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*** OFFICIAL *** COVID-19 CoronaVirus Thread


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1 minute ago, Doug B said:

The closing of intake vents is legit -- it's a way to automatically maintain ongoing exchange of outdoor air for inside air in an air-conditioned space. In some homes and buildings, the HVAC system itself can be adjusted to let in some outdoor air and take away indoor air as it runs -- otherwise, you gotta open a window and tape up a vent.

FWIW, hospitals that have converted regular patient rooms to COVID ICUs have jury-rigged the rooms with outside venting and air scrubbers, basically accomplishing the same thing. Otherwise, COVID-laden aerosols escape the patients' rooms and permeate the hallways.

Not saying they are not legit. Just saying if a family member gets sick, CDC recommends them isolating in their room. I dont think CDC recommends also sealing and taping up any air intake vents in that room. I just think people in this thread tend to take things to the extreme. Heck, if I locked myself in a bubble like the bubble boy for a year I can pretty much guarantee I wont get COVID.

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My dad has been sick for a few weeks.  My mom called me today to say he was about to die.  I said some final words to him and he could hear me but was unable to respond.  He passed a short time later.

Not to derail anything, but we had our baby last night! She's doing amazingly well. Due to the hospital's pandemic policies, I had to leave her right after my wife was released from recovery. I can't

On a positive note, my wife gave birth to our first child this morning!! We were expecting our daughter to be born in the first week of April, which does not align very well if this hospital sees a ma

1 hour ago, jobarules said:

Also, everyone I know refuse to get the vaccine except for me, my father, and my teacher SIL.

Depends on lifestyles ... but at some point, a lot of their hands will be forced if they want to travel, work certain jobs, etc. For instance, someone who works for themselves and doesn't really fly anywhere can probably avoid the vaccine for some time. If anyone was a fan of ocean cruises before COVID, that will be out of the window without a vaccine.

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Just now, Doug B said:

Depends on lifestyles ... but at some point, a lot of their hands will be forced if they want to travel, work certain jobs, etc. For instance, someone who works for themselves and doesn't really fly anywhere can probably avoid the vaccine for some time. If anyone was a fan of ocean cruises before COVID, that will be out of the window without a vaccine.

I think thats yet to be determined but yes I agree, if they have to get vaccinated to travel then I believe they will do so. Thats on them to worry about. I plan on getting vaccinated as soon as available to me.

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24 minutes ago, jobarules said:

Just saying if a family member gets sick, CDC recommends them isolating in their room. I don't think CDC recommends also sealing and taping up any air intake vents in that room

Maybe not per se and maybe not specifically aimed at the general public, but the CDC has long-standing airborne-contaminant protocols. Improving and adjusting ventilation is covered at length.

Whether someone wants to create a negative-pressure air space in a private home likely depends on the immediate conditions ... a case-by-case thing. If you're living in Wayne Manor or something, it's pretty easy to avoid the COVID carrier and the surrounding air space. If, on the other hand, you're living in a three-bedroom house, and the only bathroom is right next to the COVID carrier's room, and it's a multigenerational home with elderly folks ... simple, cheap measures like covering a vent and opening a window might have more appeal.

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1 minute ago, Doug B said:

Maybe not per se and maybe not for the general public, but the CDC has long-standing airborne-contaminant protocols. Improving and adjusting ventilation is covered at length.

Whether someone wants to create a negative-pressure air space in a private home likely depends on the immediate conditions ... a case-by-case thing. If you're living in Wayne Manor or something, it's pretty easy to avoid the COVID carrier and the surrounding air space. If, on the other hand, you're living in a three-bedroom house, and the only bathroom is right next to the COVID carrier's room ... simple, cheap measures like covering a vent and opening a window might have more appeal.

This is exactly us. My wife didnt isolate at all and I slept in the same bed and neither me or my son got sick.

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1 minute ago, jobarules said:

This is exactly us. My wife didn't isolate at all and I slept in the same bed and neither me or my son got sick.

It is true that there are many cases like this -- spouses, prisoners, people who regularly share a confined space like a car or a truck cab, etc. Often COVID doesn't spread even when it should have been easy for the virus to make the jump.

But you have to excuse people for not incorporating your personal experience and treating that as the most likely outcome when making their own decisions. I have to think that's been one of the difficult things about getting all Americans on the exact same page about COVID -- personal experiences with this virus vary so much, and for a lot of people making decisions about their own lives ... personal experience strongly trumps (no pun) external information.

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3 minutes ago, Doug B said:

It is true that there are many cases like this -- spouses, prisoners, people who regularly share a confined space like a car or a truck cab, etc. Often COVID doesn't spread even when it should have been easy for the virus to make the jump.

But you have to excuse people for not incorporating your personal experience and treating that as the most likely outcome when making their own decisions. I have to think that's been one of the difficult things about getting all Americans on the exact same page about COVID -- personal experiences with this virus vary so much, and for a lot of people making decisions about their own lives ... personal experience strongly trumps (no pun) external information.

Im definitely not and never once did I recommend people not isolate but when someone goes above and beyond common sense CDC guidelines found here, I do think THEY are taking things to the other extreme.

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3 minutes ago, jobarules said:

... when someone goes above and beyond common sense CDC guidelines found here, I do think THEY are taking things to the other extreme.

From that link:

Quote

 

* If possible, have the person who is sick use a separate bedroom and bathroom. If possible, have the person who is sick stay in their own “sick room” or area and away from others. Try to stay at least 6 feet away from the sick person.

* Shared space: If you have to share space, make sure the room has good air flow.

- - Open the window to increase air circulation.

- - Improving ventilation helps remove respiratory droplets from the air.

 


I mean, yeah ... they don't outright say "tape up a vent". But it seems clear that the guidelines as written do support various quick-&-dirty means of improving ventilation.

Hey, I'm with you on the baking mail and sterilizing groceries. I have my own COVID "blind spots" from the perspectives of other, more careful people (i.e. I don't think fomite exposure really matters). But I think the "closing off vents" has real merit and it's a legitimate choice for a household to make.

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6 minutes ago, Doug B said:

From that link:


I mean, yeah ... they don't outright say "tape up a vent". But it seems clear that the guidelines as written do support various quick-&-dirty means of improving ventilation.

Hey, I'm with you on the baking mail and sterilizing groceries. I have my own COVID "blind spots" from the perspectives of other, more careful people (i.e. I don't think fomite exposure really matters). But I think the "closing off vents" has real merit and it's a legitimate choice for a household to make.

That's in a shared space (aka studio apartment) not a house with separate rooms.

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The flu numbers this year for the U.S. are crazy. Last year at this time at the height of flu season we had 130K positive flu tests. This year so far, a grand total of around 1,300. 

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49 minutes ago, Kilgore Trout said:

The flu numbers this year for the U.S. are crazy. Last year at this time at the height of flu season we had 130K positive flu tests. This year so far, a grand total of around 1,300. 

I wonder if it will be possible to take something learned from the COVID pandemic and apply it to minimizing annual flu spread. Rhetorically: has it mostly been masking keeping flu at bay ... or is any other mitigation measure applicable?

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8 minutes ago, Doug B said:

I wonder if it will be possible to take something learned from the COVID pandemic and apply it to minimizing annual flu spread. Rhetorically: has it mostly been masking keeping flu at bay ... or is any other mitigation measure applicable?

Mask.  Wash hands.  Stay home when you feel a cold coming on.  Probably should be flu season protocol going forward.

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Read an article somewhere where they finally concluded the transmission via sports equipment was virtually impossible. That should put some worriers at ease

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6 minutes ago, Leeroy Jenkins said:

Mask.  Wash hands.  Stay home when you feel a cold coming on.  Probably should be flu season protocol going forward.

Yes very much to the bolded. In every and all workplaces nationwide, "I'm snotty and coughing" should be considered equivalent to "I'm puking everywhere" or "It's coming out of both ends :( " Goes double for white-collar folks that can stare at a laptop from home.

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9 minutes ago, belljr said:

Read an article somewhere where they finally concluded the transmission via sports equipment was virtually impossible. That should put some worriers at ease

A good BBC link -- it was a British study. Maybe not "finally concluded" being it's just one study ... but I would bet these results get corroborated widely in the near future.

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11 hours ago, [icon] said:

Got Moderna jab 2 yesterday at 3pm. Keeping a running "diary" of sorts for kicks... here it is: 

 

3PM:
2ND Moderna Injection in left arm

More pain (4/10) than 1st shot (1/10) during injection. Sharp pain with burn. Went away almost immediately after. 

 

3HR drive home:
No symptoms at all. 0/10 arm pain. 

 

6PM:
Arrived home. Took 1000mg Tylenol. Cooked dinner. No symptoms. 0/10 arm pain. 

 

7:15pm:
no symptoms. Not even arm pain 

 

9:30pm:
no symptoms. Took 3mg melatonin. 

 

10:30pm:
no symptoms (maybe tiny bit disoriented but that's likely melatonin/being tired). Took 1000mg Tylenol + 35mg Doxylamine Succinate. 

 

11:00pm:
bedtime. Did I maybe feel a tiny bit of nausea as I was drifting off or was it just in my head? 

 

12:30am:
woke briefly. No symptoms other than slight arm pain (2/10). Rolled over and slept on arm to see if I could. No problem. 

 

2:30am: 
woke briefly. No symptoms other than 2/10 arm pain. 

 

5:30: 
woke to use restroom (drank a lot of water). Still very mild 2/10 arm pain. Took 1000mg Tylenol and going back to bed. 

Update: 

9:30: 
Wave of lightheadedness and mild nausea after a cup of coffee.. faded by 10:00am

12:00
Little groggy (3/10) but no other symptoms (other than sore arm 2/10). Took 1000mg Tylenol 

3:30pm (~24hr mark)  
About an hour of muscle aches in core/back... like a day after a good workout. (3/10). Jumping in a hot shower. 

5:00
Felt chills so checked temp: 100.6. Not bad. Muscle aches persisting.. maybe 4/10.  Added 1000mg Tylenol and liquid IV.. plus 1/2 of 20mg THC gummy. 


Side effects def still VERY mild overall. Ramped up a bit from 24-28 hour mark. 

Gonna drug up good to ensure sleep tonight 😁

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1 hour ago, [icon] said:

Update: 

9:30: 
Wave of lightheadedness and mild nausea after a cup of coffee.. faded by 10:00am

12:00
Little groggy (3/10) but no other symptoms (other than sore arm 2/10). Took 1000mg Tylenol 

3:30pm (~24hr mark)  
About an hour of muscle aches in core/back... like a day after a good workout. (3/10). Jumping in a hot shower. 

5:00
Felt chills so checked temp: 100.6. Not bad. Muscle aches persisting.. maybe 4/10.  Added 1000mg Tylenol and liquid IV.. plus 1/2 of 20mg THC gummy. 


Side effects def still VERY mild overall. Ramped up a bit from 24-28 hour mark. 

Gonna drug up good to ensure sleep tonight 😁

Quick math, and I might be wrong, but did you take 4,000mg Tylenol in 24 hours? I'd be careful of taking that much for an extended period of time, especially if you're regularly drinking alcohol. If that's a one-off, no worries, but if you're regularly taking that much, it could impact your liver.

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58 minutes ago, ProstheticRGK said:

Quick math, and I might be wrong, but did you take 4,000mg Tylenol in 24 hours? I'd be careful of taking that much for an extended period of time, especially if you're regularly drinking alcohol. If that's a one-off, no worries, but if you're regularly taking that much, it could impact your liver.

Agree.  Be careful taking that much Tylenol.

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1 hour ago, ProstheticRGK said:

E Quick math, and I might be wrong, but did you take 4,000mg Tylenol in 24 hours? I'd be careful of taking that much for an extended period of time, especially if you're regularly drinking alcohol. If that's a one-off, no worries, but if you're regularly taking that much, it could impact your liver.

Thanks for checking. Yeah I know it's a bit ahead of the bottle's recommended 6hr dosing, but I literally never take Tylenol and this was absolutely a one off.

Gummy will finish me off I think. Already feel like the worst (which was nothing really) is behind me. Anticipating things to be clearing up tomm. :) 

 

 

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4 hours ago, Doug B said:

I wonder if it will be possible to take something learned from the COVID pandemic and apply it to minimizing annual flu spread. Rhetorically: has it mostly been masking keeping flu at bay ... or is any other mitigation measure applicable?

Social distancing, not going into the office, kids distance learning and not on campus, oh, and hand washing. 

I have only been on in one other house other than my own in 11 months and that was when we had a short-term pod with another family.

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1 minute ago, b-snatchers said:

So CDC is saying those who have been vaccinated do not have to quarantine if exposed to someone with COVID-19.

 

Are they finally saying that those who are vaccinated cannot transmit this virus?

 

I think I see what you're saying. Good question. 

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22 hours ago, Gilroy34 said:

Wait, are you saying your family wore double mask while inside visiting your in laws?  We wear a mask everywhere in public but while at home or visiting family we don't wear a mask.

We do something different — we don’t visit anyone indoors, including my SIL and BIL.  We haven’t seen them in 11 months, except for 10 minutes in their front yard.

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19 hours ago, jobarules said:

In the summer, we kept all gatherings to outdoors. Since then we have not had any indoor gatherings except small ones (Thanksgiving, Christmas, New Years, even went to AC and hung out in the rooms and drank without masks because drink service shut down after 10pm). These gatherings were generally limited to 10 people. Now keep in mind, that we were invited to an indoor wedding in October with around 100 guests that I was hesitant to goto. We ended up canceling because my wife tested positive for COVID right before.

We are all in our 40s and generally good health. Keep in mind, my wife did catch COVID at Thanksgiving from her brother's fiancee. Nobody else caught it. We followed CDC protocols and quarantined for 10 days. Everyone was fine. 

Living in isolation, masked up for a year plus is no way to live. We are all willing to deal with the risks. 

I am not saying that we are throwing caution to the wind either. We wear masks in stores 100% of the time and avoid large indoor gatherings. But we are trying to live our lives the best we can too. 

Also, everyone I know refuse to get the vaccine except for me, my father, and my teacher SIL.

Appreciate the choices you are making.  Everyone is free to make those personal choices.

We’ve made a different choice, which is to mask up and mostly isolate the past year.  We’ve seen some folks outdoors for meals.  We’ve traveled as a family (just the 4 of us).  It’s been awesome.  I don’t feel deprived at all.

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59 minutes ago, b-snatchers said:

So CDC is saying those who have been vaccinated do not have to quarantine if exposed to someone with COVID-19.

 

Are they finally saying that those who are vaccinated cannot transmit this virus?

 

I think even if they can transmit, CDC has to incentivize people to get the vaccine even if it means small chance of transmission.

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1 hour ago, b-snatchers said:

So CDC is saying those who have been vaccinated do not have to quarantine if exposed to someone with COVID-19.

Are they finally saying that those who are vaccinated cannot transmit this virus?

Yes.  It's about time.  

This thing is over.   

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4 minutes ago, belljr said:

Summer should be close to normal imo

I agree that summer SHOULD be close to normal, at least for the US, when you look at the total number of people, and high percentage of elderly and at risk, who should be vaccinated by then. But I fear it won't be, because we don't have a clear goal.  When this all first started, there was a lot of talk about "flattening the curve" - the virus will likely be with us for the long term, and the goal was to make sure the health care system wasn't overwhelmed.  But what's the goal now? Among some it seems to be "not a single person should ever catch the virus", and that's not realistic. Without a clearly articulated threshold for when we can fully open up, we never will, and I fear that restrictions are going to drag on long past when they should.

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12 hours ago, The Z Machine said:

Social distancing, not going into the office, kids distance learning and not on campus, oh, and hand washing. 

Increased work-from-home and increased hand-washing makes sense as cultural shifts ... but COVID-style social distancing as a permanent thing? I'd have to see the latter to believe it.

My experience is that kids' distance learning leaves far too many children behind. Not to mention the social aspects. Brick-and-mortar schools are a necessity for the foreseeable future.

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1 hour ago, b-snatchers said:

So CDC is saying those who have been vaccinated do not have to quarantine if exposed to someone with COVID-19.

Are they finally saying that those who are vaccinated cannot transmit this virus?

Scientists would say that "the likelihood is very small" ... but essentially "yes".

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5 minutes ago, Doug B said:

Increased work-from-home and increased hand-washing makes sense as cultural shifts ... but COVID-style social distancing as a permanent thing? I'd have to see the latter to believe it.

My experience is that kids' distance learning leaves far too many children behind. Not to mention the social aspects. Brick-and-mortar schools are a necessity for the foreseeable future.

No he was saying all those measures are why the flu was kept at Bay, answering your question. Not life going forward

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27 minutes ago, belljr said:
28 minutes ago, culdeus said:

Yes.  It's about time.  

This thing is over.   

Summer should be close to normal imo

I hope you guys are right. I do believe that when pandemic status does end, it will feel kind of sudden (in relative terms).

One interesting thing will be when all the "variants!" news just quietly slinks away. One day it will still be the "Bill Paxton in Aliens" stuff like you hear now in the popular media ... the next day it will be "What variants?"

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22 minutes ago, themeanmachine said:

I agree that summer SHOULD be close to normal, at least for the US, when you look at the total number of people, and high percentage of elderly and at risk, who should be vaccinated by then. But I fear it won't be, because we don't have a clear goal.  When this all first started, there was a lot of talk about "flattening the curve" - the virus will likely be with us for the long term, and the goal was to make sure the health care system wasn't overwhelmed.  But what's the goal now? Among some it seems to be "not a single person should ever catch the virus", and that's not realistic. Without a clearly articulated threshold for when we can fully open up, we never will, and I fear that restrictions are going to drag on long past when they should.

Exactly

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22 minutes ago, themeanmachine said:

I agree that summer SHOULD be close to normal, at least for the US, when you look at the total number of people, and high percentage of elderly and at risk, who should be vaccinated by then. But I fear it won't be, because we don't have a clear goal.  When this all first started, there was a lot of talk about "flattening the curve" - the virus will likely be with us for the long term, and the goal was to make sure the health care system wasn't overwhelmed.  But what's the goal now? Among some it seems to be "not a single person should ever catch the virus", and that's not realistic. Without a clearly articulated threshold for when we can fully open up, we never will, and I fear that restrictions are going to drag on long past when they should.

Agreed. Vaccine fear and misinformation will slow the process a bit. And I think we are trying to race the new variants as well. If we slow the spread enough before the new variants take hold (and sprout even more variants that are potentially more dangerous), then we'll be good. 

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3 minutes ago, Doug B said:

I hope you guys are right. I do believe that when pandemic status does end, it will feel kind of sudden (in relative terms).

One interesting thing will be when all the "variants!" news just quietly slinks away. One day it will still be the "Bill Paxton in Aliens" stuff like you hear now in the popular media ... the next day it will be "What variants?"

I said should be close not fully the same.

I expect fall school to be almost normal imo 

Or at least it's hopeful

 

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1 hour ago, parasaurolophus said:

Osterholm calls for delaying second shot to get more first shots out there. 

 

I don't agree at all.  Like Fauci said, that trials/data call for a second shot within a certain period of time.  Utilize the supply we have instead of wasting product and get more mass and efficient vaccination sites.

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3 hours ago, jobarules said:

It should be but I fear there will still be unnecessary restrictions.

At this point basically all restrictions will be unnecessary soon.  I don't think people really fathomed just how effective the vax is and how fast the rollout would go.  

 

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29 minutes ago, culdeus said:

At this point basically all restrictions will be unnecessary soon.  I don't think people really fathomed just how effective the vax is and how fast the rollout would go.  

 

The issue is if we only get 50% penetration and these variants spread fast without the vaccines being as effective.  We need big penetration and people adhering to restrictions until we hit that point so we can tamp down the variants and be ready for booster shots this fall to combat them potentially,  Then this thing can turn into a common cold issue with 12-24 month vaccination along with your flu shots yearly.  While maybe people wear masks on public transit from October to March, wash their hands better, and stay/work from home when feeling slightly off.  

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4 hours ago, Doug B said:

I hope you guys are right. I do believe that when pandemic status does end, it will feel kind of sudden (in relative terms).

One interesting thing will be when all the "variants!" news just quietly slinks away. One day it will still be the "Bill Paxton in Aliens" stuff like you hear now in the popular media ... the next day it will be "What variants?"

I'm still not sure I understand the variants. Fauci says that uncontrolled community spread creates the variants. If that is the case, the variants probably originated in the US based on our global domination of cases and deaths from this thing. South Africa cases have just plummeted since the South African variant hysteria started, with deaths following down. UK cases are also trending down seemingly faster than other European countries. Perhaps the UK and South African variants are misnomers, kind of like the Spanish Flu? If they truly did originate in the UK and South Africa, their progression doesn't look any worse than any other place in the globe, and seem to be receding faster than other places. Don't really get it.

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3 minutes ago, jobarules said:

I dont understand the rush to vaccine ahead of the variants if the vaccines do not prevent the variants

They vaccines offer protection against the variants, but maybe not at 95% effectiveness.  So you still can slow things down and keep folks out of the hospital.  Then we can get an updated mRNA vaccine that covers these protein spikes better at a later date.

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