Jump to content
Fantasy Football - Footballguys Forums

*** OFFICIAL *** COVID-19 CoronaVirus Thread


Recommended Posts

Here's link I found interesting: https://medicalxpress.com/news/2021-07-case-intranasal-covid-vaccines.html

This is something we may need as the disease becomes endemic. Could help quickly deliver vaccines in anticipation of outbreaks.

The talk about masks in schools is a bit frustrating.  I don't mean this as criticism, but some parents have adopted masks as a security blanket.  It's not their fault, because it's basically the only topic we have, when we should be exploring many other options, primarily centered around ventilation.  While cases were going down, nobody was really thinking about getting our schools, libraries, public transportation etc., ventilated in a way to keep people safe.  I am certain the technology is there, heck, it may be as simple as opening windows and blowing fans in every classroom, but the problem is we don't have enough scientific studies to know exactly how to fix it.  So we need to study it now!  This school year, we need different types of ventilation studied against control groups.

In the meantime, here's a solution that I am confident will work much more effectively than masks; let's get thousands of large tents and put them in schoolyards and school parking lots and have school outside while the weather is still warm. The science is clear that outdoors is vastly safer than indoors.  There is no political effort to demonize tents like there is for masks.  We are not relying on 7-year-olds to keep a mask on.  It's a few weeks until school starts in most places.  We can have this for the fall term and it will save lives.  

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 minutes ago, worrierking said:

Here's link I found interesting: https://medicalxpress.com/news/2021-07-case-intranasal-covid-vaccines.html

This is something we may need as the disease becomes endemic. Could help quickly deliver vaccines in anticipation of outbreaks.

The talk about masks in schools is a bit frustrating.  I don't mean this as criticism, but some parents have adopted masks as a security blanket.  It's not their fault, because it's basically the only topic we have, when we should be exploring many other options, primarily centered around ventilation.  While cases were going down, nobody was really thinking about getting our schools, libraries, public transportation etc., ventilated in a way to keep people safe.  I am certain the technology is there, heck, it may be as simple as opening windows and blowing fans in every classroom, but the problem is we don't have enough scientific studies to know exactly how to fix it.  So we need to study it now!  This school year, we need different types of ventilation studied against control groups.

In the meantime, here's a solution that I am confident will work much more effectively than masks; let's get thousands of large tents and put them in schoolyards and school parking lots and have school outside while the weather is still warm. The science is clear that outdoors is vastly safer than indoors.  There is no political effort to demonize tents like there is for masks.  We are not relying on 7-year-olds to keep a mask on.  It's a few weeks until school starts in most places.  We can have this for the fall term and it will save lives.  

Doesn't work so well in 110 degree temps.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Biff84 said:

School districts were able to put mask mandates and most did for in person learning. Now there’s a law that prevents schools from mandating masks, vaccines and even quarantining.

The quarantining is just idiotic. 
 

ETA - the other two aren’t great but not being able to mandate quarantining seems ridiculous 

Edited by AAABatteries
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, top dog said:

:shrug:

I'm ok with that. Still highly effective against severe cases and death. Honestly, that was the selling point for the vaccines from the start. They claimed their effectiveness on preventing severe cases and death, not so much on not getting covid. We found out later from more data that they were very good against the original strain and that was promising. But if the Delta variant is breaking through but the vaccines keep people out of the hospital and dead... Good enough for me. 

Not good for keeping spread down.

  • Sad 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Israel's COVID research and studies have been consistently out of step with other nations, going back to the earliest days of the pandemic. Compounding that has been the Israeli popular media's penchant for doomcasting.

I need some other nations to back up the Israeli study. Replicate. Corroborate. I'd be shocked if a bunch of other areas start reporting similar results to Israel's.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, AAABatteries said:

The quarantining is just idiotic. 
 

ETA - the other two aren’t great but not being able to mandate quarantining seems ridiculous 

Yeah I couldn’t believe that. Didn’t think it would be part but they actually fighting a school district that’s trying to enforce quarantines after exposure.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Doug B said:

Israel's COVID research and studies have been consistently out of step with other nations, going back to the earliest days of the pandemic. Compounding that has been the Israeli popular media's penchant for doomcasting.

I need some other nations to back up the Israeli study. Replicate. Corroborate. I'd be shocked if a bunch of other areas start reporting similar results to Israel's.

I thought they had some kind of special arrangement that shared data with pfizer that no other country had

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, worrierking said:

Here's link I found interesting: https://medicalxpress.com/news/2021-07-case-intranasal-covid-vaccines.html

This is something we may need as the disease becomes endemic. Could help quickly deliver vaccines in anticipation of outbreaks.

The talk about masks in schools is a bit frustrating.  I don't mean this as criticism, but some parents have adopted masks as a security blanket.  It's not their fault, because it's basically the only topic we have, when we should be exploring many other options, primarily centered around ventilation.  While cases were going down, nobody was really thinking about getting our schools, libraries, public transportation etc., ventilated in a way to keep people safe.  I am certain the technology is there, heck, it may be as simple as opening windows and blowing fans in every classroom, but the problem is we don't have enough scientific studies to know exactly how to fix it.  So we need to study it now!  This school year, we need different types of ventilation studied against control groups.

In the meantime, here's a solution that I am confident will work much more effectively than masks; let's get thousands of large tents and put them in schoolyards and school parking lots and have school outside while the weather is still warm. The science is clear that outdoors is vastly safer than indoors.  There is no political effort to demonize tents like there is for masks.  We are not relying on 7-year-olds to keep a mask on.  It's a few weeks until school starts in most places.  We can have this for the fall term and it will save lives.  

Ventilation was/is a big point of contention in our school district as the schools werent all well ventilated.  I do think this is important and should be addressed.  I like the tent option and believe some schools do this but i think in some cases the elements may not work well or safety could be an issue especially if in a city. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

20 hours ago, ericttspikes said:

I'm still trying to wrap my head around Purdue requiring a meningitis vax to get in but COVID vax is optional. 

Take it up with the FDA.

We currently live a very strange world, where pretty much every elected leader is suggesting, pleading, and/or begging people to take a drug that isn't approved by our official approvers-of-drugs.  Everybody just assumes that eventual approval is a formality, but it hasn't happened yet, and that lack of approval means something when it comes to state institutions like Purdue.

I have no idea why people think this is an acceptable arrangement.  If you take the FDA seriously, you should consider Purdue's position an obvious no-brainer.  I mean, of course the state isn't going to require people to take an drug that it's own regulators refuse to approve.  Of course, I don't take the FDA seriously.  The fact that we're all just basically ignoring it really should be a sign of how badly it needs to be rebuilt.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

17 hours ago, worrierking said:

The talk about masks in schools is a bit frustrating.  I don't mean this as criticism, but some parents have adopted masks as a security blanket. 

To be fair, we went through a full year and change where we had no choice but to rely on really lousy mitigation measures because we didn't have anything better.  As recently as a few months ago, wearing ill-fitting cloth masks and keeping a few feet away from one another were literally our best options.  And they worked okay.  Obviously our sad little masks weren't very good protection from a virus, but they were better than nothing.  They probably had a pretty high marginal benefit compared to "doing nothing" so it made sense that everybody wore them and that we made a big deal out of them.

We haven't actually been vaccinated for very long.  Looking back, I only reached the "full vaccination point -- two weeks from shot #2 -- back on 4/21, just three short months ago.  Lots of people were traumatized by the pandemic, and it's not surprising that they're still clinging to the totems that kept them safe during 2020.  If you're vaccinated, though, your mask is probably pretty close to pointless now.  The vaccines protect you infinitely better than a mask does, and while a mask will still reduce your risk from covid a tiny bit, we're now talking about tenths and hundreths of percentage points.  The marginal benefit of masking isn't literally zero, but it's got to be very close to zero.  At this point, "security blanket" is about right.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

17 hours ago, worrierking said:

Here's link I found interesting: https://medicalxpress.com/news/2021-07-case-intranasal-covid-vaccines.html

This is something we may need as the disease becomes endemic. Could help quickly deliver vaccines in anticipation of outbreaks.

The talk about masks in schools is a bit frustrating.  I don't mean this as criticism, but some parents have adopted masks as a security blanket.  It's not their fault, because it's basically the only topic we have, when we should be exploring many other options, primarily centered around ventilation.  While cases were going down, nobody was really thinking about getting our schools, libraries, public transportation etc., ventilated in a way to keep people safe.  I am certain the technology is there, heck, it may be as simple as opening windows and blowing fans in every classroom, but the problem is we don't have enough scientific studies to know exactly how to fix it.  So we need to study it now!  This school year, we need different types of ventilation studied against control groups.

In the meantime, here's a solution that I am confident will work much more effectively than masks; let's get thousands of large tents and put them in schoolyards and school parking lots and have school outside while the weather is still warm. The science is clear that outdoors is vastly safer than indoors.  There is no political effort to demonize tents like there is for masks.  We are not relying on 7-year-olds to keep a mask on.  It's a few weeks until school starts in most places.  We can have this for the fall term and it will save lives.  

Said it a year ago, will say it again, put an air scrubber in every room. We have piles of money to throw at this and we pissed it away on everything but air scrubbers. Is it the cure? No. Is it proven technology that will capture a significant portion of any airborne virus? Yes.

Edit to add - outside school is an ok idea but it’s a non starter for places down south and out west. You can’t put 7 year olds in a tent in 110 degree heat regardless of how many cooling fans you point at them.

Edited by beer 30
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

23 minutes ago, IvanKaramazov said:

Take it up with the FDA.

We currently live a very strange world, where pretty much every elected leader is suggesting, pleading, and/or begging people to take a drug that isn't approved by our official approvers-of-drugs.  Everybody just assumes that eventual approval is a formality, but it hasn't happened yet, and that lack of approval means something when it comes to state institutions like Purdue.

I have no idea why people think this is an acceptable arrangement.  If you take the FDA seriously, you should consider Purdue's position an obvious no-brainer.  I mean, of course the state isn't going to require people to take an drug that it's own regulators refuse to approve.  Of course, I don't take the FDA seriously.  The fact that we're all just basically ignoring it really should be a sign of how badly it needs to be rebuilt.

Preaching to the choir re: FDA, but clearly Purdue’s own decision since Indiana U requires it. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, IvanKaramazov said:

Take it up with the FDA.

We currently live a very strange world, where pretty much every elected leader is suggesting, pleading, and/or begging people to take a drug that isn't approved by our official approvers-of-drugs.  Everybody just assumes that eventual approval is a formality, but it hasn't happened yet, and that lack of approval means something when it comes to state institutions like Purdue.

I have no idea why people think this is an acceptable arrangement.  If you take the FDA seriously, you should consider Purdue's position an obvious no-brainer.  I mean, of course the state isn't going to require people to take an drug that it's own regulators refuse to approve.  Of course, I don't take the FDA seriously.  The fact that we're all just basically ignoring it really should be a sign of how badly it needs to be rebuilt.

I don't know if I'd agree with "refuse to approve," I think it's more "can't get their heads out of their own bureaucratic procedures even in a pandemic." 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, IvanKaramazov said:

Take it up with the FDA.

We currently live a very strange world, where pretty much every elected leader is suggesting, pleading, and/or begging people to take a drug that isn't approved by our official approvers-of-drugs.  Everybody just assumes that eventual approval is a formality, but it hasn't happened yet, and that lack of approval means something when it comes to state institutions like Purdue.

I have no idea why people think this is an acceptable arrangement.  If you take the FDA seriously, you should consider Purdue's position an obvious no-brainer.  I mean, of course the state isn't going to require people to take an drug that it's own regulators refuse to approve.  Of course, I don't take the FDA seriously.  The fact that we're all just basically ignoring it really should be a sign of how badly it needs to be rebuilt.

And yet the FDA gave accelerated approval for aducanumb (brand name Aduhelm from Biogen) against the advice of its panel of experts. It's an expensive infusion drug for Alzheimers disease which removes amyloid plaques in the brain, but has not been proven to have clinical benefit and has many safety concerns.  They jumped the gun on this approval, actually there may have been improprieties and congress is investigating. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Pip's Invitation said:

I don't know if I'd agree with "refuse to approve," I think it's more "can't get their heads out of their own bureaucratic procedures even in a pandemic." 

I just flashed back to the CYDY thread.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 7/24/2021 at 3:35 PM, worrierking said:

Here's link I found interesting: https://medicalxpress.com/news/2021-07-case-intranasal-covid-vaccines.html

This is something we may need as the disease becomes endemic. Could help quickly deliver vaccines in anticipation of outbreaks.

The talk about masks in schools is a bit frustrating.  I don't mean this as criticism, but some parents have adopted masks as a security blanket.  It's not their fault, because it's basically the only topic we have, when we should be exploring many other options, primarily centered around ventilation.  While cases were going down, nobody was really thinking about getting our schools, libraries, public transportation etc., ventilated in a way to keep people safe.  I am certain the technology is there, heck, it may be as simple as opening windows and blowing fans in every classroom, but the problem is we don't have enough scientific studies to know exactly how to fix it.  So we need to study it now!  This school year, we need different types of ventilation studied against control groups.

In the meantime, here's a solution that I am confident will work much more effectively than masks; let's get thousands of large tents and put them in schoolyards and school parking lots and have school outside while the weather is still warm. The science is clear that outdoors is vastly safer than indoors.  There is no political effort to demonize tents like there is for masks.  We are not relying on 7-year-olds to keep a mask on.  It's a few weeks until school starts in most places.  We can have this for the fall term and it will save lives.  

Definitely with you on the ventilation. But I think you're missing something about masks: As a parent of two school-age children who are too young to be vaccinated, masks are a simple, cheap solution that my wife and I have direct control over (at least for our kids; obviously we don't have control over what other kids do). Even at the schoolboard level, they can pass a mask mandate tomorrow. Ventilation solutions require far more time and money, and while I agree outdoor classes might be more effective in terms of safety, they also bring a bunch of logistical concerns.

I don't know what to think about the upcoming school year. We definitely plan on sending both boys in-person, and I think we will most likely have them wear masks (although I already know the school district won't be requiring them). Given that my wife and I (and just about all the adults we see regularly) are vaxxed, the existential fear of last year is pretty much gone, and that's no small thing. But I would still really prefer that none of us get Covid, and I feel like we should take reasonable steps to ensure that doesn't happen.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Something I'm confused about: For the last year and a half, we've been hearing a lot about "viral load". My understanding was that it was the main determinant of severity; when my father-in-law came down with his ultimately fatal case of Covid, his doctor explained to us that for whatever reason, he simply had a higher viral load, and that was why, even though he was in excellent health, they were unable to treat it successfully.

But now I'm hearing that the Delta variant produces a higher viral load that makes it more transmissible but not more deadly. So what happened? Has there been a shift in the consensus opinion on the significance of viral load? Is the media using imprecise terms? Did we misunderstand my FIL's doctor last year?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, ignatiusjreilly said:

Something I'm confused about: For the last year and a half, we've been hearing a lot about "viral load". My understanding was that it was the main determinant of severity; when my father-in-law came down with his ultimately fatal case of Covid, his doctor explained to us that for whatever reason, he simply had a higher viral load, and that was why, even though he was in excellent health, they were unable to treat it successfully.

But now I'm hearing that the Delta variant produces a higher viral load that makes it more transmissible but not more deadly. So what happened? Has there been a shift in the consensus opinion on the significance of viral load? Is the media using imprecise terms? Did we misunderstand my FIL's doctor last year?

This has intrigued me as well. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, ignatiusjreilly said:

Something I'm confused about: For the last year and a half, we've been hearing a lot about "viral load". My understanding was that it was the main determinant of severity; when my father-in-law came down with his ultimately fatal case of Covid, his doctor explained to us that for whatever reason, he simply had a higher viral load, and that was why, even though he was in excellent health, they were unable to treat it successfully.

But now I'm hearing that the Delta variant produces a higher viral load that makes it more transmissible but not more deadly. So what happened? Has there been a shift in the consensus opinion on the significance of viral load? Is the media using imprecise terms? Did we misunderstand my FIL's doctor last year?

Viral load you spew isn't necessarily what is transmitted. 

Delta is like changing the shot size in a 12 gauge. As least thats my read. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, ignatiusjreilly said:

Something I'm confused about: For the last year and a half, we've been hearing a lot about "viral load". My understanding was that it was the main determinant of severity; when my father-in-law came down with his ultimately fatal case of Covid, his doctor explained to us that for whatever reason, he simply had a higher viral load, and that was why, even though he was in excellent health, they were unable to treat it successfully.

But now I'm hearing that the Delta variant produces a higher viral load that makes it more transmissible but not more deadly. So what happened? Has there been a shift in the consensus opinion on the significance of viral load? Is the media using imprecise terms? Did we misunderstand my FIL's doctor last year?

Depends on what they mean by ‘more deadly’ because any variant right now is bound to cause a lower % of death because most higher risk patients are vaccinated. Which means those who are hospitalized are more likely to survive. If they mean that the higher viral load doesn’t cause more severe illness, I’d be surprised. My understanding is that the higher viral load would put more people at risk of severe illness than if they were infected with a previous strain.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I really don’t want to keep my kids home again this year (7 and 4.5). 
 

As of now, masks are optional. They ask teachers who are not vaccinated to wear masks, but they are not requiring proof of vaccination. No clue if they updated ventilation systems anywhere. PA had a big movement to get teachers the JJ vaccine in the spring to open schools back up, so the vaxxed teachers are mostly JJ. 
 

When my kids get sick, it always seems to hit them hard. My wife has an autoimmune condition (we both are vaxxed with moderna) so there is always concern the boys are compromised in some way. 
 

Parents shouldn’t be getting put into these situations because of politics. We had an in-person school spring where things went very well with masking and distancing. These kids are still not vaccinated— why change it now???

I think there is still a chance my district changes, because these were “summer guidelines” but who knows. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 hours ago, Biff84 said:

Depends on what they mean by ‘more deadly’ because any variant right now is bound to cause a lower % of death because most higher risk patients are vaccinated. Which means those who are hospitalized are more likely to survive. If they mean that the higher viral load doesn’t cause more severe illness, I’d be surprised. My understanding is that the higher viral load would put more people at risk of severe illness than if they were infected with a previous strain.

First of all, this stuff always ends up confusing me, and I screwed up when I said "more deadly" instead of "more severe". I remember a few months back when the first major variant emerged (I think we called it the UK variant at the time, but it's now called Alpha) some statistician modeled two scenarios: one where a variant was twice as transmissible (double the R0) and one where it was twice as severe (double the IFR). What he showed was that the latter scenario would result in twice as many deaths, but the former would result in like nine times as many, because exponentially more people would get infected.

So if Delta is more transmissible, that means it likely is more deadly, in the sense of ultimately killing more people. However, what I have been hearing is that it is not more severe (although I don't believe that's confirmed yet). And you are of course correct in that you can't compare total IFR now to what it was pre-vaccine. But I believe (and someone can correct me if I'm wrong here) that when they say it has the same severity they are talking about solely among the unvaccinated.

Anyway, none of this discussion gets at the thing that seems to be puzzling all of us, which is how Delta can cause a higher viral load but not cause more severe symptoms. There just seems to be some kind of disconnect here. Either we're wrong about the higher viral load thing, or Delta does in fact increase severity, or understanding around viral load has changed, or media reports are being imprecise in their terms (kinda like how I was in my earlier post).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Leeroy Jenkins said:

I really don’t want to keep my kids home again this year (7 and 4.5). 
 

As of now, masks are optional. They ask teachers who are not vaccinated to wear masks, but they are not requiring proof of vaccination. No clue if they updated ventilation systems anywhere. PA had a big movement to get teachers the JJ vaccine in the spring to open schools back up, so the vaxxed teachers are mostly JJ. 
 

When my kids get sick, it always seems to hit them hard. My wife has an autoimmune condition (we both are vaxxed with moderna) so there is always concern the boys are compromised in some way. 
 

Parents shouldn’t be getting put into these situations because of politics. We had an in-person school spring where things went very well with masking and distancing. These kids are still not vaccinated— why change it now???

I think there is still a chance my district changes, because these were “summer guidelines” but who knows. 

Mine are 11 and 6, and I'm totally with you on wanting them in school. Last year, we sent the older one back in February and kept the younger one home (for complicated reasons having nothing to do with the virus or his health). Given the low incidence of school outbreaks, I felt like the situation was pretty safe. The two things that have me nervous for the upcoming year are a) Delta and b) likely lower rates of masking. We live in Miami, so the likelihood of a district-wide mask mandate would seem to be pretty low. But our town leans left, so I'm hoping that, even if it's voluntary, there's a fairly high rate of masking. (And for the record, I hate that political orientation should affect that, but here we are). At a minimum, I hope there's a high enough rate that my sons don't feel any peer pressure not to wear their own masks.

The one thing that I find most reassuring is the knowledge that the nightmare scenario from last year -- that they bring home the virus from school and end up infecting us or, God forbid, my immunocompromised mother-in-law -- seems to be off the table. But yeah, I'm still a little nervous.

If you think there's a chance of your district keeping the mask mandate in place, I would certainly recommend advocating for it. I just feel like the cost-benefit analysis of risk mitigation vs. inconvenience makes it worthwhile among a mostly unvaxxed population.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Someone upthread posted the news that the Pfizer vaccine was only proving 39% effective against infection in Israel.  I saw Dr. Campbell's weekend youtube update https://youtu.be/wNbs4LCgrcY in which he explains that they are finding considerable waning of effectiveness over time.  For instance people vaccinated in January are only seeing 16 percent effectiveness with the percentage improving with each following month.  Severe disease remains low in vaccinated individuals (whew!).

Some of this may be related to age. The oldest populations were vaccinated first, with ages going lower as the months passed.  Younger people may have longer immunity, but we won't know that for a while.  

They are not seeing the same thing in the UK, where most of the second shots were much later, due to the British strategy of getting first shots in quickly and worrying about second doses later.

This is only for Pfizer, but I suspect we'll see similar issues with the other vaccines, as it's probably our bodies that are the issue, not any individual vaccine.  

This is actually good news in one sense.  This is not just the Delta Variant overpowering the vaccines, which would make controlling the disease long-term very difficult.  This may be partly that, but at least we have the opportunity with boosters to beat the variant down.  

We'll likely need boosters, perhaps annually, maybe more frequently for at-risk.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Very little momentum to 5-12 year old approval.  I really thought they'd square this away before school.  Going to be a lot of kids that just spent a full year on zoom thrown into a classroom with 0% peers with shots. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 7/24/2021 at 5:54 PM, The Z Machine said:
On 7/24/2021 at 4:36 PM, Doug B said:

Israel's COVID research and studies have been consistently out of step with other nations, going back to the earliest days of the pandemic.

Can you give specific examples?

I thought it would be sufficient to just to pull examples from this thread. In chronological order:

Quote

2/27/2020 by H Jass:

With nothing but scary, crappy news about this in the news, I’m posting this as maybe a slight glimmer?

Israel vaccine on way?

 

Quote

4/2/2020 by Statorama:

Fingers Crossed - Israel Team Days Away From Creating Active Component Of Coronavirus Vaccine

A team of Israeli researchers says that they are days away from completing the production of the active component of a coronavirus vaccine that could be tested on humans as early as June 1.

 

Quote

6/17/2020, by worrierking:

Interesting research underway in Israel regarding the cause of blood clotting.  They have a theoretical fix and will be doing trials.

 

 

Quote

2/5/2021, by worrierking:

We haven't had one of these for a while.  Israeli hospital says they have found a cure for patients with moderate to severe COVID-19:

https://www.ynetnews.com/health_science/article/rJoYyaYeO?utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=facebook&utm_term=rJoYyaYeO&fbclid=IwAR0MA3iyvYKffg3LEZXo6MtjiiFiHPtsAR3SWVD6TEAU5ul9UlU0p_IvL7U

All of these have been found to be untrue in the past, but what the heck, let's keep hoping.

 

Quote

 

4/16/2021 by Leeroy Jenkins:

https://twitter.com/carlquintanilla/status/1382855768995729408?s=21

FUNDSTRAT: Israel “has vaccinated 62% of its population. And even with mutations, .. COVID-19 looks to have been largely obliterated .. 

.. “latest 7D avg is a mere 26 cases per 1mm residents” (down from 952 per 1mm, three months ago.) 

 

 

Quote

 

6/16/2021 by worrierking:

Israel continues to be a great source of information because of their unique situation.  They have incredible access to medical records.  Article today suggesting that immunity from previous infection is doing a much better job of preventing cases than immunity from vaccines.

https://www.israelnationalnews.com/News/News.aspx/309762

Almost all of the vaccines in Israel have been Pfizer.  

I'm concerned about this surge and the timing. My worst fear is that my area, which was hit by two hurricanes last year, will get hit again while we are in the middle of a huge outbreak.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Have had a bit of a sore throat and muscle soreness since Sunday AM. Nothing bad but it's there.

Played Golf for the first time in a while which could be it, but also was out in public a good bit late last week.

Likely nothing, but out of an abundance of caution I've scheduled a rapid COVID test for tomorrow afternoon. 

 

Recap of basic pertinent info: 
44yo Male, Some comorbidities (Hypertension / Overweight)... have avoided COVID infection thus far... 2nd Moderna shot was Mid Feb. 

 

:popcorn: 

Edited by [icon]
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Good luck, @[icon]

My stepmother and sister (both fully vaccinated) tested positive this weekend. So far, my dad, who has had roughly 732 heart bypasses, is still negative and his house is big enough he can pretty well isolate from my stepmother. 

Neither of the two has been anywhere near needing hospitalization, but then again they didn’t decide to go get tested on a whim either.

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 hours ago, Rustoleum said:

Good luck, @[icon]

My stepmother and sister (both fully vaccinated) tested positive this weekend. So far, my dad, who has had roughly 732 heart bypasses, is still negative and his house is big enough he can pretty well isolate from my stepmother. 

Neither of the two has been anywhere near needing hospitalization, but then again they didn’t decide to go get tested on a whim either.

732?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 7/25/2021 at 4:46 PM, ignatiusjreilly said:

Something I'm confused about: For the last year and a half, we've been hearing a lot about "viral load". My understanding was that it was the main determinant of severity; when my father-in-law came down with his ultimately fatal case of Covid, his doctor explained to us that for whatever reason, he simply had a higher viral load, and that was why, even though he was in excellent health, they were unable to treat it successfully.

But now I'm hearing that the Delta variant produces a higher viral load that makes it more transmissible but not more deadly. So what happened? Has there been a shift in the consensus opinion on the significance of viral load? Is the media using imprecise terms? Did we misunderstand my FIL's doctor last year?

Viral load is simply the measure of the amount of virus in a person's blood.  This can be for multiple reasons.  The virus can simply be aggressive and mutate really fast to achieve that result, or it can be a product of how long the virus has been in one's system and the individual's immune system success/failure in slowing it.  Viral load can be "high" because it's just an aggressive virus that replicates really fast OR it can be "high" because a normal replicating virus is in the system but the immune response is slow.  

The doctor above was basically telling you that there was a lot of virus in his body.  That's either because they detected it after it had been there a while, they detected it in a normal period of time but immune system wasn't combating it to keep it down, or it was a mutation that learned to replicate quickly (maybe early onset of  delta variant or something).  Hope that makes a little more sense.  

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

16 minutes ago, quick-hands said:

732?

Playful hyperbole I presume. I do the same thing all the time ("I think I drank 2300 beers last night") 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

14 hours ago, culdeus said:

Very little momentum to 5-12 year old approval.  I really thought they'd square this away before school.  Going to be a lot of kids that just spent a full year on zoom thrown into a classroom with 0% peers with shots. 

Sounds like Pfizer thinks they will be ready to go in September, however, based on what they are hearing from FDA, that it likely won't be approved until "Mid-Winter" because FDA wants 6+ months of follow-up -- which is what, February?  Dosage of 10mg as opposed to the adult 30mg.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 minutes ago, Leeroy Jenkins said:

Sounds like Pfizer thinks they will be ready to go in September, however, based on what they are hearing from FDA, that it likely won't be approved until "Mid-Winter" because FDA wants 6+ months of follow-up -- which is what, February?  Dosage of 10mg as opposed to the adult 30mg.

I am assuming 6 months from getting the vaccine. They were enrolling kids in the spring. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

15 hours ago, culdeus said:

Very little momentum to 5-12 year old approval.  I really thought they'd square this away before school.  Going to be a lot of kids that just spent a full year on zoom thrown into a classroom with 0% peers with shots. 

FDA just asked them to expand the trial group

https://www.yahoo.com/news/pfizer-biontech-moderna-expand-studies-174948226.html

Edited by jobarules
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 minutes ago, jobarules said:

Hence January or February at best for the kids.  So let's have flu season and a covid-spike at the same time and not have any mitigation in-place for the one subset that cannot get vaccinated.  

  • Sad 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 7/24/2021 at 6:17 AM, cap'n grunge said:

Youngest started in person school this past week in middle school. We are all fully Pfizer vaxxed. In AZ masks at schools are optional. We’ve had her mask up which sucks because very few are wearing. Annoys the crap out of me because I can imagine that many are not vaxxed. They say they are supposed to be on guard for mask bullying and she said so far it’s been fine. Still sucks to feel like you’re one of a small minority being responsible and wearing a mask all day can’t be fun. They say they are keeping the kids 3 feet apart. I know there’s lots of crowding though especially in between classes and at llunch etc. She says most of the kids have no respect for personal space and are right up in your face when talking to you. Same as it ever was at that age. They had an assembly this week where they were in the gymnasium all on top of each other and yelling. So stupid.

We have been extremely cautious through all this and been at home for work and school since last March. It’s weird trying to navigate back into a sense of normalcy when the vast majority of people just want to proclaim COVID done but a large percentage refuse to take the steps to actually put this sucker to bed.

We decided to get her back into some activities. She thought about trying softball at school second quarter but in the end decided to do a city league instead she had been in since age three. Yesterday she decided she also wants to tryout for volleyball at school. Filled out a bunch of paperwork online and getting her a sports physical today so she can do tryouts this week. I’m sort of nervous about the whole thing. I know she is largely protected with the vax, but with in person school and now sports, which I’ve heard can be a pretty good spreader of this crap, it gives me some worry. I’ve been the super protective parent up til now and just don’t want to screw up and yet at the same time feel bad for building that wall too high and having her miss out on things.

 

My wife and I and kids are vaccinated and when school starts this Fall our kids will not be wearing masks.  Do you have someone in your immediate family that is unvaccinated?  Curious why your kids are wearing masks in school.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 minutes ago, Gilroy34 said:

My wife and I and kids are vaccinated and when school starts this Fall our kids will not be wearing masks.  Do you have someone in your immediate family that is unvaccinated?  Curious why your kids are wearing masks in school.

Some folks think about people other than themselves*. :shrug:

Even if their immediate family are vaccinated...If their kid gets it and passes it along to someone else who's elderly/high-risk (even if vaccinated), or someone who's NOT vaccinated... that would suck. 

If you distill down our end goal, it's to stop transmission. Wearing a mask largely does that. 

 

EDIT: This * is not an attack at you, just a general statement. Wanted to clarify. :thumbup:

Edited by [icon]
Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 minutes ago, [icon] said:

Some folks think about people other than themselves*. :shrug:

Even if their immediate family are vaccinated...If their kid gets it and passes it along to someone else who's elderly/high-risk (even if vaccinated), or someone who's NOT vaccinated... that would suck. 

If you distill down our end goal, it's to stop transmission. Wearing a mask largely does that. 

 

EDIT: This * is not an attack at you, just a general statement. Wanted to clarify. :thumbup:

Sorry but we are past that point as people have had sufficient time to get vaccinated so that is not a concern at all to me.  That is their choice and vaccinated people should not be inconvenienced with masks anymore.

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Gilroy34 said:

Sorry but we are past that point as people have had sufficient time to get vaccinated so that is not a concern at all to me.  That is their choice and vaccinated people should not be inconvenienced with masks anymore.

Kids have no choice in their vaccination status.  Teachers, even vaccinated, may still be able to spread it.  Some schools have hundreds of children -- all unprotected and not due to anything they have chosen.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

23 minutes ago, Doug B said:

The Catholic schools in the N.O. area (gigantic here) have been waiting for an official CDC announcement before deciding on a masking recommendation for this coming school year. This will get them going.

We didn't require masks last year - no chance we require them this year.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
  • Create New...