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Should students be allowed to walk out of school to support pro gun rights?


KCitons

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Curious how people here would feel if students organized a walk out to support gun rights? Would they be given the same support to rights to protest? Where do you draw the line as to what they can and can't protest?

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Not sure I understand.  What are they "protesting"?  Seems like two different questions.  Organize a walk out to support gun rights?  Sure...go for it.  Just be prepared for the onslaught and be ready to defend your position.  I think the same applies to a protest as well...be prepared to defend your position.

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10 minutes ago, KCitons said:

Curious how people here would feel if students organized a walk out to support gun rights? Would they be given the same support to rights to protest? Where do you draw the line as to what they can and can't protest?

The current student "protests" are highly popular and most people get why they are demonstrating.  Where protesting gets difficult is if you are going against the grain or demonstrating for ideas that are not popular.  

Where the kids today are going to find it difficult is in 2-3 months when nothing has changed and they want to protest again.  People are going to be like "you did your little walk out already, be quite and go back to class".  

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6 minutes ago, Matthias said:

God.

Do conservatives have anything left other than a victim mentality and the creativity of a kumquat? If there's anything that happens, "whatabout..." Sure. Students are allowed to protest whatever they like. But the truth of the matter is they don't want to protest for the right to make their lives more dangerous. With the White House, Senate, House, and SCOTUS, Republicans still act like they're some oppressed victims. Get over yourselves.

One of these days we're gonna have to discuss why conservatives are so lousy at protesting. I have no idea what it's like to support the status quo power structure of just about anything so I'm gonna have to have it explained to me.

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I think the OP took a stand on a subject that should have been avoided. The question should have been (IMO of course) would schools be willing to allow protests for something they dont agree with...and I think that would have been a valid question. 

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14 minutes ago, Cjw_55106 said:

I think the OP took a stand on a subject that should have been avoided. The question should have been (IMO of course) would schools be willing to allow protests for something they dont agree with...and I think that would have been a valid question. 

In the end, the question of "allowing" a protest isn't really valid. Schools really can't stop it from happening.

I think there's a general disconnect between liberals and conservatives about rules and our deference to them.

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They should be given exactly as much or as little consideration as was given to the students who started the current debate.  The message, the content of the speech, within reasonable limits, should not matter.  Knowing that there is a wide range of beliefs one has to be careful in accommodating the popular of the moment because that will be the standard.  When school administrators were contemplating their policies this past month hopefully they considered that they would have to be equally accommodating of matters less instantly popular.

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32 minutes ago, Matthias said:

If they want to do it on school property and grounds, then I'd say the threshold should be sufficient interest and support. Otherwise you could have students throwing protests every day to protest that they don't want ham at lunch.

Ham is disgusting, so I can get behind that 

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Ofcourse they should be allowed. At least our school, the walk out yesterday had no mention of gun control or gun reform. It was 17 minutes of silence for the victims. Kids held up signs with the names of the victims. There was a sign that said "Never Again" and there were signs with the names of other schools where shootings had taken place. Based on many of the kids that participated, I would guess many of them are rather pro-gun. 

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19 minutes ago, Ditkaless Wonders said:

They should be given exactly as much or as little consideration as was given to the students who started the current debate.  The message, the content of the speech, within reasonable limits, should not matter.  Knowing that there is a wide range of beliefs one has to be careful in accommodating the popular of the moment because that will be the standard.  When school administrators were contemplating their policies this past month hopefully they considered that they would have to be equally accommodating of matters less instantly popular.

Our district actually has rules against any form of political protest or political disruption (I am sure it could be legally challenged if someone wanted to). So we did not let the kids protest for any gun law reform, the walkout at our school was strictly to honor the victims of gun violence. So the administration was accommodating in allow students to do so without punishment and sending staff out there to make sure it was peaceful and safe. 

Edited by Ilov80s
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2 minutes ago, Ilov80s said:

Our district actually has rules against any form of political protest or political disruption (I am sure it could be legally challenged if someone wanted to). So we did not let the kids protest for any gun law reform, the walkout at our school was strictly to honor the victims of gun violence. So the administration was accommodating in allow students to do so without punishment and sending staff out there to make sure it was peaceful and safe. 

A distinction the courts might not recognize.    Still, it sounds like your school made a good faith effort to wrestle with the concepts and to be responsible to the circumstances of the day. 

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Just now, Ditkaless Wonders said:

A distinction the courts might not recognize.    Still, it sounds like your school made a good faith effort to wrestle with the concepts and to be responsible to the circumstances of the day. 

I think they handled it pretty well. Our population of students is very diverse and I can imagine we have many parents that are NRA TV watching Trump trolls just as we have many parents that are social justice warriors. We also had a short assembly at the end of the day, all ran by Stuco where they spoke on lots of issues: bullying, mental health, ways to report something if they are concerned about a potentially dangerous situation, reflected on the lives of the victims and called for students to engage in politics (no affiliation or issue, just register to vote, contact reps, etc.). 

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1 minute ago, roadkill1292 said:

Yes, the right's answer to school safety concerns -- moar firepower.

I don’t see why we shouldn’t be allowed fully automatic weapons...not doing so is an insult to the sacred second amendment 

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1 hour ago, timschochet said:

Well, so far as I know most teenagers don’t get to personally own AR-15s and take them to school. 

Clearly you haven't spent much time in Texas, Arkansas or Alabama. 

It was around 25 years ago but I distinctly remember a few buddies taking their rifles to school, keeping them locked in their trucks, then going hunting at lunch. Seems weird that it was okay at the time. 

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2 minutes ago, -OZ- said:

Clearly you haven't spent much time in Texas, Arkansas or Alabama. 

It was around 25 years ago but I distinctly remember a few buddies taking their rifles to school, keeping them locked in their trucks, then going hunting at lunch. Seems weird that it was okay at the time. 

When I was in 7th grade wood shop and metal shop were mandatory classes. In wood shop there were three preapproved projects for your final project, though you could submit another for approval if you wished.  Among the three was a gun rack for your pickup which it was presumed you would eventually get at 16.  Same in metal shop. 

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41 minutes ago, Ditkaless Wonders said:

They should be given exactly as much or as little consideration as was given to the students who started the current debate.  

Kids can't own guns.

Guns aren't being taken away from them.

What are they protesting?

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6 minutes ago, urbanhack said:

Kids can't own guns.

Guns aren't being taken away from them.

What are they protesting?

You would have to address that question to the protestors.  My issue is that all be given equal recognition as to their rights. That some may want to use their rights in manners incomprehensible to me is irrelevant so long as they do not diminish my rights or put me directly at immediate risk.

Edited by Ditkaless Wonders
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2 hours ago, roadkill1292 said:

In the end, the question of "allowing" a protest isn't really valid. Schools really can't stop it from happening.

I think there's a general disconnect between liberals and conservatives about rules and our deference to them.

OK, not "allow" but condone and in many cases, participate with them. Not punish those that walk out, whatever you want to call it.  

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2 hours ago, Matthias said:

God.

Do conservatives have anything left other than a victim mentality and the creativity of a kumquat? If there's anything that happens, "whatabout..." Sure. Students are allowed to protest whatever they like. But the truth of the matter is they don't want to protest for the right to make their lives more dangerous. With the White House, Senate, House, and SCOTUS, Republicans still act like they're some oppressed victims. Get over yourselves.

They cheated to get almost all of that too. 

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Yes, people can protest about whatever they choose. As has been pointed out, the rights are already there to own a gun, so what are they protesting exactly might be a question. But that isn't up to me to decide. Feels a little bit "War on Christmas" like though. A little "whoa is me", if you will. But again, not for me to call.

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3 hours ago, Matthias said:

God.

Do conservatives have anything left other than a victim mentality and the creativity of a kumquat? If there's anything that happens, "whatabout..." Sure. Students are allowed to protest whatever they like. But the truth of the matter is they don't want to protest for the right to make their lives more dangerous. With the White House, Senate, House, and SCOTUS, Republicans still act like they're some oppressed victims. Get over yourselves.

 

3 hours ago, Matthias said:

Why are all the Tough Guys who Love Guns such big babies?

Wrong on both counts. 

Why do you favor one sides right to be heard, but want to squash the other sides rights?

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2 hours ago, roadkill1292 said:

In the end, the question of "allowing" a protest isn't really valid. Schools really can't stop it from happening.

I think there's a general disconnect between liberals and conservatives about rules and our deference to them.

Did some schools allow students to protest yesterday? Would they have the same leniency if it was a pro gun walk out? Would you support it?

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2 hours ago, Matthias said:

I don't think he's actually interested in that question, though. He's just interested in muddying the waters on something which someone else organized and got wide support. It's just the, "All Lives Matter" shtick. Pretend that there's equivocation on positions. The larger question he doesn't actually care about.

I guess you have the right to determine when a group has a right to free speech or the right to protest. 

BTW, you don't have any idea what I care about, so be careful.

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3 hours ago, Matthias said:

If they want to do it on school property and grounds, then I'd say the threshold should be sufficient interest and support. Otherwise you could have students throwing protests every day to protest that they don't want ham at lunch.

Where the same rules applied to yesterdays protests?

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4 minutes ago, Matthias said:

The, "you don't have any idea what I care about" part is rich. Considering you keep flying around what other people obviously don't believe.

So, I'm the only person in America that thinks this way? Heck, I'm not even the only person on this board that thinks this way. 

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