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Just now, supermike80 said:

Openly inflammatory is of course not cool.

But someone saying  "Biden's Presidency is fradulent" because they believe the election was rife with fraud, is NOT inflammatory.  In my opinion of course.   

I agree with this.  Many in here were suggesting that Trump directly colluded with Russia.

Not me of course...:D

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4 minutes ago, Rich Conway said:

No one signed off on anything, which is the point.  Literally the opposite happened.

Change any one of the "1077" in my post to "1081" or "1073" if you want.  Are you arguing the chain of events was different than what I wrote above?  If yes, then what was the chain of events as you understand them?  If no, then how do you get to malfeasance or "helps Biden"?

Here is his whole thread.

One of our monitors discovered a 9,626 vote error in the DeKalb County hand count. One batch was labeled 10,707 for Biden and 13 for Trump - an improbable margin even by DeKalb standards. The actual count for the batch was 1,081 for Biden and 13 for Trump.

Had this counting error not been discovered, Biden would have gained enough votes from this one batch alone to cancel out Trump’s gains from Fayette, Floyd and Walton.

We were limited to 1 monitor for every 10 counting tables and we were kept some distance from the tables. There is no telling what we missed under these unreasonable restrictions. The miscounted batch had been be signed off by two official counters.

Biden’s margin of victory in this batch of votes (99.9%) bested Bashar al-Assad’s 2007 margin (97.6%) and Raul Castro’s 2008 margin (99.4%). It matched Kim Jong-il’s 2009 margin (99.9%).

Our attorneys have turned over an affidavit from our monitor to the Secretary of State and requested an investigation.

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1 minute ago, James Daulton said:

I agree with this.  Many in here were suggesting that Trump directly colluded with Russia.

Not me of course...:D

Yeah but my thing is, was, and will be..Say what you feel.  Share your opinions.   When we start banning people for sharing their opinions?  What kind of world is that?

 

Edited by supermike80
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1 minute ago, Max Power said:

Here is his whole thread.

One of our monitors discovered a 9,626 vote error in the DeKalb County hand count. One batch was labeled 10,707 for Biden and 13 for Trump - an improbable margin even by DeKalb standards. The actual count for the batch was 1,081 for Biden and 13 for Trump.

Had this counting error not been discovered, Biden would have gained enough votes from this one batch alone to cancel out Trump’s gains from Fayette, Floyd and Walton.

We were limited to 1 monitor for every 10 counting tables and we were kept some distance from the tables. There is no telling what we missed under these unreasonable restrictions. The miscounted batch had been be signed off by two official counters.

Biden’s margin of victory in this batch of votes (99.9%) bested Bashar al-Assad’s 2007 margin (97.6%) and Raul Castro’s 2008 margin (99.4%). It matched Kim Jong-il’s 2009 margin (99.9%).

Our attorneys have turned over an affidavit from our monitor to the Secretary of State and requested an investigation.

You still seem to be ignoring the actual chain of events.

Separately, it seems the Trump argument here is "the fact that the process worked and we identified a mistake proves that the process doesn't work"?

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15 minutes ago, Max Power said:

Read his whole thread. It wasn't off a typo. His final total was 1,081. That isn't a digit in the wrong place.

Here is the full text of the affidavit that Shafer was tweeting about (posted by Stephen Fowler of Georgia Public Broadcasting). It's a quick read and an interesting behind-the-scenes look at how ballot-counting information gets contested in real time. Of note to me is that the Republican observer who filled out the affidavit reported a spirit of cooperation between he and a supervisor after some initial distrust conveyed by one of the counters -- people are still people, after all.

There will likely be no way to know whether the 10,707 figure was an intentional fraudulent act or a mistake of some kind. Be that as it may, the error/fraud was detected and corrected before the DeKalb count completed Sunday night. This is water under the bridge now.

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8 minutes ago, James Daulton said:

The machine count came in at 1k, the hand count came in at 1k, when the handcount was written down it was written as 10k.  This mistake was immediately caught and corrected.  It never was intended nor did it ever have a chance to impact the vote count.  Checks and balances worked as prescribed. 

Caught by poll watchers and not the certification is the concerning part.

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3 minutes ago, Joe Summer said:

"Inadequate men in big jobs are always dangerous. President Trump has cemented his legacy as an inadequate man who lacks the mental faculties and strength of character necessary for the job. How many others will prove, by saying and doing nothing, that they too are inadequate?"

- Carly Fiorina

I do'nt understand these little snippets that are being thrown in.

Is that to say that even if there were true election fraud, who cares because Trump is terrible?

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3 minutes ago, Max Power said:

Caught by poll watchers and not the certification is the concerning part.

The 10k number wasn't part of the machine count nor part of the hand count.  How is it concerning?  That number would never have made it's way into the vote count.  The large discrepancy between the 3 numbers would have been investigated and corrected. 

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3 minutes ago, supermike80 said:

I do'nt understand these little snippets that are being thrown in.

Is that to say that even if there were true election fraud, who cares because Trump is terrible?

Mike- as someone here who likes to call out the hypocrisy and ridiculousness (which I enjoy about your posts honestly) why aren’t you doing the same for the obvious hypocrisy and ridiculousness going on now with the “just want a fair election” schtick?   

Edited by dkp993
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20 minutes ago, HellToupee said:

I won't make posts like that anymore if you won't. Deal?

Better yet, I just won't make posts like that anymore, regardless of what you do.

Edited by Gr00vus
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6 minutes ago, dkp993 said:

Mike- as someone here who likes to call out the hypocrisy and ridiculousness (which I enjoy about your posts honestly) why aren’t you doing the same for the obvious hypocrisy and ridiculousness going on now with the “just want a fair election” schtick?   

Well because I have for the most part stayed out of it.

However...On the other board..I have ripped into my fellow conservative posters for doing exactly that.  They are repeating the same thing the liberals did in 2016 and embarrassing themselves in the process.

 

Edited by supermike80
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8 minutes ago, supermike80 said:
12 minutes ago, Joe Summer said:

"Inadequate men in big jobs are always dangerous. President Trump has cemented his legacy as an inadequate man who lacks the mental faculties and strength of character necessary for the job. How many others will prove, by saying and doing nothing, that they too are inadequate?"

- Carly Fiorina

I do'nt understand these little snippets that are being thrown in.

Is that to say that even if there were true election fraud, who cares because Trump is terrible?

I don't think Ms. Fiorina was specifically referring to how President Trump handled the election. It seems more like a general comment about being inadequate to handle the job of being President.

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2 minutes ago, supermike80 said:

Well because I have for the most part stayed out of it.

However...On the other board..I have ripped into my fellow conservative posters for doing exactly that.  They are repeating the same thing the liberals did in 2016 and embarrassing themselves in the process.

 

Thanks for the answer. 

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1 minute ago, Joe Summer said:

I don't think Ms. Fiorina was specifically referring to how President Trump handled the election. It seems more like a general comment about being inadequate to handle the job of being President.

So why post it in the middle of a conversation about election fraud--and in this thread?  Just liked the quote I guess?

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3 minutes ago, supermike80 said:
6 minutes ago, Joe Summer said:

I don't think Ms. Fiorina was specifically referring to how President Trump handled the election. It seems more like a general comment about being inadequate to handle the job of being President.

So why post it in the middle of a conversation about election fraud--and in this thread?  Just liked the quote I guess?

:shrug:

This isn't the election fraud thread. It's the Trump 2020 thread. It's the only thread left in the forum relating to the general topic of Donald Trump. I have to presume by the moderator actions that they expect general Trump discussion to be consolidated into this thread. I saw the quote from Fiorina this morning and I thought it was relevant to the topic of Donald Trump, since she had previously endorsed him.

Also, the quote does have an indirect connection to the topic of election fraud, as Fiorina was Ted Cruz's pick for Vice President, and Cruz has not only endorsed some of Trump's fraud claims, but it's possible, if not likely, that Fiorina was referring to Cruz and others like him when she wrote, "How many others will prove, by saying and doing nothing, that they too are inadequate?"

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Just now, Joe Summer said:

:shrug:

This isn't the election fraud thread. It's the Trump 2020 thread. It's the only thread left in the forum relating to the general topic of Donald Trump. I have to presume by the moderator actions that they expect general Trump discussion to be consolidated into this thread. I saw the quote from Fiorina this morning and I thought it was relevant to the topic of Donald Trump, since she had previously endorsed him.

Also, the quote does have an indirect connection to the topic of election fraud, as Fiorina was Ted Cruz's pick for Vice President, and Cruz has not only endorsed some of Trump's fraud claims, but it's possible, if not likely, that Fiorina was referring to Cruz and others like him when she wrote, "How many others will prove, by saying and doing nothing, that they too are inadequate?"

I see.

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38 minutes ago, James Daulton said:

The 10k number wasn't part of the machine count nor part of the hand count.  How is it concerning?  That number would never have made it's way into the vote count.  The large discrepancy between the 3 numbers would have been investigated and corrected. 

I am not sure I understand his point either.  The original count was 1k for Biden.  On recount it was erroneously reported as 10k, they found the issue  and corrected it back to 1k. 

The net result was the original count was correct and validated in the recount.   What exactly is the problem here?

Edited by Godsbrother
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26 minutes ago, Godsbrother said:

I am not sure I understand his point either.  The original count was 1k for Biden.  On recount it was erroneously reported as 10k, they found the issue  and corrected it back to 1k. 

The net result was the original count was correct and validated in the recount.   What exactly is the problem here?

It was signed off as accurate before caught by a watcher. The hand recount looks worse than the machines.

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3 hours ago, Godsbrother said:
4 hours ago, Ramblin Wreck said:

I bet there's fewer post about it than the four years worth of Russia nothing burger that the Dems clinged to

The two are unrelated but at least the Russian investigation resulted in indictments.  How many indictments do you think the 2020 election will result in?

this

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19 minutes ago, Max Power said:

It was signed off as accurate before caught by a watcher. The hand recount looks worse than the machines.

Juran, one of the giants of Quality, has written that, based on his studies performed on Inspector accuracy, 100% inspection is about 87% effective.

ETA: I expect a hand recount to be less accurate than a machine.

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43 minutes ago, Max Power said:

It was signed off as accurate before caught by a watcher. The hand recount looks worse than the machines.

This had to be pretty disappointing.  You got pretty excited about the Fraud they had finally caught!  

The hand count will probably be a little worse for accuracy than the machine count, but it will catch any huge errors (if there was any).

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2 hours ago, GordonGekko said:
2 hours ago, Gr00vus said:

@FBG Moderator is it o.k. to post lies like this on the board? Just checking for future reference.

 

You sure you want to play this game?  Trying to force the 4-5 conservative minded who actually post regularly to play the "Use the Report Button" game?

But hey, once you cancel Toupee, and then you go after me, then Max Power, and Norville Barnes, you'll finally be most of the way to silencing everyone with the crime of having a different political opinion than you.

This is the part that makes me so sad.

If someone claimed that 2+2=5 and everyone else corrected them that 2+2=4, would then the individual claim people are trying to silence him for the crime of having a different opinion of everyone else?

So sad

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2 hours ago, Rich Conway said:

If all of the following are true:
- The posts are intentionally inflammatory
- The posts are verifiable untrue
- The poster provides no evidence of the claim

Yes, the poster should be suspended.  I'm unclear why that would be controversial.

I agree with this.  There is a difference in speaking as fact and as opinion:

  • I believe the earth is flat (opinion)
  • The earth is flat (fact)

Expressing opinion is fine.  Expressing opinion as facts is not fine.

:2cents:

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2 minutes ago, JAA said:

This is the part that makes me so sad.

If someone claimed that 2+2=5 and everyone else corrected them that 2+2=4, would then the individual claim people are trying to silence him for the crime of having a different opinion of everyone else?

So sad

Ugh these comparisons are so tedious and ridiculous.

What if that person was, say 4? And didn't know that 2+2=4?  What if he was mentally slow?  Bad at math?   

The point is that to ban someone because they don't agree with you is wrong. WRONG WRONG WRONG....You wanna argue that they are wrong, of course----go for it.  But to ban them for something.....that's just way off. 

The flat earth is the best comparison by far.   How about the folks that think the moon landing was faked?  Or those that feel aliens exist?  Or those that believe there is no God?  The list goes on and on.  Where do we stop suppressing others opinions because they don't mesh with your own?

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3 minutes ago, supermike80 said:

Ugh these comparisons are so tedious and ridiculous.

What if that person was, say 4? And didn't know that 2+2=4?  What if he was mentally slow?  Bad at math?   

The point is that to ban someone because they don't agree with you is wrong. WRONG WRONG WRONG....You wanna argue that they are wrong, of course----go for it.  But to ban them for something.....that's just way off. 

The flat earth is the best comparison by far.   How about the folks that think the moon landing was faked?  Or those that feel aliens exist?  Or those that believe there is no God?  The list goes on and on.  Where do we stop suppressing others opinions because they don't mesh with your own?

Just Stop!  Stop throwing softballs at us!  You don't know how hard it was to resist.

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2 hours ago, Rich Conway said:

I'd suggest if someone posts something that is intentionally inflammatory, untrue, and provides no evidence to back it up, the post should be deleted and/or the poster given a timeout.  I don't think "the Earth is flat" rises to the level of inflammatory, as it would more likely be seen as unserious and a joke.  If someone repeated it multiple times, then yes, the poster should be given a timeout as it would clearly be trolling.

 

http://cbldf.org/2011/06/40-years-on-one-mans-vulgarity-is-still-anothers-lyric/

 

"....the Supreme Court’s decision on Cohen v. California — a decision that still shapes how the First Amendment is interpreted and protected today.

....which centered on one man’s First Amendment right to protest the Vietnam War by wearing a jacket bearing the words “F**k the Draft.” In 1968, Paul Robert Cohen was arrested in California for disturbing the peace by offensive conduct. Cohen’s conviction was ultimately overturned by a majority decision in the Supreme Court.....

The Court’s 5-4 ruling in Cohen v. California cleared a wider field for freedom of speech in several ways. It limited the fighting-words doctrine, rejected application of the obscenity doctrine to profanity, emphasized that offensive speech deserves protection and warned against the prospect that the government could ban words to discriminate against unpopular views.

As Justice John Marshall Harlan wrote in his majority opinion, “one man’s vulgarity is another’s lyric,” reinforcing the idea that even unpopular speech is protected by the First Amendment...."

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14 minutes ago, supermike80 said:

Ugh these comparisons are so tedious and ridiculous.

What if that person was, say 4? And didn't know that 2+2=4?  What if he was mentally slow?  Bad at math?   

The point is that to ban someone because they don't agree with you is wrong. WRONG WRONG WRONG....You wanna argue that they are wrong, of course----go for it.  But to ban them for something.....that's just way off. 

The flat earth is the best comparison by far.   How about the folks that think the moon landing was faked?  Or those that feel aliens exist?  Or those that believe there is no God?  The list goes on and on.  Where do we stop suppressing others opinions because they don't mesh with your own?

You seem to use the terms "ban" and "temporarily suspend" interchangeably, when they aren't the same.

Beyond that, my contention regarding suspension was more about being intentionally inflammatory than just being factually wrong.

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20 minutes ago, Rich Conway said:

You seem to use the terms "ban" and "temporarily suspend" interchangeably, when they aren't the same.

Beyond that, my contention regarding suspension was more about being intentionally inflammatory than just being factually wrong.

I know the difference.  And neither is acceptable. 

And OK.    Thanks for clarifying your opinion.

Edited by supermike80
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37 minutes ago, supermike80 said:

Ugh these comparisons are so tedious and ridiculous.

What if that person was, say 4? And didn't know that 2+2=4?  What if he was mentally slow?  Bad at math?   

The point is that to ban someone because they don't agree with you is wrong. WRONG WRONG WRONG....You wanna argue that they are wrong, of course----go for it.  But to ban them for something.....that's just way off. 

The flat earth is the best comparison by far.   How about the folks that think the moon landing was faked?  Or those that feel aliens exist?  Or those that believe there is no God?  The list goes on and on.  Where do we stop suppressing others opinions because they don't mesh with your own?

Instead of looking at it from the perspective of the guest, why not look at it from the perspective of the host?

"Where do we stop allowing guests to say whatever they want without consequence?"

Or, better yet, "Why shouldn't a free society allow hosts to decide which guests are welcome?"

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1 minute ago, Joe Summer said:

Instead of looking at it from the perspective of the guest, why not look at it from the perspective of the host?

"Where do we stop allowing guests to say whatever they want without consequence?"

Or, better yet, "Why shouldn't a free society allow hosts to decide which guests are welcome?"

Because I don't want to think of it from that angle.   I like to think of it from my angle    

If you don't mind that is.

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3 hours ago, James Daulton said:

... barely any insignificant, fraud. ...

 

There is no such thing as an insignificant vote nor such thing as insignificant fraud when it comes to voting.  This issue runs deeper than just this election and further than just Donald J Trump.

 

****

 

https://time.com/3423102/people-died-so-i-could-vote/

 

"People Died So I Could Vote

By Jocelyn Y. Stewart

September 23, 2014 4:45 PM EDT

When we were growing up in South Los Angeles, my siblings and I often heard my dad’s impromptu sermons about matters of importance: the value of education, the perils of purchasing on credit, the virtue of hard work, and the dire necessity of voting.

“People died so we could vote,” he’d say.

As a very young kid, I imagined the dying as a scene from a Western movie: good guys vs. bad guys and bodies strewn across a grassy battlefield. In the end the good guys walked away, alive and free to vote. My imaginary battle scene was historically inaccurate, but I came to learn the element of peril was real. And we weren’t talking about faraway countries like Iraq and Afghanistan, but the U.S.A., in the not very distant past.

I came to learn how perilous it had been for black people to vote in the South, especially in the era prior to the Voting Rights Act of 1965. People of color didn’t return from the poll wearing a splashy red, white and blue “I voted” sticker the way we might now. People of color often weren’t allowed to vote, and if they persisted, and tried organizing others to exercise their rights as Americans, they were often beaten, sometimes killed, for their efforts.

Hence my dad’s “you gotta vote” speeches. At the core of my dad’s fidelity to the ballot was an appreciation for the sacrifices made by everyday people that allowed African Americans—and other people of color—to obtain it.

In the 1950s, when my parents were kids, the NAACP began an effort to register voters in the small rural Louisiana town where they lived. Local African-American residents, like my mother’s father and the father of her friend Curtis Spears Jr., became members and participated in the effort.

One day Curtis’s father returned from town beaten and bloodied. The assault had come at the hands of the town marshal, who later explained it as a case of “mistaken identity.” Not long afterward, the loan on the family’s farm was recalled by the local lending institution. The family was forced to become sharecroppers—a plummet in status and fortune—all because of their desire to vote.

My mother remembers her mother and others memorizing the Preamble to the Constitution and various historical facts before heading to the polls to face questions from a poll worker. But preparation didn’t always help, my dad added.

“They’d ask you: ‘How many bubbles in a bar of soap?” he said.

Any answer was wrong if the poll worker wanted it to be and the bid to vote ended there. Today my parents are avid voters, going to the polls for races that feature only city councilmembers and candidates for sheriff, in addition to the ones for president. They vote with a sense of duty and commitment that might be hard for non-voters to understand.

History explains it.

Our democracy demanded a double portion of faith from older African Americans. It required them to believe in the rights accorded to citizens of this nation, even as the nation denied these same rights to people of color. It required them to march, sit-in, stand up, face police dogs and water hoses until America was forced to do as Martin Luther King, Jr. said: “Rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: ‘We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal.’”

The true price of the ballot was reinforced many years later, in the mid 1990s, when I met my friend Frank Godden.

At his home near USC, where he was mostly housebound and later blind, Frank, then in his 80s, loved talking about all he’d witnessed in his almost a century of living. He had the longest political memory of anyone I’d ever met. He was a World War II veteran, a graduate of Tuskegee Institute and a businessman who’d helped develop a resort community in northern Los Angeles County open to African Americans during segregation when other places of recreation were closed to them.

As a small boy growing up in Live Oak, Florida, he remembered his father telling him: “When you finish school I want you to leave Live Oak, leave the South. You spend too much time trying to be accepted as a citizen.”

The admonition to leave the South baffled him. Frank had eight brothers and sisters, a dog named Scout, a horse named Fannie, and plenty of friends. Life was good, as far as he could see—until the issue of black people voting arose in the early 1920s.

The voting efforts in Live Oak were part of a larger campaign by African Americans in Florida to use the ballot as a means of defeating Jim Crow laws that segregated nearly every part of Southern life, I later learned by reading Emancipation Betrayed: The Hidden History of Black Organizing and White Violence in Florida from Reconstruction to the Bloody Election of 1920. This was a time when black men were beaten, black women arrested, and white supporters threatened — all to thwart black voting.

In Live Oak, the town’s black leaders decided to run a candidate for office. They gathered on the porch of the Godden home one Sunday and nominated Frank’s father to run for postmaster. The family was well-known in the Live Oak community — Frank’s father was a livestock farmer and a minister; his mother was a principal at the town’s colored elementary school and a music teacher.

Rev. Godden was elected and, the way Frank remembered it, that vote on the porch was the beginning of the end.

Frank’s father received threats, including a letter that he carried in his wallet. Then one night a carload full of men drove to the Godden house. A man jumped out and lobbed a firebomb that landed on the porch of the home and exploded, leaving a crater that extended into the living room of the home.

Anxious about the possibility of violence, Frank’s parents had sent the children to their grandparents’ house for the evening. So thankfully, nobody was hurt.

As a very old man, Frank still remembered the fear his 11-year-old self felt upon returning home and staring into the hole left by the bomb. That day, the family packed up their lives and left Live Oak forever, on a train headed to New Orleans.

“We couldn’t let anybody know we were leaving,” Frank recalled. “We couldn’t even say goodbye to our friends.”

To be American is to appreciate and acknowledge those who died so we could vote, who faced bombs and beatings, and lost farms—and voted anyway. They are owed a debt, payable in the currency of participation in the democratic process.

When I turned 18, my father walked with me, a newly minted voter, to the polling place at the school down the street from our house. My first vote was important enough he felt he had to share it with me. Like my parents, I now consider myself a regular voter. This is not to say that I never miss; I have. But I believe, like they do, that my vote matters.

I’ve heard my father’s words flowing from my mouth when I talk to younger people about voting: people died so we could vote. Now they are my words. Now I understand the battlefield and the soldiers.

In 2000, I traveled to Greenwood, Mississippi, with Endesha Ida Mae Holland, a foot soldier in the Civil Rights movement who had just published a memoir about her life in the Mississippi Delta. She had received an invitation to speak at a literary conference at the University of Mississippi at Oxford (better known by its nickname Ole Miss). This was a place black people could only dream of attending when she was growing up. I accompanied Holland, who had since become a professor at USC and a Pulitzer-prize-nominated playwright, to write a Los Angeles Times magazine profile.

She showed me where she’d once seen the battered body of Emmett Till, an African-American teen who had been killed for reportedly flirting with a white woman, and where she had marched. She showed me where the house she grew up used to be. It had been firebombed because she joined civil rights workers in registering people to vote. Holland’s mother had been afraid that her daughter was stirring up trouble and was opposed to her civil rights activity; she didn’t want to vote. When the house was bombed, Holland’s disabled mother was seriously injured. In our conversations, Holland told me how, at the hospital, not long before she died, her mother whispered to her: “Tote me to vote, gal.”

Voting stories have been to me like family heirlooms; they make it impossible for me to take voting lightly. For Frank, the bombing robbed him of the world as he knew it. It might have stripped him too of his faith in democracy. Instead, Frank became fervent about voting, community involvement, collective action—from the neighborhood block club, to the college alumni association, to his political party. He remained a believer in the democratic process. He followed politics like others follow sports.

In 2008, at the age of 97, Frank did something his parents never did: he casted a vote for an African American to hold the nation’s highest office, then he’d witnessed Barack Obama’s election. Listening to the inauguration, Frank cried tears that carried the weight of generations."

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26 minutes ago, GordonGekko said:

There is no such thing as an insignificant vote nor such thing as insignificant fraud when it comes to voting.  This issue runs deeper than just this election and further than just Donald J Trump.

So I ask again. Where is your insistence on investigations in other Trump won states?  If fair is the metric as is the need to root out any fraud no matter how insignificant, as you point out, we should have 50 deep exhaustive dives going on. I don’t see you, or anyone else, calling for that.  

And please can I make a suggestion, IF you do reply (which so far has not been the case when I asked this if multiple people here) please TL;DR it for me. The 17 paragraph replies suck to read on my phone.  Thx.  

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1 minute ago, supermike80 said:
3 minutes ago, Joe Summer said:

Instead of looking at it from the perspective of the guest, why not look at it from the perspective of the host?

"Where do we stop allowing guests to say whatever they want without consequence?"

Or, better yet, "Why shouldn't a free society allow hosts to decide which guests are welcome?"

Because I don't want to think of it from that angle.   I like to think of it from my angle    

I appreciate the honesty. In my opinion, it's essentially the pro-Yelper/anti-freedom argument: private businesses should be subjected to the desires of the vocal minority.

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1 hour ago, JAA said:

This is the part that makes me so sad.

If someone claimed that 2+2=5 and everyone else corrected them that 2+2=4, would then the individual claim people are trying to silence him for the crime of having a different opinion of everyone else?

So sad

 

 

“If liberty means anything at all, it means the right to tell people what they do not want to hear.”
― George Orwell

 

“If freedom of speech is taken away, then dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep to the slaughter.”
― George Washington

 

“Whoever would overthrow the liberty of a nation must begin by subduing the freeness of speech.”
― Benjamin Franklin, Silence Dogood

 

“It is the rare fortune of these days that one may think what one likes and say what one thinks.”
― Tacitus, Histories of Tacitus

 

“Most people do not really want others to have freedom of speech, they just want others to be given the freedom to say want they want to hear.”
― Mokokoma Mokhonoana

 

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