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*** OFFICIAL *** COVID-19 CoronaVirus Thread


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On 3/5/2021 at 4:04 PM, jobarules said:

I am 6'1" 250. I'm fat. Everyone I talk to thinks I'm crazy when I tell them I'm obese. Only my stomach is big.

Anyway, i have a 33 BMI. The minimum threshold to get the vaccine is 30. I'm getting the shot tomorrow.

BMI is kind of stupid because it doesn't take into account muscle. Not that I have muscle but I'd have to be 185 to be considered healthy weight. I'd look like a crack addict. I'm happiest at 220 so I do have 30lbs to lose. Considering I started the year at 266 I'm on my way.

Societal standards are skewed toward an unhealthy weight for men. Like it or not, you’re almost certainly obese. Perhaps more importantly, central adiposity (big stomach) is associated with a host of chronic diseases.

You definitely should get vaccinated ASAP, and keep up whatever you’re doing to lose the weight.

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Studies have shown people with obesity are more likely to have worse outcomes from COVID-19 than others with a lower body mass index (BMI).

Researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill found people with a BMI above 30 had a 113% higher risk for hospitalization, a 74% higher risk for ICU admission and a 48% higher risk of death, according to a study published in August 2020 in Obesity Reviews.

At first, health experts believed people with obesity were more at risk for severe COVID-19 because the disease also is associated with numerous underlying risk factors including hypertension, heart disease, type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney and liver disease.

But after controlling for those factors, researchers found people with obesity were still at higher risk for COVID-19, said Dr. Rekha Kumar, medical director of the American Board of Obesity Medicine and associate professor of clinical medicine at Weill Cornell Medicine. This may be partly due to the excess fat tissue producing more inflammation, she said.

 

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My dad has been sick for a few weeks.  My mom called me today to say he was about to die.  I said some final words to him and he could hear me but was unable to respond.  He passed a short time later.

Not to derail anything, but we had our baby last night! She's doing amazingly well. Due to the hospital's pandemic policies, I had to leave her right after my wife was released from recovery. I can't

On a positive note, my wife gave birth to our first child this morning!! We were expecting our daughter to be born in the first week of April, which does not align very well if this hospital sees a ma

Congrats to you guys who have a state site to sign up. Here in ohio I have no idea when I'm going to be eligible. 

On a sad note,  a good friend of mine from high school, his mom passed away from covid last night. She had been getting better and it looked like she had beaten it then... bam... gone. 😪

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11 hours ago, Dinsy Ejotuz said:

It'd definitely a guideline and muscle mass can screw with it.  Saquon Barkley isn't fat.

All the BMI math does (using height and weight as the inputs) is make it so that you have a measure of mass that is uncorrelated with height.  Obviously height and weight go up together (on average), but BMI doesn't follow height.  It's almost entirely independent.

This is true, but there is plenty of data showing BMI correlates to health and disease. Moreover, on a population level, BMI tends to underestimate body fat, not overstate it, as implied by people attributing high BMIs to excess muscle mass/big frame/etc. 

And most of the guys writing off BMIs in excess of 30 look nothing like Saquon, or even Charles Barkley.

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1 hour ago, Terminalxylem said:

This is true, but there is plenty of data showing BMI correlates to health and disease. Moreover, on a population level, BMI tends to underestimate body fat, not overstate it, as implied by people attributing high BMIs to excess muscle mass/big frame/etc. 

And most of the guys writing off BMIs in excess of 30 look nothing like Saquon, or even Charles Barkley.

Oh, for sure.  Was just agreeing that a lot of muscle mass can mess up the raw #s.

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1 hour ago, Terminalxylem said:

This is true, but there is plenty of data showing BMI correlates to health and disease. Moreover, on a population level, BMI tends to underestimate body fat, not overstate it, as implied by people attributing high BMIs to excess muscle mass/big frame/etc. 

And most of the guys writing off BMIs in excess of 30 look nothing like Saquon, or even Charles Barkley.

To be fair, Charles Barkley is pretty fat...

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On 3/5/2021 at 1:55 PM, nirad3 said:

I just went to a website California has to see if you're eligible.  There was a question about health conditions, one of which was "obesity".  I would be considered "obese" by the standard BMI chart that is widely accepted.  I did not check that I was obese, maybe I should have.  Wonder if that would have changed anything.  I don't consider myself overly obese.  I could stand to lose 15-20 pounds, maybe more... but by no means am I a huge fat slob.  :lol: 

 

Your BMI has to be over 40 in CA to qualify 

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On 3/5/2021 at 8:27 AM, Leeroy Jenkins said:

So that is my concern:  that we all send our kids back full time, so the distancing is gone due to class-size and masks aren't required either.  We all know kids get sick and bring home flu and other fun stuff in normal years.  Why would COVID be different?  Maybe kids don't get sick or as sick, but they certainly could spread it like they do every other thing.

Because it is a different virus? 

Any number of reasons.

Kids have different immume systems and we know there are other diseases that adults and children react to differently. This isnt some crazy new concept. 

 

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35 minutes ago, The Z Machine said:

To be fair, Charles Barkley is pretty fat...

He’s 6’6” and weighs 251 pounds. We’ve got a couple guys in the last two pages who weigh about the same, yet scoff at the idea of being obese, despite being half a foot shorter.

But yeah, even “skinny” Chuck Barkley’s BMI is 29.

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8 minutes ago, Terminalxylem said:

He’s 6’6” and weighs 251 pounds. We’ve got a couple guys in the last two pages who weigh about the same, yet scoff at the idea of being obese, despite being half a foot shorter.

But yeah, even “skinny” Chuck Barkley’s BMI is 29.

Who scoffed at it? I literally called myself obese in the post you replied to and decided to pile on for no reason whatsoever. Your bedside manner sucks.

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4 minutes ago, Chadstroma said:

There is this thing called humor. 

Fair enough, but there’s plenty non-comedic BMI denial and mockery of what constitutes a healthy weight, so it’s hard to know who’s joking.

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34 minutes ago, jobarules said:

Who scoffed at it? I literally called myself obese in the post you replied to and decided to pile on for no reason whatsoever. Your bedside manner sucks.

You said “everyone thinks I’m crazy when I tell them I’m obese”, and you’d “look like a crack addict” at a healthy weight. Then you went on to give the standard (generally inapplicable) excuse why BMI is “stupid”. I’m not trying to get in a p!ssing match with you, or anyone, but suffice it to say, I strongly disagree regarding the utility of BMI.

My “piling on” was intended to underscore how off-base our society’s understanding of obesity is, and to reiterate the connection between BMI and covid.

 

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49 minutes ago, Terminalxylem said:

You said “everyone thinks I’m crazy when I tell them I’m obese”, and you’d “look like a crack addict” at a healthy weight. Then you went on to give the standard (generally inapplicable) excuse why BMI is “stupid”. I’m not trying to get in a p!ssing match with you, or anyone, but suffice it to say, I strongly disagree regarding the utility of BMI.

My “piling on” was intended to underscore how off-base our society’s understanding of obesity is, and to reiterate the connection between BMI and covid.

 

A skewed view of healthy weight and portions yes.

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8 hours ago, krista4 said:

I love seeing more people post that they're becoming eligible or getting their shots, but it also increases my frustration over what a cluster Washington is.  On Tuesday they issued updates for the first time in three weeks, finally giving some additional guidance on when we'll hit some upcoming phases.  We've been in the same phase (1B1) for over two months.  They estimate people here 16-64 with two risk factors will become eligible around April 26.  And god only knows when those with one or none will be in the queue - that April 26 phase is the last one they've listed, with anything after that marked as "more phases to come."  

That situation really is ridiculous.  And it is what happens when they open up things to do big of a portion of the population at once.  Of course, where I am we have the opposite — very narrow groups of people who qualify, but then a bunch of IL a-holes finding excuses to jump the line......

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I don’t think anyone here is a highly sculpted athlete. If you’re BMI puts you in the range to get the vaccine, get it. The reason these high risk factors get it early is because you getting COVID could contribute to stressing hospital capacities. 

It’s about keeping hospital beds available, not about who deserves it. 

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6 hours ago, Scoresman said:

I don’t think anyone here is a highly sculpted athlete. If you’re BMI puts you in the range to get the vaccine, get it. The reason these high risk factors get it early is because you getting COVID could contribute to stressing hospital capacities. 

It’s about keeping hospital beds available, not about who deserves it. 

If there's one thing I've learned from BMI discussions on this forum, it's that 99% of the adult male population is build like Ray Lewis.  It's just that I never see any of those guys because they all live everyplace except the places that I live, visit, or see on television.

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Random vaccination anecdote that I thought I would throw out there just so we can all compare notes:

On Friday morning, my county dropped its age restrictions on vaccines and opened them up to anybody with at least one underlying condition.  "Underlying conditions" are extremely broad and, it seems to me, super-common.  The list includes things like high blood pressure, any kind of cancer, obesity, any kind of heart disease, asthma (that's me), and a bunch of other things.  I don't really know what percent of the population has something on this list, but it's got to be a pretty high percentage.  A third?  Half?  

In addition, they're not even trying to verify anybody's medical history.  Anybody who wants to do so can jump the line this week just by making up something about hypertension or some other invisible ailment.  

The next mass-vaccination event is coming up on Thursday at our local convention center.  My county in South Dakota has a population of about 35K (yes, we have a convention center -- no, I don't have a good explanation for that).  They're offering about 2,500 appointments that day for the Moderna vaccine.  If you sign up, you get automatically signed up for a second shot on April 8.  As of this morning, it looks like there are about 500 open appointments still available.  

That's kind of wild to me.  When I got the mass email announcing this event, I dropped everything and signed up that second, and I kind of assumed that it would fill up in a few hours.  And while it's mostly full, there's still a surplus.  I did not expect that.

I'm not sure if that's a sign that people are generally healthier than I thought, that people are less eager to cut in front of others in line than I thought, that people are more vaccine-resistant than I thought, or some combination of these.  No real point to this -- just sharing so we have a general idea of how things are going in various parts of the country. 

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Based off how it’s been handling covid and it’s demographic base, I would expect South Dakota to be among the 3 worst states in vaccination participation. 

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11 hours ago, Terminalxylem said:

He’s 6’6” and weighs 251 pounds. We’ve got a couple guys in the last two pages who weigh about the same, yet scoff at the idea of being obese, despite being half a foot shorter.

But yeah, even “skinny” Chuck Barkley’s BMI is 29.

I thought he was quite a bit heavier than that.  Plus he's in his late 50s, so likely at least an inch shorter than his playing days. 

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44 minutes ago, IvanKaramazov said:

Random vaccination anecdote that I thought I would throw out there just so we can all compare notes:

On Friday morning, my county dropped its age restrictions on vaccines and opened them up to anybody with at least one underlying condition.  "Underlying conditions" are extremely broad and, it seems to me, super-common.  The list includes things like high blood pressure, any kind of cancer, obesity, any kind of heart disease, asthma (that's me), and a bunch of other things.  I don't really know what percent of the population has something on this list, but it's got to be a pretty high percentage.  A third?  Half?  

In addition, they're not even trying to verify anybody's medical history.  Anybody who wants to do so can jump the line this week just by making up something about hypertension or some other invisible ailment.  

The next mass-vaccination event is coming up on Thursday at our local convention center.  My county in South Dakota has a population of about 35K (yes, we have a convention center -- no, I don't have a good explanation for that).  They're offering about 2,500 appointments that day for the Moderna vaccine.  If you sign up, you get automatically signed up for a second shot on April 8.  As of this morning, it looks like there are about 500 open appointments still available.  

That's kind of wild to me.  When I got the mass email announcing this event, I dropped everything and signed up that second, and I kind of assumed that it would fill up in a few hours.  And while it's mostly full, there's still a surplus.  I did not expect that.

I'm not sure if that's a sign that people are generally healthier than I thought, that people are less eager to cut in front of others in line than I thought, that people are more vaccine-resistant than I thought, or some combination of these.  No real point to this -- just sharing so we have a general idea of how things are going in various parts of the country. 

There’s extensive discussion up thread regarding the prevalence of conditions which place one at increased risk of covid complications: it’s well over 50% of the population. This is one of the reasons the idea of “opening up” early was never a good idea, as you can’t realistically sequester all those people and their loved ones.

We’ve also talked about vaccine demand leveling off. Between sensationalism of vaccine adverse events, mistrust of science/government and all the broad shouldered beefcakes convincing themselves there’s no need to rush, we’ve reached the point where it should just be first-come, first-served. As a side benefit, far fewer vaccine doses would likely be wasted.

This phenomenon also shows why complicating the process by asking about prior infection is silly. 

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In the past two days The US has given out 5.3 million vaccinations.  That's more than the total number of shots given out since December in Italy or Spain. It's twice as many as Canada has given out in total. It's more than five times the number of total shots in the Netherlands.

There is chaos in many locations and I understand the frustration.  But we are absolutely killing it in our effort. The chaos is likely to stay as long as demand outstrips supply, but we are witnessing a fantastic achievement.

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1 hour ago, Capella said:

Based off how it’s been handling covid and it’s demographic base, I would expect South Dakota to be among the 3 worst states in vaccination participation. 

Per the CDC vaccination tracker, SD has the 3rd highest 1st dose vaccination rate at 22.5%. Their efficiency is also good at 78%. ND is also doing well at 21.4% and 87% (2nd highest). 

Texas has the 5th lowest vaccination rate (14.7%), but it's also the 3rd youngest state in % of seniors, which may explain the low rate of vaccinations. 

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6 minutes ago, SoBeDad said:

Per the CDC vaccination tracker, SD has the 3rd highest 1st dose vaccination rate at 22.5%. Their efficiency is also good at 78%. ND is also doing well at 21.4% and 87% (2nd highest). 

Yeah, we're actually doing pretty well with regard to vaccinations.  But we (not me personally, my state) handled the rest of the pandemic so poorly that I can't really begrudge anybody for taking a shot.  We earned that.

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15 minutes ago, IvanKaramazov said:

Yeah, we're actually doing pretty well with regard to vaccinations.  But we (not me personally, my state) handled the rest of the pandemic so poorly that I can't really begrudge anybody for taking a shot.  We earned that.

I mean, I live in Florida...

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35 minutes ago, Terminalxylem said:

There’s extensive discussion up thread regarding the prevalence of conditions which place one at increased risk of covid complications: it’s well over 50% of the population. This is one of the reasons the idea of “opening up” early was never a good idea, as you can’t realistically sequester all those people and their loved ones.

Amen. This is why I've rejected out of hand all the calls to "protect the vulnerable!" Who's truly not vulnerable for sure?

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... we’ve reached the point where it should just be first-come, first-served. As a side benefit, far fewer vaccine doses would likely be wasted.

At this point, absolutely. Also need mobile vaccination efforts to get into areas where people struggle with transportation -- door-to-door if necessary.

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2 hours ago, IvanKaramazov said:

If there's one thing I've learned from BMI discussions on this forum, it's that 99% of the adult male population is build like Ray Lewis.  It's just that I never see any of those guys because they all live everyplace except the places that I live, visit, or see on television.

How much you bench?

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2 hours ago, IvanKaramazov said:

Random vaccination anecdote that I thought I would throw out there just so we can all compare notes:

On Friday morning, my county dropped its age restrictions on vaccines and opened them up to anybody with at least one underlying condition.  "Underlying conditions" are extremely broad and, it seems to me, super-common.  The list includes things like high blood pressure, any kind of cancer, obesity, any kind of heart disease, asthma (that's me), and a bunch of other things.  I don't really know what percent of the population has something on this list, but it's got to be a pretty high percentage.  A third?  Half?  

In addition, they're not even trying to verify anybody's medical history.  Anybody who wants to do so can jump the line this week just by making up something about hypertension or some other invisible ailment.  

The next mass-vaccination event is coming up on Thursday at our local convention center.  My county in South Dakota has a population of about 35K (yes, we have a convention center -- no, I don't have a good explanation for that).  They're offering about 2,500 appointments that day for the Moderna vaccine.  If you sign up, you get automatically signed up for a second shot on April 8.  As of this morning, it looks like there are about 500 open appointments still available.  

That's kind of wild to me.  When I got the mass email announcing this event, I dropped everything and signed up that second, and I kind of assumed that it would fill up in a few hours.  And while it's mostly full, there's still a surplus.  I did not expect that.

I'm not sure if that's a sign that people are generally healthier than I thought, that people are less eager to cut in front of others in line than I thought, that people are more vaccine-resistant than I thought, or some combination of these.  No real point to this -- just sharing so we have a general idea of how things are going in various parts of the country. 

My state's done the same thing and IIRC it's around 50-60% of the population that qualifies under the 1B criteria above.  I got in line on 1/27 and expect to have my appointment 3rd or 4th week of the month, give or take.  Seems like shots happen within a week of that, so I'm expecting to get mine at the very end of the month or early April.

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13 hours ago, Terminalxylem said:

Fair enough, but there’s plenty non-comedic BMI denial and mockery of what constitutes a healthy weight, so it’s hard to know who’s joking.

It might be that part about California 

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4 hours ago, IvanKaramazov said:

Random vaccination anecdote that I thought I would throw out there just so we can all compare notes:

On Friday morning, my county dropped its age restrictions on vaccines and opened them up to anybody with at least one underlying condition.  "Underlying conditions" are extremely broad and, it seems to me, super-common.  The list includes things like high blood pressure, any kind of cancer, obesity, any kind of heart disease, asthma (that's me), and a bunch of other things.  I don't really know what percent of the population has something on this list, but it's got to be a pretty high percentage.  A third?  Half?  

In addition, they're not even trying to verify anybody's medical history.  Anybody who wants to do so can jump the line this week just by making up something about hypertension or some other invisible ailment.  

The next mass-vaccination event is coming up on Thursday at our local convention center.  My county in South Dakota has a population of about 35K (yes, we have a convention center -- no, I don't have a good explanation for that).  They're offering about 2,500 appointments that day for the Moderna vaccine.  If you sign up, you get automatically signed up for a second shot on April 8.  As of this morning, it looks like there are about 500 open appointments still available.  

That's kind of wild to me.  When I got the mass email announcing this event, I dropped everything and signed up that second, and I kind of assumed that it would fill up in a few hours.  And while it's mostly full, there's still a surplus.  I did not expect that.

I'm not sure if that's a sign that people are generally healthier than I thought, that people are less eager to cut in front of others in line than I thought, that people are more vaccine-resistant than I thought, or some combination of these.  No real point to this -- just sharing so we have a general idea of how things are going in various parts of the country. 

Opening it up to a giant share of the population without the volume of doses to meet demand (weeks and weeks ago) is the reason some states seem chaotic for folks who want a vaccine.  
 

Serious question:  if slots are still open, can I sign up and drive over from Illinois to get vaccinated?

At what point does the govt stop sending an abundance of vaccines to states that don’t need/want/use the doses they receive?

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Anyone have any insight into how Israel has something like 80% of their population vaccinated and they are considering a 4th lockdown due to increased spread? I've read all the supposed great real world data on the PFE vaccine from Israel, but this result doesn't seem to match those reports. UAE numbers aren't great either more than 2 months in. Are these vaccines not working? Take a long time to work? 

https://www.timesofisrael.com/as-transmission-rate-rises-above-1-virus-czar-says-4th-lockdown-a-possibility/

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6 minutes ago, ericttspikes said:

Anyone have any insight into how Israel has something like 80% of their population vaccinated and they are considering a 4th lockdown due to increased spread? I've read all the supposed great real world data on the PFE vaccine from Israel, but this result doesn't seem to match those reports. UAE numbers aren't great either more than 2 months in. Are these vaccines not working? Take a long time to work? 

https://www.timesofisrael.com/as-transmission-rate-rises-above-1-virus-czar-says-4th-lockdown-a-possibility/

Did you read this? 

However, coronavirus testing also showed its lowest positivity rate in months, with some 3,600 tests coming back positive Thursday out of 92,000 tests — or some 4 percent.

Serious cases also remained at their lowest number since December, with 690 patients.

....

 

the vaccine prevents you from dying or getting seriously ill from covid - it does not mean you cannot acquire it. Also, there are still plenty of people there without the vax  

 

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1 hour ago, ericttspikes said:

Anyone have any insight into how Israel has something like 80% of their population vaccinated and they are considering a 4th lockdown due to increased spread? I've read all the supposed great real world data on the PFE vaccine from Israel, but this result doesn't seem to match those reports. UAE numbers aren't great either more than 2 months in. Are these vaccines not working? Take a long time to work? 

https://www.timesofisrael.com/as-transmission-rate-rises-above-1-virus-czar-says-4th-lockdown-a-possibility/

The article looks like a political squabble to me.  The PM starts saying that the pandemic is over a few weeks ahead of an election.  The public health guys think that's irresponsible and threaten a fourth lockdown and tell that to a friendly reporter. 

There might be periodic small rises in cases, but there is almost no chance of another big wave that would necessitate a lockdown..  

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1 hour ago, Capella said:

the vaccine prevents you from dying or getting seriously ill from covid - it does not mean you cannot acquire it. Also, there are still plenty of people there without the vax  

 

this. 

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10 hours ago, Terminalxylem said:

There’s extensive discussion up thread regarding the prevalence of conditions which place one at increased risk of covid complications: it’s well over 50% of the population. This is one of the reasons the idea of “opening up” early was never a good idea, as you can’t realistically sequester all those people and their loved ones.

We’ve also talked about vaccine demand leveling off. Between sensationalism of vaccine adverse events, mistrust of science/government and all the broad shouldered beefcakes convincing themselves there’s no need to rush, we’ve reached the point where it should just be first-come, first-served. As a side benefit, far fewer vaccine doses would likely be wasted.

This phenomenon also shows why complicating the process by asking about prior infection is silly. 

Then you also get to defend against our Russian friends

https://www.marketwatch.com/story/u-s-sees-pfizers-and-other-western-vaccines-becoming-latest-target-of-russian-disinformation-11615134392

10 hours ago, worrierking said:

In the past two days The US has given out 5.3 million vaccinations.  That's more than the total number of shots given out since December in Italy or Spain. It's twice as many as Canada has given out in total. It's more than five times the number of total shots in the Netherlands.

There is chaos in many locations and I understand the frustration.  But we are absolutely killing it in our effort. The chaos is likely to stay as long as demand outstrips supply, but we are witnessing a fantastic achievement.

That’s cause all us fat ####s crushing a +30 BMI wanna get out and get jiggy wit it.

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12 minutes ago, beer 30 said:

Then you also get to defend against our Russian friends

https://www.marketwatch.com/story/u-s-sees-pfizers-and-other-western-vaccines-becoming-latest-target-of-russian-disinformation-11615134392

That’s cause all us fat ####s crushing a +30 BMI wanna get out and get jiggy wit it.

Hell yea Applebee’s two for Tuesday bout to be lit 

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12 hours ago, IvanKaramazov said:

I don't really know what percent of the population has something on this list, but it's got to be a pretty high percentage.  A third?  Half?  

Obesity + high blood pressure (controlled or uncontrolled) alone is probably more than half. 

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12 hours ago, IvanKaramazov said:

Random vaccination anecdote that I thought I would throw out there just so we can all compare notes:

On Friday morning, my county dropped its age restrictions on vaccines and opened them up to anybody with at least one underlying condition.  "Underlying conditions" are extremely broad and, it seems to me, super-common.  The list includes things like high blood pressure, any kind of cancer, obesity, any kind of heart disease, asthma (that's me), and a bunch of other things.  I don't really know what percent of the population has something on this list, but it's got to be a pretty high percentage.  A third?  Half?  

In addition, they're not even trying to verify anybody's medical history.  Anybody who wants to do so can jump the line this week just by making up something about hypertension or some other invisible ailment.  

The next mass-vaccination event is coming up on Thursday at our local convention center.  My county in South Dakota has a population of about 35K (yes, we have a convention center -- no, I don't have a good explanation for that).  They're offering about 2,500 appointments that day for the Moderna vaccine.  If you sign up, you get automatically signed up for a second shot on April 8.  As of this morning, it looks like there are about 500 open appointments still available.  

That's kind of wild to me.  When I got the mass email announcing this event, I dropped everything and signed up that second, and I kind of assumed that it would fill up in a few hours.  And while it's mostly full, there's still a surplus.  I did not expect that.

I'm not sure if that's a sign that people are generally healthier than I thought, that people are less eager to cut in front of others in line than I thought, that people are more vaccine-resistant than I thought, or some combination of these.  No real point to this -- just sharing so we have a general idea of how things are going in various parts of the country. 

You’re probably to the point where South Dakota starts dropping in the rankings for % vaccinated. As you get to more of the open groups, you’ll see which states don’t care or believe in vaccinations. Your county probably isn’t too rural in comparison to the rest of the state, but a lot of the state will be fighting to convince people to get the shot very soon.

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10 hours ago, Biff84 said:

You’re probably to the point where South Dakota starts dropping in the rankings for % vaccinated. As you get to more of the open groups, you’ll see which states don’t care or believe in vaccinations. Your county probably isn’t too rural in comparison to the rest of the state, but a lot of the state will be fighting to convince people to get the shot very soon.

One would think a state like CT (somewhat small, good density, not very rural, lots of commuters into NYC via train) would end up being very high on vaccination penetration.

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On 3/6/2021 at 10:35 PM, parasaurolophus said:

Because it is a different virus? 

Any number of reasons.

Kids have different immume systems and we know there are other diseases that adults and children react to differently. This isnt some crazy new concept. 

 

It is still a coronavirus that spreads through droplets and aerosols.  Kids will carry it home if exposed.  There is evidence of that happening, as well as kids who have long-hauler complications from it.  The faster we get to a place where the vaccines are deemed safe for kids, the better.

Some really good overall trends though here:

 

US Key Metrics

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22 hours ago, worrierking said:

In the past two days The US has given out 5.3 million vaccinations.  That's more than the total number of shots given out since December in Italy or Spain. It's twice as many as Canada has given out in total. It's more than five times the number of total shots in the Netherlands.

There is chaos in many locations and I understand the frustration.  But we are absolutely killing it in our effort. The chaos is likely to stay as long as demand outstrips supply, but we are witnessing a fantastic achievement.

Wonder what changed.

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18 minutes ago, Leeroy Jenkins said:

Wonder what changed.

I am guessing supply is starting to ramp up.  They said Pfizer/Moderna would deliver 220mil by the end of March.  They have a lot of doses to send out to pronto if they will reach that.

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16 minutes ago, Leeroy Jenkins said:

It is still a coronavirus that spreads through droplets and aerosols.  Kids will carry it home if exposed.  There is evidence of that happening, as well as kids who have long-hauler complications from it.  The faster we get to a place where the vaccines are deemed safe for kids, the better.

Some really good overall trends though here:

 

US Key Metrics

No reasonable person says it NEVER happens.

But no reasonable person should look at all the data available and conclude that this is just like other viruses and use the same general assumptions about kids. 

Thats the whole point. It is different. The data shows it is different. The data has always shown that it is different. 

The China Report team of 25 doctors from all over the world stated it was different re:children last February and has yet to be proven wrong. 

 

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2 minutes ago, parasaurolophus said:

No reasonable person says it NEVER happens.

But no reasonable person should look at all the data available and conclude that this is just like other viruses and use the same general assumptions about kids. 

Thats the whole point. It is different. The data shows it is different. The data has always shown that it is different. 

The China Report team of 25 doctors from all over the world stated it was different re:children last February and has yet to be proven wrong. 

 

Data shows that transmission to/from kids is different, or only how they are not getting as sick?

I think school transmission data to/from kids is going to be somewhat skewed.  Schools were one of the first things to close globally, and when they went back there was strict mitigation in place.  Less kids were in school, masks, plexi-glass, cohorts, lunch at desks, etc. 

If we suddenly eliminate those mitigating factors, particularly the class-sizes growing back to a pre-existing over-crowded situation, and that population is fully un-vaccinated (but for teachers/staff), then I think we are opening ourselves up for disaster. 

If class sizes can be reduced, other mitigating factors remain in place, and schools keep remote-learning as an option and as a back-up, then no issue.  But I think ripping the band aid off and going back to school in a "normal" fashion when no kids have the vaccine is a big mistake.  

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1 hour ago, Leeroy Jenkins said:

I think school transmission data to/from kids is going to be somewhat skewed.  Schools were one of the first things to close globally, and when they went back there was strict mitigation in place.  Less kids were in school, masks, plexi-glass, cohorts, lunch at desks, etc. 

If we suddenly eliminate those mitigating factors, particularly the class-sizes growing back to a pre-existing over-crowded situation, and that population is fully un-vaccinated (but for teachers/staff), then I think we are opening ourselves up for disaster.

These are good points. Are we quite sure kids don't spread COVID in numbers in a 'naive' 2019 school environment?

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