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MY List of Top 100 Instrumental Songs/Artists - and at #1 Frankenstein


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#9. Misirlou - Dick Dale "Misirlou" (Greek: Μισιρλού < Turkish: Mısırlı 'Egyptian' < Arabic: مصر‎ Miṣr 'Egypt') is a song from the Eastern Mediterranean region. The earliest known recording

#70. Fire On High - Electric Light Orchestra "Fire on High" is the opening instrumental track from the 1975 Electric Light Orchestra (ELO) album Face the Music. The song was the UK B-side to

Have wanted to do something like this for a while now, and I have been inspired by Krista and Tim. So here we go. But before we begin, a few disclaimers: 1. This is MY list. Yours might diff

The entire album “The Snow Goose” by Camel is a wonderful instrumental work. It plays like a soundtrack but there is no movie. A search on YouTube will get you the string of videos, one for each song on the album. Here is the opening track, hopefully it streams through the whole album for you: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=NoiBtAXRnIo&list=PLGFfX89dROQWw4Ufo8gACwty1gjetQbyZ&index=2&t=0s

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Bernard Hermann deserves the John Williams treatment

Taxi Driver (he died like a day after he finished this)  the way it bounces between horror and romance is incredible, the tension between those two themes fighting just like they do with Bickle

North by Northwest  There’s no James Bond or Indiana Jones without Roger Thornhill and Hermann created the score to match. 

Vertigo One of the most sinister movie scores ever made but also beautifully hypnotic. He really understood these movies.

 Psycho the definitive horror score but beneath the slashing there is a gorgeous melody that emerges periodically 

 

Twisted Nerve/Kill Bill   Hermann did the score for the obscure thriller Twisted Nerve and QT repurposed it for Kill Bill

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1 hour ago, Ilov80s said:

Bernard Hermann deserves the John Williams treatment

Taxi Driver (he died like a day after he finished this)  the way it bounces between horror and romance is incredible, the tension between those two themes fighting just like they do with Bickle

North by Northwest  There’s no James Bond or Indiana Jones without Roger Thornhill and Hermann created the score to match. 

Vertigo One of the most sinister movie scores ever made but also beautifully hypnotic. He really understood these movies.

 Psycho the definitive horror score but beneath the slashing there is a gorgeous melody that emerges periodically 

 

Twisted Nerve/Kill Bill   Hermann did the score for the obscure thriller Twisted Nerve and QT repurposed it for Kill Bill

If we're talking soundtracks, Once Upon A Time In America my Ennio Morricone is the greatest soundtrack in the history of film.

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Just now, Mr. Mojo said:

If we're talking soundtracks, Once Upon A Time In America my Ennio Morricone is the greatest soundtrack in the history of film.

Yes! Morricone could also get his own spot here 

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NFL films had some great music..two favorites 

Sam Spence - Round up

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P4tuavqU68Y

 

Sam Spence - The Pony Riders

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x--nCW8YtYs

 which I didn’t know, until now,  was taken from the movie Hang ‘em High

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0gscut1p4kY

Booker T and MGs version 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L-UjuPw5tiA

 

Edited by Rove!
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On 5/29/2019 at 2:19 PM, wikkidpissah said:

oldmanbrainfarted it yesterday, but this would have been my numero uno.

ETA: rock, jazz, soul, metal, dharma rolled into one

Great choice. Love me some Billy Cobham on the drums. Here is another from Mahavishnu Orchestra: One Word

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I'm sure most haven't hear this one but feel compelled to post it

Speechless

One of the comments states it better than I ever could

"Whenever I'm stressed with whatever it is in the world, this song absolutely takes me away from anything bothering me. It makes the world seem calm and safe."

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5 hours ago, pecorino said:

Great choice. Love me some Billy Cobham on the drums. Here is another from Mahavishnu Orchestra: One Word

Birds of Fire is right up there among the the most disappointing albums of my listening career. But then i was heavily invested in Inner Mounting Flame - to this day, it's with What's Going On, Fullfillingness' First Finale (i sang my way thru a heart attack w this'n), and Peter Gabriel Plays Live among my true desert island options. Since i'm doing nothing right now. allow me to tell you why.

The sexiest female i've ever known moved to Salem MA not long after i did. I may be partial because i was 11-12yo and had no real idea what sexy was. I did as soon as i met this new girl, who was like Brigitte Bardot in a jumper and that's been my model ever since. I am happy and proud to say we shared intimate pleasures on & off from the beginning to the end of my sexual career, almost 50 years.

But i was never her ideal. How could a big lunkhead like me, even in my sweetest & bravest & most unusual emanations, be the ideal for the sexiest girl in the world?! And she wanted all the ideals that most girls do and she especially deserved. So, she shopped past me to her ideals when first lover, serious boyfriend, husband was on the menu. I got to be Mr InBetween for over 40 yrs, though, and that's always been fine with me.

Now, what that has to do with the Mahavishnu Orchestra. My li'l Bardot and i played doctor so often we became specialists, but she wanted her "first" to be special. Another local girl, perhaps the only teenager empirically hotter than li'l Bardot and already a factor on the local groupie scene, invited my gal to a Grateful Dead concert. When i wasn't invited, i had a pretty good idea why and heard that many of the rockers came back to her house for the weekend (LB's folks were rich, often away & had a fancyass coastal house). LB made it clear afterward that the deed was done, it was cool for us to do stuff now and she didn't wanna kiss&tell about her weekend. She hasn't told me to this day (still my best female friend).

An altogether satisfactory outcome, although one which of course raised my curiosity as to who her rock god had been. When i felt jealous, i imagined it was PigPen done the deed. One thing, though - she became utterly fascinated with the band that had opened for the Dead, a Chicago band with a horn section AND a fiddle player called The Flock. Their sound really never came together but i shonuff hadda listen to their first album a LOT and woulda been the same w the 2nd album but i ran away from home b4 i needed suffer that.

The other aspect in my investment in Mahavishnu had to do with another friendship i made around that time. I'm gonna longstoryshort this one cuz i've told it before- me Da had a thing for/with a local stripper and used me as an alibi. There was a jazz club on Rte 1 where he'd take me to see bands, amid which he'd cut out to get hummers from this Silky Doll across the street. I was a tween when all this began and it was weirdly wonderful when the jazz fam @ Lenny's 'babysat' me. One of those was a blind piano player going to Berklee School of Music named Mike Mandel (who was later the original keyboard player in the jazz ensemble Return to Forever). He looooved that jazz was going electric and, because he couldnt even begin to afford a synthesizer, had started experimenting with things like signal splitters & ring modulators to manipulate the sounds from his electric piano.

OK, i ran away from home in sept of 1970 and returned to Boston for good just before the winter of 71/72. Besides hugs & kisses and introduction to her dreamy musician bf, my li'l Bardot was all excited about this album by a band that had her fiddle player from The Flock (still #1 suspect - i actually met #2 suspect, Flock mgr Aaron Russo, whose name she had mentioned a lot and who became a big deal in music & politics, later). In addition, my first visit to the Lenny's club (which had relocated due to a fire while i was on the road) my pal Mike told me about this band i HAD to listen to cuz their keyboard player was using his electronic techniques to revolutionize jazz keyboarding.

Turns out they were the same band each was talking about, and that band was playing a gig at U New Hampshire (opening for the Byrds, i remember) that Mike - who couldnt drive, of course, needed a lift to. Li'l Bardot & i picked him up, were absolutely blown away by the Mahavishnu Orchestra and ended up taking him to a half dozen of their college gigs. This all ended up w LB breaking up w her fancy musician bf and us being together again and we did naughty things to Inner Mounting Flame over&over&over again. I still don't like Birds of Fire (too much intentional complexity instead of how it organically sprung from IMF) but how could any album properly compete with a harmonic convergence of personal motive & history such as that?!

 

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20 minutes ago, wikkidpissah said:

Birds of Fire is right up there among the the most disappointing albums of my listening career. But then i was heavily invested in Inner Mounting Flame - to this day, it's with What's Going On, Fullfillingness' First Finale (i sang my way thru a heart attack w this'n), and Peter Gabriel Plays Live among my true desert island options. Since i'm doing nothing right now. allow me to tell you why.

The sexiest female i've ever known moved to Salem MA not long after i did. I may be partial because i was 11-12yo and had no real idea what sexy was. I did as soon as i met this new girl, who was like Brigitte Bardot in a jumper and that's been my model ever since. I am happy and proud to say we shared intimate pleasures on & off from the beginning to the end of my sexual career, almost 50 years.

But i was never her ideal. How could a big lunkhead like me, even in my sweetest & bravest & most unusual emanations, be the ideal for the sexiest girl in the world?! And she wanted all the ideals that most girls do and she especially deserved. So, she shopped past me to her ideals when first lover, serious boyfriend, husband was on the menu. I got to be Mr InBetween for over 40 yrs, though, and that's always been fine with me.

Now, what that has to do with the Mahavishnu Orchestra. My li'l Bardot and i played doctor so often we became specialists, but she wanted her "first" to be special. Another local girl, perhaps the only teenager empirically hotter than li'l Bardot and already a factor on the local groupie scene, invited my gal to a Grateful Dead concert. When i wasn't invited, i had a pretty good idea why and heard that many of the rockers came back to her house for the weekend (LB's folks were rich, often away & had a fancyass coastal house). LB made it clear afterward that the deed was done, it was cool for us to do stuff now and she didn't wanna kiss&tell about her weekend. She hasn't told me to this day (still my best female friend).

An altogether satisfactory outcome, although one which of course raised my curiosity as to who her rock god had been. When i felt jealous, i imagined it was PigPen done the deed. One thing, though - she became utterly fascinated with the band that had opened for the Dead, a Chicago band with a horn section AND a fiddle player called The Flock. Their sound really never came together but i shonuff hadda listen to their first album a LOT and woulda been the same w the 2nd album but i ran away from home b4 i needed suffer that.

The other aspect in my investment in Mahavishnu had to do with another friendship i made around that time. I'm gonna longstoryshort this one cuz i've told it before- me Da had a thing for/with a local stripper and used me as an alibi. There was a jazz club on Rte 1 where he'd take me to see bands, amid which he'd cut out to get hummers from this Silky Doll across the street. I was a tween when all this began and it was weirdly wonderful when the jazz fam @ Lenny's 'babysat' me. One of those was a blind piano player going to Berklee School of Music named Mike Mandel (who was later the original keyboard player in the jazz ensemble Return to Forever). He looooved that jazz was going electric and, because he couldnt even begin to afford a synthesizer, had started experimenting with things like signal splitters & ring modulators to manipulate the sounds from his electric piano.

OK, i ran away from home in sept of 1970 and returned to Boston for good just before the winter of 71/72. Besides hugs & kisses and introduction to her dreamy musician bf, my li'l Bardot was all excited about this album by a band that had her fiddle player from The Flock (still #1 suspect - i actually met #2 suspect, Flock mgr Aaron Russo, whose name she had mentioned a lot and who became a big deal in music & politics, later). In addition, my first visit to the Lenny's club (which had relocated due to a fire while i was on the road) my pal Mike told me about this band i HAD to listen to cuz their keyboard player was using his electronic techniques to revolutionize jazz keyboarding.

Turns out they were the same band each was talking about, and that band was playing a gig at U New Hampshire (opening for the Byrds, i remember) that Mike - who couldnt drive, of course, needed a lift to. Li'l Bardot & i picked him up, were absolutely blown away by the Mahavishnu Orchestra and ended up taking him to a half dozen of their college gigs. This all ended up w LB breaking up w her fancy musician bf and us being together again and we did naughty things to Inner Mounting Flame over&over&over again. I still don't like Birds of Fire (too much intentional complexity instead of how it organically sprung from IMF) but how could any album properly compete with a harmonic convergence of personal motive & history such as that?!

 

I like intentional complexity.

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2 hours ago, Tom Skerritt said:

Little Wing is a bad miss. My apologies.

Been listening to REO Speedwagon and Foreigner recently. Came across this one from Double Vision.

Tramontane

 

 

I missed that I had missed First Tube by Phish. One might also call You Enjoy Myself an instrumental which is clearly top 10 material, but maybe it contains too much chattering.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=PoX0Z2ptU8w

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No Nine Inch Nails?  He's done a bunch of great instrumentals, hell, albums of them.  Maybe I'm biased because it's my favorite band.  A couple of my favorites:

Nine Inch Nails – “Just Like You Imagined” (1999)

Nine Inch Nails – “A Warm Place” (1994)

Also, really like The xx - "Intro" (2009)

 

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On 6/3/2019 at 4:52 PM, falguy said:

I'm sure most haven't hear this one but feel compelled to post it

Speechless

One of the comments states it better than I ever could

"Whenever I'm stressed with whatever it is in the world, this song absolutely takes me away from anything bothering me. It makes the world seem calm and safe."

Eno

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