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Trump care, Trump just lied straight into your face


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The cruelty is the point. (The dumbassery too but, the cruelty comes first.)

I can't believe Republicans immediately turned to health care after the Barr letter.  Democrats were drowning and the GOP is handing them a luxury yacht.

I'm not sure what you expect. But wide swaths of that population are either still in school or working in the "Gig" economy and not covered. Gives them some extra time to get a job so they can have in

13 minutes ago, Jackstraw said:

I've been informing my office staff with children over 23 the administration is trying to kick their children off insurance. They seem nonplussed

This word always confuses me. It literally has two meanings that are almost total opposites.

Quote

 

1: unsure about what to say, think, or do : PERPLEXED

2: chiefly US : not bothered, surprised, or impressed by something

 

Apparently the second definition is one that was initially incorrect but has become accepted through usage. Still, the problem is I never know exactly what someone means when they use it. Were your coworkers confused or unbothered?

(I guess you could say that people's usage of "nonplussed" leaves me nonplussed, but other people are apparently nonplussed by the issue.)

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38 minutes ago, bosoxs45 said:

I figured there should be a thread to balance out the other one.

It is ridiculous thread title given that Trump has told well over 8k lies during his presidency.  With all of the editing of anti-Trump titles and that persists.... 

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14 minutes ago, zftcg said:

This word always confuses me. It literally has two meanings that are almost total opposites.

Apparently the second definition is one that was initially incorrect but has become accepted through usage. Still, the problem is I never know exactly what someone means when they use it. Were your coworkers confused or unbothered?

(I guess you could say that people's usage of "nonplussed" leaves me nonplussed, but other people are apparently nonplussed by the issue.)

Nonplussed is a bit archaic, however whenever I have seen it used, the user has always meant that one is confused or perplexed.

Strange word to me, if one nonplussed, could one also be plussed?

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20 minutes ago, squistion said:

Nonplussed is a bit archaic, however whenever I have seen it used, the user has always meant that one is confused or perplexed.

Strange word to me, if one nonplussed, could one also be plussed?

As per the second link in my post above, apparently not:

Quote

It’s somewhat questionable whether the non in nonplus is actually a prefix at all; the word came into English in the 16th century, and was taken from the Latin non plus, which means “no more.” When it first appeared in our language it was used as a noun, with the meaning of “quandary.”

Reminds me of something I once read about Antonin Scalia's jihad against the word "choate" as an antonym of "inchoate".

There are a bunch of words like that I've always wondered about. If a killer feels really bad about his murderes, is he "ruthful"? Is a happy employee "gruntled"?

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1 hour ago, Jackstraw said:

I've been informing my office staff with children over 23 the administration is trying to kick their children off insurance. They seem nonplussed. 

 

I am 100% uninformed on this, but at 23 should you expect to be on your parents insurance?

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43 minutes ago, matuski said:

I am 100% uninformed on this, but at 23 should you expect to be on your parents insurance?

I'm not sure what you expect. But wide swaths of that population are either still in school or working in the "Gig" economy and not covered. Gives them some extra time to get a job so they can have insurance. 

Have I mentioned that being dependent upon an employer for insurance is like the weirdest thing ever? 

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1 hour ago, zftcg said:

This word always confuses me. It literally has two meanings that are almost total opposites.

Apparently the second definition is one that was initially incorrect but has become accepted through usage. Still, the problem is I never know exactly what someone means when they use it. Were your coworkers confused or unbothered?

(I guess you could say that people's usage of "nonplussed" leaves me nonplussed, but other people are apparently nonplussed by the issue.)

I've been accused of overly flowerly language before. 

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4 minutes ago, Don't Noonan said:

Maybe they need to get a job?

Maybe it's hard to find jobs with benefits these days?

Wait, what am I doing? Ignore that! The ACA provision allowing people to stay on their parents' plan until age 26 is a terrible idea, and voters will absolutely reward a political party that runs on repealing it. Trump should make that the centerpiece of his re-election campaign.

And while you're at it, please don't throw me in that briar patch!

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15 minutes ago, Jackstraw said:

I've been accused of overly flowerly language before. 

Nah, it wasn't your fault. I see it fairly frequently; I just never know what it's supposed to mean.

So were your coworkers upset or unconcerned?

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4 minutes ago, zftcg said:

Maybe it's hard to find jobs with benefits these days?

Wait, what am I doing? Ignore that! The ACA provision allowing people to stay on their parents' plan until age 26 is a terrible idea, and voters will absolutely reward a political party that runs on repealing it. Trump should make that the centerpiece of his re-election campaign.

And while you're at it, please don't throw me in that briar patch!

It's certainly a bold strategy. I agree that the republicans should run on this. :popcorn: 

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2 hours ago, zftcg said:

(I guess you could say that people's usage of "nonplussed" leaves me nonplussed, but other people are apparently nonplussed by the issue.)

I know you can be overwhelmed, and you can be underwhelmed, but can you ever just be whelmed?

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33 minutes ago, Jackstraw said:

I'm not sure what you expect. But wide swaths of that population are either still in school or working in the "Gig" economy and not covered. Gives them some extra time to get a job so they can have insurance. 

Have I mentioned that being dependent upon an employer for insurance is like the weirdest thing ever? 

What is the age cut off right now?

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2 hours ago, zftcg said:
2 hours ago, Jackstraw said:

I've been informing my office staff with children over 23 the administration is trying to kick their children off insurance. They seem nonplussed

This word always confuses me. It literally has two meanings that are almost total opposites.

Quote

 

1: unsure about what to say, think, or do : PERPLEXED

2: chiefly US : not bothered, surprised, or impressed by something

 

Apparently the second definition is one that was initially incorrect but has become accepted through usage. Still, the problem is I never know exactly what someone means when they use it. Were your coworkers confused or unbothered?

(I guess you could say that people's usage of "nonplussed" leaves me nonplussed, but other people are apparently nonplussed by the issue.)

One of my co-workers (a egotistical know-it-all type) pronounces this word as "non-PLOOZED", as if it was a fancy French word.  He's said it about 10 times in the past 3 years and no one in the company has said anything to him. The rest of us just giggle behind his back.

He also uses the word incorrectly. To him, it is a synonym of "irrelevant". "Guys, we really don't need to worry about the 4th quarter numbers. Those numbers are nonploozed anyway."

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41 minutes ago, Jackstraw said:

I'm not sure what you expect. But wide swaths of that population are either still in school or working in the "Gig" economy and not covered. Gives them some extra time to get a job so they can have insurance. 

Have I mentioned that being dependent upon an employer for insurance is like the weirdest thing ever? 

One of my daughters was in the gig economy after graduating, working on political campaigns, restaurants and as a Google search engine evaluator until age 26. I'm glad she was covered by my insurance and then had affordable ObamaCare for a few months until she got a job in the medical marijuana industry with insurance benefits. My other daughter was fortunate enough to get a fulltime graduate assistanceship for a degree in Massachusetts at age 23, where her medical benefits are tremendous. Glad again that she was covered until age 23, as she had some medical issues.

If I lose or change my job at age 60, I'll have to pay expensive Cobra, or go without insurance for 3 to 6 months until it kicks in. I think that's crazy.

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Just now, Mookie said:

There is no such thing as Trumpcare.  "Get ####ed" would be a more appropriate label for what he and the Republicans are aiming to do.

If they successfully repeal Obamacare, the Democrats should definitely label the new healthcare system Trumpcare. 

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Some stuff I just heard, assume it's correct:

6 of the 9 states that have states that have the highest level of enrollment are states Trump won including Florida, Penn, Michigan. Average enrollee is White, 55-64, makes $18K a year. 

Those kind of sound like Trump base people.

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1 hour ago, JbizzleMan said:

If they successfully repeal Obamacare, the Democrats should definitely label the new healthcare system Trumpcare. 

If this is happens, it's 30+ million having their insurance taken away, most of which with pre-existing conditions.  That's a campaign gift from the Gods....I can't believe this is where they decided to go.  I'm in genuine disbelief :lmao: 

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6 minutes ago, timschochet said:

Huge gift to the Democrats. Could easily be the deciding issue of 2020. 

Florida again. We have 7% of the population, but 20% of ACA enrollees. It's popular in Hialeah, which has the top zipcodes for enrollment, where many Hispanic immigrants have service jobs, work for small companies or are self-employed. California expanded Medicaid and Texas is using block grants from CMS to enroll people in association plans, which is what DiSantis is proposing. Let's see if it's as popular as the ACA and reduces the number of uninsured. If TrumpCare fails, assuming it becomes a thing, its another step toward Medicare for all.

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6 minutes ago, The Commish said:

If this is happens, it's 30+ million having their insurance taken away, most of which with pre-existing conditions.  That's a campaign gift from the Gods....I can't believe this is where they decided to go.  I'm in genuine disbelief :lmao: 

“Never interrupt your enemy when he is making a mistake.” 

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57 minutes ago, Mile High said:

Donald J. Trump @realDonaldTrump · 21m

The Republican Party will become “The Party of Healthcare!”

it seems he forgot a negation again

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52 minutes ago, Stealthycat said:

a 23 year old isn't a child FYI

He said "their children", as in the people they gave birth to and/or raised. You are always the child of your parents, no matter how old you are.

This isn't merely a semantic debate. Under the terms of the ACA, parents can keep their children (or, if you prefer, offspring) on their insurance plans until the age of 26.

Do you oppose that provision?

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22 minutes ago, SoBeDad said:

Florida again. We have 7% of the population, but 20% of ACA enrollees. It's popular in Hialeah, which has the top zipcodes for enrollment, where many Hispanic immigrants have service jobs, work for small companies or are self-employed. California expanded Medicaid and Texas is using block grants from CMS to enroll people in association plans, which is what DiSantis is proposing. Let's see if it's as popular as the ACA and reduces the number of uninsured. If TrumpCare fails, assuming it becomes a thing, its another step toward Medicare for all.

I moved to Miami in 2015. One of the first things I noticed was that there were storefronts promoting "Obamacare" enrollment  everywhere, especially in poorer neighborhoods.

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57 minutes ago, zftcg said:

He said "their children", as in the people they gave birth to and/or raised. You are always the child of your parents, no matter how old you are.

This isn't merely a semantic debate. Under the terms of the ACA, parents can keep their children (or, if you prefer, offspring) on their insurance plans until the age of 26.

Do you oppose that provision?

I'm not sure ............... why the age limitations at all ?

Why can't I have a dependent under me who's 35 on my insurance or who's 45 ? why age limit it ? Insurance gets their premiums, everyone is covered etc ...

but lets not all a 21 or 23 or 26 year old a child/children

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7 hours ago, SoBeDad said:

Florida again. We have 7% of the population, but 20% of ACA enrollees. It's popular in Hialeah, which has the top zipcodes for enrollment, where many Hispanic immigrants have service jobs, work for small companies or are self-employed. California expanded Medicaid and Texas is using block grants from CMS to enroll people in association plans, which is what DiSantis is proposing. Let's see if it's as popular as the ACA and reduces the number of uninsured. If TrumpCare fails, assuming it becomes a thing, its another step toward Medicare for all.

Yeah I thought Florida had to be a favorite for Republicans given the last election. But you combine this with Trump’s renewed determination to stop helping Puerto Rico and you gotta think it becomes wide open. 

Without Florida Trump can’t win. 

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19 minutes ago, timschochet said:

Yeah I thought Florida had to be a favorite for Republicans given the last election. But you combine this with Trump’s renewed determination to stop helping Puerto Rico and you gotta think it becomes wide open. 

Without Florida Trump can’t win. 

You'd think. But Democrats have actually done a terrible job mobilizing the Puerto Rican vote (and as others have mentioned, GOP candidates have done a good job holding their margins down in those demos.)

Florida is always close, but it typically only goes to Dems when they're already winning big ('96, '08, '12). It's never been the thing that tipped the election in their favor (though maybe it should have been in '00).

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