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*** OFFICIAL *** COVID-19 CoronaVirus Thread


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26 minutes ago, Doug B said:

Seasonality is not yet apparent. However, a distinct pattern of rises and falls -- waves, IOW -- is apparent. It's become a matter of how fast a country gets through the wave.

Looking at countries that dealt with Delta** earlier than the USA -- chiefly the UK and India -- a fairly quick-arriving fall comes after the rise. Delta is not yet causing especially sustained peaks anywhere -- not like the winter peak in the U.S., anyway. Cold comfort for those effected, but that's the way Delta looks from the top of a mountain.

** sorry, couldn't resist

Generally, waves climb for 7-8 weeks and then fall suddenly.  That's pretty much what happened in both Scotland and the UK as a whole.  No guarantees, but looking at Louisiana, we still have 2-3 weeks of increases based on that. 

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20 minutes ago, Leeroy Jenkins said:

And like was posted above I think, Delta is probably more rampant here than what is being reported due to lack of testing and tracing, so we could be close (hopefully) to heading back down.  

For places where schools start in September, the timing of the Delta wave's eventual crash might be fortuitous. Especially if the U.S. Delta wave ends up shaped like the UK's (high, but sharp like a church steeple).

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9 hours ago, quick-hands said:

732?

I did say roughly...

Dad had I think a triple bypass almost 37 years ago at the age of 35 (drove himself to the hospital from the gym), a bunch of stints and angioplastys and then a quadruple where scheduled surgery became “right now” surgery in pre-op maybe 15 years ago. Somewhere in there he lost the first bypass, which was what they thought was the only thing keeping him alive. So 732 seems close.

Jerk is still a better trumpet player than me.

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14 minutes ago, worrierking said:

Generally, waves climb for 7-8 weeks and then fall suddenly.  That's pretty much what happened in both Scotland and the UK as a whole.  No guarantees, but looking at Louisiana, we still have 2-3 weeks of increases based on that. 

I'm hoping that the U.S.'s current number of vaccinations -- plus the number of previously infected -- has enough of a effect on Delta's wave to keep it tall and thin (constrained in time). An 8-week climb would be unfortunate -- that would mean that this fourth wave would peak far higher than this past winter's wave when very few were vaccinated.

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3 hours ago, [icon] said:

Hospitalization percentages in MS (source MS Dep of Heath

Age Group (Proportion of Hospitalizations)
0-19  (Up 500% from 1 year ago)
20-29 (Up 300%) 
30-39 (Up 200%)
40-49 (Up 200%)

- Positivity at an all time high (15% and climbing fast)
- 3600 new cases over the weekend / 1300 new cases today / almost all likely delta)

More fuel to the kids and young adults are going to be getting very sick and or dying this time around.... 

Buckle up and hunker down. 

Do you have anything on people that already had Covid with this?  I understand how valuable the vaccine is but the goal should be herd immunity.  Vaccines are a huge part of that but goal seems to be vaccines and anything else be darned.  Anyways my 2 cents.  Hope you all are doing well.

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25 minutes ago, SpurrierisisGod said:

Just took my 14 yo daughter to get 1st Pfizer shot.  Walgreens was packed.  I guess everyone down here saw that CNN sent a crew to investigate why our number of vaxxed is lagging so far behind....

17yo son still resisting.  He's about to get the "well you are going to sit home and do nothing" talk. No soccer camp, no girlfriend visit, no soccer tournaments.....

Good luck! Hope her side effects are minimal.

Was there anything specific that caused you to change your mind about getting your kids vaxxed? Or just the rising case numbers?

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On 7/25/2021 at 10:46 AM, ignatiusjreilly said:

Something I'm confused about: For the last year and a half, we've been hearing a lot about "viral load". My understanding was that it was the main determinant of severity; when my father-in-law came down with his ultimately fatal case of Covid, his doctor explained to us that for whatever reason, he simply had a higher viral load, and that was why, even though he was in excellent health, they were unable to treat it successfully.

But now I'm hearing that the Delta variant produces a higher viral load that makes it more transmissible but not more deadly. So what happened? Has there been a shift in the consensus opinion on the significance of viral load? Is the media using imprecise terms? Did we misunderstand my FIL's doctor last year?

You’re trying to reconcile three different virology concepts: virulence, transmissibility and viral load.

Viral virulence (ability to damage and possibly kill its host) and transmissibility/contagion (ability to infects others) aren’t necessarily related. There was long thought to be a trade-off between the two, as viruses that kill their hosts too readily may soon find a shortage of fresh bodies to infect - Ebola is a good example of this. And highly contagious infections like measles rarely kill people. But the relationship is far from uniform, with infections like smallpox being both easily spread and deadly. Recall this graph of virulence vs. transmissibility.

While viral load/burden is often a good proxy of infection severity, that too is an imperfect generalization. HIV viral loads are often highest very early in the course of infection, when mild mono/flu-like symptoms are present, and in late stage disease, when the virus has decimated the immune system. It’s also important to consider where the virus is abundant, as a lot of SARS-CoV-2 in the nasopharynx promotes effective spread, but doesn’t cause shortness of breath/low oxygen levels, which is the hallmark of covid-19.

With any infection, there is an interplay between pathogen virulence, host immune response and the intensity/severity of exposure. All things being equal, more virus will probably cause more symptoms, but there are many other variable in play. For covid in particular, one must consider the damage caused directly by the virus and secondarily by an exaggerated immune response. The latter includes stuff like the “cytokine storm”, which is thought to underlie lung and other organ damage in patients who progress to more severe covid. Although we know medical conditions associated with the risk of developing severe covid-19, we still don’t fully understand why some individuals progress and others don’t.

In summary, it’s complicated.

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57 minutes ago, jobarules said:

Seems to me that getting the vax for Delta is now strictly about your own health and not civic duty.

IMO this has been a messaging failure since the start of the pandemic.  Some people care about civic duty, but some don't.  Everyone cares about their own self-interest.  Getting vaccinated doesn't need to be a moral crusade or anything -- it's totally okay and good to watch out for yourself!

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1 hour ago, jobarules said:

For all the concerns about Delta, the #s in India are considerably lower than they were back in May. Why? Are their vax #s much better now? No. Only 7% of their population if fully vaccinated. 

How many died?

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15 minutes ago, IvanKaramazov said:

IMO this has been a messaging failure since the start of the pandemic.  Some people care about civic duty, but some don't.  Everyone cares about their own self-interest.  Getting vaccinated doesn't need to be a moral crusade or anything -- it's totally okay and good to watch out for yourself!

I wonder how rationing would have to be marketed if we had another WW2-like predicament.  I think there would be a good chunk of the population who would respond with the same resistance to requests from the government.  

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Companies dropping out of our big Vegas conf like flies. Attendance about 30% of normal. That’s with a fully vaccinated mandate for attendees.  No control once you get out of exhibit hall and Clark County is a complete hotspot. Making employees sign a waiver they won’t go to casinos, etc. Fun times.

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20 minutes ago, Captain Cranks said:

I wonder how rationing would have to be marketed if we had another WW2-like predicament.  I think there would be a good chunk of the population who would respond with the same resistance to requests from the government.  

Not a doubt in my mind.

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52 minutes ago, Doug B said:

For places where schools start in September, the timing of the Delta wave's eventual crash might be fortuitous. Especially if the U.S. Delta wave ends up shaped like the UK's (high, but sharp like a church steeple).

School starts Sept 13 in NYC

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On 7/25/2021 at 10:46 AM, ignatiusjreilly said:

Something I'm confused about: For the last year and a half, we've been hearing a lot about "viral load". My understanding was that it was the main determinant of severity; when my father-in-law came down with his ultimately fatal case of Covid, his doctor explained to us that for whatever reason, he simply had a higher viral load, and that was why, even though he was in excellent health, they were unable to treat it successfully.

But now I'm hearing that the Delta variant produces a higher viral load that makes it more transmissible but not more deadly. So what happened? Has there been a shift in the consensus opinion on the significance of viral load? Is the media using imprecise terms? Did we misunderstand my FIL's doctor last

10 hours ago, The Commish said:

Viral load is simply the measure of the amount of virus in a person's blood.  This can be for multiple reasons.  The virus can simply be aggressive and mutate really fast to achieve that result, or it can be a product of how long the virus has been in one's system and the individual's immune system success/failure in slowing it.  Viral load can be "high" because it's just an aggressive virus that replicates really fast OR it can be "high" because a normal replicating virus is in the system but the immune response is slow.  

The doctor above was basically telling you that there was a lot of virus in his body.  That's either because they detected it after it had been there a while, they detected it in a normal period of time but immune system wasn't combating it to keep it down, or it was a mutation that learned to replicate quickly (maybe early onset of  delta variant or something).  Hope that makes a little more sense.  

 

One of the reasons I’ve avoided the term “viral load” is its being used very differently for COVID than in other viral infections. Historically, viral load only referred to virus measured in the bloodstream, but people (scientists included) are using it to mean virus anywhere in the body, such as the mucosa of the nasopharynx. While a lot of virus in the nose promotes efficient spread, it may or may not correlate to viral burden elsewhere, including the lungs and blood. Perhaps more importantly, quantitative tests for sars-cov-2 aren’t commercially available tmk, so labs outside research settings aren’t actually measuring viral load at all - all they know is whether the virus is detected, or not.

I think the doctor mentioned above was trying to explain something in layspeak using imprecise language, realizing an accurate description was far more complex.

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50 minutes ago, IvanKaramazov said:

Not a doubt in my mind.

Its just mind blowing that you have the public clambering for a drug that isn't even approved.  Damned be the unlucky ones.  Get the vax, if you don't have it and no immunity.  Goal is get this virus beat my all means necessary.  

What is the reinvention rate.  I wish I knew this to make an educated decision.

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1 hour ago, IC FBGCav said:

Do you have anything on people that already had Covid with this?  I understand how valuable the vaccine is but the goal should be herd immunity.  Vaccines are a huge part of that but goal seems to be vaccines and anything else be darned.  Anyways my 2 cents.  Hope you all are doing well.

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2021/07/26/delta-variant-reinfects-chances-getting-covid-small/amp/

 

https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.courier-journal.com/amp/8090806002

 

Two COMPLETELY different headlines. 

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1 hour ago, Captain Cranks said:

My wife, who had previously said she would wait a year before being vaccinated, just told me she's going to get it when we get back from our vacation in a week.  Nice!

This assumes she doesn't catch it on vacation.  Nearly everyone I know that got it (and wasn't some sort of medical personnel) got it on a trip somewhere while not vaccinated. 

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Just now, jobarules said:

Yep, the reinfected rate seems lower than the infected vaccine rate.  Its just mind boggling we have no real information on this in the US.

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1 hour ago, Captain Cranks said:

I wonder how rationing would have to be marketed if we had another WW2-like predicament.  I think there would be a good chunk of the population who would respond with the same resistance to requests from the government.  

It's somewhat gilded narrative to say that the US cooperated with WW2 completely.  A large portion worked against it.  There are always #######s that just want to be contrarian. 

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3 hours ago, IC FBGCav said:

Do you have anything on people that already had Covid with this?  I understand how valuable the vaccine is but the goal should be herd immunity.  Vaccines are a huge part of that but goal seems to be vaccines and anything else be darned.  Anyways my 2 cents.  Hope you all are doing well.

Sorry, GB, no data from MS DoH on previous infections among these folks. 

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On 7/26/2021 at 5:28 PM, [icon] said:

Have had a bit of a sore throat and muscle soreness since Sunday AM. Nothing bad but it's there.

Played Golf for the first time in a while which could be it, but also was out in public a good bit late last week.

Likely nothing, but out of an abundance of caution I've scheduled a rapid COVID test for tomorrow afternoon. 

 

Recap of basic pertinent info: 
44yo Male, Some comorbidities (Hypertension / Overweight)... have avoided COVID infection thus far... 2nd Moderna shot was Mid Feb. 

 

:popcorn: 

Test results: Negative. 

Currently 0 for 5 on COVID tests. I like the Adam Dunn of getting my nose swabbed. 

(hotlink provided for non-beisbol nerds) 

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3 hours ago, ignatiusjreilly said:

Good luck! Hope her side effects are minimal.

Was there anything specific that caused you to change your mind about getting your kids vaxxed? Or just the rising case numbers?

My wife's work (dental office) had 8 cancelations last 2 days - all covid related.  She came around to my side this morning and agreed we should make the kids do it.

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5 hours ago, jobarules said:

For all the concerns about Delta, the #s in India are considerably lower than they were back in May. Why? Are their vax #s much better now? No. Only 7% of their population if fully vaccinated. 

Well not for nothing but a whole helluva lot of them died so…

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14 minutes ago, beer 30 said:

Well not for nothing but a whole helluva lot of them died so…

Do you know how many people live in India? This is a stupid comment

And what do deaths have to do with future infections? If someone has covid they are not going to be a future infection in the short term whether they live or die.

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3 minutes ago, jobarules said:

Do you know how many people live in India? This is a stupid comment

And what do deaths have to do with future infections? If someone has covid they are not going to be a future infection in the short term whether they live or die.

Based on the economic disparities in India it is highly likely that the number of cases and deaths are severely under-counted.

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20 minutes ago, Leeroy Jenkins said:

Based on the economic disparities in India it is highly likely that the number of cases and deaths are severely under-counted.

Regardless, the number have cases has declined whether they under counted or not. Unless you think they are under counting now but counted right in May. 

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5 minutes ago, jobarules said:

Regardless, the number have cases has declined whether they under counted or not. Unless you think they are under counting now but counted right in May. 

Maybe it’s run it’s course through the low hanging fruit and there are better containment processes in place as opposed to when the outbreak took hold?

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10 hours ago, IC FBGCav said:

Yep, the reinfected rate seems lower than the infected vaccine rate.  Its just mind boggling we have no real information on this in the US.

Untrue. I linked a study a while back, in response to one of your posts. I think it’s in the alternative covid thread in ffa.

ETA Found it

Quote

To restate, among people who previously had been exposed to SARS-CoV-2, there was ~80% protection against recurrent infection. This number dropped to 47% for people over age 65.

And that was before delta. 

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Houston Texas: "Yes we have kids in TX on ventilators due to COVID

"Out of all the kids who show up to Texas Children’s concerned they may have COVID-19, “Currently, roughly 10 percent of those children who test positive do require hospitalization,” said Dr. Jim Versalovic, Pathologist-in-Chief and Interim Pediatrician-in-Chief at Texas Children’s Hospital, “and roughly one-third of those may require critical care.”"


 

Jesus :eek: that can't be right can it? 
 

10% of kids who test positive require hospitalization and 3% require critical care?! 

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8 minutes ago, [icon] said:

Houston Texas: "Yes we have kids in TX on ventilators due to COVID

"Out of all the kids who show up to Texas Children’s concerned they may have COVID-19, “Currently, roughly 10 percent of those children who test positive do require hospitalization,” said Dr. Jim Versalovic, Pathologist-in-Chief and Interim Pediatrician-in-Chief at Texas Children’s Hospital, “and roughly one-third of those may require critical care.”"


 

Jesus :eek: that can't be right can it? 
 

10% of kids who test positive require hospitalization and 3% require critical care?! 

I wouldn’t be shocked if its true.  The key is that you are looking at kids that are being brought to a hospital because they are sick enough to where the parents are worried about their well being. I’d imagine that for every child that is taken to the hospital with covid—that there are lots more that don’t get taken to the hospital (which would reduce these percentages if accounted for). 

With that said—I worry very much about the Delta variant and the general attitude of the public. I understand that people are tired about Covid and its impact on our lives—but it seems like a lot of people just want to ignore it.  I think we are basically on a collision course with the sad reality that the vast majority of the people in this country will most likely get Covid at some point or another.  You have people that worry about the long term effects of the vaccine more than they do the long term effects of the disease—even though there has already been lots of troubling data that shows that covid infection does carry a lot of long term risks.  Secondly—you have things opening wide up right at a time where it has become evident that the strains are mutating to become more transmittable while our vaccines are losing efficacy due to when they were administered.  We also seem to be in a country where the government is not all that concerned with gathering proper data to see exactly where we are at in regards to infection rates and covid.  We’re using data from Israel and the UK because we’re not using test samples of our own population.   Even after vaccinated—I’ve never stopped masking up and will absolutely continue to do so—but my confidence level in preventing myself and the masses from inevitably getting the disease are starting to diminish.  The disease will persist far longer than most people are willing to be persistent against preventing it. 

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15 minutes ago, jvdesigns2002 said:

With that said—I worry very much about the Delta variant and the general attitude of the public. I understand that people are tired about Covid and its impact on our lives—but it seems like a lot of people just want to ignore it.  I think we are basically on a collision course with the sad reality that the vast majority of the people in this country will most likely get Covid at some point or another.  You have people that worry about the long term effects of the vaccine more than they do the long term effects of the disease—even though there has already been lots of troubling data that shows that covid infection does carry a lot of long term risks.  Secondly—you have things opening wide up right at a time where it has become evident that the strains are mutating to become more transmittable while our vaccines are losing efficacy due to when they were administered.  We also seem to be in a country where the government is not all that concerned with gathering proper data to see exactly where we are at in regards to infection rates and covid.  We’re using data from Israel and the UK because we’re not using test samples of our own population.   Even after vaccinated—I’ve never stopped masking up and will absolutely continue to do so—but my confidence level in preventing myself and the masses from inevitably getting the disease are starting to diminish.  The disease will persist far longer than most people are willing to be persistent against preventing it. 

Pretty much sums up my feelings about all of this exactly :goodposting:

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Have sent 5 buddies with kids these links. No hyperbole, just a heads up. 
 

2 (deniers) are actually MAD at me :lol: 

What the #### is wrong with people. If you want to keep your head in the sand regarding yourself that's fine. Your kids?! Dude... 

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16 hours ago, ignatiusjreilly said:

I find articles like this really frustrating:

Isn't it a reporter's job to actually tell us what the evidence does say so that we can evaluate the claims by Corcoran and DeSantis, rather than just telling us whether or not they provided it? As the parent of kids who will be attending school in Florida this fall, I'd really like to know!

This would seem to provide somewhat of an answer to my question:

Quote

Canada's three largest provinces during the Spring wave (March-June): One kept schools open, no masks. One kept schools open, with masks. One closed schools entirely. Can anyone tell them apart in this graph?

Now, I have no idea of the credibility of this source. And the anecdotes from Arkansas and Texas that everyone's sharing about kids in the ICU is obviously concerning. 

Here's where I'm at right now on this question: Given the level of uncertainty around the virus in general and Delta in particular, and the fact that my kids don't seem all that bothered by wearing masks, I'm leaning toward having them continue to wear them indoors once school starts because why not? But I want to learn more and am definitely open to changing my mind.

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23 minutes ago, jvdesigns2002 said:

With that said—I worry very much about the Delta variant and the general attitude of the public. I understand that people are tired about Covid and its impact on our lives—but it seems like a lot of people just want to ignore it.  I think we are basically on a collision course with the sad reality that the vast majority of the people in this country will most likely get Covid at some point or another.  You have people that worry about the long term effects of the vaccine more than they do the long term effects of the disease—even though there has already been lots of troubling data that shows that covid infection does carry a lot of long term risks.  Secondly—you have things opening wide up right at a time where it has become evident that the strains are mutating to become more transmittable while our vaccines are losing efficacy due to when they were administered.  We also seem to be in a country where the government is not all that concerned with gathering proper data to see exactly where we are at in regards to infection rates and covid.  We’re using data from Israel and the UK because we’re not using test samples of our own population.   Even after vaccinated—I’ve never stopped masking up and will absolutely continue to do so—but my confidence level in preventing myself and the masses from inevitably getting the disease are starting to diminish.  The disease will persist far longer than most people are willing to be persistent against preventing it. 

I think this is probably true, but I don't think it's a big deal.  For vaccinated people, "getting covid" isn't anything to worry about -- it's just somewhat nastier than the other coronaviruses that we've all been infected by many times uneventfully during our lives.  Assuming that's where we land with covid-19, that's a great outcome.  No need to worry about prevention if we're talking about something in the same general tier as the common cold.  

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28 minutes ago, jvdesigns2002 said:

I wouldn’t be shocked if its true.  The key is that you are looking at kids that are being brought to a hospital because they are sick enough to where the parents are worried about their well being. I’d imagine that for every child that is taken to the hospital with covid—that there are lots more that don’t get taken to the hospital (which would reduce these percentages if accounted for). 

With that said—I worry very much about the Delta variant and the general attitude of the public. I understand that people are tired about Covid and its impact on our lives—but it seems like a lot of people just want to ignore it.  I think we are basically on a collision course with the sad reality that the vast majority of the people in this country will most likely get Covid at some point or another.  You have people that worry about the long term effects of the vaccine more than they do the long term effects of the disease—even though there has already been lots of troubling data that shows that covid infection does carry a lot of long term risks.  Secondly—you have things opening wide up right at a time where it has become evident that the strains are mutating to become more transmittable while our vaccines are losing efficacy due to when they were administered.  We also seem to be in a country where the government is not all that concerned with gathering proper data to see exactly where we are at in regards to infection rates and covid.  We’re using data from Israel and the UK because we’re not using test samples of our own population.   Even after vaccinated—I’ve never stopped masking up and will absolutely continue to do so—but my confidence level in preventing myself and the masses from inevitably getting the disease are starting to diminish.  The disease will persist far longer than most people are willing to be persistent against preventing it. 

In the past couple weeks I've started to come to terms with the idea that I may get Covid. Not that it's necessarily likely, just that it's a very real possibility. On the one hand, the fact that I'm vaccinated removes the existential dread that I might have felt six months ago. On the other, I'd really rather not get $%#@%^ Covid! So the thought that I might makes me a little bit sad and a little bit more determined to remain vigilant, but mostly just resigned, which isn't exactly a good or a bad thing

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8 minutes ago, IvanKaramazov said:

I think this is probably true, but I don't think it's a big deal.  For vaccinated people, "getting covid" isn't anything to worry about -- it's just somewhat nastier than the other coronaviruses that we've all been infected by many times uneventfully during our lives.  Assuming that's where we land with covid-19, that's a great outcome.  No need to worry about prevention if we're talking about something in the same general tier as the common cold.  

I disagree with you on the tier of a common cold—but everybody is entitled to their own opinion. I personally know several covid long haulers—some of them are young and were in perfect health before covid—that are struggling big time months after an infection.  Data from the UK shows that many people that have had Covid are actually losing brain mass and brain matter in their frontal lobes.  It’s a disease that has already been linked to clotting issues.   I want to make my position clear.  While I am of the belief that most of us will inevitably get Covid at some point—I still believe that it’s a very serious disease with lots of potential long term ramifications.    

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11 minutes ago, jvdesigns2002 said:

I disagree with you on the tier of a common cold—but everybody is entitled to their own opinion. I personally know several covid long haulers—some of them are young and were in perfect health before covid—that are struggling big time months after an infection.  Data from the UK shows that many people that have had Covid are actually losing brain mass and brain matter in their frontal lobes.  It’s a disease that has already been linked to clotting issues.   I want to make my position clear.  While I am of the belief that most of us will inevitably get Covid at some point—I still believe that it’s a very serious disease with lots of potential long term ramifications.    

Were the covid long-haulers vaccinated?

(To be clear, I was in the same boat as you as recently as just a few months ago -- I really did not want to get covid even though theoretically I'm not at especially high risk.  "Long covid" in particular was something I I did not want to mess with.  But what I'm seeing about the vaccines makes me not particularly worried about getting infected now.  Obviously I'd still rather not be sick, just like how I'd rather not get a chest cold.  But I've had chest colds before, I'll have them again, and I'm not going to waste any mental energy worrying about it).

Edited by IvanKaramazov
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I think the two main concerns I have right now are: 

 

1. Whether vaccinated adults can spread covid to their unvaccinated kids (how likely); and

2. How effective are the measures being taken in schools against infection of the unvaccinated kids.

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9 minutes ago, IvanKaramazov said:

Were the covid long-haulers vaccinated?

Only 1 of them.  This same person was also unlucky enough to be moderately symptomatic with covid even though vaccinated.   The others got covid before vaccinations were available. The concern is that with the Delta strain—a lot of vaccinated people are getting infected with covid—but are generally not experiencing symptoms or are experiencing mild symptoms.  The UK data that showed direct correlations between covid infection and loss of brain mass/matter in the frontal lobe was consistent for people who had both severe covid and mild/asymptomatic covid.  Basically—the UK data showed that a lot of people that had covid—regardless of severity—have shown a decrease in brain matter in their frontal lobe.  We won’t know if the vaccines actually prevent the long term ramifications of a covid infection for a long while—but they certainly seem to be doing a good job at minimizing the the chances of short term severe infection. 

Edited by jvdesigns2002
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37 minutes ago, ignatiusjreilly said:

Here's where I'm at right now on this question: Given the level of uncertainty around the virus in general and Delta in particular, and the fact that my kids don't seem all that bothered by wearing masks, I'm leaning toward having them continue to wear them indoors once school starts because why not? But I want to learn more and am definitely open to changing my mind.

One more argument in favor of continued masking: I don't want to make the same mistake the CDC did! Right now my kids are used to wearing masks and if we tell them they have to keep doing it, they likely won't complain. But if we tell them they can stop and then later things continue to get worse and we want to go back, it will be that much harder and more confusing for them.

Again, I haven't made a definitive decision yet. But for now I'm erring on the side of caution. (Haven't sat down and discussed it with my wife, but I know she's generally going to be pro-mask, too.)

 

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