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Official Chicago Bulls Thread: Pick #7 third year in a row


Juxtatarot

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3 hours ago, DJackson10 said:

Am I the only one who doesn't get the MPJ hype? Yeah he was projected as the top guy before his injury but this was also before any American knew of Luca Doncic who even before MPJ got hurt said could be the #1 pick. You are relying on a guys potential who dominated HS players who had a back injury. Anyone remember what happened with Jared Sullinger? He had a year or two that was pretty solid but the dude dropped like a fly down the board. He was suppose to be a top lottery pick. He's now playing in China. I think a lot of this hype Chicago fans have with MPJ is more because of the Hard on he has with the Bulls. If he didn't I think more people would not be on board with him if he wasn't such expressive of his love. He's played so little and NBA is a totally different beast them beating up on a bunch of HS kids. This is one of the reasons I hate 1 and done in college. I want this kid first to be able to walk without problems for the rest of his life. Don't push himself to do something that could effect it more. Before the back injury I wasn't all that impressed with him either. We don't need a Rose situation again here. I know I could be a bit biased here on this part but people I see are comparing Bridges to Kwahi Leonard and Leonard was pretty Raw at the time himself. The Bulls really need a guy who can play D on the wing. THey've always had a guy on the wing that can play from Pippen to Butler. We lost some of that defensive mojo when Jimmy was traded last year. 

 

Clearly he was in the top of his class, and played against top age group talent:

McDonald's All-American (2017)

McDonald's All-American Game MVP (2017)

Mr. Basketball USA (2017)

USA Today Player of the Year (2017)

Jordan Brand Classic (2017)

Nike Hoop Summit (2017)

Gatorade National Player of the Year (2017)

Naismith Prep Player of the Year (2017)

This doesn’t mean he’ll be a star in the NBA but the potential is obviously there. I’m nervous about his health but if the Bulls think the risk is acceptable, I’m fine with selecting him at 7. But I’m easy to please. I’m OK with them drafting any of Porter, Bamba, Mikal Bridges, Carter or even Young.

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10 minutes ago, Juxtatarot said:

 

Clearly he was in the top of his class, and played against top age group talent:

McDonald's All-American (2017)

McDonald's All-American Game MVP (2017)

Mr. Basketball USA (2017)

USA Today Player of the Year (2017)

Jordan Brand Classic (2017)

Nike Hoop Summit (2017)

Gatorade National Player of the Year (2017)

Naismith Prep Player of the Year (2017)

This doesn’t mean he’ll be a star in the NBA but the potential is obviously there. I’m nervous about his health but if the Bulls think the risk is acceptable, I’m fine with selecting him at 7. But I’m easy to please. I’m OK with them drafting any of Porter, Bamba, Mikal Bridges, Carter or even Young.

I honestly don't like dealing with any prospect that high with medical issues. Let some other poor soul take the risk. I'd rather go with the safer pick. I'd have no issue if Porter had dropped like a fly into the 20s or 2nd round to take a chance. I just don't like risking that high in the draft. Who knows if we'll have an opportunity like this again to draft a pretty good player? I'd rather not take a huge risk like that considering Back issues can linger. I do get your point but how many of these kids go through that and then suck in the NBA? I blame lack of player development. They develop players better in Europe compared to here now. Wouldn't be surprised by Summer of 2024 we are wondering why Team USA Basketball isn't dominating the olympics and why we either at battling for Bronze or not medaling at all. There's too many guys trying to be the start out there. Poor team basketball, lack fundamentals, poor Basketball IQ's overall and more about me me me. One of the reasons I'm ok with Bridges is even though he's Raw he comes from a solid college program. Wright has these guys prepared for the next level even if they aren't the best players. Good IQ's play team ball and work with in a system. Archie who's on our 2 way contract was nicknamed by teammates and media as Ryan Wright for his success and deamnor in the program. Most college programs don't do that these days. I'm perfectly fine with Bamba and warming up to Carter. I don't want Young though. 

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Nbadraft.net is reporting the Bulls guaranteed Chandler Hutchison they’d draft him at 22. He mysteriously pulled out of the combine.  I don’t know if I believe this. It seems out of character for the organization.

From the little I’ve seen and read about him, he seems to be a decent wing prospect. 

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I don't think the Bulls are in full tank mode but also aren't trying to compete for a title. They're looking to clear the decks for 2020. I agree they will be looking to take on crappy one year deals in return for assets with the idea of clearing the salary detritus in 2020 and reloading then with a chance to contend early next decade once LeBron retires and the Warriors break up. 

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37 minutes ago, Evilgrin 72 said:

I don't think the Bulls are in full tank mode but also aren't trying to compete for a title. They're looking to clear the decks for 2020. I agree they will be looking to take on crappy one year deals in return for assets with the idea of clearing the salary detritus in 2020 and reloading then with a chance to contend early next decade once LeBron retires and the Warriors break up. 

By 2020 do you mean the 2019-2020 season or 2020-2021?

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On 5/16/2018 at 8:02 PM, DJackson10 said:

If you want to make a bigger splash trade Lopez/Lavine/22nd overall to Philly or the 10th Pick, Covington and a contract like Jarryed Bayless. Philly can afford to give Lavine a max deal, in desperate need of a SG and could go into FA and grab a SF. Plus BC is stupid enough to do that trade and pay Zach a Max deal I did like the Lavine to the Kings for the 2 pick someone mentioned as well maybe trade 7 and 22 plus Lavine.

 

 

yeah, NO

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On 5/19/2018 at 5:44 PM, Juxtatarot said:

Nbadraft.net is reporting the Bulls guaranteed Chandler Hutchison they’d draft him at 22. He mysteriously pulled out of the combine.  I don’t know if I believe this. It seems out of character for the organization.

From the little I’ve seen and read about him, he seems to be a decent wing prospect. 

It sounds more like fluff then anything else. Maybe trying to draw up interest for the #22 pick. 

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59 minutes ago, DJackson10 said:

It sounds more like fluff then anything else. Maybe trying to draw up interest for the #22 pick. 

You know, after being skeptical yesterday I’m now starting to change my mind. Maybe it is true.

By pulling out of the combine and if he doesn’t work out for other teams, it would indeed seem obvious that he has a promise. But maybe the rumor about it being the Bulls is wrong.  Hutchison certain fits the profile of what Pax and Gar look for though.  (Athletic, experienced wing with length who can guard multiple positions. He seems to be smart, hard-working and have a high character.) 

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13 hours ago, Juxtatarot said:

You know, after being skeptical yesterday I’m now starting to change my mind. Maybe it is true.

By pulling out of the combine and if he doesn’t work out for other teams, it would indeed seem obvious that he has a promise. But maybe the rumor about it being the Bulls is wrong.  Hutchison certain fits the profile of what Pax and Gar look for though.  (Athletic, experienced wing with length who can guard multiple positions. He seems to be smart, hard-working and have a high character.) 

Boise State forward Chandler Hutchison abruptly withdrew from the combine and shut down all workouts Wednesday, which league executives believe to be the result of a promise from a team in the range of no. 18 (Spurs) and no. 24 (Trail Blazers). I inquired about the odds he’d drop to playoff teams at the end of the first like the Sixers, Celtics, and Warriors and was told outright he won’t make it that far. The 22-year-old forward had already worked out for the Timberwolves (no. 20) and Bulls (no. 22) before shutting it down.

It’s unclear who made the promise, if one was made at all, but it’s no secret that Hutchison’s agent Mark Bartelstein, the CEO of Chicago-based agency Priority Sports, is a family friend of Bulls owner Jerry Reinsdorf. The Bulls and Bartelstein have a successful working relationship. Bartelstein has represented a long list of former Bulls, from Steve Kerr and Jud Buechler to Taj Gibson and Bobby Portis, among many others.

Hutchison will be great for whichever team drafts him. He has a pro-ready body, and his shooting stroke and defensive intensity create a good foundation to become a 3-and-D player. There’s more to Hutchison’s game as an attacker off the dribble. The team that drafts him will have a chance to tap into that upside.

 

Maybe there is something to it.  Also could mean the Bulls are looking big (Carter?) at 7 and wing at 22.

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15 minutes ago, Evilgrin 72 said:

Boise State forward Chandler Hutchison abruptly withdrew from the combine and shut down all workouts Wednesday, which league executives believe to be the result of a promise from a team in the range of no. 18 (Spurs) and no. 24 (Trail Blazers). I inquired about the odds he’d drop to playoff teams at the end of the first like the Sixers, Celtics, and Warriors and was told outright he won’t make it that far. The 22-year-old forward had already worked out for the Timberwolves (no. 20) and Bulls (no. 22) before shutting it down.

It’s unclear who made the promise, if one was made at all, but it’s no secret that Hutchison’s agent Mark Bartelstein, the CEO of Chicago-based agency Priority Sports, is a family friend of Bulls owner Jerry Reinsdorf. The Bulls and Bartelstein have a successful working relationship. Bartelstein has represented a long list of former Bulls, from Steve Kerr and Jud Buechler to Taj Gibson and Bobby Portis, among many others.

Hutchison will be great for whichever team drafts him. He has a pro-ready body, and his shooting stroke and defensive intensity create a good foundation to become a 3-and-D player. There’s more to Hutchison’s game as an attacker off the dribble. The team that drafts him will have a chance to tap into that upside.

 

Maybe there is something to it.  Also could mean the Bulls are looking big (Carter?) at 7 and wing at 22.

I didn't realize they already worked him out.  And with all those connections, yeah, it probably is true.

Maybe they get 2 wings?  They could use the depth there.  And with the small ball NBA trend I could see both getting on the court together.  I still wouldn't be surprised if they drafted any of Carter, Bamba, Porter or Bridges.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Nova's Dante DiVencenco announced he's hiring an agent and won't be back on the main line next year. This is a guy I think Chicago would love. He works hard and is such a blue collar guy. He's projected to go anywhere from 27-20 depending how everything shapes out. 

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Woj latest mock draft has MPJ sliding to #15 do to health issues and Chi picking up Trae Young. I don't like the pick there but I can definitely see MPJ sliding. I know completely different type of player but Jared Sullinger had similar back issues and was suppose to be a top 10 pick and slick into the 20s the year he got drafted. 

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4 hours ago, DJackson10 said:

Woj latest mock draft has MPJ sliding to #15 do to health issues and Chi picking up Trae Young. I don't like the pick there but I can definitely see MPJ sliding. I know completely different type of player but Jared Sullinger had similar back issues and was suppose to be a top 10 pick and slick into the 20s the year he got drafted. 

I think that happened on that mock draft TV special they had.  Givony’s ESPN mock on Insider now has the Bulls picking Carter and Porter going 8 to the Cavs. It has the Bulls picking Musa at 22. Hutchison goes 23 to the Pacers and he writes that some teams think that’s who gave him the promise. DiVincenzo goes 28 but I think there’s a good chance he continues rising.

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1 hour ago, Juxtatarot said:

I think that happened on that mock draft TV special they had.  Givony’s ESPN mock on Insider now has the Bulls picking Carter and Porter going 8 to the Cavs. It has the Bulls picking Musa at 22. Hutchison goes 23 to the Pacers and he writes that some teams think that’s who gave him the promise. DiVincenzo goes 28 but I think there’s a good chance he continues rising.

I could Donte go earlier then 20 at this point. He's incredible underrated player. 

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Bamba only working out for 3 teams one being the Bulls. Says he feels Chicago is one of his best fits. Saw a suggestion of drafting Bamba if we can then signing PG13 in FA. I'd be absolutely ecstatic if that happened but most likely a pipe dream. 

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On 6/1/2018 at 5:00 PM, DJackson10 said:

Bamba only working out for 3 teams one being the Bulls. Says he feels Chicago is one of his best fits. Saw a suggestion of drafting Bamba if we can then signing PG13 in FA. I'd be absolutely ecstatic if that happened but most likely a pipe dream. 

Would George want to come to Chicago? Will Bamba be there at 8? I think that's N x 2, but it would be glorious. If this did occur, do they re-sign LaVine or just let him walk? 

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2 hours ago, Evilgrin 72 said:

Would George want to come to Chicago? Will Bamba be there at 8? I think that's N x 2, but it would be glorious. If this did occur, do they re-sign LaVine or just let him walk? 

I could see them Resigning Lavine if the deal is something both can agree to and not outrageous. If not maybe a sign and trade with another team. Bamba needs to fall to 8 or be there at 5-6 and if they feel someone is trying to leap them for him you pull the trigger and take him. I've seen a lot of suggestions lately that MPJ is really dropping in the draft. Now if he drops as far as our 2nd 1st then I'd be more inclined on taking him as to me it's not as much as a risk as taking him in the lottery. It's a lower risk higher reward. 

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15 hours ago, DJackson10 said:

I could see them Resigning Lavine if the deal is something both can agree to and not outrageous. If not maybe a sign and trade with another team. Bamba needs to fall to 8 or be there at 5-6 and if they feel someone is trying to leap them for him you pull the trigger and take him. I've seen a lot of suggestions lately that MPJ is really dropping in the draft. Now if he drops as far as our 2nd 1st then I'd be more inclined on taking him as to me it's not as much as a risk as taking him in the lottery. It's a lower risk higher reward. 

If MPJ is still there at 22...

1) I'll eat my own foot

2) If the Bulls passed on him, I would abandon the team completely until GarPax is not only fired, but ritually executed. 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Apparently theres multiple teams interested in Bobby Portis after his strong 2nd half of the year. 

Also according to a few reports Gar/Pax aren't high on Kriss Dunn. I don't know why seemed to improve and all but that's perplexing. Then again these two are always perplexing and make us scratch our heads. 

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9 minutes ago, DJackson10 said:

Also according to a few reports Gar/Pax aren't high on Kriss Dunn. I don't know why seemed to improve and all but that's perplexing. Then again these two are always perplexing and make us scratch our heads. 

This article in the Sun Times is where it first came from, I think.

 

Quote

But multiple sources told the Sun-Times last week that the Bulls’ coaching staff and front office have been less than impressed with Dunn’s work habits so far in the offseason, a far cry from the player they acquired from the Timberwolves in the deal for Jimmy Butler on draft night 2017.

Dunn was a workout warrior last offseason, but the sources said he has been ‘‘shortcutting’’ his way through May and early June enough that the idea of the Bulls selecting a point guard in the NBA Draft on June 21 is back in play.

Whether this information is being leaked to light a fire under Dunn or because the Bulls have some legitimate concerns about him, the last thing the staff wants during the rebuild is players suddenly feeling entitled.

Shooting guard Zach LaVine needed a talking-to about that during the season, and now Dunn is getting a similar message. One source said it wasn’t a problem yet, but the Bulls want to make sure it doesn’t go in that direction.

 

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Just now, Juxtatarot said:

This article in the Sun Times is where it first came from, I think.

 

 

That explains everything it's Cawley I take him with a huge Grain of salt most times. Dude seems like a clown. He's the typical throwing something on the wall hoping it sticks type journalists 

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10 minutes ago, DJackson10 said:

That explains everything it's Cawley I take him with a huge Grain of salt most times. Dude seems like a clown. He's the typical throwing something on the wall hoping it sticks type journalists 

Another theory is it's a smokescreen to make teams think they might be interested in Trae Young.  Personally I don't think it's that because it's kind of throwing Dunn under the bus.  I guess they could deny it later, though.

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22 hours ago, Juxtatarot said:

Another theory is it's a smokescreen to make teams think they might be interested in Trae Young.  Personally I don't think it's that because it's kind of throwing Dunn under the bus.  I guess they could deny it later, though.

Oh they could deny it. It's more so I don't trust anything Cawley says. About a year or two ago he said Jerry's Son Micheal was going to take full ownership and get rid of Gar/Pax over the summer. Went into extensive detail on the whole thing as well. 

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Found this on a blog, I was planning to summarize my thoughts on the possible picks this week, but this hews so close to what I would have written that I just saved myself the time and copied it over.

 

The most valuable asset the Bulls were getting back in the Jimmy Butler trade was always thought to be the value of their own draft pick in 2018, a line of thinking that exposes the franchise’s own flawed logic in the deal while also representing their best shot at landing another superstar. In that sense, the No. 7 pick equates to something like a worst-case scenario: the Bulls just spent the entire year losing on purpose, and they don’t even have a top-five selection to show for it, let alone the No. 1 pick.

This is a bummer, but not yet a certain disaster. Stephen Curry was once the No. 7 pick. Lauri Markkanen was also taken there, and he looks like a cornerstone piece even if the Bulls essentially admitted they got lucky and had no idea he was going to be this good, this quick. There will be a great player in this draft taken at No. 7 or later; all the Bulls have to do is find him.

The Bulls will have a lot of appealing options likely to be on the board when they come on the clock, but there is no obvious pick. This is my best attempt at sorting through their choices.

Wendell Carter Jr., C, Duke

This is a talented draft class, if one with odd timing. Five of the first seven picks could be big men at a time when traditional centers are becoming more marginalized than ever. The Bulls are one of the franchises at the forefront of this decision. How many minutes can Markkanen handle at the 5? And if he’s closing out potential playoff games at center, is it really worth it to take another center with this pick?

At the same time, the Bulls are not in a position to draft anything but the best player available. This roster needs talent in the worst way before anyone can really figure out what to make of it. That brings us to Wendell Carter Jr., who is probably going to be the only remaining “elite” big on the board when the Bulls come on the clock at No. 7.

Carter is 6’10 with a 7’3 wingspan. He played close to 270 pounds as a freshman at Duke but has slimmed down to around 250 pounds for the pre-draft process. Those physical dimensions are the start of Carter’s appeal: he’s a bruising big man with an NBA-ready body who can score in the paint and rebound, block some shots and hit face-up jumpers. Carter’s skill set has a lot of strengths and only one apparent weakness.

Let’s get to what Carter does well first. A major knock on Markkanen coming out of college was his lack of rebounding ability. It turned out Markkanen handled himself quite well in that area, nearly finishing top-20 in the league in defensive rebound percentage. Much of that can be credited to the selfless Robin Lopez, who would box opponents out and let Markkanen grab the board. Lopez won’t be around forever, so this remains something the Bulls have to consider moving forward. Carter will give the Bulls another strong rebounder on both ends of the floor. This might be his most NBA-ready skill and it complements Markkanen well.

Carter already knows how to score with his back to the basket, which is a lost art in the modern game. With Markkanen spacing out to the three-point line in the frontcourt, he should have plenty of room to eat. But don’t think his heavy frame and inside scoring touch makes him Jahlil Okafor: Carter has legit range on his jump shot, knocking down 19-of-46 threes as a freshman, good for 41 percent. That’s a low volume, yes, but he’s a confident and capable shooter already and it should be a major part of his game going forward. I’d be willing to wager he turns out to be the best jump-shooting big man in this draft not named Jaren Jackson Jr., which is saying something considering Mo Bamba, Deandre Ayton and Marvin Bagley III each have potential as a shooter, too.

Carter can block shots as well, posting a 7.6 block percentage that ranked No. 64 in the country. You need some context to understand that stat: Duke played zone this past year largely because Carter and Bagley struggled to defend high ball screens. Carter’s biggest and maybe only question mark is his lateral quickness, which happens to be a major issue in a league that switches defensively more than ever and asks its bigs to stick with guards for a few seconds off ball screens.

Again: Carter isn’t Okafor in this area. He’s not that slow, and he also has high basketball IQ and plus-length. That combination should give Carter a chance to defend in space at the NBA level, though obviously he’s not as fleet of foot as someone like Clint Capela.

The book on Carter is that he’s a high-floor, low-upside guy. That first part is true, but I wonder how much the second part is. Wendell Carter Jr. is good enough to be an All-Star in this league. You need to have a pretty damn high ceiling to get there. I would agree it’s unlikely he turns into a top-10 overall player, though it’s possible if he becomes a Karl-Anthony Towns-like three-point shooter.

This really all comes back to the fit with Markkanen. Lauri is 7-feet tall and as such should probably be playing lots of center in this era. But if the Bulls think he needs help inside — or if they simply believe Carter is the best player available — he’s worth the pick at No. 7. He’s going to be a good NBA player, I have little doubt.

Trae Young, PG, Oklahoma

Trae Young is the most polarizing player in the draft. He was a phenom at the start of the college season, going from the No. 23 recruit in the country to the best player in the sport as a freshman. He essentially fell apart in the second half of the year. His shooting dipped, his turnovers skyrocketed and Oklahoma dropped out of the polls entirely after peaking in the top five.

But here’s the thing: Oklahoma never should have been that good in the first place. It was a team that won 12 games the year before and only had one other top-100 recruit in the rotation. Trae Young had to do everything for the Sooners, and he did.

Young is the best shooter and maybe the best passer (along with Luka Doncic) in the draft. Those are skills that translate. The question is whether Young will still be able to work his magic against NBA length, and whether his lack of size and poor defensive ability will ultimately submarine all of the value he has offensively.

Let’s start with the shot. Young only hit 36 percent of his threes this year, but make no mistake: he’s an elite shooter. He has deep range off the dribble and never hesitates to pull. This has always been the basis of those Steph Curry comparisons, and while that’s unfair to him, there’s no denying certain similarities.

Young’s shooting makes him a scheme changer. You have to go over every screen on him, and your big man better hedge, too. The rub is that he also has tremendous vision and passing ability to find the open man and put the offense at an advantage. He is a player with deep range who is ready and willing to pull from anywhere who uses his shooting to set up his passing.

Young is a below-the-rim athlete, and that’s putting it charitably. Can he dunk? I don’t think we’ll ever see it in a game. But even with his lack of explosion, he still has ways of finishing around the rim, mostly notably with a crafty floater that would make Tony Parker blush. Being able to score in the paint would make him a complete offensive player, but that will be difficult against NBA length and athleticism.

Defensively ... Young is bad. How bad? Like, maybe the worst defensive guard in the league. Curry’s defensive struggles are a bit overblown -- he’s bigger than Young, fights through screens, has quick hands and is attentive. Young doesn’t have or do any of that. A better comp might be the guy who helped usher in this era of spread-n-shred NBA style: Steve Nash. Nash couldn’t defend a paper bag, but his offensive value was so immense that he made up for whatever he was giving back.

Still, the defense and lack of size at 6’2, 177 pounds is going to be a real issue. Small point guards tend to get roasted in the playoffs unless they’re Chris Paul. There’s no doubt teams will pick on Young, particularly in the postseason, especially in a league that is consistently targeting the weakest defender on switches. You can’t switch with Trae Young, and that limits how good your defense can be.

The fit with the Bulls is fascinating. He’s theoretically a good match with Kris Dunn, who has the length and defensive acumen to defend multiple positions on the perimeter. You could always hide Young on the weakest offensive player, assuming he’s not dying on screens and being forced to switch. The problem is that Zach LaVine is also really bad on defense. A Young-LaVine pairing just doesn’t work. The Bulls need to decide if that’s a Trae Young problem or a Zach LaVine problem.

To me, here’s what’s so tempting about Young: no team had ever taken 30 threes per game until the 2015 season. This past year, the Rockets took 42 threes per game. What’s it going to look like five years from now, when Trae Young is 25? Will be teams be averaging 50 threes per game? Will some teams take 60?

Three is always going to be worth more than two. If the Bulls put two truly elite shooters on the floor with Markkanen and Young, they could hypothetically be on the cutting edge of the NBA’s new reality.

Michael Porter Jr., F, Missouri

I am actually in a unique position to evaluate Porter, because I’m one of the few who actually watched him when he was healthy while covering recruiting for SB Nation. The first grassroots (or AAU) game I ever watched was in Lexington, Kentucky on Nike’s EYBL circuit. It was Michael Porter (and Trae Young) of Mokan Elite vs. Jayson Tatum and the Saint Louis Eagles.

I saw Porter as a junior and senior on the EYBL, saw him at USA Basketball minicamp, saw him at the McDonald’s All-American Game. That was before he had back surgery that stole all but two unimpressive games from his freshman year at Missouri. There’s a general line of thinking that Porter is going to be a stud if he’s healthy, but the back issues are just the start of the concerns. His skill set has some real question marks even if the back holds up.

Namely: How efficient will Porter be as a scorer? Will he defend anyone? And does he use his scoring to set up his teammates? Those are legit questions, and most of them come back to Porter’s general feel for the game.

The talent is obvious. The ideal version of Porter is a 6’11 go-to scorer who can get buckets from all three levels. He has been raised his whole life to be a 30 point-per-game NBA scorer, and earnestly believes he can be the next Kevin Durant, who he already counts as a close friend (Curry, too).

The question is the cost his scoring comes at. He reminds me a bit of Andrew Wiggins, another prospect who had all the talent in the world but hasn’t really lived up to the hype yet in the NBA, in part because he might be missing the mental component. I want to see Porter read the floor and hit teammates for assists. I want to see him use his physical gifts on the defensive end. We also have no real idea where his shooting and ball handling are at right now. Is this a 40 percent 3-point shooter? 35 percent? 30 percent?

If the Bulls take Porter, I want to see him at the four, not the three. I want him and Lauri Markkanen to split ball handling duties in 4-5 pick-and-rolls, which would catch just about anybody on their heels. I want them to focus on what he does poorly, not what he does well, because his natural talent alone will give him a baseline for a certain amount of success provided he’s healthy.

Porter to me is the biggest boom-or-bust pick in the draft. He’s a high-ceiling, low-floor guy. Maybe that’s perfect for a team like the Bulls who could just hope to find another superstar in the draft by tanking again if they whiff on him. But at a certain point, you can’t just keep wasting seasons in hope of some invisible savior. Maybe Michael Porter Jr. really will be a star, but there are quite a few questions he’ll have to answer before he gets there.

Mikal Bridges, F, Villanova

Bridges fits the Bulls’ historical draft profile, for better or for worse. He spent four years in college (he redshirted his freshman year) developing his game for one of the nation’s best programs. He leaves school with two national titles and an elevated draft status that has him in the conversation for the top 10.

Bridges is a straight 3-and-D guy. The jump shot was one of his biggest question marks heading into school, but he worked to become one of the very best shooters in this draft. He hit 43.5 percent of his six three-point attempts per game, mostly on catch-and-shoot opportunities within the nation’s clear-cut No. 1 offense. Bridges won’t splash threes off the dribble like Young, probably, but he can zip around screens like a young Kyle Korver or Rip Hamilton and rise-and-fire with a quick release. When you also factor in his free throw percentages (91 percent as a junior, 85 percent as a senior), it leaves little doubt he’s an elite shooter, at least from a standstill.

The problem with Bridges’ offense is that it essentially starts and stops at his shooting ability. He does not offer much value as a creator. He isn’t going to break you down off the dribble and finish at the hoop or kick out to a teammate. He mostly stays in his lane as a catch-and-shoot guy, which is valuable but certainly limits his upside.

If you’re going to take a perimeter player who can’t create at No. 7, he better be a lockdown defender. Like, the type of guy who can check LeBron, Durant, James Harden, ect., at least as much as anyone can defend those guys. Bridges is a very good defender, thanks mostly to his length (7’1 wingspan) and quick feet. The issue is his lack of strength, which has been a problem for him since he enrolled at Villanova.

The dude is skinny, only weighing in at 210 pounds at the combine. He should be able to defend most perimeter guys (I like him hounding opposing point guards), but in a switch-heavy league it’s fair to wonder if he has the strength to switch on frontcourt players. Also: will he be able to hold his own with someone like Jimmy Butler or Harden driving at him?

What Bridges can do is elevate the value of his teammates by spacing the floor and defending. He still feels more like a final piece to me than a first or second piece. He has the lowest upside in this group by a mile, as evidenced by the fact that he was redshirting when he was Carter, Young and Porter’s age. He is good and will be good, but the lack of creation ability ultimately weighs down his ceiling.

Miles Bridges, F, Michigan State

Bridges could have been a lottery pick last year, but he came back to school for his sophomore season at Michigan State without really helping or hurting his stock at all. After two years in college, he isn’t the shiny new thing in this draft, and as such has lost a little luster in terms of hype. But if you look at the way the NBA has evolved, Bridges’ game looks like it will translate well.

If you watched Cavs-Celtics or Rockets-Warriors in the conference finals, you saw a bunch of athletic wings on the floor who could switch on defense, make a play by putting the ball on the floor and hit a jump shot. Bridges can do all of those things, entering the draft as something like a jack of all trades but a master of none. He has baseline competency at every skill you want from a wing, while still being one of the best athletes in this draft at 225 pounds.

Bridges’ issue at MSU was that he settled for his jump shot too often. You want to see an athlete this explosive attack the rim consistently. Perhaps that’s because he wanted to prove to the NBA that he could hit shots off the dribble. It also wasn’t always easy for him to get all the way to the paint with Tom Izzo usually playing two big-man lineups that put Bridges at the three, when he was best suited in college at the four.

He’ll be able to play either forward spot in the league, and that versatility adds to his value. He’s a bit undersized for a modern 4 at 6’6 with a 6’9 wingspan, and he could still raise his skill level as a shooter and ball handler before he becomes an ideal three. But he’s still an athletic 6’6 wing in a league that values that type of player more than ever. If you’re concerned about investing the No. 7 pick in a center who plays next to Markkanen because traditional bigs have been devalued, then why not go the other way and pair Lauri with a 6’6 wrecking ball who can fly around the court and make plays above the rim?

Bridges might never be more than a third option, but he’s the type of player every good team needs. He offers more creation ability on the wing than Mikal offensively. He’s also stronger and more athletic. Mikal is longer and the better shooter. If the Bulls want a wing at No. 7 and Porter is gone, their decision between the two Bridges would be a fascinating look into what the Bulls value from the position.

 

So, who should the Bulls take?

To me, the two best players in this draft are Luka Doncic and Jaren Jackson Jr. Neither is likely to be available, a symptom of the Niko Mirotic-powered seven-game winning streak midway through the season. The Bulls will have a few talented guys to choose from, but each of them comes with their own red flags.

I should have a strong opinion on this. I’ve been watching the one-and-dones live since they were juniors in high school as part of my recruiting coverage. I wrote a Mo Bamba feature when he was a junior. I got to know Carter’s parents when he was a senior. I chronicled the circus around Porter at the McDonald’s Game. I also was a year early in projecting the Mikal Bridges breakout, which happened for him as a senior and not a junior as I suspected.

Even as someone who has watched these guys for years, I am completely torn on what to do at No. 7. The best move would be trading up for Doncic or Jackson with a package of No. 7 + No. 22 + Bobby Portis, but it’s unlikely anyone would bite on that. I’d also look to trade down with the Clippers, sending No. 7 for No. 12 and No. 13, then targeting Zhaire Smith, Shai Gilgeous-Alexander, Robert Williams, one of the Bridges or Kevin Knox (I wrote a high school feature on him, too) with the picks.

Assuming they stick at No. 7, I think I’d rank them like this:

5. Mikal Bridges

4. Miles Bridges

3. Trae Young

2. Michael Porter Jr.

1. Wendell Carter Jr.

I just worry that Young has to be perfect mentally to hit his ceiling, and I have questions about that to go along with the obvious size/athleticism limitations. Porter has more upside than Carter, but the back injury is scary, and even if he’s healthy I think it’s fair to question his impact on winning.

There’s an argument for Porter that, even if he busts, the Bulls are just back in the lottery again next year. Well, the Bulls are going to be back in the lottery again next year regardless, because no 19-year-old will have that great of an impact on winning, and because tanking for another year is in the Bulls’ best long-term interest. Still, you can’t just waste draft picks, especially when the Bulls wasted an entire year of our lives to get this selection.

Carter is going to be good. The Al Horford comps are legitimate. He also reminds me a bit of Elton Brand. There’s value in simply adding another good player — one with an All-Star ceiling, in my opinion — even if he’s not a true stud. It would make the Bulls more appealing to free agents (hold your laughter) and also give them another major trade asset. It’s also worth considering the talent at the top of the 2019 draft. If this draft is mostly bigs, next year is mostly wings. You can already read my features on Cam Reddish, Zion Williamson, and R.J. Barrett (don’t forget about Nassir Little, either).

There’s no easy pick for the Bulls at No. 7, but forced into making one, I think I’m going with Wendell Carter.

 

I think I would take Porter or Young over Carter or Mikal Bridges, not even necessarily because I think they're going to be better players, but because I think the Bulls need to swing for the fences here and try to land a future star.  The core of Markkanen, Dunn, and LaVine (assuming that even stays together) is not good enough to win a title if surrounded by role players, even really good ones.  They need at least one, if not two stars to complement that group, and I am of the mind that they should let LaVine go elsewhere if he wants a max deal.  He's just not worth it.

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On 6/15/2018 at 1:35 PM, Juxtatarot said:

Fantastic article/scouting report on Porter from a guy that apparently used to work for Hinkie:

https://cleaningtheglass.com/the-michael-porter-mystery/

I don't trust anything by Hinkie. put his hands on Dude liked to draft a lot of players who were hurt and only Joel Embiid made anything worth the while bu Embiid had to be taken there. 

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8 hours ago, Evilgrin 72 said:

Found this on a blog, I was planning to summarize my thoughts on the possible picks this week, but this hews so close to what I would have written that I just saved myself the time and copied it over.

 

The most valuable asset the Bulls were getting back in the Jimmy Butler trade was always thought to be the value of their own draft pick in 2018, a line of thinking that exposes the franchise’s own flawed logic in the deal while also representing their best shot at landing another superstar. In that sense, the No. 7 pick equates to something like a worst-case scenario: the Bulls just spent the entire year losing on purpose, and they don’t even have a top-five selection to show for it, let alone the No. 1 pick.

This is a bummer, but not yet a certain disaster. Stephen Curry was once the No. 7 pick. Lauri Markkanen was also taken there, and he looks like a cornerstone piece even if the Bulls essentially admitted they got lucky and had no idea he was going to be this good, this quick. There will be a great player in this draft taken at No. 7 or later; all the Bulls have to do is find him.

The Bulls will have a lot of appealing options likely to be on the board when they come on the clock, but there is no obvious pick. This is my best attempt at sorting through their choices.

Wendell Carter Jr., C, Duke

This is a talented draft class, if one with odd timing. Five of the first seven picks could be big men at a time when traditional centers are becoming more marginalized than ever. The Bulls are one of the franchises at the forefront of this decision. How many minutes can Markkanen handle at the 5? And if he’s closing out potential playoff games at center, is it really worth it to take another center with this pick?

At the same time, the Bulls are not in a position to draft anything but the best player available. This roster needs talent in the worst way before anyone can really figure out what to make of it. That brings us to Wendell Carter Jr., who is probably going to be the only remaining “elite” big on the board when the Bulls come on the clock at No. 7.

Carter is 6’10 with a 7’3 wingspan. He played close to 270 pounds as a freshman at Duke but has slimmed down to around 250 pounds for the pre-draft process. Those physical dimensions are the start of Carter’s appeal: he’s a bruising big man with an NBA-ready body who can score in the paint and rebound, block some shots and hit face-up jumpers. Carter’s skill set has a lot of strengths and only one apparent weakness.

Let’s get to what Carter does well first. A major knock on Markkanen coming out of college was his lack of rebounding ability. It turned out Markkanen handled himself quite well in that area, nearly finishing top-20 in the league in defensive rebound percentage. Much of that can be credited to the selfless Robin Lopez, who would box opponents out and let Markkanen grab the board. Lopez won’t be around forever, so this remains something the Bulls have to consider moving forward. Carter will give the Bulls another strong rebounder on both ends of the floor. This might be his most NBA-ready skill and it complements Markkanen well.

Carter already knows how to score with his back to the basket, which is a lost art in the modern game. With Markkanen spacing out to the three-point line in the frontcourt, he should have plenty of room to eat. But don’t think his heavy frame and inside scoring touch makes him Jahlil Okafor: Carter has legit range on his jump shot, knocking down 19-of-46 threes as a freshman, good for 41 percent. That’s a low volume, yes, but he’s a confident and capable shooter already and it should be a major part of his game going forward. I’d be willing to wager he turns out to be the best jump-shooting big man in this draft not named Jaren Jackson Jr., which is saying something considering Mo Bamba, Deandre Ayton and Marvin Bagley III each have potential as a shooter, too.

Carter can block shots as well, posting a 7.6 block percentage that ranked No. 64 in the country. You need some context to understand that stat: Duke played zone this past year largely because Carter and Bagley struggled to defend high ball screens. Carter’s biggest and maybe only question mark is his lateral quickness, which happens to be a major issue in a league that switches defensively more than ever and asks its bigs to stick with guards for a few seconds off ball screens.

Again: Carter isn’t Okafor in this area. He’s not that slow, and he also has high basketball IQ and plus-length. That combination should give Carter a chance to defend in space at the NBA level, though obviously he’s not as fleet of foot as someone like Clint Capela.

The book on Carter is that he’s a high-floor, low-upside guy. That first part is true, but I wonder how much the second part is. Wendell Carter Jr. is good enough to be an All-Star in this league. You need to have a pretty damn high ceiling to get there. I would agree it’s unlikely he turns into a top-10 overall player, though it’s possible if he becomes a Karl-Anthony Towns-like three-point shooter.

This really all comes back to the fit with Markkanen. Lauri is 7-feet tall and as such should probably be playing lots of center in this era. But if the Bulls think he needs help inside — or if they simply believe Carter is the best player available — he’s worth the pick at No. 7. He’s going to be a good NBA player, I have little doubt.

Trae Young, PG, Oklahoma

Trae Young is the most polarizing player in the draft. He was a phenom at the start of the college season, going from the No. 23 recruit in the country to the best player in the sport as a freshman. He essentially fell apart in the second half of the year. His shooting dipped, his turnovers skyrocketed and Oklahoma dropped out of the polls entirely after peaking in the top five.

But here’s the thing: Oklahoma never should have been that good in the first place. It was a team that won 12 games the year before and only had one other top-100 recruit in the rotation. Trae Young had to do everything for the Sooners, and he did.

Young is the best shooter and maybe the best passer (along with Luka Doncic) in the draft. Those are skills that translate. The question is whether Young will still be able to work his magic against NBA length, and whether his lack of size and poor defensive ability will ultimately submarine all of the value he has offensively.

Let’s start with the shot. Young only hit 36 percent of his threes this year, but make no mistake: he’s an elite shooter. He has deep range off the dribble and never hesitates to pull. This has always been the basis of those Steph Curry comparisons, and while that’s unfair to him, there’s no denying certain similarities.

Young’s shooting makes him a scheme changer. You have to go over every screen on him, and your big man better hedge, too. The rub is that he also has tremendous vision and passing ability to find the open man and put the offense at an advantage. He is a player with deep range who is ready and willing to pull from anywhere who uses his shooting to set up his passing.

Young is a below-the-rim athlete, and that’s putting it charitably. Can he dunk? I don’t think we’ll ever see it in a game. But even with his lack of explosion, he still has ways of finishing around the rim, mostly notably with a crafty floater that would make Tony Parker blush. Being able to score in the paint would make him a complete offensive player, but that will be difficult against NBA length and athleticism.

Defensively ... Young is bad. How bad? Like, maybe the worst defensive guard in the league. Curry’s defensive struggles are a bit overblown -- he’s bigger than Young, fights through screens, has quick hands and is attentive. Young doesn’t have or do any of that. A better comp might be the guy who helped usher in this era of spread-n-shred NBA style: Steve Nash. Nash couldn’t defend a paper bag, but his offensive value was so immense that he made up for whatever he was giving back.

Still, the defense and lack of size at 6’2, 177 pounds is going to be a real issue. Small point guards tend to get roasted in the playoffs unless they’re Chris Paul. There’s no doubt teams will pick on Young, particularly in the postseason, especially in a league that is consistently targeting the weakest defender on switches. You can’t switch with Trae Young, and that limits how good your defense can be.

The fit with the Bulls is fascinating. He’s theoretically a good match with Kris Dunn, who has the length and defensive acumen to defend multiple positions on the perimeter. You could always hide Young on the weakest offensive player, assuming he’s not dying on screens and being forced to switch. The problem is that Zach LaVine is also really bad on defense. A Young-LaVine pairing just doesn’t work. The Bulls need to decide if that’s a Trae Young problem or a Zach LaVine problem.

To me, here’s what’s so tempting about Young: no team had ever taken 30 threes per game until the 2015 season. This past year, the Rockets took 42 threes per game. What’s it going to look like five years from now, when Trae Young is 25? Will be teams be averaging 50 threes per game? Will some teams take 60?

Three is always going to be worth more than two. If the Bulls put two truly elite shooters on the floor with Markkanen and Young, they could hypothetically be on the cutting edge of the NBA’s new reality.

Michael Porter Jr., F, Missouri

I am actually in a unique position to evaluate Porter, because I’m one of the few who actually watched him when he was healthy while covering recruiting for SB Nation. The first grassroots (or AAU) game I ever watched was in Lexington, Kentucky on Nike’s EYBL circuit. It was Michael Porter (and Trae Young) of Mokan Elite vs. Jayson Tatum and the Saint Louis Eagles.

I saw Porter as a junior and senior on the EYBL, saw him at USA Basketball minicamp, saw him at the McDonald’s All-American Game. That was before he had back surgery that stole all but two unimpressive games from his freshman year at Missouri. There’s a general line of thinking that Porter is going to be a stud if he’s healthy, but the back issues are just the start of the concerns. His skill set has some real question marks even if the back holds up.

Namely: How efficient will Porter be as a scorer? Will he defend anyone? And does he use his scoring to set up his teammates? Those are legit questions, and most of them come back to Porter’s general feel for the game.

The talent is obvious. The ideal version of Porter is a 6’11 go-to scorer who can get buckets from all three levels. He has been raised his whole life to be a 30 point-per-game NBA scorer, and earnestly believes he can be the next Kevin Durant, who he already counts as a close friend (Curry, too).

The question is the cost his scoring comes at. He reminds me a bit of Andrew Wiggins, another prospect who had all the talent in the world but hasn’t really lived up to the hype yet in the NBA, in part because he might be missing the mental component. I want to see Porter read the floor and hit teammates for assists. I want to see him use his physical gifts on the defensive end. We also have no real idea where his shooting and ball handling are at right now. Is this a 40 percent 3-point shooter? 35 percent? 30 percent?

If the Bulls take Porter, I want to see him at the four, not the three. I want him and Lauri Markkanen to split ball handling duties in 4-5 pick-and-rolls, which would catch just about anybody on their heels. I want them to focus on what he does poorly, not what he does well, because his natural talent alone will give him a baseline for a certain amount of success provided he’s healthy.

Porter to me is the biggest boom-or-bust pick in the draft. He’s a high-ceiling, low-floor guy. Maybe that’s perfect for a team like the Bulls who could just hope to find another superstar in the draft by tanking again if they whiff on him. But at a certain point, you can’t just keep wasting seasons in hope of some invisible savior. Maybe Michael Porter Jr. really will be a star, but there are quite a few questions he’ll have to answer before he gets there.

Mikal Bridges, F, Villanova

Bridges fits the Bulls’ historical draft profile, for better or for worse. He spent four years in college (he redshirted his freshman year) developing his game for one of the nation’s best programs. He leaves school with two national titles and an elevated draft status that has him in the conversation for the top 10.

Bridges is a straight 3-and-D guy. The jump shot was one of his biggest question marks heading into school, but he worked to become one of the very best shooters in this draft. He hit 43.5 percent of his six three-point attempts per game, mostly on catch-and-shoot opportunities within the nation’s clear-cut No. 1 offense. Bridges won’t splash threes off the dribble like Young, probably, but he can zip around screens like a young Kyle Korver or Rip Hamilton and rise-and-fire with a quick release. When you also factor in his free throw percentages (91 percent as a junior, 85 percent as a senior), it leaves little doubt he’s an elite shooter, at least from a standstill.

The problem with Bridges’ offense is that it essentially starts and stops at his shooting ability. He does not offer much value as a creator. He isn’t going to break you down off the dribble and finish at the hoop or kick out to a teammate. He mostly stays in his lane as a catch-and-shoot guy, which is valuable but certainly limits his upside.

If you’re going to take a perimeter player who can’t create at No. 7, he better be a lockdown defender. Like, the type of guy who can check LeBron, Durant, James Harden, ect., at least as much as anyone can defend those guys. Bridges is a very good defender, thanks mostly to his length (7’1 wingspan) and quick feet. The issue is his lack of strength, which has been a problem for him since he enrolled at Villanova.

The dude is skinny, only weighing in at 210 pounds at the combine. He should be able to defend most perimeter guys (I like him hounding opposing point guards), but in a switch-heavy league it’s fair to wonder if he has the strength to switch on frontcourt players. Also: will he be able to hold his own with someone like Jimmy Butler or Harden driving at him?

What Bridges can do is elevate the value of his teammates by spacing the floor and defending. He still feels more like a final piece to me than a first or second piece. He has the lowest upside in this group by a mile, as evidenced by the fact that he was redshirting when he was Carter, Young and Porter’s age. He is good and will be good, but the lack of creation ability ultimately weighs down his ceiling.

Miles Bridges, F, Michigan State

Bridges could have been a lottery pick last year, but he came back to school for his sophomore season at Michigan State without really helping or hurting his stock at all. After two years in college, he isn’t the shiny new thing in this draft, and as such has lost a little luster in terms of hype. But if you look at the way the NBA has evolved, Bridges’ game looks like it will translate well.

If you watched Cavs-Celtics or Rockets-Warriors in the conference finals, you saw a bunch of athletic wings on the floor who could switch on defense, make a play by putting the ball on the floor and hit a jump shot. Bridges can do all of those things, entering the draft as something like a jack of all trades but a master of none. He has baseline competency at every skill you want from a wing, while still being one of the best athletes in this draft at 225 pounds.

Bridges’ issue at MSU was that he settled for his jump shot too often. You want to see an athlete this explosive attack the rim consistently. Perhaps that’s because he wanted to prove to the NBA that he could hit shots off the dribble. It also wasn’t always easy for him to get all the way to the paint with Tom Izzo usually playing two big-man lineups that put Bridges at the three, when he was best suited in college at the four.

He’ll be able to play either forward spot in the league, and that versatility adds to his value. He’s a bit undersized for a modern 4 at 6’6 with a 6’9 wingspan, and he could still raise his skill level as a shooter and ball handler before he becomes an ideal three. But he’s still an athletic 6’6 wing in a league that values that type of player more than ever. If you’re concerned about investing the No. 7 pick in a center who plays next to Markkanen because traditional bigs have been devalued, then why not go the other way and pair Lauri with a 6’6 wrecking ball who can fly around the court and make plays above the rim?

Bridges might never be more than a third option, but he’s the type of player every good team needs. He offers more creation ability on the wing than Mikal offensively. He’s also stronger and more athletic. Mikal is longer and the better shooter. If the Bulls want a wing at No. 7 and Porter is gone, their decision between the two Bridges would be a fascinating look into what the Bulls value from the position.

 

So, who should the Bulls take?

To me, the two best players in this draft are Luka Doncic and Jaren Jackson Jr. Neither is likely to be available, a symptom of the Niko Mirotic-powered seven-game winning streak midway through the season. The Bulls will have a few talented guys to choose from, but each of them comes with their own red flags.

I should have a strong opinion on this. I’ve been watching the one-and-dones live since they were juniors in high school as part of my recruiting coverage. I wrote a Mo Bamba feature when he was a junior. I got to know Carter’s parents when he was a senior. I chronicled the circus around Porter at the McDonald’s Game. I also was a year early in projecting the Mikal Bridges breakout, which happened for him as a senior and not a junior as I suspected.

Even as someone who has watched these guys for years, I am completely torn on what to do at No. 7. The best move would be trading up for Doncic or Jackson with a package of No. 7 + No. 22 + Bobby Portis, but it’s unlikely anyone would bite on that. I’d also look to trade down with the Clippers, sending No. 7 for No. 12 and No. 13, then targeting Zhaire Smith, Shai Gilgeous-Alexander, Robert Williams, one of the Bridges or Kevin Knox (I wrote a high school feature on him, too) with the picks.

Assuming they stick at No. 7, I think I’d rank them like this:

5. Mikal Bridges

4. Miles Bridges

3. Trae Young

2. Michael Porter Jr.

1. Wendell Carter Jr.

I just worry that Young has to be perfect mentally to hit his ceiling, and I have questions about that to go along with the obvious size/athleticism limitations. Porter has more upside than Carter, but the back injury is scary, and even if he’s healthy I think it’s fair to question his impact on winning.

There’s an argument for Porter that, even if he busts, the Bulls are just back in the lottery again next year. Well, the Bulls are going to be back in the lottery again next year regardless, because no 19-year-old will have that great of an impact on winning, and because tanking for another year is in the Bulls’ best long-term interest. Still, you can’t just waste draft picks, especially when the Bulls wasted an entire year of our lives to get this selection.

Carter is going to be good. The Al Horford comps are legitimate. He also reminds me a bit of Elton Brand. There’s value in simply adding another good player — one with an All-Star ceiling, in my opinion — even if he’s not a true stud. It would make the Bulls more appealing to free agents (hold your laughter) and also give them another major trade asset. It’s also worth considering the talent at the top of the 2019 draft. If this draft is mostly bigs, next year is mostly wings. You can already read my features on Cam Reddish, Zion Williamson, and R.J. Barrett (don’t forget about Nassir Little, either).

There’s no easy pick for the Bulls at No. 7, but forced into making one, I think I’m going with Wendell Carter.

 

I think I would take Porter or Young over Carter or Mikal Bridges, not even necessarily because I think they're going to be better players, but because I think the Bulls need to swing for the fences here and try to land a future star.  The core of Markkanen, Dunn, and LaVine (assuming that even stays together) is not good enough to win a title if surrounded by role players, even really good ones.  They need at least one, if not two stars to complement that group, and I am of the mind that they should let LaVine go elsewhere if he wants a max deal.  He's just not worth it.

If Young's defense is that bad and we're keeping Lavine not sure I want one of the worst NBA backcourts defensively. Plus can Hoiberg adapt an offense around him? My biggest fear with Porter are 1. his back injury and 2. I didn't see enough to really make me believe he's a top their guy. Like that blog says about comparing him to Wiggins in Mental toughness is kind of where I'm at with those two. Dream scenario would've been Ayton/Doncic but not happening unless they drop or we trade up. I still want Bamba but have gone with being ok with Carter

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13 hours ago, DJackson10 said:

If Young's defense is that bad and we're keeping Lavine not sure I want one of the worst NBA backcourts defensively. Plus can Hoiberg adapt an offense around him? My biggest fear with Porter are 1. his back injury and 2. I didn't see enough to really make me believe he's a top their guy. Like that blog says about comparing him to Wiggins in Mental toughness is kind of where I'm at with those two. Dream scenario would've been Ayton/Doncic but not happening unless they drop or we trade up. I still want Bamba but have gone with being ok with Carter

If Carter can be Towns-lite, it's a good pick. I just don't know how good his shooting actually is, 41% from three is good, but it's a small sample size. A 73% FT is pretty solid for a big, but doesn't portend more than league average from 3.

I certainly wouldn't hate a Carter pick, I just don't know if he's a game changer. Porter or Young could be, but they obviously also carry much higher bust risk. 

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7 hours ago, Juxtatarot said:

My guess is they will pick Bamba at 7 if he is available.  If not, it will be Carter.  Porter just seems too risky for the organization.

I still think the promise for Hutchison at 22 is true.

I think Bamba goes 4 or 5.  We'd need someone to take Porter in the top 5 for Bamba to slip.  If it goes Ayton-Doncic-Jackson-Bagley-Porter in some order for the top 5, then Bamba will probably drop.  I don't see Orlando taking him.  I really think the Magic are going to take Trae Young, so if someone does take Porter in the top 5 (I doubt it, but you never know) - then either Jackson, Bamba, or Bagley may fall to 7.  Bamba probably the most likely of those three.  That's what I am hoping for.

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Vincent Goodwill on NBC Sports Chicago says the bulls are trying to move up to the top 3 for Luca Doncic now. He basically piggybacked Lowe's suggestion but added a target/ 

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11 hours ago, DJackson10 said:

Vincent Goodwill on NBC Sports Chicago says the bulls are trying to move up to the top 3 for Luca Doncic now. He basically piggybacked Lowe's suggestion but added a target/ 

I think when all is said and done that Sacto will take Doncic #2.  But then again, it's Sacramento.

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45 minutes ago, Juxtatarot said:

K.C. Johnson is reporting the target in trading up is for Bamba.  http://www.chicagotribune.com/sports/basketball/bulls/ct-spt-bulls-nba-draft-mo-bamba-20180620-story.html

I trust K.C.  He is usually careful with his reporting.  The price to move up might be too steep though.  But I really like Bamba.  

So much noise.  I read elsewhere that the Bulls were looking to trade up for Porter, as they don't think he'll get past #5.  If they take on the onerous Parsons contract to move up from 7 to 4 and then take Porter, I'm done.  Permanently.  Or at least until GarPax is gone.

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16 minutes ago, Evilgrin 72 said:

So much noise.  I read elsewhere that the Bulls were looking to trade up for Porter, as they don't think he'll get past #5.  If they take on the onerous Parsons contract to move up from 7 to 4 and then take Porter, I'm done.  Permanently.  Or at least until GarPax is gone.

Yeah, that contract is why too high just to move up.  Fortunately the organization is much too conservative and frugal to agree to that, in my opinion.

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FWIW, online draft props seem pretty sure of a few things based on the odds.. 

1) Ayton will definitely go #1 (not even offered) 

2) Bagley, not Doncic will go #2 (Bagley - 500 to go top 3, Doncic +240 to go top 2.)

3) Jackson (O/U at pick 4), Bamba (-260 to go top 5) and Porter (-175 to go top 6) will be the next 3 picks. 

That would leave Young (-110 to go top 7) and Carter (-105) as a coin flip to Chicago at 7.

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10 hours ago, Juxtatarot said:

K.C. Johnson is reporting the target in trading up is for Bamba.  http://www.chicagotribune.com/sports/basketball/bulls/ct-spt-bulls-nba-draft-mo-bamba-20180620-story.html

I trust K.C.  He is usually careful with his reporting.  The price to move up might be too steep though.  But I really like Bamba.  

Yeah I trust him too. I heard Portis and both Picks but I'd be fine with that. 

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I still think it goes 

Ayton 

Bagley 

Doncic 

Jackson

Bamba

Young

 

And we're left to choose from Porter or Carter. If so, I think they'll take Porter or trade down a couple of spots if one of the teams between 8-10 are hot for Porter's chili. If so, they'll pick up an asset and draft Carter or Mikal Bridges. 

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32 minutes ago, Evilgrin 72 said:

I still think it goes 

Ayton 

Bagley 

Doncic 

Jackson

Bamba

Young

 

And we're left to choose from Porter or Carter. If so, I think they'll take Porter or trade down a couple of spots if one of the teams between 8-10 are hot for Porter's chili. If so, they'll pick up an asset and draft Carter or Mikal Bridges. 

It would be shocking if they picked Porter. It will be Carter.

Your top 6 matches what Woj says.

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31 minutes ago, Juxtatarot said:

It would be shocking if they picked Porter. It will be Carter.

Your top 6 matches what Woj says.

That about quadruples my confidence in these guesses. :lol:

Trades could mix it up, but I really think it falls this way even if Orlando trades up to #3. 

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Just now, Evilgrin 72 said:

Holy ####, Bamba may land in our laps. Doncic 3rd traded to Dallas. Memphis will not draft Bamba. Dallas takes Young for Atlanta. If Orlando doesn't take Bamba at 6 (they have a few centers already)... 

Yes, Orlando like Sexton and Shai GA too.

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If Orlando does take Bamba, I want Porter over Carter, knowing full well that Carter has a better chance of being good or even an All-Star than Porter. They desperately need a superstar and need to swing, IMO. I say this knowing full well that Porter could easily be a colossal bust. 

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