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*** OFFICIAL *** COVID-19 CoronaVirus Thread


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Sigh... 

i'll ask again… If n95 masks don't offer protection Against being infected by sick people, then why does the CDC demand health care workers wear them as part of PPE when treating sick people? Why did they deem them so important that they asked healthcare practitioners to save expired units rather than discarding them?

Asserting that they are "only useful to stop sick people from getting others sick" is one of the dumbest ongoing myths of this situation... Second only to  "the flu is more dangerous because it's killed more people." :lmao:

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My dad has been sick for a few weeks.  My mom called me today to say he was about to die.  I said some final words to him and he could hear me but was unable to respond.  He passed a short time later.

Not to derail anything, but we had our baby last night! She's doing amazingly well. Due to the hospital's pandemic policies, I had to leave her right after my wife was released from recovery. I can't

On a positive note, my wife gave birth to our first child this morning!! We were expecting our daughter to be born in the first week of April, which does not align very well if this hospital sees a ma

The mask thing seems simple, if you have reasonable certainty that you are not exposed to someone who is sick, or are sick yourself, masks are pointless.  

Wearing one around where people might be sick will only exhaust our supply of masks, and keep them out of the hands of people who are in the above categories (like doctors/nurses)

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Just now, Joe Bryant said:

Thank you. This seems very helpful.

Not going to lie: I kinda needed an excuse to throttle back the prepping I thought I was going to have to do.

...

Different, but related, topic:

I'm following a few COVID-19 threads on a few boards. There are a minority of people out there that are convinced that the U.S. already has around "a few thousand" COVID-19 infections, but it's just that almost no specific testing is being done and thus the COVID cases are "noise" among the usual level of flu/bronchitis/pneumonia patients. If that's true (big "if"), and the number of general "flu-like" deaths doesn't really increase ... maybe the U.S. is somehow absorbing some level of COVID-19 infections without particularly severe effects?

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3 minutes ago, -fish- said:

So don't do anything, but also listen to the CDC, who is saying have two weeks of food and water and stock up on prescription meds.  

What was the CDC’s pre-corona standard disaster prep recommendation? How does the recommendation differ today? 

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1 minute ago, culdeus said:

The mask thing seems simple, if you have reasonable certainty that you are not exposed to someone who is sick, or are sick yourself, masks are pointless.  

Wearing one around where people might be sick will only exhaust our supply of masks, and keep them out of the hands of people who are in the above categories (like doctors/nurses)

Masks being sold at retail to the general public come from an entirely different supply channel than those going to hospitals and doctors offices. Joe six pack using one does not keep it out of the hands of Dr. Bob.

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7 minutes ago, -fish- said:

So don't do anything, but also listen to the CDC, who is saying have two weeks of food and water and stock up on prescription meds.  

This is the CDC's generic emergency-panning advice, isn't it? Can you link to a public directive from the CDC advising these actions in response to COVID-19?

I asked for this in the "Are you preparing?" thread that icon started, but it went ignored. I'm sure that was an oversight in a fast-moving thread ... but I keep seeing these "CDC recommendations" but no one ever sources them. Again, I have seen the CDC's general emergency page with those two-week reccomendations -- but that's not the same thing.

EDIT: And actually ... that article does recommend doing quite a few things. Just not prep purchases of certain items named therein.

Edited by Doug B
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7 minutes ago, [icon] said:

Sigh... 

i'll ask again… If n95 masks don't offer protection Against being infected by sick people, then why does the CDC demand health care workers wear them as part of PPE when treating sick people? Why did they deem them so important that they asked healthcare practitioners to save expired units rather than discarding them?

Asserting that they are "only useful to stop sick people from getting others sick" is one of the dumbest ongoing myths of this situation... Second only to  "the flu is more dangerous because it's killed more people." :lmao:

What’s the source of this? We all know health care professionals don’t slap on masks when you go in for the flu. It just doesn’t happen.

Edited by JerseyToughGuys
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4 minutes ago, culdeus said:

The mask thing seems simple, if you have reasonable certainty that you are not exposed to someone who is sick, or are sick yourself, masks are pointless.  

Wearing one around where people might be sick will only exhaust our supply of masks, and keep them out of the hands of people who are in the above categories (like doctors/nurses)

At some point, going out in public will make it reasonably certain that you are exposed to someone who is sick.  The claim that an N95 mask does not protect from transmission is simply false.   How much protection one offers is up for debate.   At least one recent study concluded that there is no difference between a regular medical mask and a surgical N95 mask, but that either was better than nothing.

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11 minutes ago, Doug B said:

This is the CDC's generic emergency-panning advice, isn't it? Can you link to a public directive from the CDC advising these actions in response to COVID-19?

I asked for this in the "Are you preparing?" thread that icon started, but it went ignored. I'm sure that was an oversight in a fast-moving thread ... but I keep seeing these "CDC recommendations" but no one ever sources them. Again, I have seen the CDC's general emergency page with those two-week reccomendations -- but that's not the same thing.

EDIT: And actually ... that article does recommend doing quite a few things. Just not prep purchases of certain items named therein.

This is CDC's advice in response to any epidemic/pandemic.   They have issued a statement that their instructions for a pandemic, which have been in place since 2005 and were updated a couple years ago, should be applied to this virus.

 

Quote

Dr. Messonnier pointed out that public health organizations in the U.S. already have a basic framework for a pandemic containment strategy.

She directed the public to the CDC’s Community Mitigation Guidelines to Prevent Pandemic Influenza document from 2017, which, she pointed out, contains the key actions that individuals and communities can take in the event that a viral infection should spread widely.

The CDC are currently adapting these existing guidelines specifically to COVID-19.

It should be noted that Community Mitigation Guidelines to Prevent Pandemic Influenza included a recommendation for home quarantine for the incubation period--which for the flu is 3 days.   Here there have been reports of up to 24 days for incubation.   

 

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8 minutes ago, [icon] said:

Sigh... 

i'll ask again… If n95 masks don't offer protection Against being infected by sick people, then why does the CDC demand health care workers wear them as part of PPE when treating sick people? Why did they deem them so important that they asked healthcare practitioners to save expired units rather than discarding them?

In short: the article was saying the general populace, collectively, will use the n95 masks incorrectly -- won't get them fitted, etc.

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Just now, -fish- said:

This is CDC's advice in response to any epidemic/pandemic.   They have issued a statement that their instructions for a pandemic, which have been in place since 2005 and were updated a couple years ago, should be applied to this virus.

I looked for this yesterday -- I will try again. You never saw this on another website or anything that you can link? Got it via radio or TV?

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4 minutes ago, -fish- said:

This is CDC's advice in response to any epidemic/pandemic.   They have issued a statement that their instructions for a pandemic, which have been in place since 2005 and were updated a couple years ago, should be applied to this virus.

 

More accurate, I believe it’s the generic response that also covers natural disasters.

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12 minutes ago, JerseyToughGuys said:

What’s the source of this? We all know health care professionals don’t slap on masks when you go in for the flu. It just doesn’t happen.

Even the receptionist at the doctor's office I go to wears a mask.

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I saw three people wearing masks at the grocery store yesterday and I had one of those Steve Harvey meme moments. Even before this coronavirus stuff you'd see someone wearing a mask out in public every so often but never multiple people in the same place. Unless we got a government directive to wear masks when out in public would anyone here actually wear one? Anyone wearing them already? Isn't this like a don't touch your face, make sure you wash your hands type thing? Fatality numbers that much different than the flu?

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3 minutes ago, Doug B said:
8 minutes ago, JerseyToughGuys said:

More accurate, I believe it’s the generic response that also covers natural disasters.

I saw that page, too. Found it on my own ... no one linked to it.

You're looking for this:  https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/66/rr/rr6601a1.htm

 

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4 minutes ago, belljr said:

Reading this now and I see this:

Quote

 

For this guidance high-risk exposures refer to HCP who performed or were present in the room for procedures that generate aerosols or during which respiratory secretions are likely to be poorly controlled (e.g., cardiopulmonary resuscitation, intubation, extubation, bronchoscopy, nebulizer therapy, sputum induction) on patients with COVID-19 when the healthcare providers’ eyes, nose, or mouth were not protected.

Medium-risk exposures generally include HCP who had prolonged close contact with patients with COVID-19 where HCP mucous membranes or hands were exposed to material potentially infectious with COVID-19.  These exposures could place the exposed HCP at risk of developing disease that is less than that described under high-risk.

Proper adherence to currently recommended infection control practices, including all recommended PPE, should protect HCP having prolonged close contact with patients infected with COVID-19. However, HCP in this category are classified as having low-risk to account for any inconsistencies in use or adherence that could result in unrecognized exposures.

 

 

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4 minutes ago, -fish- said:

This is helpful:

Quote

 

NPIs routinely recommended for prevention of respiratory virus transmission, such as seasonal influenza, include personal protective measures for everyday use (i.e., voluntary home isolation of ill persons, respiratory etiquette, and hand hygiene) and environmental surface cleaning measures (i.e., routine cleaning of frequently touched surfaces and objects). During an influenza pandemic, these NPIs are recommended regardless of the pandemic severity level. Additional personal and community NPIs also might be recommended. Personal protective measures reserved for pandemics include voluntary home quarantine of exposed household members and use of face masks in community settings when ill. Community NPIs might include temporary closures or dismissals of child care facilities and schools with students in grades kindergarten through 12 (K–12), as well as other social distancing measures that increase the physical space between people (e.g., workplace measures such as replacing in-person meetings with teleconferences or modifying, postponing, or cancelling mass gatherings) ( Figure 5) (Table 1). Local decisions about NPI selection and timing involve consideration of overall pandemic severity and local conditions (1) and require flexibility and possible modifications as the pandemic progresses and new information becomes available.

Updated recommendations on the use of NPIs to help slow the spread and decrease the impact of an influenza pandemic are provided, as is information on the rationale for using each NPI as part of a comprehensive public health strategy for pandemic response and the appropriate settings and use for each NPI according to the severity of the pandemic ( Table 9).¶ The recommendations that follow are considered an update to the existing recommendations in the 2007 guidance because the same set of NPIs has been maintained and recommended for use early in a pandemic. However, the difference between the guidance issued in 2007 and in 2017 is the clear delineation of NPIs into two categories: 1) NPIs recommended at all times and 2) NPIs recommended for use only during pandemics (based on the level of pandemic severity and local conditions). The 2017 update also provides additional evidence to support the NPI recommendations.

 

 

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People in my office are starting to get uppity that we haven't been told or given the option to work remotely.  I think it's a little premature, but we do work in an airport so I'm not sure how unreasonable they're really being.  If this thing's coming here, it's going to be via planes.  

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2 hours ago, matuski said:

Fear mongering aside, this is :lmao:

This one (jvdesign12324 or whatever, not you) paints with a broad brush.

1 hour ago, [icon] said:

I think as soon as cases start surfacing here (in the next week or two?), yes I think the average person will be out shopping for food and masks. 

By the time they need it, full on panic buying will occur in the areas that are effected. 98% of the population is not proactive such as yourself, your cohort and ham. The rest of us go to the store, sometimes daily for the their sustenance and will only become aware of an issue when their go to frozen meal shelf is empty and there is no ice cream left.

Good on you and the crew for thinking ahead. I told the wife last night we should look to stock up on some things for the future based on the information from this thread because I think it will get much worse before it gets better. But more so to avoid being in public and mitigating the panic buying I know will occur than thinking we are heading for armageddon (not saying you are). I live in SC and they routinely clear the shelves for a dusting of snow, the hint of a hurricane and any number of other stupid reasons. I just don't want to go without Twizzlers for months on end.

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1 minute ago, -fish- said:

That's not it either, at least not that I can make out.

...

Until I can read or see otherwise ... I have to conclude that the CDC has not yet made a public call for citizens to store away two weeks of food and water :shrug: 

Oblique references to "other, previous guidance" isn't good enough to inform the public. They're going to have to be a lot more direct.

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Department of Homeland Security also has a page for preparing for a pandemic.

https://www.ready.gov/pandemic.  Most of it is common sense.   First recommendation is two weeks food and water.

Quote

Before a Pandemic

Store a two week supply of water and food.

Periodically check your regular prescription drugs to ensure a continuous supply in your home.

Have any nonprescription drugs and other health supplies on hand, including pain relievers, stomach remedies, cough and cold medicines, fluids with electrolytes, and vitamins.

Get copies and maintain electronic versions of health records from doctors, hospitals, pharmacies and other sources and store them, for personal reference. Get help accessing electronic health records.

Talk with family members and loved ones about how they would be cared for if they got sick, or what will be needed to care for them in your home.

During a Pandemic

Limit the Spread of Germs and Prevent Infection

Avoid close contact with people who are sick.

When you are sick, keep your distance from others to protect them from getting sick too.

Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when coughing or sneezing. It may prevent those around you from getting sick.

Washing your hands often will help protect you from germs.

Avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth.

Practice other good health habits. Get plenty of sleep, be physically active, manage your stress, drink plenty of fluids, and eat nutritious food.

 

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6 minutes ago, -fish- said:

This is also worth highlighting:

Quote

 

Use of Face Masks in Community Settings

Face masks (disposable surgical, medical, or dental procedure masks) are widely used by health care workers to prevent respiratory infections both in health care workers and patients. They also might be worn by ill persons during severe, very severe, or extreme pandemics to prevent spread of influenza to household members and others in the community. However, little evidence supports the use of face masks by well persons in community settings, although some trials conducted during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic found that early combined use of face masks and other NPIs (such as hand hygiene) might be effective (supplementary Chapter 3 https://stacks.cdc.gov/view/cdc/44313).

 

 

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8 minutes ago, Doug B said:

"Two weeks of food & water" is not mentioned. Nor is "revert to pandemic protocols" or anything like that.

I was Lincoln specifically to healthcare providers covering their face there's a whole bunch of stuff out there on that website that I haven't dove into

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1 minute ago, JerseyToughGuys said:

This is helpful ...

Fish and I may have been talking past each other. I didn't care about the CDC's mask recommendations. I wanted a link to their public message that Americans need to stockpile two weeks of food & water.

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22 minutes ago, JerseyToughGuys said:

What’s the source of this? We all know health care professionals don’t slap on masks when you go in for the flu. It just doesn’t happen.

Cmon man.. I know you're not this bad at the Internet. :lol: 

It's from the CDC's Site on Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) direct from the section on Guidelines for Infection Control when interacting with suspected COVID-19 patients. 

Feel free to do your own homework. 

 

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1 minute ago, Doug B said:

That's not it either, at least not that I can make out.

...

Until I can read or see otherwise ... I have to conclude that the CDC has not yet made a public call for citizens to store away two weeks of food and water :shrug: 

Oblique references to "other, previous guidance" isn't good enough to inform the public. They're going to have to be a lot more direct.

2 weeks is the SOP. 

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1 minute ago, Doug B said:

That's not it either, at least not that I can make out.

...

Until I can read or see otherwise ... I have to conclude that the CDC has not yet made a public call for citizens to store away two weeks of food and water :shrug: 

Oblique references to "other, previous guidance" isn't good enough to inform the public. They're going to have to be a lot more direct.

They recommend home quarantine for the incubation period.  If the incubation period is 14 days, you're going to need food and water, right?

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Just now, belljr said:
9 minutes ago, Doug B said:

"Two weeks of food & water" is not mentioned. Nor is "revert to pandemic protocols" or anything like that.

I was Lincoln specifically to healthcare providers covering their face there's a whole bunch of stuff out there on that website that I haven't dove into

Yeah, we had crossed wires. No worries.

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2 minutes ago, [icon] said:

Cmon man.. I know you're not this bad at the Internet. :lol: 

It's from the CDC's Site on Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) direct from the section on Guidelines for Infection Control when interacting with suspected COVID-19 patients. 

Feel free to do your own homework. 

 

Thanks!

Since I don't want to get shot by my overzealous neighbor in the brick house on the hill, I will heed this thoughtful advice. 

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1 hour ago, AAABatteries said:

Got this from our kids school 

——————

Dear Parents,

On behalf of the Superintendent, please be advised that we are aware of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) guidance to schools to prepare contingency plans for the coronavirus-borne disease COVID-19.

Our School District works closely with the Georgia Department of Public Health and local public safety officials whenever there is a public health or safety concern affecting any of our schools.  Our custodial provider is equally dedicated to keeping our schools clean and our children safe with numerous industry best practices in place.

What can you do as a parent?  You can reinforce with your children the importance of every-day good health habits to avoid illnesses including: frequently washing your hands; using a tissue when you sneeze or cough and then throwing it away; keeping your fingers out of your eyes, nose and mouth; not sharing water bottles or similar containers; and staying home when sick.  When children have a fever, they need to stay home from school and be fever free, without the aid of fever-reducing medication, for at least 24 hours before returning to school.

In the event we were to need to close schools, for any reason, our Canvas online learning management system, which our students and teachers have tested for the past year, allows for teaching and learning to continue in these situations.  As we have previously announced, we will be using Canvas on Tuesday, March 24, 2020 for a Digital Learning Day; our schools will be closed that day for safety concerns, as many will be used for Presidential Primary election polling sites.  Canvas is a type of “teleschool” option that CDC officials suggested school systems have in place as a contingency plan.

Cobb County?

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Just now, -fish- said:

They recommend home quarantine for the incubation period.

I can't even find that much.

When you say "they recommend home quaratine" ... is that a recommendation for right now, or down the road at some indeterminate point?

Frankly ... I'm not finding that the CDC is addressing much of anything to the general public. I think they're talking to reporters who speak their language, I guess, but in doing so speaking right over the general public's heads. At least IMHO. The messaging is a problem. If they want Americans to react a certain way, they aren't making that happen with the current messaging.

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For the guys on the leading edge of this stuff, do we trust the CDC or do we not trust them? 

When they say "little evidence supports the use of face masks by well persons in community settings," do we believe them are they conspiring to keep all the masks for themselves? 

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Another health official says 2 weeks food and water

Quote

Georges Benjamin, executive director of the American Public Health Association, said: “Everybody should take a deep breath. It’s about preparedness.” He advised that businesses should consider giving employees paid sick leave to ensure they do not come to work when ill, and put in place contingency plans so everyone can work from home. Individuals should think about stockpiling food for at least three or four days — or ideally two weeks, in case there are lockdowns, he added.

 

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3 minutes ago, JerseyToughGuys said:

2 weeks is the SOP. 

Understood. Fish had written on the last page something to the effect of "The CDC said to fall back on their pandemic recommendations from 2005". I cannot find where the CDC said that. 

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1 minute ago, Doug B said:

I can't even find that much.

When you say "they recommend home quaratine" ... is that a recommendation for right now, or down the road at some indeterminate point?

Frankly ... I'm not finding that the CDC is addressing much of anything to the general public. I think they're talking to reporters who speak their language, I guess, but in doing so speaking right over the general public's heads. At least IMHO. The messaging is a problem. If they want Americans to react a certain way, they aren't making that happen with the current messaging.

They say incubation period 3 days (which is normal). So it's fair to conclude they mean incubation period period. 

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5 hours ago, Joe Bryant said:

I haven't read any of this thread but saw the report asking the title be changed.

Is this a joke thread or are people trying to offer serious advice here? 

It seems as since people are dying from this and some have seemingly legit concerns, we could do without jokes in this one. 

For the most part, serious. But shockingly, some  are over-reacting a tad and of course others are really angry at the over-reactions. Sometimes some gallows humor slips in to lighten the tone, but with no disrespect intended. At least from what I read, which is only about half of it at most.

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28 minutes ago, -fish- said:

This is CDC's advice in response to any epidemic/pandemic. They have issued a statement that their instructions for a pandemic, which have been in place since 2005 and were updated a couple years ago, should be applied to this virus.

The underlined statement, specifically, is what I am trying to find -- and coming up empty.

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5 minutes ago, Doug B said:

I can't even find that much.

When you say "they recommend home quaratine" ... is that a recommendation for right now, or down the road at some indeterminate point?

Frankly ... I'm not finding that the CDC is addressing much of anything to the general public. I think they're talking to reporters who speak their language, I guess, but in doing so speaking right over the general public's heads. At least IMHO. The messaging is a problem. If they want Americans to react a certain way, they aren't making that happen with the current messaging.

If you know you have been exposed, they recommend voluntary home quarantine.

Quote

Voluntary Home Quarantine

Voluntary home quarantine of non-ill household members of persons with influenza (also called self-quarantine or household quarantine) helps prevent disease spread from households to schools, workplaces, and other households because those household members have been exposed to the influenza virus. Exposed household members of symptomatic persons (with confirmed or probable pandemic influenza) should stay home for up to 3 days (the estimated incubation period for seasonal influenza) (61) starting from their initial contact with the ill person. If they then become ill, they should practice voluntary home isolation (i.e., they should remain at home until recovered as discussed previously; https://www.cdc.gov/quarantine/index.html). For certain exposed household members (e.g., those at high risk for influenza complications or with severe immune deficiencies), guidelines should be consulted regarding the prophylactic use of antiviral medications (https://www.cdc.gov/flu/professionals/antivirals/index.htm).

Again, this is being adapted from influenza, so the incubation period is longer.

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