:

Anybody have experience with the CSS Profile for Financial Aid?  We already filled out the FAFSA, but I just came across this and it turns out one of my daughter's choices indicates on their financial aid page that "First-year students should complete the CSS PROFILE in order to be considered for the full range of Santa Clara University scholarships and grants."  Googling isn't giving me much info, other than some indication that it may particularly benefit lower-income applicants. 

Any thoughts?

CSS Profile is used by some private schools.  I don't think any publics require it.

 

It digs deeper into your home equity, business (if you own one), divorce (if you are) among other items.

 

The FAFSA and CSS Profile each put out an EFC (Expected Family Contribution).  Schools that require both forms will typically take the higher EFC and develop their financial aid package off that number. 

 

Hope that helps.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, SteelCurtain said:

CSS Profile is used by some private schools.  I don't think any publics require it.

 

It digs deeper into your home equity, business (if you own one), divorce (if you are) among other items.

 

The FAFSA and CSS Profile each put out an EFC (Expected Family Contribution).  Schools that require both forms will typically take the higher EFC and develop their financial aid package off that number. 

 

Hope that helps.

 

It does, a bit, and thanks to all that weighed in.   The wording on their website makes it sound optional

Quote

Santa Clara University recommends that first-year students complete both the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) as well as the CSS PROFILE to maximize their federal, state and non-federal aid program eligibility.

NOTE: To be considered for federal financial aid, first-year students need only to complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA).

CSS PROFILE

First-year students should complete the CSS PROFILE in order to be considered for the full range of Santa Clara University scholarships and grants.

My ex filled out the FAFSA since she's remarried and her stepson is at a JC, so it cuts the EFC in half as long as he's enrolled.  From what you and others are saying it sounds like the CSS might dig into my finances as well, which we were able to leave out of the FAFSA, and would then likely raise our EFC for Santa Clara. But it might also open up other financial aid opportunities.  So I'm still not clear if it would be beneficial or actually a negative to have her fill it out.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am still bitter at the whole admissions process and my son is 2 years into University.  I feel being from Florida and a white male with 2 college graduate parents severely handicapped his admissons to out of state schools.  Top 5 in class, National AP scholar, perfect ACT score, All County Athlete and Musician.  He was denied from every IVY and Out of State school.  The heartbreak of him finding out he was waitlisted or flat out denied still bothers me today.  His girlfriend at the time who did not do as well academically and was of another ethnic bacground got into an IVY.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

26 minutes ago, tonysmiles said:

I am still bitter at the whole admissions process and my son is 2 years into University.  I feel being from Florida and a white male with 2 college graduate parents severely handicapped his admissons to out of state schools.  Top 5 in class, National AP scholar, perfect ACT score, All County Athlete and Musician.  He was denied from every IVY and Out of State school.  The heartbreak of him finding out he was waitlisted or flat out denied still bothers me today.  His girlfriend at the time who did not do as well academically and was of another ethnic bacground got into an IVY.

Is he enjoying where he is now?  Do you think his college experience has suffered because of this?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

28 minutes ago, The Z Machine said:

Is he enjoying where he is now?  Do you think his college experience has suffered because of this?

He would not trade his experience yet these first two years.

Discussing going to IVY or out of state for post grad degree.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 1/7/2021 at 2:44 PM, SFBayDuck said:

 

It does, a bit, and thanks to all that weighed in.   The wording on their website makes it sound optional

My ex filled out the FAFSA since she's remarried and her stepson is at a JC, so it cuts the EFC in half as long as he's enrolled.  From what you and others are saying it sounds like the CSS might dig into my finances as well, which we were able to leave out of the FAFSA, and would then likely raise our EFC for Santa Clara. But it might also open up other financial aid opportunities.  So I'm still not clear if it would be beneficial or actually a negative to have her fill it out.

Yes, fill the CSS out.

 

At Santa Clara -- they will use FAFSA to determine eligibility for federal grants and loans.  What the CSS determines will have no impact on federal eligibility.

 

The CSS will impact your eligibility for Santa Clara money which will be your more likely range to get money.  And it is unlikely the FAFSA will impact your eligibility for SC money.

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

16 hours ago, tonysmiles said:

He would not trade his experience yet these first two years.

Discussing going to IVY or out of state for post grad degree.  

I can imagine how heartbreaking that must have been for your son. Unfortunately most Ivys are reach schools for everyone, even those with perfect ACT scores and an amazing resume like your son. At that level of selectivity, the decisions seem almost arbitrary. I’m sorry it was such a negative process, but it sounds like your son is having a great college experience and that’s really the most important thing. He could have gone to Brown and been miserable.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've mentioned Floppinho will be going to HS next year.

Any thoughts on weighted vs non weighted grading in HS and how college admissions view each? We have to rank the public high schools here in NYC as part of the application process...trying to figure out pros and cons as much as possible without being able to tour any of these schools 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

17 hours ago, tonysmiles said:

He would not trade his experience yet these first two years.

Discussing going to IVY or out of state for post grad degree.  

What is he looking to study?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, El Floppo said:

I've mentioned Floppinho will be going to HS next year.

Any thoughts on weighted vs non weighted grading in HS and how college admissions view each? We have to rank the public high schools here in NYC as part of the application process...trying to figure out pros and cons as much as possible without being able to tour any of these schools 

Definitely folks here with a lot more expertise than me, but as long as the actual classes are comparable, whether a high school weights its students' GPAs shouldn't matter.   Most colleges take whatever transcript is sent by the HS and do their own weighting.  

My son goes to a pretty well-respected private school and they not only don't weight grades, they don't even offer official AP classes.  Plenty of kids still take AP tests after finishing a particular class and tend to do well, but there won't be a "Joe had a 4.8 GPA and took 12 AP classes" anywhere on the transcript.  None of this appears to have hurt the students as admissions officers tend to get a feel for particular high schools based on previous experiences.  I'm sure that the student profile and academic reputation of most NYC public schools is pretty well known, at least among competitive colleges.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Question on this process. Some schools conduct interviews with applicants, either with current students or alumni doing the interviews (over zoom these days). Obviously it would make sense for the applicant to send a timely "thank you" after these interviews.

The question is - if the applicant didn't know to do this, and just now realized they never sent a "thank you" email to the alumni who interviewed them 13 days ago - is it better/worse to send a "thank you" now or just forget it? Could sending a thank you this late be worse than doing nothing, as it might call more attention to the tardiness?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 minutes ago, dancer said:

Question on this process. Some schools conduct interviews with applicants, either with current students or alumni doing the interviews (over zoom these days). Obviously it would make sense for the applicant to send a timely "thank you" after these interviews.

The question is - if the applicant didn't know to do this, and just now realized they never sent a "thank you" email to the alumni who interviewed them 13 days ago - is it better/worse to send a "thank you" now or just forget it? Could sending a thank you this late be worse than doing nothing, as it might call more attention to the tardiness?

In all likelihood it will make no difference to his admission.  I briefly did alumni interviews for my school and I always would have sent in my recommendation in the few days after the interview so it's still fresh.  I'd assume most alumni interviewers are the same.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, dancer said:

Question on this process. Some schools conduct interviews with applicants, either with current students or alumni doing the interviews (over zoom these days). Obviously it would make sense for the applicant to send a timely "thank you" after these interviews.

The question is - if the applicant didn't know to do this, and just now realized they never sent a "thank you" email to the alumni who interviewed them 13 days ago - is it better/worse to send a "thank you" now or just forget it? Could sending a thank you this late be worse than doing nothing, as it might call more attention to the tardiness?

I do interviews for my alma mater. Absolutely send a thank you...even if late. I usually try to get my reports in within a week after the interview, so might miss it...but sometimes I'll wait- especially if I haven't gotten that thank you. I've only had one kid not send me a thank you at all, and it obviously has stood out to me.

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, fatguyinalittlecoat said:

In all likelihood it will make no difference to his admission.  I briefly did alumni interviews for my school and I always would have sent in my recommendation in the few days after the interview so it's still fresh.  I'd assume most alumni interviewers are the same.

I don't think ANYTHING I wrote made a difference with the kids I've interviewed. Even with the kids I love and give glowing praise to, most don't get in.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 minutes ago, El Floppo said:

I don't think ANYTHING I wrote made a difference with the kids I've interviewed. Even with the kids I love and give glowing praise to, most don't get in.

Yeah, that too. Alumni interviews seem to have almost no impact on the admissions process to begin with.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 minutes ago, fatguyinalittlecoat said:

Yeah, that too. Alumni interviews seem to have almost no impact on the admissions process to begin with.

My sense is that their only purpose is to red flag kids who are obviously a-holes or psychopaths, a quick sniff test to get them into the pool of candidates but no influence beyond that. 

  • Laughing 1
  • Sad 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, fatguyinalittlecoat said:

Yeah, that too. Alumni interviews seem to have almost no impact on the admissions process to begin with.

Eh, I think I bombed one and I didn't get in.  I crushed another and got into that school.

Didn't attend either.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 1/9/2021 at 6:14 PM, scorchy said:

Definitely folks here with a lot more expertise than me, but as long as the actual classes are comparable, whether a high school weights its students' GPAs shouldn't matter.   Most colleges take whatever transcript is sent by the HS and do their own weighting.  

My son goes to a pretty well-respected private school and they not only don't weight grades, they don't even offer official AP classes.  Plenty of kids still take AP tests after finishing a particular class and tend to do well, but there won't be a "Joe had a 4.8 GPA and took 12 AP classes" anywhere on the transcript.  None of this appears to have hurt the students as admissions officers tend to get a feel for particular high schools based on previous experiences.  I'm sure that the student profile and academic reputation of most NYC public schools is pretty well known, at least among competitive colleges.

This is accurate.  Choose the best HS for him.   HS grading scales are all over the map.  There is no advantage or disadvantage of one grading scale over another so it shouldn’t drive where you rank the schools.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 1/12/2021 at 10:45 AM, dancer said:

Question on this process. Some schools conduct interviews with applicants, either with current students or alumni doing the interviews (over zoom these days). Obviously it would make sense for the applicant to send a timely "thank you" after these interviews.

The question is - if the applicant didn't know to do this, and just now realized they never sent a "thank you" email to the alumni who interviewed them 13 days ago - is it better/worse to send a "thank you" now or just forget it? Could sending a thank you this late be worse than doing nothing, as it might call more attention to the tardiness?

I’m going to say this and i mean it in the kindest way.

 

Your kid should write the thank you note.  Why?  Because it’s the right thing to do.  The lesson of sending the thank you note is important.  And late is better than never.  Also, I don’t think it will harm them.....but if it does, I’d vouch the lesson is more important.  

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...