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*** OFFICIAL *** COVID-19 CoronaVirus Thread


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39 minutes ago, belljr said:

i didnt realize we had so many important people here to get early shots :)

I can't speak for others, but in my case for my job from time to time I have to go into locations where the patients are all high risk. The company procured enough doses for the patients and employees, and after the frontline workers and patients were taken care of, the rest of us were allowed to get it. 

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1 minute ago, Dezbelief said:

OTC would indicate a self test bought off the shelf? I haven't seen any of those yet.

I looked it up. They had received approval already back in December. Pretty sure culdeus posted about it in here.

That reporter is just not very good at her job(surprising I know). The news today was an inked deal to purchase a bunch of kits and build a facility in the US. Cant find any details about how many and when. 

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16 minutes ago, parasaurolophus said:

That reporter is just not very good at her job(surprising I know). The news today was an inked deal to purchase a bunch of kits and build a facility in the US.

I guess she mistook today's press conference for an announcement of initial approval. Andy Slavitt, the first speaker, does not make clear that FDA approval took place in December.

Edited by Doug B
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4 hours ago, Leeroy Jenkins said:

I am juuuuusssst fat enough to get my vaccine in PA on 2/19 -- moderna.  

It really doesn't take much given the CDC's BMI calculator. I'm 5'6" and bounce between 180 and 184. I'm no body builder but no one accuses me of being fat either, if I ate a big meal and weighed myself I might get to 186 which would get me to obese on their charts. More worried about my wife (diabetic and a teacher) and in-laws (both in their 80's) getting it right now. If they get through are able to then I might see if I can. They are all signed up, just waiting to see if they are actually able to get the shots.

 

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So my second Pfizer dose was just delayed two weeks, putting my next scheduled 2nd dose right at 5 weeks. Wish I had any more faith in this scheduled 2nd dose than I did the first. But seeing the local buffoonery going on with this whole process, I won/t be surprised if I don't get it in the six week window. The fact that the news went out of their way to point out that the CDC is saying the second dose is still effective out past the six week cutoff strikes me as prep work for further disappointment.

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17 hours ago, SwampDawg said:

It really doesn't take much given the CDC's BMI calculator. I'm 5'6" and bounce between 180 and 184. I'm no body builder but no one accuses me of being fat either, if I ate a big meal and weighed myself I might get to 186 which would get me to obese on their charts. More worried about my wife (diabetic and a teacher) and in-laws (both in their 80's) getting it right now. If they get through are able to then I might see if I can. They are all signed up, just waiting to see if they are actually able to get the shots.

 

I know.  When they include just normal obese, as opposed to morbidly obese, it really opens it up to a lot of Americans.

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22 hours ago, Tom Skerritt said:

Got my second dose of Moderna on Friday morning. Felt fine Friday. Felt like crap on Saturday. Laid in bed and slept off and on all day. Rebounded by Sunday morning. 

 

22 hours ago, IvanKaramazov said:

My wife got her second dose last week too.  She said she didn't really feel sick per se, just very achy and she couldn't drag herself out of bed the day after.  One of her co-workers apparently got knocked to the couch for a couple of days.

So stupid question, when you get these vaccinations, do you quarantine at home or just business as usual?

My company announced yesterday that they might have the ability to assist in getting us the vaccine. My company is designated essential (I know, who isn't?) and are trying to partner with a provider to leverage that to get us vaccines sooner. I'm torn, I want to get the vaccine but I checked my spot in line on one of the internet sites and out of about 2 million folks in SC, all but about 50,000 are behind me so I'm about as low on the list as it goes. Don't want to screw someone that actually needs this thing because I selfishly just want to speed the process up.

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3 minutes ago, beer 30 said:

So stupid question, when you get these vaccinations, do you quarantine at home or just business as usual?

Good question. My daughter works in a nursing home and when they did the 2nd round, EVERYONE was sick the next day. Her boss was begging her to come in early, but she felt like crap too. She went in for her shift later in the day just because they were so short on people. She had a 100.4 fever when she left the house, but she was just under 100 on the work thermometer, so they let her in. Not really sure what they were supposed to do in this situation. You assume everyone is just feeling the effects of the shot, but you never really know for sure?

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1 hour ago, beer 30 said:

 

So stupid question, when you get these vaccinations, do you quarantine at home or just business as usual?

My company announced yesterday that they might have the ability to assist in getting us the vaccine. My company is designated essential (I know, who isn't?) and are trying to partner with a provider to leverage that to get us vaccines sooner. I'm torn, I want to get the vaccine but I checked my spot in line on one of the internet sites and out of about 2 million folks in SC, all but about 50,000 are behind me so I'm about as low on the list as it goes. Don't want to screw someone that actually needs this thing because I selfishly just want to speed the process up.

I'd say business as usual if you feel OK. But definitely prepare for a day off work the following day, as it seems to be somewhat common within 24 hours, of the second dose especially. No need to quarantine, as you aren't infected, it's just your body putting up an immune response.... unless you happen to have already been infected at the time of vaccination. :tinfoilhat: 

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2 hours ago, beer 30 said:

 

So stupid question, when you get these vaccinations, do you quarantine at home or just business as usual?

My company announced yesterday that they might have the ability to assist in getting us the vaccine. My company is designated essential (I know, who isn't?) and are trying to partner with a provider to leverage that to get us vaccines sooner. I'm torn, I want to get the vaccine but I checked my spot in line on one of the internet sites and out of about 2 million folks in SC, all but about 50,000 are behind me so I'm about as low on the list as it goes. Don't want to screw someone that actually needs this thing because I selfishly just want to speed the process up.

I was supposed to get my second shot on Thursday. Had to reschedule it for Friday, and I’m glad I did. I would have been able to work through it, but I’m glad I didn’t have to do that. Just a low level general body ache. 

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My company just had their Q1 global town hall and half of it was dedicated to COVID stuff.  53,000 employees and 7,000 were logged in via Zoom.  So far there have been 2200 reported cases of employees being COVID positive, with 15 fatalities due to COVID.  Through contact tracing, 75 of those cases were determined to be of employment related transmission, i.e. in the line of work.  No reported transmissions within the manufacturing plants, so these 75 were from employees contracting the virus while doing work outside of the company offices / factories / DCs, etc.  This would be customer visits for service, sales, etc.

A lot  time was spent discussing on the safety and efficacy of the various vaccines and what the company is doing to promote vaccine adoption.  Reading between the lines, it does not sound like a vaccine will be required, but the company is "strongly suggesting" that all employees get a vaccine when it is available to them.

Finally, there was a talk on the future of the workplace.  The company is forging ahead with some jobs being 100% remote, many jobs being a hybrid of work from home and on-site, and some being 100% on-site depending on job responsibilities.  They will be investing in revamping the office layouts to provide more collaboration areas, innovation areas, and conference rooms.  My read on this is that cubicles are basically done.  People that were office drones in cubicles only will be asked to work from home and d video conferences for meetings.  Those that need access to labs, equipment, etc. will simply come in to use those spaces, do meetings in in conference rooms, but not get a cubicle.  I bet everyone gets issued a storage locker to hold their crap.

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https://www.politico.com/news/2021/02/02/biden-vaccine-pharmacies-464995

Looks like they’re going to start distributing vaccine directly to the pharmacies rather than having using the states a middle man. This is likely a good thing but it depends on their strategy, so I’ll wait for more details to come out.

My worries as a pharmacy currently giving the vaccine is that their goal is to spread the vaccine out to as many locations as possible which could lead to decreased distribution to the places currently giving the shots. That will leave us scrambling to have the second doses for everyone we promised them to.

Spreading the vaccine out to all pharmacies is likely an effective strategy that has worked yearly for the flu vaccine. But it’s not without concerns because the COVID vaccine is much more time consuming. During flu season we’ve been known to do 40-50 shots and still be able to effectively run the pharmacy but right now 20 COVID shots per day with normal staffing crushes the rest of business for those 5 hours.

Most pharmacies, especially CVS and Walgreens, are severely understaffed and are likely to push the COVID shot expectations much higher than are realistic leading to massive lines, chaos and the regular pharmacy work being shut down. We’re also months away from being able to walk-in appointments, so add in the difficulties of many different scheduling processes to deal with.

 My experience is that trying to do the COVID vaccine in normal workflow is highly inefficient. We started off doing about 120 per week and we struggled mightily. We’ve now transitioned to more of a ‘clinic’ setting where we can almost do that same amount daily with both the vaccinations and the daily pharmacy work going much smoother. As long as we can get a steady supply of vaccine, we’re probably going to do 400-500 per week. If more pharmacies can commit to  a similar strategy, it could be a very efficient way to get the vaccine out. The problem is that it does require more payroll commitment that many corporations may not be willing to do.

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IDK the pharmacy model seems flawed, the hub model is cranking thru shots in Texas as fast as they can put them in the fridges.  

Doing 40k at the speedway this week.  Goal to ramp that to 100k soon.  What good is 100-200 shots a week vs. that.  Hoping Texas ignores the pharmacy model, so far we've given the CDC the finger for the majority of the vax stuff as is I assume that will continue.

https://www.dallasnews.com/news/2021/02/02/thousands-get-their-covid-19-shots-as-texas-motor-speedway-vaccine-hub-opens-with-10000-doses/

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6 hours ago, culdeus said:

IDK the pharmacy model seems flawed, the hub model is cranking thru shots in Texas as fast as they can put them in the fridges.  

Doing 40k at the speedway this week.  Goal to ramp that to 100k soon.  What good is 100-200 shots a week vs. that.  Hoping Texas ignores the pharmacy model, so far we've given the CDC the finger for the majority of the vax stuff as is I assume that will continue.

https://www.dallasnews.com/news/2021/02/02/thousands-get-their-covid-19-shots-as-texas-motor-speedway-vaccine-hub-opens-with-10000-doses/

Yep.  This seems like the most logical and efficient way to do it.

Only concern, I would guess, has something to do with distance people have to travel / accessibility if the # of vaccination sites is limited.

At this stage, I would opt for the highest volume/most efficient approach possible.

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14 minutes ago, Desert_Power said:

This is a silver lining.

I don't miss shaking hands, sitting next to sick people on planes, or getting crammed into a small conference room with people hacking & coughing.   It would be amazing if, going forward, sick people would just stay home for a few days before going out into the world.

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4 minutes ago, Alex P Keaton said:

I don't miss shaking hands, sitting next to sick people on planes, or getting crammed into a small conference room with people hacking & coughing.   It would be amazing if, going forward, sick people would just stay home for a few days before going out into the world.

Yeah. I was reflecting earlier how much I miss hugging friends and family though.

I also wonder if masks on transit and other close public spaces will become more normal.

Edited by Desert_Power
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2 minutes ago, Desert_Power said:

Yeah. I was reflecting earlier how much I miss hugging friends and family though.

I also wonder if masks on transit and other close public spaces will become more normal.

I don't miss hugging very many people.   Particularly larger people.  I do miss hugging younger, attractive, in-shape females. 

(Mostly kidding)

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19 hours ago, E-Z Glider said:

Good question. My daughter works in a nursing home and when they did the 2nd round, EVERYONE was sick the next day. Her boss was begging her to come in early, but she felt like crap too. She went in for her shift later in the day just because they were so short on people. She had a 100.4 fever when she left the house, but she was just under 100 on the work thermometer, so they let her in. Not really sure what they were supposed to do in this situation. You assume everyone is just feeling the effects of the shot, but you never really know for sure?

Why wouldn’t they space the shots out? Seems like they should have thought of that ahead of time.

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2 hours ago, AAABatteries said:

Why wouldn’t they space the shots out? Seems like they should have thought of that ahead of time.

I've seen little to indicate foresight or well thought out plans have ever been a part of the rollout process. From top to bottom, all I have seen is pockets of off the cuff cluster-####s.

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8 hours ago, Alex P Keaton said:

I don't miss shaking hands, sitting next to sick people on planes, or getting crammed into a small conference room with people hacking & coughing.   It would be amazing if, going forward, sick people would just stay home for a few days before going out into the world.

Some people cant afford to take sick days

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8 hours ago, Alex P Keaton said:

Yep.  This seems like the most logical and efficient way to do it.

Only concern, I would guess, has something to do with distance people have to travel / accessibility if the # of vaccination sites is limited.

At this stage, I would opt for the highest volume/most efficient approach possible.

From what I understand.  They are still doing the hub model and pharmacy model.  Pharmacy for the reasons you stated.   SOmething like 1 million doses to pharmacies and 10 million to the "hubs"

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The good news is that apparently we now have empirical evidence that the AstraZeneca vaccine actually reduced transmission.  It's preliminary, but it lines up with everyone's intuition and provides that much more promise that we'll succeed in science-ing our way out of this.

The bad news, of course, is that while this vaccine has already been approved by the nimble, forward-looking regulators of [checks notes] the EU, our own FDA can't be bothered to get around to approving this one any time soon.  Because hey it's not as if this is a time-sensitive problem or anything like that. 

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57 minutes ago, IvanKaramazov said:

The good news is that apparently we now have empirical evidence that the AstraZeneca vaccine actually reduced transmission.  It's preliminary, but it lines up with everyone's intuition and provides that much more promise that we'll succeed in science-ing our way out of this.

The bad news, of course, is that while this vaccine has already been approved by the nimble, forward-looking regulators of [checks notes] the EU, our own FDA can't be bothered to get around to approving this one any time soon.  Because hey it's not as if this is a time-sensitive problem or anything like that. 

AZ, a British company, started their US trials later than their EU trials knowing the US approval process is longer than in the EU. It is frustrating that the FDA refuses to trust any other country's process in the middle of a pandemic. 

Edited by Dezbelief
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to piggyback on @IvanKaramazov's post, here's what Your Local Epidemiologist said about that same trial. Encouraging perhaps but not time to celebrate just yet, in her expert opinion. link to her blog:

Quote

Delayed second dose and (yes) transmission...

Disclaimer: This was the most challenging post I’ve ever written. Translating the complexity of the messy study design, statistical analyses, and implications was not easy and I recognize that I may lose a few of you. Just know that it was not intended. And, honestly, I was thinking about not posting this. But NYT came out with “breaking news” headlines this morning so I thought it was important to get out. Buckle up...

Yesterday, the Lancet (a highly respected journal) released a preprint from the AstraZeneca trial. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether delaying the second dose had an impact on efficacy and antibodies. This was done post-hoc (so not intended, but since they had the data they ran the numbers). This paper also reported asymptomatic numbers, which can tell us impact of transmission after vaccination.

Delayed dose results:

-A delayed dose does not impact efficacy. In fact, it improves efficacy. Vaccine efficacy after a single dose of vaccine from day 22 to day 90 post vaccination was a combined 76% (59% efficacy at day 22 and 86% efficacy at day 90).

-Protection did not wane before a second dose. Antibody levels were maintained during this period with minimal waning by day 90 day

-The impact of a delayed dose on efficacy was no different among asymptomatic and symptomatic cases

-This study did confirm the importance of the second dose. We can NOT skip our second dose altogether. This boost is important.

Transmission results:

-There were 130 cases of asymptomatic infection.

-(remember important context: this trial had some people that got the doses that were intended (SD/SD) and some accidentally got a half dose first (LD/SD).)

-There was no difference in asymptomatic cases (and thus transmission) among the SD/SD people (41 cases in vaccine group and 42 cases in control group)

-There WAS a difference in asymptomatic cases (and thus transmission) among the LD/SD people (16 cases in vaccine group and 31 cases in control group)

Important considerations that I think are largely missed in mainstream media:

-Not all vaccines are the same. In fact, they are quite different. This is NOT evidence that we can delay Moderna or Pfizer doses

-There were key analyses NOT included in the paper, particularly age. In fact, it looks like they weren’t included in this delayed dose at all (see Figure). It’s not clear whether a delayed dose is generalizable to older adults (55+ years). This is incredibly important to know, as older folks have less neutralizing antibodies.

-It’s obvious that the two groups (those that received a delayed booster vs. those that did not have delayed booster) were VERY different in terms of age, sex, and occupation. We also know that those in the LD/SD group were VERY different in terms of age (younger) compared to those in the SD/SD group. We NEED to take this into account (which the study didn’t do) to imply causality. In other words, it’s not clear whether the increase in efficacy or decrease in transmission was actually from the delayed dose, the low dose, or because of demographics.

-This study did not report variants. And did not report whether delaying a second dose adds pressure on the virus to mutate even more

Bottom line: (And this is all my humble scientific opinion; take it or leave it) This data is messy. And it’s really hard to parse together the story in an accurate way. It looks like a delayed dose of AZ is “okay”. We aren’t necessarily surprised by this. But, I don’t think this study provides enough data to make sweeping policy changes (like delaying a second dose for the older population).

It also looks like we can remain hopeful that vaccines reduce transmission. But this wasn’t the “ah ha” transmission study I was waiting for. The data leads us to more questions than answers. We can’t really answer how transmission is reduced because this was not a transmission study. We simply do not have enough people in this study to be confident in the numbers.

So, it’s too early for me to call re: transmission. I know that NYT called it, but, as a scientist, I just cannot. Sorry guys, I’m just as disappointed as you. But, I AM still incredibly hopeful and you should be too. This is a reassuring sign that the pandemic will, in fact, end.

Love, YLE

PS: I hope other epidemiologists chime in! I had a brief discussion with other epi’s before posting this, but would love to hear other opinions too!

 

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3 hours ago, Dezbelief said:

AZ, a British company, started their US trials later than their EU trials knowing the US approval process is longer than in the EU. It is frustrating that the FDA refuses to trust any other country's process in the middle of a pandemic. 

I wouldn't trust China or Russia, but the EU process is legit.

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26 minutes ago, SoBeDad said:

I wouldn't trust China or Russia, but the EU process is legit.

Yup.  And this situation highlights the absurdity of our FDA.  The decision to delay this vaccine - the unintended effect - is that the FDA is killing people in the US.   They are responsible for any additional deaths due to unwillingness to rely on the EU's process.

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1 hour ago, Nathan R. Jessep said:

Not all vaccines are the same. In fact, they are quite different. This is NOT evidence that we can delay Moderna or Pfizer doses

She read mind, I've had the first dose of Moderna.

 

And the last couple of paragraphs give measured hope.

 

It also looks like we can remain hopeful that vaccines reduce transmission. But this wasn’t the “ah ha” transmission study I was waiting for. The data leads us to more questions than answers. We can’t really answer how transmission is reduced because this was not a transmission study. We simply do not have enough people in this study to be confident in the numbers.

So, it’s too early for me to call re: transmission. I know that NYT called it, but, as a scientist, I just cannot. Sorry guys, I’m just as disappointed as you. But, I AM still incredibly hopeful and you should be too. This is a reassuring sign that the pandemic will, in fact, end.

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Starting to have the feeling that once the pandemic is fairly considered to have come to an end ... we won't have seen it coming and we really won't understand how it ends up, well, ending until well afterwards. There just seem to be no forward-facing headlights with anything. Vaccines work/don't work, two shots/one shot, transmission is diminished/unaffected, variants mean "Game Over!"/ variants mean "meh". And so on.

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My god, one of my closer coworkers just announced he was taking a LOA.  Both of his parents died of Covid within a time of eachother (not sure how long, max a week I figure).  I had no idea that was going on or they were sick or anything like that.  I don't even know what to say to someone like that other than the normal stuff like I'm sorry.  Guy even came in to make sure his stuff was all tied off, I mean I don't get how you do that.  

Not going to lie I'm shaken up a little.

  Both my parents have gotten 2 shots, and my wife's has 1.  Go get your parents the shots people. Drag them if you have to.

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15 minutes ago, culdeus said:

My god, one of my closer coworkers just announced he was taking a LOA.  Both of his parents died of Covid within a time of eachother (not sure how long, max a week I figure).  I had no idea that was going on or they were sick or anything like that.  I don't even know what to say to someone like that other than the normal stuff like I'm sorry.  Guy even came in to make sure his stuff was all tied off, I mean I don't get how you do that.  

Not going to lie I'm shaken up a little.

  Both my parents have gotten 2 shots, and my wife's has 1.  Go get your parents the shots people. Drag them if you have to.

You do it to cope. And now with COVID, dying has become a more solitary event than it was when my parents passed surrounded by family. Do you even get to see the body of your loved one now before burial?

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4 minutes ago, beer 30 said:

You do it to cope. And now with COVID, dying has become a more solitary event than it was when my parents passed surrounded by family. Do you even get to see the body of your loved one now before burial?

Yes you can have visitation, depending on your state there are no longer any restrictions on the number of friends and family who attend the funeral.

 

I visited my FIL's grave about an hour ago. We buried him 3 weeks ago today. I was amazed by how many burials there have been since the grass has been dormant, mind blowing.

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36 minutes ago, culdeus said:

My god, one of my closer coworkers just announced he was taking a LOA.  Both of his parents died of Covid within a time of eachother (not sure how long, max a week I figure).  I had no idea that was going on or they were sick or anything like that.  I don't even know what to say to someone like that other than the normal stuff like I'm sorry.  Guy even came in to make sure his stuff was all tied off, I mean I don't get how you do that.  

Not going to lie I'm shaken up a little.

  Both my parents have gotten 2 shots, and my wife's has 1.  Go get your parents the shots people. Drag them if you have to.

Send him food, send flowers to the funeral home and/or offer to help clear out his parents' place.

Edited by Dezbelief
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22 hours ago, culdeus said:

IDK the pharmacy model seems flawed, the hub model is cranking thru shots in Texas as fast as they can put them in the fridges.  

Doing 40k at the speedway this week.  Goal to ramp that to 100k soon.  What good is 100-200 shots a week vs. that.  Hoping Texas ignores the pharmacy model, so far we've given the CDC the finger for the majority of the vax stuff as is I assume that will continue.

https://www.dallasnews.com/news/2021/02/02/thousands-get-their-covid-19-shots-as-texas-motor-speedway-vaccine-hub-opens-with-10000-doses/

Completely agree. Pharmacies have their place but are largely inefficient. Last week we had to significantly ramp up our vaccine appointments because Governor Ducey threatened to take our doses away if we don’t get up to 80% used within a week.

We started with 1000 doses and did 20 daily doses during the week and 10 on the week (120 per week) and doing just that was tough. The next week we worked in an in-store clinic and increased to 60 shots with two pharmacists and found that to be a great way of doing it. Last week I did an off-site clinic and did 80 doses in 5 hours and tomorrow I will do it again for 100 doses in 6 hours with two additional clinic this week to bring the total to 400 per week. We’re set to do that weekly as long as we get continue to get doses.

That can be easily be dwarfed by PODs and large off-site clinics. Despite how much people complain about them, our PODs are very well put together to maximize doses given. The elderly hate everything about it but love the convenience of the pharmacy and even more when I went to their community for a clinic.

I see mass distribution to pharmacies as the best option when we get closer to having walk-up appointments which I doubt we will see before summer. I also think that it would have been good for the elderly if they could just go to their regular pharmacy to get their shot. But for groups like teachers, health care, essential workers, under 65, the focus should be on PODs and on-site clinics.

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11 hours ago, IvanKaramazov said:

The good news is that apparently we now have empirical evidence that the AstraZeneca vaccine actually reduced transmission.  It's preliminary, but it lines up with everyone's intuition and provides that much more promise that we'll succeed in science-ing our way out of this.

The bad news, of course, is that while this vaccine has already been approved by the nimble, forward-looking regulators of [checks notes] the EU, our own FDA can't be bothered to get around to approving this one any time soon.  Because hey it's not as if this is a time-sensitive problem or anything like that. 

The AstraZenaca is not an mRNA vaccine. Do we know if there's any reason to believe that the mRNA ones will work differently in regards to reducing transmission?

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They are closing my office. They are moving to a free addressing format for everyone starting at the earliest in July. Five office buildings will be consolidated into three.

It's crazy how this has changed life permanently for the entire world.

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3 hours ago, DallasDMac said:

60% of long term health care staff are turning down the vaccine. WTF? They should be laid off. They work with the HIGHEST risk people. They shouldn't have the option to put them at risk.

I'm wondering what percentage of the 60% have been infected by covid and have not experienced a reinfection since returning.

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12 hours ago, DallasDMac said:

60% of long term health care staff are turning down the vaccine. WTF? They should be laid off. They work with the HIGHEST risk people. They shouldn't have the option to put them at risk.

Nationwide, or isolated to one place?

EDIT: NM, found an article (ABC News, 2/1/2021):

Quote

 

The CDC looked at more than 11,000 nursing homes and skilled nursing facilities that had at least one vaccination clinic between the middle of December and the middle of January. The researchers found that while 78% of residents got at least one shot, only 37.5% of staff members did.

Data previously showed that people who work in nursing homes and long-term care facilities get flu vaccines at lower rates than other health-care workers. Surveys suggest that long-term care workers are skeptical the shots work and don't think viruses spread easily from them to the people they care for.

The problem was discussed last week during a meeting of an expert panel that advises the CDC on vaccine policy. At the meeting, the CDC’s Dr. Amanda Cohn said more staffers get vaccinated when a second or third clinic is held at a home.

“Continuing to capture those staff who did not accept vaccine early will be really important as we try eliminate outbreaks and protect both staff and residents in long-term care facilities,” Cohn said.

 


From another article (KCBS Radio, San Francisco, 2/2/2021)

Quote

 

Dr. Charlene Harrington, a UCSF Professor Emeritus in the school of nursing who specializes in nursing home care, said it demonstrates the need for more education on the vaccine even among healthcare workers.

"Nursing homes, 60% of the staff are aides that only have two weeks of training. They have very little training and education."

 

 

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On 2/3/2021 at 11:32 AM, ericttspikes said:

More on the results in Israel - only .06% of vaccinated folks getting sick is pretty awesome.  

Now just to get jabs in millions of arms here and we can be out of this nightmare...

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14 minutes ago, Sand said:

More on the results in Israel - only .06% of vaccinated folks getting sick is pretty awesome.  

Now just to get jabs in millions of arms here and we can be out of this nightmare...

The unvaccinated control group is getting pounded in comparison. Seems like the unvaccinated population should be shrinking at this point. I would like to see the overall cases and deaths go down in Israel. Not really clear why it hasn't fallen that much with the vaccination % and positive news on the data, although it seems like 3 weeks after the 2 shot is when the efficacy is highest. Hoping the next 2-3 weeks show the overall cases, hospitalization and death start trending down for Israel.

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We haven't had one of these for a while.  Israeli hospital says they have found a cure for patients with moderate to severe COVID-19:

https://www.ynetnews.com/health_science/article/rJoYyaYeO?utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=facebook&utm_term=rJoYyaYeO&fbclid=IwAR0MA3iyvYKffg3LEZXo6MtjiiFiHPtsAR3SWVD6TEAU5ul9UlU0p_IvL7U

All of these have been found to be untrue in the past, but what the heck, let's keep hoping.

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