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$50 + Aged Steak Disaster - Burnt to a Crisp


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7 minutes ago, OrtonToOlsen said:

In 20 years people are going to look at sous vide the same way we look at our parents’ fondue pots.

:lmao: I’ve never actually used one. I’m old fashioned. 

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#cappyknowsstuff if the interior is overcooked your skillet was on the exposed Cherynobyl core.    Do not cook your steak over exposed reactor cores in the future and you should be fine

You can get a good look at a butcher's ### by sticking your head up there. But wouldn't you rather take his word for it?

Just did some bone-in ribeyes Saturday. Over charcoal.  Like a man.  

41 minutes ago, OrtonToOlsen said:

In 20 years people are going to look at sous vide the same way we look at our parents’ fondue pots.

I don't see the utility of using sous vide for a nice steak.  Those cook well in a number of different ways.  Sous vide is best used to take tough cuts and turn it into meat a few grades better.  I can take an Engligh roast and turn it into four really good steaks.  It's also really good for items like beef ribs, which tend to be a bit tough, but flavorful - takes care of the tough part.

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3 minutes ago, Sand said:

I don't see the utility of using sous vide for a nice steak.  Those cook well in a number of different ways.  Sous vide is best used to take tough cuts and turn it into meat a few grades better.  I can take an Engligh roast and turn it into four really good steaks.  It's also really good for items like beef ribs, which tend to be a bit tough, but flavorful - takes care of the tough part.

That’s all great but did you see my post above about Steak-ums?

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29 minutes ago, shuke said:

Just did some bone-in ribeyes Saturday.

Over charcoal.  Like a man.  

How many bites did it take? 🤔

 

God. That meal looks great. I had 3 protein drinks and some spaghetti. ☹️

I did not count the bites - sorry.

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16 hours ago, ShamrockPride said:

Do people like their steaks like bagels now? That a thing?

I was pleasantly surprised.  It wasn’t burnt but it had a nice char and crunch to the outside.  The inside was perfectly medium.  It was a NY strip if that matters.

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13 hours ago, encaitar said:

Reverse sear with real charcoal.  Get yourself a wireless meat thermometer, smoke at 250 until internal temp is 115-120.  Pull off, and get the grill as hot as possible.  Put it back on, sear it for 60-90 seconds per side.  

If you're gonna spend $50 on dry aged meat, it's worth taking the time to cook it perfectly.  Sous-vide would also work well.

Smoke for an hour, sous-vide for 2-3 hours at 120, then sear on your choice of implement to finish. Bonus if you use cast iron you can baste in butter, rosemary, garlic and thyme while it sears.

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On ‎6‎/‎2‎/‎2019 at 7:07 AM, pollardsvision said:

4 minutes shouldn't have done that, but you might try the Reverse Sear method. It's got some nice advantages and could give you a little more control.

You just put the steak in a low oven (250ish) to slowly get the internal temp to the desired temp (or just below it), could take 20-30 minutes depending on some factors. Then sear it really quickly (about 45 seconds per side).

It's especially helpful for a really thick steak. 

 

The end product with reverse seer is fantastic.  Not sure why more people don't do this.  Works on a grill as well...just have the steaks in a covered grill in the cool zone.  Then finish on the hot zone. 

https://www.seriouseats.com/2017/03/how-to-reverse-sear-best-way-to-cook-steak.html

 

Edited by Pipes
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On 6/1/2019 at 8:52 PM, Klimtology said:

Followed the advice of my butcher. Sear over very high heat in a cast iron skillet. 

4 min on each side.(2 and 1/2 inch ribeye steak.)

WTF? did I do wrong?

TIA

High heat is probably too hot.   Med high should do it.   Also med. high can vary by 25% on various stoves, like the two I cook over.

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18 hours ago, Ignoramus said:

Absolutely nothing wrong with using a cast iron skillet to cook a steak. I'm really puzzled how four minutes on a side could result in a burnt to a crisp steak though. It's a bit on the long side but not egregiously so.

Going to go out on a limb here and suggest that he's not seasoning his cast iron skillet appropriately.  I treat my cast iron skillets with more love and care than at least 3 of my kids.

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5 hours ago, Pipes said:

The end product with reverse seer is fantastic.  Not sure why more people don't do this.  Works on a grill as well...just have the steaks in a covered grill in the cool zone.  Then finish on the hot zone. 

https://www.seriouseats.com/2017/03/how-to-reverse-sear-best-way-to-cook-steak.html

 

this looks cool.  gonna try it

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17 hours ago, Sand said:

I don't see the utility of using sous vide for a nice steak.  Those cook well in a number of different ways.  Sous vide is best used to take tough cuts and turn it into meat a few grades better.  I can take an Engligh roast and turn it into four really good steaks.  It's also really good for items like beef ribs, which tend to be a bit tough, but flavorful - takes care of the tough part.

It cooks it better. By better, I mean the finished temp all the way through the steak.  So it's not rare and then medium rare and them medium and then seared. It's just rare and seared. I love reverse-sear but sous vide is better. And you can cook a bunch of different steaks to suit various tastes and have them all come out perfect and at the same time.

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On 6/2/2019 at 7:56 PM, OrtonToOlsen said:

In 20 years people are going to look at sous vide the same way we look at our parents’ fondue pots.

Not even close. It is merely a precision cooking technique that has been used in professional kitchens for decades, the only new aspect is that technology advances has allowed it to become accessible to home chefs.

Certainly there are tech advances that could shift the precision cooker from water based to some sort of counter top oven, there are several of these products out there but they are a very mixed bag. But precision cooking techniques as a category will only grow.

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The most basic process for a great sear is 450 degree pan, 45-60 seconds per side with light pressure. Finish in the oven, ideally with a temperature probe.

A grill press that gets up to 450 (like the Cuisinart Griddler 5) is great for the task as well. A lot of them don't go over 400.

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1 hour ago, Chaka said:

The most basic process for a great sear is 450 degree pan, 45-60 seconds per side with light pressure. Finish in the oven, ideally with a temperature probe.

A grill press that gets up to 450 (like the Cuisinart Griddler 5) is great for the task as well. A lot of them don't go over 400.

One of the best things I ever purchased was a temperature probe.   Pretty much foolproof.   

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3 hours ago, Chaka said:

Not even close. It is merely a precision cooking technique that has been used in professional kitchens for decades, the only new aspect is that technology advances has allowed it to become accessible to home chefs.

Certainly there are tech advances that could shift the precision cooker from water based to some sort of counter top oven, there are several of these products out there but they are a very mixed bag. But precision cooking techniques as a category will only grow.

Put that in your hot-air popcorn popper or panini press and smoke it.

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On 6/3/2019 at 9:58 PM, [icon] said:

S & P is the choice for me. 

 

Was it ‘berta Beef?

I thinks Montreal steak spice needs to be parts of the conversations.

Aside from joy of batting LK quotes around, Montreal steak salt truly is the best seasoning for steak, hands down.

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7 minutes ago, Stompin' Tom Connors said:

I thinks Montreal steak spice needs to be parts of the conversations.

Aside from joy of batting LK quotes around, Montreal steak salt truly is the best seasoning for steak, hands down.

:goodposting:

Great on Brisket as well. 

Also, a little bit in some homemade chicken salad is pretty tasty.

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4 minutes ago, In The Zone said:
13 minutes ago, Stompin' Tom Connors said:

I thinks Montreal steak spice needs to be parts of the conversations.

Aside from joy of batting LK quotes around, Montreal steak salt truly is the best seasoning for steak, hands down.

:goodposting:

Great on Brisket as well. 

Also, a little bit in some homemade chicken salad is pretty tasty.

I put it in my scrambled eggs.

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2 hours ago, OrtonToOlsen said:

Put that in your hot-air popcorn popper or panini press and smoke it.

I am pretty sure both those items get used a heck of a lot more than your stand-mixer, food processor and blender. The fondue set lives in a box in the garage.

Either way enjoy your dry chicken breast and chewy steak.

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24 minutes ago, Ron Swanson said:

Or the Instant Pot.

I can see that. I personally use mine very often, but mostly as a one trick pony to make bone broth. 

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1 hour ago, In The Zone said:

:goodposting:

Great on Brisket as well. 

Also, a little bit in some homemade chicken salad is pretty tasty.

Concur. My beef rub is 2 parts MSS and 1 part coarse tellcherry black pepper.. 

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4 hours ago, Chaka said:

I am pretty sure both those items get used a heck of a lot more than your stand-mixer, food processor and blender. The fondue set lives in a box in the garage.

Either way enjoy your dry chicken breast and chewy steak.

HA! I have you now!

My stand mixer gets used more than Trump’s AquaNet.  My wife bakes all the time. In fact she actually broke the damn whisk attachment.

 

 

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8 hours ago, OrtonToOlsen said:

HA! I have you now!

My stand mixer gets used more than Trump’s AquaNet.  My wife bakes all the time. In fact she actually broke the damn whisk attachment.

 

 

There's always one.

I'm sure there are people who fondue 3x a week too. Go figure.

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Thanks again guys!  

I cooked the porterhouse for about a min and a half on each side on the grill.

Then on indirect heat for another min or so.

Cooked perfectly for super rare which is the way I like it.

The steak cost me $70 and it was good, but I'm not sure if it was worth $70. 

I'll probably get a reg non aged steak next time. It's about half the price.

Thanks again everyone for your advice. 

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10 hours ago, NutterButter said:

Ex wife swore by that thing.   Only thing she ever cooked in it was rice.   

Like I said, I use mine primarily to make bone broth. Compared to "slow'n'low" I get better results in a fraction of the time.

One thing I also think it does exceedingly well is transform tough cuts of meat. Again, compared to "slow'n'low" you get great results in a fraction of the time.

I think the primary drawback is storage. If it can't live on your counter it is less likely to be used. That is the case for me at any rate.

But it definitely has utility and versatility. Michelle Tam's Nom Nom Paleo books/website is an excellent resource if you're thinking about breaking it out again.

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1 hour ago, Chaka said:

Like I said, I use mine primarily to make bone broth. Compared to "slow'n'low" I get better results in a fraction of the time.

One thing I also think it does exceedingly well is transform tough cuts of meat. Again, compared to "slow'n'low" you get great results in a fraction of the time.

I think the primary drawback is storage. If it can't live on your counter it is less likely to be used. That is the case for me at any rate.

But it definitely has utility and versatility. Michelle Tam's Nom Nom Paleo books/website is an excellent resource if you're thinking about breaking it out again.

My ex-wife actually bought two of them.   We were at the stage of our marriage where I didn't even want to know why.    I'm just glad to not having those monstrosities cluttering up my counter top.   

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11 minutes ago, shuke said:

At Kroger yesterday, the bottom of my receipt said that the ribeyes I bought were part of a recall notice and I should return them.  :mellow:

I don't think that's something that men, especially real men that cook over charcoal, care about.

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1 hour ago, Klimtology said:

I cooked the porterhouse for about a min and a half on each side on the grill. Then on indirect heat for another min or so. Cooked perfectly for super rare which is the way I like it.

Was the porterhouse French?  Wow, that's rare. Bifteck. 

Edited by rockaction
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2 hours ago, NutterButter said:

My ex-wife actually bought two of them.   We were at the stage of our marriage where I didn't even want to know why.    I'm just glad to not having those monstrosities cluttering up my counter top.   

And that's the issue right there. It is a useful and versatile tool but if you don't have the space it gets put away next to the fondue set.

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Surely there has to be a company out there selling American Steak Seasoning with the same ingredients as Montreal steak seasoning. 

There must be some portion of the population that does not want some Frenchie Canadian telling them how to season their steak.

Ah, never mind. I just realized that that same portion of the population is cooking their steaks well done and dousing them with ketchup, so the seasoning really doesn't matter.

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On 6/2/2019 at 8:26 PM, shuke said:

Just did some bone-in ribeyes Saturday.

Over charcoal.  Like a man.  

That's a good looking steak.  I would be honored to sit down at your table and eat that meal with you.

Still, I'll take perfect results every single time, without fail, over even the occasional overdone grill cooked steak.  A non-professional* grill cook can swear up and down that they never let their steaks go over but they'd be lying, probably to themselves.  And that's the really good grillers, or at least the ones smart enough to use a temperature probe with an alarm, most home grillers hammer their proteins and then everyone needs to pretend they did a great job because those grillers are, surprisingly, quite the sensitive types.

*If your work involves preparing hundreds of proteins every night/week I will not question your technique, even if I still occasionally get the over or under protein at your restaurant.

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2 minutes ago, pollardsvision said:

Surely there has to be a company out there selling American Steak Seasoning with the same ingredients as Montreal steak seasoning. 

There must be some portion of the population that does not want some Frenchie Canadian telling them how to season their steak.

There's always A-1...

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